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Jinh
Sep 12, 2008



Fun Shoe

Yeah, gear is just an easy topic to talk about between the photography and trip reports, I don't see a problem with it, even if I don't have an REI membership and most stuff posted here is way out of my price range. I have nike trail runners, baggy shorts with deep pockets and under armor tops. What about socks in the summer? Is smartwool best for hot and cold weather or should I just buy the thinnest wicking socks I can find?

I finally ordered the guardian bugnet and a profly tarp for my doublenest eno hammock, gonna try to take it out to kissimmee state park in FL this weekend. Making the best of flat-rear end florida even if the heat and bugs kill me. :woot:

A question about the appalachian trail. How did you get the 4-10 grand to do it in the first place? It'd take a few years to work up that kind of money, for me at least, and when people say "if you're thinking about doing it, just do it." It bugs me. 6000, to go one way comfortably, is not "just do it" money to me :(

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BeefofAges
Jun 5, 2004

Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the cows of war.



UglyDucklett posted:

A question about the appalachian trail. How did you get the 4-10 grand to do it in the first place? It'd take a few years to work up that kind of money, for me at least, and when people say "if you're thinking about doing it, just do it." It bugs me. 6000, to go one way comfortably, is not "just do it" money to me :(

I live really frugally, so most of my salary just goes into my bank account. Some people get sponsorships from various gear companies. You can also just spend very very carefully on the trail - buy cheap food, cook all your own meals, don't go out drinking, don't stay overnight in town, etc.

Unfortunately since my hike last year I've had to spend some $10k (and will probably have to spend more) on medical bills to fix my lovely hip :(

I love gear, but now that I have basically all the gear I'll ever need (ultralight solo gear as well as slightly heavier gear I can loan to friends or take car camping) I feel a little sad when there are REI sales and there's nothing I want. Right now the only thing I need is a new spork, because I seem to have lost my old one.

BeefofAges fucked around with this message at 20:13 on May 20, 2013

krispykremessuck
Jul 22, 2005

unlike most veterans and SA members $10 is not a meaningful expenditure for me

I'm gonna have me a swag Bar-B-Q

UglyDucklett posted:

What about socks in the summer? Is smartwool best for hot and cold weather or should I just buy the thinnest wicking socks I can find?

I always just stick with thick merino wool and bring a couple of extra pairs with me, even in summer. Cuts down on blisters and my boots breathe well enough that I never have a problem with my feet overheating. I'd say whatever is most comfortable for you/what you're doing. So bring a pair of both and try both out and see what works best.

edit: gearchat is great just because it may save someone from buying a piece of junk, and when REI is holding a sale ... what else are you going to talk about?

BeefofAges
Jun 5, 2004

Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the cows of war.



For socks I wear the thinnest artificial-fiber socks I can find, usually Injinjis, and then I wear breathable (non-waterproof) trail runners. That way I don't build up moisture in my shoes, and even when I step in puddles or hike in rain, the water drains out quickly and I don't get blisters.

Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.

UglyDucklett posted:

Yeah, gear is just an easy topic to talk about between the photography and trip reports, I don't see a problem with it, even if I don't have an REI membership and most stuff posted here is way out of my price range. I have nike trail runners, baggy shorts with deep pockets and under armor tops. What about socks in the summer? Is smartwool best for hot and cold weather or should I just buy the thinnest wicking socks I can find?

I finally ordered the guardian bugnet and a profly tarp for my doublenest eno hammock, gonna try to take it out to kissimmee state park in FL this weekend. Making the best of flat-rear end florida even if the heat and bugs kill me. :woot:

A question about the appalachian trail. How did you get the 4-10 grand to do it in the first place? It'd take a few years to work up that kind of money, for me at least, and when people say "if you're thinking about doing it, just do it." It bugs me. 6000, to go one way comfortably, is not "just do it" money to me :(

Smartwool isn't that good. Get one of Darn Tough's thinner styles.

We could talk about other stores having sales.

Jinh
Sep 12, 2008



Fun Shoe

Speleothing posted:

Smartwool isn't that good. Get one of Darn Tough's thinner styles.

We could talk about other stores having sales.

The 1/4 socks look like they would rule, thanks for the recommendation!

I tend to follow the chat in here, do a ton of research and watch youtube videos, then check ebay. I'm mostly just jealous of those of you with a store nearby!

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


BleakLewis posted:

It's fun to talk about because it reminds me of times out on the trail. At a certain point though you just need to pick something and use it. 99 percent of the time experience will trump any features that one piece of gear has over another. Some people just really like one type of piece of gear to and get way into it. I have a friend who is obsessed with headlamps for some reason. Has a million of them and could tell me the pros and cons of all the different models. Lot's of people seem to be that way with knives and axes too.

Personally I'd rather save myself the money on top of the line gear and just shed 5 pounds of body weight before a long hike. It's easier, cheaper, and more beneficial to just be in shape.

Yah, I just like to get some opinions and find out if anyone really loves something or has good experiences.

With my sleeping bag question, I think I'm just going to go with using my dad's old bag...I've used it before for mountain backpacking in September and it's fine, it probably just needs a good wash and some repairs to a hole that spent 20 years repaired with duct tape. Makes for kind of a fun project maybe...might be able to just patch it with some nylon tape, or maybe get some fabric and repair it, guess it depends on how much effort I want to spend. Using old gear is kind of cool/fun sometimes :)

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Levitate posted:

Yah, I just like to get some opinions and find out if anyone really loves something or has good experiences.

With my sleeping bag question, I think I'm just going to go with using my dad's old bag...I've used it before for mountain backpacking in September and it's fine, it probably just needs a good wash and some repairs to a hole that spent 20 years repaired with duct tape. Makes for kind of a fun project maybe...might be able to just patch it with some nylon tape, or maybe get some fabric and repair it, guess it depends on how much effort I want to spend. Using old gear is kind of cool/fun sometimes :)

Yeah using old gear can be fun. Don't let me dissuade you from buying a new sleeping bag though! I think out of all the gear I've purchased over the years a good sleeping bag has made me a lot happier at the end of the day. The newer bags just pack down so small that it makes things a lot easier packing and warmer.

Favorite gear purchase ever is split between my gaiters and a khatadin water filter. Man I love that thing, just makes life so much easier. I actually enjoy the pumping too. Doesn't take that long and gives you a nice quick break to enjoy the scenery.

PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.


On gear: I don't have very much gear, but everything I have I absolutely love, and it is my favorite item I could possibly get of that kind. I justify buying expensive pieces by having only one of them, keeping it forever, and every time I use it, I think "god drat I'm glad I bought this".


This is literally my only outdoor rain jacket:



welp

PRADA SLUT fucked around with this message at 06:20 on May 21, 2013

TerminalSaint
Apr 20, 2007


Where must we go...

we who wander this Wasteland in search of our better selves?


I can relate. I've got some softshell pants I dropped a couple hundred bucks on, and while I'm usually loathe to spend that much on a single item, holy hell are they worth every penny.

Time Cowboy
Nov 4, 2007

But Tarzan... The strangest thing has happened! I'm as bare... as the day I was born!

My friend and I are looking to do a couple day hikes in eastern Pennsylvania or Maryland this weekend, weather permitting. We already picked out the Pinnacle for one day, but I can't seem to find anything else in my guidebooks that sounds like a must-see.

I'm hoping someone can recommend a good hike between 4 and 10 miles long, ideally without too much elevation gain (no more than, say, 1200 feet total), with something really interesting along the way, like a great viewpoint or a unique geological feature or something like that. Oh, and it should be no more than three hours away from Trenton by car.

Right now the only options that seem feasible are Ricketts Glen and Pole Steeple (at Pine Grove Furnace). If anyone recommends against either of those, that's good to know too. Thanks!

MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

PRADA SLUT posted:

I have one more gear question.

REI has the Arc'teryx Beta AR jacket on sale for $299 ($475).

I tried one on and really liked it, and every reviewer has nothing but good things to say about it. I will absolutely spend the big money if it's a piece that I will end up keeping forever, but I'd still like a goonpinion before spending $300 on a rain jacket. I would be using this for basically everything, from hiking, backpacking, anything outdoorsy (fishing, etc), wearing to a sporting event, etc.

Is there anything I should know about upkeep or treatment of a jacket like this? Can you stuff it in a backpack or will that somehow damage it? How long are these expected to last? Anyone have one?

The salesman at REI told me it was his favorite jacket he owns, and it should be treated for re-waterproofing every 3 washes or so.

I've got an arc'teryx gamma soft shell that I've had for like 4 years or so now and it's one of my favorite jackets I've ever owned... I also have a pair of Beta AR pants and they fit incredibly well and keep me completely dry. I've never had one of their hard shells but I'm sure they're amazing. If you can spend the dough I'm sure you won't be disappointed.

I can't remember the last time I washed one of my shells. I'm not usually crawling around in mud or anything though so I'm not sure how long you'd go before you hit 4 washes or whatever.

LogisticEarth
Mar 28, 2004

Someone once told me, "Time is a flat circle".


Time Cowboy posted:

My friend and I are looking to do a couple day hikes in eastern Pennsylvania or Maryland this weekend, weather permitting. We already picked out the Pinnacle for one day, but I can't seem to find anything else in my guidebooks that sounds like a must-see.

I'm hoping someone can recommend a good hike between 4 and 10 miles long, ideally without too much elevation gain (no more than, say, 1200 feet total), with something really interesting along the way, like a great viewpoint or a unique geological feature or something like that. Oh, and it should be no more than three hours away from Trenton by car.

Right now the only options that seem feasible are Ricketts Glen and Pole Steeple (at Pine Grove Furnace). If anyone recommends against either of those, that's good to know too. Thanks!

Delaware Water Gap/Worthington State Forest in NJ. You can dothe Mt. Tammany trail, or go up one of the various other trails to see Sunfish Pond. Mt. Tammny has been getting really crowded lately, unfortunately.

Alterntively you could do the circut hike at the Hawk Mountain sanctuary, which is literally right next door to the Pinnacle. It requires a small fee though.

Time Cowboy
Nov 4, 2007

But Tarzan... The strangest thing has happened! I'm as bare... as the day I was born!

LogisticEarth posted:

Delaware Water Gap/Worthington State Forest in NJ. You can dothe Mt. Tammany trail, or go up one of the various other trails to see Sunfish Pond. Mt. Tammny has been getting really crowded lately, unfortunately.

We already did this one. I live on Long Island and he lives near Trenton, so northern NJ is halfway between us; any notable trails there, we've already done it or we're planning to do it some other time in the future. That's why I specified PA or MD. We want to explore new ground.

I'll look into Hawk Mountain, though, thanks!

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



PRADA SLUT posted:

I have one more gear question.

REI has the Arc'teryx Beta AR jacket on sale for $299 ($475).
I would pay full price for mine again. The only thing I don't like is the lack of elastic at the wrists.

E: you can (should) wash it regularly (and use a drier), instruction vids are on the website. Apply spray on DWR when water doesn't bead anymore after a wash.

When you want to pack it, roll it into its hood.

The fit is athletic but very large, I wear M everything but I use a S beta AR and can still fit a base+merino mid under there easily.

I do everything in mine: hike, bike commute, long rides in poo poo weather, ski anything under chest high pow.

evil_bunnY fucked around with this message at 00:02 on May 22, 2013

pizzadog
Oct 9, 2009



Time Cowboy posted:

My friend and I are looking to do a couple day hikes in eastern Pennsylvania or Maryland this weekend, weather permitting. We already picked out the Pinnacle for one day, but I can't seem to find anything else in my guidebooks that sounds like a must-see.

I'm hoping someone can recommend a good hike between 4 and 10 miles long, ideally without too much elevation gain (no more than, say, 1200 feet total), with something really interesting along the way, like a great viewpoint or a unique geological feature or something like that. Oh, and it should be no more than three hours away from Trenton by car.

Right now the only options that seem feasible are Ricketts Glen and Pole Steeple (at Pine Grove Furnace). If anyone recommends against either of those, that's good to know too. Thanks!

Check out Cunningham Falls maybe if you want pools/slides!

Time Cowboy
Nov 4, 2007

But Tarzan... The strangest thing has happened! I'm as bare... as the day I was born!

Marshmallow Mayhem posted:

Check out Cunningham Falls maybe if you want pools/slides!

That does look quite interesting. I'm looking into it now. Thanks!

stupid puma
Apr 25, 2005



Anybody here use permethrin? I never have, but most of my trips are usually at the beginning or end of the summer so I don't really have to worry about ticks and mosquitos too much. But this year I'm taking a BWCA trip in late June and I'm thinking about just treating the cuffs and collars of my clothes primarily to protect against deer ticks. Thoughts?

pizzadog
Oct 9, 2009



Has anybody experimented with making their own food bars and keeping them on the trail? I've got to ship myself resupplies before I do the JMT and they could be out there 2 weeks to a month before I get them. I'd like to be able to cut some cost and packaging waste Obviously no perishable ingredients in them like dairy or anything I refrigerate, but they've got oil and water in them, I'm wondering if that would impact how this fares as compared to say trail mix (similar ingredients just less moisture). Would one advise toward 0 water content?

Just check yourself for ticks daily, imho. That poo poo is a toxic chemical. I think it might be deadly to cats as well.

PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.


A general rule is that if the ingredients are shelf stable before cooking, they will be after cooking. I've made my own bars before but never had them more than two weeks.

Although maybe a little stale after a month.

No butter, no milk, sweeten/bind with honey or molasses.

BeefofAges
Jun 5, 2004

Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the cows of war.



stupid puma posted:

Anybody here use permethrin? I never have, but most of my trips are usually at the beginning or end of the summer so I don't really have to worry about ticks and mosquitos too much. But this year I'm taking a BWCA trip in late June and I'm thinking about just treating the cuffs and collars of my clothes primarily to protect against deer ticks. Thoughts?

I soak my clothes and gear in permethrin to keep ticks and mosquitos away. It works pretty well. Just keep it far, far away from cats and fish (it's very toxic to them) and try not to expose yourself any more than necessary. It's harmless once it's dry, but when it's still liquid it's nasty stuff.

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Marshmallow Mayhem posted:

Has anybody experimented with making their own food bars and keeping them on the trail? I've got to ship myself resupplies before I do the JMT and they could be out there 2 weeks to a month before I get them. I'd like to be able to cut some cost and packaging waste Obviously no perishable ingredients in them like dairy or anything I refrigerate, but they've got oil and water in them, I'm wondering if that would impact how this fares as compared to say trail mix (similar ingredients just less moisture). Would one advise toward 0 water content?


Check the last thread, where I believe one goon posted their homemade trail bars.

Elijya
May 11, 2005

Could you please continue the petty bickering? I find it most intriguing.

Time Cowboy posted:

My friend and I are looking to do a couple day hikes in eastern Pennsylvania or Maryland this weekend, weather permitting. We already picked out the Pinnacle for one day, but I can't seem to find anything else in my guidebooks that sounds like a must-see.

I'm hoping someone can recommend a good hike between 4 and 10 miles long, ideally without too much elevation gain (no more than, say, 1200 feet total), with something really interesting along the way, like a great viewpoint or a unique geological feature or something like that. Oh, and it should be no more than three hours away from Trenton by car.

Right now the only options that seem feasible are Ricketts Glen and Pole Steeple (at Pine Grove Furnace). If anyone recommends against either of those, that's good to know too. Thanks!

Approach the Pinnacle going northbound on the AT from the Hamburg Reservoir. You'll pass a shelter near the reservoir if you want to check in, then do one big climb and arrive at the astronomical park and pulpit rock, then it's a flat (well, rocky flat) 2 miles to the pinnacle. You'll then have three return path options depending on how much more you want to do. http://www.harpweb.com/thepinnacle/maps/weisermap.jpg
There's also a firetower nearby, but I can't promise it'll be accessible. It is possible to drive up to it, though.


Hawk Mountain Sanctuary is right around the corner and you can park right at the top and walk 100 yards to the south lookout, and an easy walk to 4 others. The best is the North Lookout though. Since the Lookout Trail is ridiculously easy, duck down the River of Rocks trail (there's a short or long loop) and arrive there via the skyline. There's one small almost vertical climb that's a lot of fun and you'll actually earn the view.

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_roYLpQK7K3M/TJ4Ev1H2KyI/AAAAAAAABG0/-iEHkuECHfk/s1600/Hawk+Mtn+map+trail.jpg

Ricketts has been on my list for awhile, but having been to other glens, I'd highly recommend it.

The other great view between Trenton and Hamburg is Bake Oven Knob, which you can see from the Pinnacle. You can drive up to it, which unfortunately means it tends to be covered with garbage and graffiti from locals, but the view is excellent.

Good luck! I hope the weather is beautiful for you.

stupid puma posted:

Anybody here use permethrin? I never have, but most of my trips are usually at the beginning or end of the summer so I don't really have to worry about ticks and mosquitos too much. But this year I'm taking a BWCA trip in late June and I'm thinking about just treating the cuffs and collars of my clothes primarily to protect against deer ticks. Thoughts?

I just retreated my clothes today. I got a pretreated bandana a few years ago and immediately noticed it's effectiveness. Permethrin is the only thing I know of that works against gnats. You can also treat your pack and shoes with it. It creates an "aura" effect and the more items you have treated, the more effective it is. Lay your gear out on the ground, treat them with a spray bottle, wait a couple hours and you're good to go. Don't let cats anywhere near it when you're treating as it's very deadly to them!

Elijya fucked around with this message at 05:29 on May 23, 2013

NatasDog
Feb 9, 2009


Time Cowboy posted:

My friend and I are looking to do a couple day hikes in eastern Pennsylvania or Maryland this weekend, weather permitting. We already picked out the Pinnacle for one day, but I can't seem to find anything else in my guidebooks that sounds like a must-see.

I'm hoping someone can recommend a good hike between 4 and 10 miles long, ideally without too much elevation gain (no more than, say, 1200 feet total), with something really interesting along the way, like a great viewpoint or a unique geological feature or something like that. Oh, and it should be no more than three hours away from Trenton by car.

Right now the only options that seem feasible are Ricketts Glen and Pole Steeple (at Pine Grove Furnace). If anyone recommends against either of those, that's good to know too. Thanks!

Rickett's Glen is pretty amazing and you won't be disappointed if you do it. I try to make it out there at least once or twice a year during the hotter months because all the falling water helps drag the ambient temperatures down a good 20 degrees, which is a godsend in the dead of summer

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Marshmallow Mayhem posted:

Has anybody experimented with making their own food bars and keeping them on the trail? I've got to ship myself resupplies before I do the JMT and they could be out there 2 weeks to a month before I get them. I'd like to be able to cut some cost and packaging waste Obviously no perishable ingredients in them like dairy or anything I refrigerate, but they've got oil and water in them, I'm wondering if that would impact how this fares as compared to say trail mix (similar ingredients just less moisture). Would one advise toward 0 water content?

Just check yourself for ticks daily, imho. That poo poo is a toxic chemical. I think it might be deadly to cats as well.

I've had good luck making bars with oats, and whatever nuts and dry fruit you'd like, a scoop or two of protein powder and then keeping it all together with sweetened condensed milk. Mix it all together and bake for a bit. Here is a base recipe that I go off of skipping the coconut and adding whatever I'd like:

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Easy-Granola-Bars/Detail.aspx

pizzadog
Oct 9, 2009



BleakLewis posted:

I've had good luck making bars with oats, and whatever nuts and dry fruit you'd like, a scoop or two of protein powder and then keeping it all together with sweetened condensed milk. Mix it all together and bake for a bit. Here is a base recipe that I go off of skipping the coconut and adding whatever I'd like:

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Easy-Granola-Bars/Detail.aspx

I am not planning on baking these, but I wonder if that's the key to making them nonperishable? I am using similar ingredients but no condensed milk.

Time Cowboy
Nov 4, 2007

But Tarzan... The strangest thing has happened! I'm as bare... as the day I was born!

Elijya posted:

The Pinnacle and Hawk Mountain Sanctuary

NatasDog posted:

Rickett's Glen

Awesome, thank you! I think I'll do Ricketts Glen in July. Hawk Mountain definitely sounds worth a visit, too.

pissboy
Aug 21, 2004
Yeah for Twinkies!

Internet Explorer posted:

Not a whole lot of talk about the REI Anniversary sale. Anyone getting anything cool?

I picked up a Marmot Cloudbreak sleeping bag, Osprey Aether 70, and the 2 liter platypus gravity filter.

I then proceeded to go out and spend a couple days in the woods. :)

PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.


For gear that gets taken between multiple packs (compass, knife, matches, etc), does anyone have a system so they don't forget things? Just throw it in a stuff sack and move it from pack to pack?

stupid puma
Apr 25, 2005



You mean like a list? On paper?

PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.


I mean a system to prevent forgetting things in your other pack because you're taking a different one out than last time. Clean out your pack of "transferrable" items after going out and throw it all in a stuff sack?

Elijya
May 11, 2005

Could you please continue the petty bickering? I find it most intriguing.

PRADA SLUT posted:

I mean a system to prevent forgetting things in your other pack because you're taking a different one out than last time. Clean out your pack of "transferrable" items after going out and throw it all in a stuff sack?

Stuff sacks are opaque and expensive, Zip lock bags are extremely useful for organizing your small items. Rather than digging through a pocket looking for something, just pull out the ziplock you know it's in (I use 3-5 in my pack, plus a few others in a bounce box for back ups and things I would never carry) and you should be able to see it and go right for it.

How you organize is totally personal and will constantly be evolving. Personally, my knife is always clipped in my pocket, I never use a compass (but I'm on the AT. I have a TINY one in my emergency bag) and a Bic is far more useful than matches. Get a mini if you're trying to cut grams.

One of the best pieces of gear I have is a mini survival kit that comes with the smallest versions of a lot of the misc. gear you're probably struggling with. It's Eddie Bauer (not a brand I usually go for) but it's a 1 liter dry bag with a transparent window and about 30 small pieces of equipment (a few additions/subtractions since I got it). As an emergency bag, I almost never go into it, but I wouldn't go anywhere without it.

Elijya fucked around with this message at 05:20 on May 23, 2013

tuyop
Sep 14, 2006

Every second that we're not growing BASIL is a second wasted


Fun Shoe

UglyDucklett posted:

A question about the appalachian trail. How did you get the 4-10 grand to do it in the first place? It'd take a few years to work up that kind of money, for me at least, and when people say "if you're thinking about doing it, just do it." It bugs me. 6000, to go one way comfortably, is not "just do it" money to me :(

Yeah I don't know any details about your situation, but the solution is just to save 10-80% of your income and/or sell some stuff until you have the money. BFC has all sorts of cool folks who can help you with this.

krispykremessuck posted:

Anyway the pack I picked up is a Gregory Z30 (large, so 33L). It did really great over the 8 or so miles I did on Saturday. My roommate picked up a Camelbak Vantage (41L) from a local place here which is super nice, but I warned him that extra space makes him the group's pack mule.

Hey that's my pack (the 60L version)! I've had it since 2007 and did the Georgian and Vermont sections of the AT with it before I decided to go full ultralight.

I also took it to Costa Rica, Mexico, edit: and Turkey, Spain, France, and the Grand Canyon, and tons of trips in Eastern Canada. It's served me very well with only a few minor repairs needed (Possums biting my straps :argh:).

tuyop fucked around with this message at 13:59 on May 23, 2013

Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.

Business of Ferrets posted:

Check the last thread, where I believe one goon posted their homemade trail bars.

A bunch of us did. My recipe that I got from Outward Bound was field-stable for a month or more. I'll repost it once I get back to my laptop next week.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


I'm pretty late to the party but I just watched 127 hours for the first time the other night, already completely aware of the story and outcome. It blows my mind how irresponsible it was to set out without anyone else knowing where you are, carrying dull gear, and not taking precautions like extra water. Obviously no surprise since thats what got him in the predicament that hes famous for.

What I took away from it aside from the basic irresponsibility is the lack of competent gear. Someone was saying earlier that this thread speaks more to the miles put in at REI versus the miles put on the trail, and while those gear heads to exist and thats what they're into I don't see a problem with knowing the ins and outs of every piece of gear you bring with you into the outdoors.

Keep your knives sharp people and carry reliable gear.

tuyop
Sep 14, 2006

Every second that we're not growing BASIL is a second wasted


Fun Shoe

Verman posted:

I'm pretty late to the party but I just watched 127 hours for the first time the other night, already completely aware of the story and outcome. It blows my mind how irresponsible it was to set out without anyone else knowing where you are, carrying dull gear, and not taking precautions like extra water. Obviously no surprise since thats what got him in the predicament that hes famous for.

What I took away from it aside from the basic irresponsibility is the lack of competent gear. Someone was saying earlier that this thread speaks more to the miles put in at REI versus the miles put on the trail, and while those gear heads to exist and thats what they're into I don't see a problem with knowing the ins and outs of every piece of gear you bring with you into the outdoors.

Keep your knives sharp people and carry reliable gear.

Pff whatever. I roll with a poncho liner and a 500ml water bottle and disappear from my family and friends for many weeks at a time. Don't let this fearmongering control your lives, guys!

renzor
Jul 28, 2004

...I still get the ham, right? Good.


PRADA SLUT posted:

On gear: I don't have very much gear, but everything I have I absolutely love, and it is my favorite item I could possibly get of that kind. I justify buying expensive pieces by having only one of them, keeping it forever, and every time I use it, I think "god drat I'm glad I bought this".


This is literally my only outdoor rain jacket:



welp

My friend who's an avid hiker and works outdoors for film all year has one of these as his only foul-weather jacket. After over 10 years of 250+ days of use(per year), the seams were starting to give so he took it in for repairs. They felt bad and gave him a brand new jacket. I will for sure be buying my new raincoat from them.

Alctel
Jan 16, 2004

I love snails




I'm doing the West Coast Trail this year, starting June 22nd. I'm really excited! Bought some new boots for the occasion

http://www.mec.ca/product/5024-148/zamberlan-vioz-gt-gore-tex-backpacking-boots-mens/?h=10+50131&f=10+50026+50131


The only thing I'm worried about is keeping my down sleeping bag dry - it has a water resistant spray on but I'm still wondering if I should switch it out for a synthetic for this trip.

Also going to buy a new backpack (its time), any recommended brands? I pretty much get all my stuff at MEC.

Alctel fucked around with this message at 20:12 on May 23, 2013

krispykremessuck
Jul 22, 2005

unlike most veterans and SA members $10 is not a meaningful expenditure for me

I'm gonna have me a swag Bar-B-Q

Verman posted:

What I took away from it aside from the basic irresponsibility is the lack of competent gear. Someone was saying earlier that this thread speaks more to the miles put in at REI versus the miles put on the trail, and while those gear heads to exist and thats what they're into I don't see a problem with knowing the ins and outs of every piece of gear you bring with you into the outdoors.

I tend to over-pack even for day hikes. For example, I never go anywhere at this point in the season without my ice axe and microspikes. Trails may be a bit different here in the sense that there are tons of places with 10+ feet of snow still, and some of that snow is getting rotten or melting out from underneath. The point is, I'm prepared for really lovely conditions. I don't hike ultra-light because I'm training for some serious summits this summer, and because I just don't like being un/under-prepared. I've also seen some pretty gnarly trail injuries because of stupid/piss-poor decisions about what people should/shouldn't bring/wear.

Also I have a whiteboard at home where I note trail, target, dates, anticipated times, and who is with me so my girlfriend knows to tell them where to look for bodies me and my friends.

edit: note: I'm not making GBS threads on ultra-light hikers, mainly people that roll up in yoga pants with some Keds and try to summit moderate places like Mt. Ellinor here.

krispykremessuck fucked around with this message at 18:05 on May 23, 2013

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tuyop
Sep 14, 2006

Every second that we're not growing BASIL is a second wasted


Fun Shoe

krispykremessuck posted:

pretty gnarly trail injuries because of stupid/piss-poor decisions about what people should/shouldn't bring/wear.

Can you give examples? I haven't heard too many stories that justify just-in-case items, but I'm sure mountaineers have some good ones.

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