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ronaldreagan
Mar 25, 2005


Ralphus posted:

...It's the only designated wilderness area in the state...

Maybe there's a similar designation that I'm not familiar with - but there are areas of the Chequamegon - Nicolet National Forest that are designated wilderness areas.
I've been camping & backpacking in the Jones Spring area (1.5 hours northwest of Green Bay) for the past few years and while there aren't long distance trials to hike, there are large areas of national forest where you can do whatever you please. There are primitive campsites to use if you'd like but my understanding is that you can camp anywhere in the national forest unless otherwise specified.

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BeefofAges
Jun 5, 2004

Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the cows of war.



Verman posted:

Anyone in here have experience with gravity filters?

I don't feel like pumping and I'm tired of boiling/chlorine tabs. I really like Platypus products, the bags are simple and pretty bomb proof let alone usually cheaper than the alternatives.

I was considering just buying the standalone filter and an extra bladder for dirty water which would only be about $60 versus the $120 they charge for a 2 bladder system with the filter. That would give me 2 - 100 oz. bladders, one for dirty water and the other for clean and allow me to fill the dirty bag and walk away from it.

Gravity filters are great. You won't regret getting one.

Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.

Verman posted:

Anyone in here have experience with gravity filters?

I don't feel like pumping and I'm tired of boiling/chlorine tabs. I really like Platypus products, the bags are simple and pretty bomb proof let alone usually cheaper than the alternatives.

I was considering just buying the standalone filter and an extra bladder for dirty water which would only be about $60 versus the $120 they charge for a 2 bladder system with the filter. That would give me 2 - 100 oz. bladders, one for dirty water and the other for clean and allow me to fill the dirty bag and walk away from it.

It's a great system if you remember to read the manual. Be sure to backflush your filter every 30 liters or so. What reservoir do you already have? And you should call around to your local gear shops, I know that mine has a demo GravityWorks that they'll let you play with in-store.

Speleothing fucked around with this message at 02:59 on May 9, 2013

Texibus
May 18, 2008


a foolish pianist posted:

Pinckney and Waterloo State Recreation Areas, just north of 94 in Dexter, have good day-hike and overnight trails. Good swimming holes in the summer, too. I go pretty often, and I know the area well, so let me know if you want to meet up and do some walking.

Sweet man, I will definitely be in touch! I was planning to go Pinckney on Sunday.

Jalumibnkrayal
Apr 16, 2008



Ramrod XTreme

Verman posted:

Anyone in here have experience with gravity filters?

I don't feel like pumping and I'm tired of boiling/chlorine tabs. I really like Platypus products, the bags are simple and pretty bomb proof let alone usually cheaper than the alternatives.

I was considering just buying the standalone filter and an extra bladder for dirty water which would only be about $60 versus the $120 they charge for a 2 bladder system with the filter. That would give me 2 - 100 oz. bladders, one for dirty water and the other for clean and allow me to fill the dirty bag and walk away from it.

Have you considered the Sawyer Squeeze Filter? It's a great little product and only weighs 3 ounces. It attaches to commonly available soda bottles and just takes some gentle constant pressure to get a good flow of 0.1 micron filtered water.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


Speleothing posted:

It's a great system if you remember to read the manual. Be sure to backflush your filter every 30 liters or so. What reservoir do you already have? And you should call around to your local gear shops, I know that mine has a demo GravityWorks that they'll let you play with in-store.

I've got a Platypus Hoser 3L right now and I love it compared to camelback/Blackhawk reservoirs I've had prior. I would use that as my clean bag and buy a second 3L platypus reservoir with a zip top as a dirty bag, and just add the filter between the two for $65 rather than buying the entire 2 bag and filter set up for $120.

I feel like a gravity filter would free up time to be doing something else like preparing the stove/food or setting up camp. I just don't want to spend time and energy pumping or burning fuel on making my water potable.


Jalumibnkrayal posted:

Have you considered the Sawyer Squeeze Filter? It's a great little product and only weighs 3 ounces. It attaches to commonly available soda bottles and just takes some gentle constant pressure to get a good flow of 0.1 micron filtered water.

I looked at those, and while they are pretty inexpensive and easy to use, I've heard that they can develop leaks and still require some action to filter the water. I also was looking for something that could be used for more than just myself. I feel like gravity systems are capable of filtering a large amount of water quickly and with minimal effort.

Verman fucked around with this message at 15:38 on May 9, 2013

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Pennywise the Frown posted:

No, it's most definitely American and was issued to the US military. I figured that the patrol bag is pretty small and light which might be good for summer camping.


You're right! I am a complete idiot. Sorry!

Sierra Nevadan
Nov 1, 2010



Jalumibnkrayal posted:

Have you considered the Sawyer Squeeze Filter? It's a great little product and only weighs 3 ounces. It attaches to commonly available soda bottles and just takes some gentle constant pressure to get a good flow of 0.1 micron filtered water.

I'm actually planning on picking one of these up tomorrow. Almost bought it yesterday, but wanted to look up reviews first, and it did very well. Just the chance of bags developing a leak like Verman said.

I also saw that you shouldn't let that type of filter get too cold? Some people said they would sleep with it in their pocket to keep it warm overnight.

Ralphus
Dec 15, 2003


ronaldreagan posted:


Maybe there's a similar designation that I'm not familiar with - but there are areas of the Chequamegon - Nicolet National Forest that are designated wilderness areas.
I've been camping & backpacking in the Jones Spring area (1.5 hours northwest of Green Bay) for the past few years and while there aren't long distance trials to hike, there are large areas of national forest where you can do whatever you please. There are primitive campsites to use if you'd like but my understanding is that you can camp anywhere in the national forest unless otherwise specified.

I was just going by memory, here is what it says on the right-hand side of the DNR website: http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/parks/name/newport/
"Newport State Park, northeast of Ellison Bay, is Wisconsin's only formally-designated wilderness park."
Maybe Chequamegon-Nicolet is different since it's a national forest? I guess Newport is a wilderness "park", that's probably different from a wilderness "area". I wonder how they determine these things.
We may have to check out Jones Spring this summer, it looks like it'd be a pretty neat place to spend a weekend!

Ralphus fucked around with this message at 20:37 on May 9, 2013

Lungboy
Aug 23, 2002

NEED SQUAT FORM HELP

I'm going to be hiking in Tuolumne with a shorter visit to Yosemite valley in August/September this year for the first time. Can anyone experienced with the terrain suggest the best footwear for the trip? It will be day hikes with a light pack, nothing too heavy. I don't want to carry full hiking boots if trail shoes will suffice, but I don't want to be twisting my ankle in trail shoes if things get too rough. Will I need full gtx boots at that time of year?

BeefofAges
Jun 5, 2004

Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the cows of war.



Lungboy posted:

I'm going to be hiking in Tuolumne with a shorter visit to Yosemite valley in August/September this year for the first time. Can anyone experienced with the terrain suggest the best footwear for the trip? It will be day hikes with a light pack, nothing too heavy. I don't want to carry full hiking boots if trail shoes will suffice, but I don't want to be twisting my ankle in trail shoes if things get too rough. Will I need full gtx boots at that time of year?

It often rains and occasionally snows at that time of year, but I would still wear non-goretex trail runners if I were you.

slartibartfast
Nov 13, 2002


Lungboy posted:

I'm going to be hiking in Tuolumne with a shorter visit to Yosemite valley in August/September this year for the first time. Can anyone experienced with the terrain suggest the best footwear for the trip? It will be day hikes with a light pack, nothing too heavy. I don't want to carry full hiking boots if trail shoes will suffice, but I don't want to be twisting my ankle in trail shoes if things get too rough. Will I need full gtx boots at that time of year?

If you're wandering around on the Valley floor, or just hiking established trails to/from, then you're fine. Elevation gain in Yosemite is largely either switchbacks or rocky steps. Anything with decent EV -- doing the Mist Trail to the top of Nevada Falls or hiking to the top of either side of the valley (so top of Yose Falls, Glaicer Point, Panorama Trail, Pohono Trail, 4 Mile Trail, etc) -- would require good footwear, but full boots are probably overkill unless you have ankle problems.

The other quirk of Yosemite trails is the massive amount of decomposed granite powder covering all the flat rocky surfaces. Even flat dry places can be slippery, and especially when it hasn't rained recently. Wear something with decent grip or bring poles if you're as uncoordinated as I am. The reduced traction caused by the DG makes it easier to roll an ankle, which might be another vote in favor of boots, but I've been able to get by with trail runners and poles on all my non-winter visits to the Valley.

Sierra Nevadan, your avatar is awesome.

pizzadog
Oct 9, 2009



Lungboy posted:

I'm going to be hiking in Tuolumne with a shorter visit to Yosemite valley in August/September this year for the first time. Can anyone experienced with the terrain suggest the best footwear for the trip? It will be day hikes with a light pack, nothing too heavy. I don't want to carry full hiking boots if trail shoes will suffice, but I don't want to be twisting my ankle in trail shoes if things get too rough. Will I need full gtx boots at that time of year?

You'll be fine without full GTX boots.
I'm heading up to the East Sierra for the first peak of the season tonight, wheeeeee~

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Lungboy posted:

I'm going to be hiking in Tuolumne with a shorter visit to Yosemite valley in August/September this year for the first time. Can anyone experienced with the terrain suggest the best footwear for the trip? It will be day hikes with a light pack, nothing too heavy. I don't want to carry full hiking boots if trail shoes will suffice, but I don't want to be twisting my ankle in trail shoes if things get too rough. Will I need full gtx boots at that time of year?

I spent four months in Yosemite, and I never wanted boots. Trail runners are more than sufficient.

Lungboy
Aug 23, 2002

NEED SQUAT FORM HELP

Thanks for all the replies, trail shoes it is.

Kinkajou
Jan 6, 2004



Anyone have recommendations for hikes in Norway, Sweden, Northern Finland, or Iceland? I'll be traveling through these countries for a little over a month this summer though Finland may be cut if we get too busy in Norway. The amount of possible hikes in Norway and Iceland are almost overwhelming, but I'm having difficulty with tracking down stuff for the other two countries. Half to full day hikes are mainly what I'm looking for.

krispykremessuck
Jul 22, 2005

unlike most veterans and SA members $10 is not a meaningful expenditure for me

I'm gonna have me a swag Bar-B-Q

Did Mt. Ellinor today in the Olympic Range. Beautiful weather, but a bit warm hiking up next to the snow chute. I'm definitely out of shape (got outpaced by a 60 year old guy and his dog training for Rainier), but hopefully that will get better as the season moves on. 5,944' for those interested. Sorry about the stitching errors in the pano and the random people in the last bit. I haven't pulled the pictures off my actual camera yet.

edit: Attaching didn't work, so:
edit2: So attaching did work, the timg is from the higher res shot.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

krispykremessuck fucked around with this message at 06:03 on May 11, 2013

j.peeba
Oct 25, 2010

Almost Human

Nap Ghost

Kinkajou posted:

Anyone have recommendations for hikes in Norway, Sweden, Northern Finland, or Iceland? I'll be traveling through these countries for a little over a month this summer though Finland may be cut if we get too busy in Norway. The amount of possible hikes in Norway and Iceland are almost overwhelming, but I'm having difficulty with tracking down stuff for the other two countries. Half to full day hikes are mainly what I'm looking for.

As far as epic sceneries are considered, hiking in Finland might indeed feel a little plain compared to Norway and Iceland, but there are a few cool places in the Finnish Lapland as well. I haven't been hiking in there myself yet but I'm going to do the Hetta-Pallas route myself this summer and it could be a good location for you to swing by since it's close by to the Swedish border. Pallas and Ylläs fells serve as good starting points for half/full day hikes. http://www.outdoors.fi/destinations/nationalparks/pallasyllastunturi/Pages/Default.aspx


Further to the east, close to the Russian border, there's the Urho Kekkonen national park which is apparently quite awesome. The park covers a huge area of wilderness but day hikes can be easily made on the trails closer to the western edge of the park. http://www.outdoors.fi/destinations/nationalparks/urhokekkonennationalpark/Pages/Default.aspx

But yeah, I've heard great things about Norway and Iceland and I won't blame you if you decide to skip Finland. I really want to see the Lofoten archipelago in Norway:

Lungboy
Aug 23, 2002

NEED SQUAT FORM HELP

slartibartfast posted:

Wear something with decent grip or bring poles if you're as uncoordinated as I am.

Further to this, is there anywhere to hire poles in Yosemite? I don't own any (never even used any) and I'm coming from the UK so flying with them could be a pain. Are all poles created equal?

LogisticEarth
Mar 28, 2004

Someone once told me, "Time is a flat circle".


Flying with trekking poles shouldn't be a huge problem. Most collapse down to a size that should easily pack in a suitcase/duffel/backpack. I have a set from Black Diamond and they collapse down to about 2.5 feet in length.

All poles are not made the same, but if you're using them once there's probably no need to go crazy. I know people who have a $20 pair from Wal Mart that they've been using for some time. However, I will say that once I started using poles, I REALLY liked them, so I don't regret buying a decent pair right off the bat.

slartibartfast
Nov 13, 2002


Lungboy posted:

Further to this, is there anywhere to hire poles in Yosemite? I don't own any (never even used any) and I'm coming from the UK so flying with them could be a pain. Are all poles created equal?

You can buy 'em in the park, and you can rent bigger things (snowshoes, bikes, tents). Your best best would be to call the Mountain Shop and ask them. If anyone will know about renting poles, they will. But I've flown with poles many times without problems. I cut a hole in a tennis ball and shoved one onto each end of my hiking poles to prevent them from poking through the duffel bag they were packed in.

PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.


REI is offering the Osprey Aether 70 next week for $205 (normally $280). Has anyone used this particular pack before? I have a Talon 22 and have really liked it. I've never purchased a multi-day pack--how many days would this be good for?

http://www.rei.com/product/846410/osprey-aether-70-pack


Would anyone recommend something else instead?

BeefofAges
Jun 5, 2004

Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the cows of war.



PRADA SLUT posted:

REI is offering the Osprey Aether 70 next week for $205 (normally $280). Has anyone used this particular pack before? I have a Talon 22 and have really liked it. I've never purchased a multi-day pack--how many days would this be good for?

http://www.rei.com/product/846410/osprey-aether-70-pack


Would anyone recommend something else instead?

Osprey packs are nice. That pack is probably good for trips of a week or longer, depending on how much gear you pack, what sort of weather you're expecting, etc.

Go try it on and see if it's comfortable. Not every pack is comfortable for every hiker.

Rontalvos
Feb 22, 2006


PRADA SLUT posted:

REI is offering the Osprey Aether 70 next week for $205 (normally $280). Has anyone used this particular pack before? I have a Talon 22 and have really liked it. I've never purchased a multi-day pack--how many days would this be good for?

http://www.rei.com/product/846410/osprey-aether-70-pack


Would anyone recommend something else instead?

How do you know about this sale in advance?

Philip J Fry
Apr 25, 2007

go outside and have a blast


REI just sent out their anniversary sale catalog; sale runs May 17-27. Extra 20% off for members with coupon code ANNV13 (typical exclusions apply.)

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

PRADA SLUT posted:

REI is offering the Osprey Aether 70 next week for $205 (normally $280). Has anyone used this particular pack before? I have a Talon 22 and have really liked it. I've never purchased a multi-day pack--how many days would this be good for?


This is what I have for backpacking. I've been pleased with it, but I haven't pushed it on number of days covered; just haven't had the time lately. If fitted correctly, it is very comfortable, and I like the modest number of compartments. Biggest downside is that it is not a lightweight pack, so your load is already 4+ lbs before you add anything else. For trips of 2-3 days, and especially for mountaineering, etc., I have a 40L Mammut pack that weighs about half that, and I love it. But for longer trips, I like the sturdiness and reliability of the Osprey, plus the unbeatable product guarantee.

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Philip J Fry posted:

REI just sent out their anniversary sale catalog; sale runs May 17-27. Extra 20% off for members with coupon code ANNV13 (typical exclusions apply.)

Yah, 20% on full priced item

Speaking of this sale, I'm tempted by the Big Agnes Jack Rabbit SL2 tent that'll be on sale for $219, anyone have any thoughts on it? I've heard good things about their Fly Creek UL2, which of course is more expensive and lighter, but I think I'd be happy enough sacrificing some weight for a tent I can afford.

JAY ZERO SUM GAME
Oct 18, 2005

Walter.
I know you know how to do this.
Get up.




PRADA SLUT posted:

REI is offering the Osprey Aether 70 next week for $205 (normally $280). Has anyone used this particular pack before? I have a Talon 22 and have really liked it. I've never purchased a multi-day pack--how many days would this be good for?

http://www.rei.com/product/846410/osprey-aether-70-pack


Would anyone recommend something else instead?
This is kinda the default "I want a great pack for long hikes and am not super concerned about weight" bag. It is ridiculously comfortable. Tough to go wrong with it, really. I borrowed one for my first long hike two years ago.

I could go for two weeks out of that thing if not more but that depends on a lot really.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005


What awesome timing on that sale. I live like 6 hours from the closest REI store, so I've never been to one in person. Ordered a bunch of stuff from them online and I'm a member. I just happened to be going to a town with an REI store during that time period, so I'd love to use the opportunity to pick up a good pair of boots.

Where I live my Vibram Komodosports are perfect for hiking / backpacking, but I would like to get opinions on what I should do for hiking in other terrain. I'm looking to travel and do some backpacking out west. Probably nothing in the dead of winter. I really enjoy hiking in my Vibrams, but I don't think they'll cut it for rougher terrain.

Are there any suggestions for a minimalist style hiking shoe / boot? I know there was some info about waterproof / not waterproof a couple of pages ago that I am going to go back and re-read. Pricing isn't really a concern.

[Edit: I can't imagine wearing high-top boots. Maybe something mid-top, but more likely a shoe-type fit unless anyone has a good argument for something else. Can you use gaiters with a shoe? Don't really have any experience with them.]

Internet Explorer fucked around with this message at 15:48 on May 12, 2013

single-mode fiber
Dec 30, 2012



I'm going to be going up to Glacier National Park for a week in the middle of July. Since the park has a ridiculous amount of trails, what are some of the most "can't-miss" ones to hike in the park? This would all be done via day hiking.

JAY ZERO SUM GAME
Oct 18, 2005

Walter.
I know you know how to do this.
Get up.




single-mode fiber posted:

I'm going to be going up to Glacier National Park for a week in the middle of July. Since the park has a ridiculous amount of trails, what are some of the most "can't-miss" ones to hike in the park? This would all be done via day hiking.
People really aren't kidding when they say "anywhere," but some that I have personal experience with and are day trippable are Red Eagle Lake, Cracker Lake, Kintla Lake, and Cosley Lake.

PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.


So a 70L might be overkill for just a few days, I would be better off looking into around 40L if I'm doing ~3 days?

Do you just strap your tent on the bottom underneath the sleeping bag? I've only recently started hiking, so none of my packs have ever had some of the things that hiking packs do.

BeefofAges
Jun 5, 2004

Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the cows of war.



Internet Explorer posted:

Are there any suggestions for a minimalist style hiking shoe / boot? I know there was some info about waterproof / not waterproof a couple of pages ago that I am going to go back and re-read. Pricing isn't really a concern.

[Edit: I can't imagine wearing high-top boots. Maybe something mid-top, but more likely a shoe-type fit unless anyone has a good argument for something else. Can you use gaiters with a shoe? Don't really have any experience with them.]

1. Solomon or Merrell trail runners are pretty popular. It depends on the shape of your foot. Go to the store and try on various trail runners.
2. Waterproof shoes take forever to dry out when you do get moisture inside, and they tend to hold in your sweat. In most situations you're better off with non-waterproof shoes.
3. Yes, you can use gaiters with a shoe. Look up Dirty Girl Gaiters, they're designed for use with trail runners.

PRADA SLUT posted:

Do you just strap your tent on the bottom underneath the sleeping bag? I've only recently started hiking, so none of my packs have ever had some of the things that hiking packs do.

You can do whatever works for you. One of my tents has a separate pole bag, so I put the poles on the outside of my pack, and keep the tent itself on the inside of my pack. My other tent is a tarptent that doesn't come with poles, so it just goes inside my pack.

PabloBOOM
Mar 10, 2004
Hunchback of DOOM

PRADA SLUT posted:

So a 70L might be overkill for just a few days, I would be better off looking into around 40L if I'm doing ~3 days?

Do you just strap your tent on the bottom underneath the sleeping bag? I've only recently started hiking, so none of my packs have ever had some of the things that hiking packs do.

Unless you have a real trimmed-down kit for 3 days, you might struggle to fit 3 days of stuff into 40L. If you happen to role with a small tent/equivalent (i.e., tarptent or fly-only setup), and a compact sleeping bag, you can probably pull it off. I have a 58L that I use as my go-to for anything from a weekend year-round to week long trips in the summer and like its versatility, if you can find any around that size if you're looking for one pack to serve multiple trip types.

Lungboy
Aug 23, 2002

NEED SQUAT FORM HELP

LogisticEarth posted:

Flying with trekking poles shouldn't be a huge problem. Most collapse down to a size that should easily pack in a suitcase/duffel/backpack. I have a set from Black Diamond and they collapse down to about 2.5 feet in length.

All poles are not made the same, but if you're using them once there's probably no need to go crazy. I know people who have a $20 pair from Wal Mart that they've been using for some time. However, I will say that once I started using poles, I REALLY liked them, so I don't regret buying a decent pair right off the bat.

I suffer from aching hips after 6+ miles hiking so from what I've read, poles could help this problem. Ive ordered a pair of Black Diamond Trail Compact poles and look forward to trying them out. Sadly I also ordered a Marmot Grid and a pair of Meindl Air Revolution Ultras, so I won't be able to eat for a while.

Scottw330
Jan 24, 2005

Please, Hammer,
Don't Hurt Em


Levitate posted:

Speaking of this sale, I'm tempted by the Big Agnes Jack Rabbit SL2 tent that'll be on sale for $219, anyone have any thoughts on it? I've heard good things about their Fly Creek UL2, which of course is more expensive and lighter, but I think I'd be happy enough sacrificing some weight for a tent I can afford.

I have the jack rabbit SL3 and I love it. The Jack Rabbit series is slightly heavier than the Fly Creek series, but I like the designs a lot more. The Fly Creek UL2 is not truly "freestanding" for example. The materials also feel a little bit more durable with the Jack Rabbit.

ColdCock
Jun 3, 2001

God's Hand

PRADA SLUT posted:

REI is offering the Osprey Aether 70 next week for $205 (normally $280). Has anyone used this particular pack before? I have a Talon 22 and have really liked it. I've never purchased a multi-day pack--how many days would this be good for?

http://www.rei.com/product/846410/osprey-aether-70-pack


Would anyone recommend something else instead?

Unlike others, I hated my Aether 70. Mine was like an '08 model though. My back would sweat terribly against the back panel. I traded it for a Deuter Futura after about 6-7 3+day trips. Of course I'm in the minority I think. Most people love that pack.

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

PRADA SLUT posted:

So a 70L might be overkill for just a few days, I would be better off looking into around 40L if I'm doing ~3 days?

Do you just strap your tent on the bottom underneath the sleeping bag? I've only recently started hiking, so none of my packs have ever had some of the things that hiking packs do.

The Osprey cinches down well with its compression straps, so it wouldn't be overkill for shorter multi-day trips.

2-3 day trips on my 40L tend toward true bivouacs; sleeping bag, bivi sack, foam pad, maybe sleeping in all one's clothes if it's really cold. Sometimes a tarp. For more pleasant camping and general backpacking, I go with the Aether 70.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


PRADA SLUT posted:

So a 70L might be overkill for just a few days, I would be better off looking into around 40L if I'm doing ~3 days?

Do you just strap your tent on the bottom underneath the sleeping bag? I've only recently started hiking, so none of my packs have ever had some of the things that hiking packs do.

Depends on the scenario, while the 70 might be large it doesn't mean you can't use it for long weekend trips. The extra space is nice when the weather is dropping down at night and you need that extra gear. If you only have one pack I would suggest going with the larger to give you more versatility. Only having a small pack will limit the length of trips you can take. A big pack might cumbersome on short trips but they're still possible. Eventually you can get a smaller pack later on down the road .

With a size like that you can Just put your tent inside your bag since you have the room. I personally like having all my gear inside my pack if possible to keep it clean and dry.

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Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.

Osprey is a very good pack company, largely because that's ALL they do. They don't have their fingers in lots of different pies.

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