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MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

krispykremessuck posted:

I tend to over-pack even for day hikes. For example, I never go anywhere at this point in the season without my ice axe and microspikes. Trails may be a bit different here in the sense that there are tons of places with 10+ feet of snow still, and some of that snow is getting rotten or melting out from underneath. The point is, I'm prepared for really lovely conditions. I don't hike ultra-light because I'm training for some serious summits this summer, and because I just don't like being un/under-prepared. I've also seen some pretty gnarly trail injuries because of stupid/piss-poor decisions about what people should/shouldn't bring/wear.

Also I have a whiteboard at home where I note trail, target, dates, anticipated times, and who is with me so my girlfriend knows to tell them where to look for bodies me and my friends.

edit: note: I'm not making GBS threads on ultra-light hikers, mainly people that roll up in yoga pants with some Keds and try to summit moderate places like Mt. Ellinor here.

ahhh, see, you're talking about PNW "hiking" here. I think most of the folks in this thread are AT/East Coast hikers. probably important to call out that there are going to be some big differences in what a minimum safe loadout is for this time of year depending on what part of the country (or world) you're in.

I hike primarily in Oregon and Southwest Washington where there's still snow on top of most of the trails in the cascades and the columbia river gorge. I'm also a pretty fairweather hiker though so I'm never going to have microspikes or an ice axe on me because if I come across snow that's too deep on the trail I'll likely just call it a day and head back down to the nearest brewpub for lunch.

I think it really all depends on what you're setting out to tackle. snow/ice on the trail really ups the ante regardless of where you are.

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krispykremessuck
Jul 22, 2005

unlike most veterans and SA members $10 is not a meaningful expenditure for me

I'm gonna have me a swag Bar-B-Q

I'm hardly a mountaineer, but the most common injury I see up here is rolled ankles and sprains. Those normally aren't that gnarly, but when you're a couple miles in with no way to contact EMS and by yourself or just +1 on a low-traffic trail, that can turn into a really bad situation quickly. Especially if you cut yourself up on sharp basalt scree in the process.

The OP stressed it in this thread, and I doubt people here are lacking the good sense, but most strains, sprains, fractures, and cuts I've seen were a direct result of improper footwear.

As far as the ice axe and microspikes go, I'm frequently in places I may be glissading back down, or doing long snow traverses. I could do them without an ice axe, probably, but it's 1 extra pound on a tool loop for that little bit of extra insurance. I've seen a guy break his ankle in a hole in snow chute because he had no way to self-arrest. That was several miles in and turned into a 5 person/4 hour effort to get him to the trailhead where it was still another couple of hours before EMS could get on scene.

That's pretty extreme and out of the ordinary conditions, I know. Most of the time it's entirely uneventful and I don't see injuries other than mild sprains, but it seems like once a season I watch someone go down a forest road in an ambulance, or the back of a truck to a point where EMS can pick them up.

You can check youtube for videos of the glissade down Ellinor's snow chute. Glissading is really fun, but can be super dangerous if you're unprepared/inexperienced. I have some pictures, but they'll never do justice to how steep that chute is, and how fast you can get going on the way down. Also a couple weeks ago when I was up there, there was a HUGE cornice at the summit that I hope falls down before anyone stands on it.

http://www.wta.org/trail-news/signpost/three-hikers-rescued-from-mount-ellinor - A few years old

Bonus: A decent video of the descent from Ellinor, even if he goes a little slow.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WwWMqWFqzY

Sorry for the long "It's Dangerous!" post, but a lot of people really underestimate even the moderate and easy trails around here.

edit: /\/\/\/\ Yeah, I set out with the summit in mind pretty much every time unless I'm conditioning, which I tend to just do around home anyway. Weather and rotten snow/ice/major cornices/gear failures are usually what stop me.

PabloBOOM
Mar 10, 2004
Hunchback of DOOM

PRADA SLUT posted:

For gear that gets taken between multiple packs (compass, knife, matches, etc), does anyone have a system so they don't forget things? Just throw it in a stuff sack and move it from pack to pack?

I have a small red stufsack that always has my compass, mini multitool, headlamp, duct tape, and a lighter. I throw it in whatever bag I'm taking, including on remote day hikes. I store those items in the bag so organizing is not a problem since I know those will be there when I need them from my pack.

BeefofAges
Jun 5, 2004

Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the cows of war.



Alctel posted:

The only thing I'm worried about is keeping my down sleeping bag dry - it has a water resistant spray on but I'm still wondering if I should switch it out for a synthetic for this trip.

Line your pack with a trash compactor bag and your stuff should stay pretty dry.

Chroisman
Mar 27, 2010


For snow shoes and crampons, do they usually just strap onto any boot across the board, or do you have to have boots that are more so catered towards putting crampons and snow shoes on? I'm not likely to do anything like that in the immediate future but I was just wondering.

MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

Chroisman posted:

For snow shoes and crampons, do they usually just strap onto any boot across the board, or do you have to have boots that are more so catered towards putting crampons and snow shoes on? I'm not likely to do anything like that in the immediate future but I was just wondering.

Crampons, yes, snowshoes, not so much. Crampons are typically designed to fit on hard boots that have a toe and healed designed for them to latch on. Micro spikes or yaktrax will fit on any boots. Snowshoes should fit on any as well.

BeefofAges
Jun 5, 2004

Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the cows of war.



There are plenty of crampons that will strap onto any boot or shoe. You just have to buy the right crampons for your shoes and expected conditions.

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Chroisman posted:

For snow shoes and crampons, do they usually just strap onto any boot across the board, or do you have to have boots that are more so catered towards putting crampons and snow shoes on? I'm not likely to do anything like that in the immediate future but I was just wondering.

For crampons, look for models featuring straps at both the toe and the heel if you need them to fit on a wide range of boots. Also, the rigidity of both the boot and the crampons is a factor that needs to be correlated. And bigger boots might require a longer connector than the stock version. Just bring your boots with you when you go to try on crampons, and try to find a knowledgeable salesperson to help.

tuyop
Sep 14, 2006

Every second that we're not growing BASIL is a second wasted


Fun Shoe

krispykremessuck posted:

I'm hardly a mountaineer, but the most common injury I see up here is rolled ankles and sprains. Those normally aren't that gnarly, but when you're a couple miles in with no way to contact EMS and by yourself or just +1 on a low-traffic trail, that can turn into a really bad situation quickly. Especially if you cut yourself up on sharp basalt scree in the process.

The OP stressed it in this thread, and I doubt people here are lacking the good sense, but most strains, sprains, fractures, and cuts I've seen were a direct result of improper footwear.

As far as the ice axe and microspikes go, I'm frequently in places I may be glissading back down, or doing long snow traverses. I could do them without an ice axe, probably, but it's 1 extra pound on a tool loop for that little bit of extra insurance. I've seen a guy break his ankle in a hole in snow chute because he had no way to self-arrest. That was several miles in and turned into a 5 person/4 hour effort to get him to the trailhead where it was still another couple of hours before EMS could get on scene.

That's pretty extreme and out of the ordinary conditions, I know. Most of the time it's entirely uneventful and I don't see injuries other than mild sprains, but it seems like once a season I watch someone go down a forest road in an ambulance, or the back of a truck to a point where EMS can pick them up.

You can check youtube for videos of the glissade down Ellinor's snow chute. Glissading is really fun, but can be super dangerous if you're unprepared/inexperienced. I have some pictures, but they'll never do justice to how steep that chute is, and how fast you can get going on the way down. Also a couple weeks ago when I was up there, there was a HUGE cornice at the summit that I hope falls down before anyone stands on it.

http://www.wta.org/trail-news/signpost/three-hikers-rescued-from-mount-ellinor - A few years old

Bonus: A decent video of the descent from Ellinor, even if he goes a little slow.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WwWMqWFqzY

Sorry for the long "It's Dangerous!" post, but a lot of people really underestimate even the moderate and easy trails around here.

edit: /\/\/\/\ Yeah, I set out with the summit in mind pretty much every time unless I'm conditioning, which I tend to just do around home anyway. Weather and rotten snow/ice/major cornices/gear failures are usually what stop me.

Ah that's kind of what I thought. You've got a lot more serious conditions out West than I've seen here in the East. Even in Arizona and New Mexico, when it can get dangerously hot, it's still really a matter of attitude over gear to maintain safety.

I don't really bother bringing any "just in case" items because I've only seen two categories of injury:

1. The type where you will die without immediate medical attention (this was in the military so that was available) (e.g., fall down a mountain with some gear and suffer a broken neck and pelvis, deep wounds, severe frostbite) and

2. The type where you can HTFU and either treat in place with a bit of tape, knife and iodine, wait for help to come to you, or hobble out on your own. (e.g., blisters, sprains, infections (MRSA), pneumonia, etc.)

For type 1, there is nothing that I would be able to carry that would save a person in that situation. We needed four men, a stretcher, an IV and a helicopter. If this had been one of my friends in the Hundred-Mile Wilderness, they would have just died.

For type 2, a FAK isn't necessary because they can usually be treated with tools and materials that you use regularly for other things. And if they're not treated, the person won't die or come out with a serious injury anyway (and any reasonable FAK won't prevent it if they will).

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


I have a really close friend who lived out in California with her boyfriend. Both were in their mid 20s, in great shape and pretty avid hikers. They were out hiking Mt. San Jacinto in May 2009 and got heat exhaustion, and thinking that turning around and heading back was the best idea. He started either getting sick or blacking out and realized it was way more serious than they thought so he told her to run ahead for help. I believe she got a few miles down the trail reaching the parking lot and passed out the moment help arrived.

I think the temps were near 100 even with their 6am start, and they started to run out of water and rather than finishing the hike they talked to a passing local who advised them to just turn around. They followed his/her advice and started down off the trail. Her boyfriend sat down and realized something was up and they decided she would run ahead to get help. She reached the parking lot and got help before passing out. I think it was somewhere around noon or 1 when they found him unconscious.

She made it but spent several days in the hospital but her boyfriend didn't. The S&R reached him but by the time they got him off the trail he was apparently in arrest and died in the parking lot.

Its one of those things where you just don't take nature for granted and its better to carry too much water than not enough.

VVVVV - Agreed, my closest hiking buddies and I have a "wuss" rule meaning that nobody will think or speak negatively of anyone on the trip if we need to call it quits early for any reason. A lot of times groups of people, especially guys, can get competitive and feel like they need to prove something so they don't voice their concerns and can get themselves into trouble. Before setting out, especially with new people, we make it very welcoming for anyone to speak up about concerns. It generally leads to really good trips and a general group understanding that safety is the primary focus, which relaxes everyone and makes it really enjoyable.

Verman fucked around with this message at 16:31 on May 24, 2013

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


You don't always realize how much heat and the sun can affect you, even if you do have enough water. The first time I went backpacking in the Grand Canyon, I had some troubles on a few days when it was just so drat hot and the sun is beating down on you and it just starts sapping your energy and making you feel terrible

MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

Verman posted:

VVVVV - Agreed, my closest hiking buddies and I have a "wuss" rule meaning that nobody will think or speak negatively of anyone on the trip if we need to call it quits early for any reason. A lot of times groups of people, especially guys, can get competitive and feel like they need to prove something so they don't voice their concerns and can get themselves into trouble. Before setting out, especially with new people, we make it very welcoming for anyone to speak up about concerns. It generally leads to really good trips and a general group understanding that safety is the primary focus, which relaxes everyone and makes it really enjoyable.

This is a great policy definitely don't want to be hiking with people who would peer pressure you into potential serious injury.

krispykremessuck
Jul 22, 2005

unlike most veterans and SA members $10 is not a meaningful expenditure for me

I'm gonna have me a swag Bar-B-Q

Verman posted:

VVVVV - Agreed, my closest hiking buddies and I have a "wuss" rule meaning that nobody will think or speak negatively of anyone on the trip if we need to call it quits early for any reason. A lot of times groups of people, especially guys, can get competitive and feel like they need to prove something so they don't voice their concerns and can get themselves into trouble. Before setting out, especially with new people, we make it very welcoming for anyone to speak up about concerns. It generally leads to really good trips and a general group understanding that safety is the primary focus, which relaxes everyone and makes it really enjoyable.

My group does this too, and it's for the best. We also talk a lot to listen to people's voices and see if someone is really straining, and adjust pace or stop for rest if it turns out something is more strenuous than we thought.

pizzadog
Oct 9, 2009



Verman posted:

I have a really close friend who lived out in California with her boyfriend. Both were in their mid 20s, in great shape and pretty avid hikers. They were out hiking Mt. San Jacinto in May 2009 and got heat exhaustion, and thinking that turning around and heading back was the best idea. He started either getting sick or blacking out and realized it was way more serious than they thought so he told her to run ahead for help. I believe she got a few miles down the trail reaching the parking lot and passed out the moment help arrived.

I think the temps were near 100 even with their 6am start, and they started to run out of water and rather than finishing the hike they talked to a passing local who advised them to just turn around. They followed his/her advice and started down off the trail. Her boyfriend sat down and realized something was up and they decided she would run ahead to get help. She reached the parking lot and got help before passing out. I think it was somewhere around noon or 1 when they found him unconscious.

She made it but spent several days in the hospital but her boyfriend didn't. The S&R reached him but by the time they got him off the trail he was apparently in arrest and died in the parking lot.

Its one of those things where you just don't take nature for granted and its better to carry too much water than not enough.

VVVVV - Agreed, my closest hiking buddies and I have a "wuss" rule meaning that nobody will think or speak negatively of anyone on the trip if we need to call it quits early for any reason. A lot of times groups of people, especially guys, can get competitive and feel like they need to prove something so they don't voice their concerns and can get themselves into trouble. Before setting out, especially with new people, we make it very welcoming for anyone to speak up about concerns. It generally leads to really good trips and a general group understanding that safety is the primary focus, which relaxes everyone and makes it really enjoyable.

I'm so sorry man, that's such a bad way to learn a lesson.
I believe you are speaking of the Cactus to Clouds trail which shouldn't really be attempted after dawn in the summer, or by anybody not in really good shape and carrying more than a gallon of water. It is not an officially sanctioned or maintained trail for this reason. And there's no water or shade for 6000 feet of gain and like 10 miles up from the desert floor to the palm springs aerial tramway unless you are lucky and a trail runner angel left a bottle at the halfway point in this one metal box. I did this hike last October, and it was still warm as balls at 5 am when we started hiking with headlamps, even worse after sunrise. Man nobody is gonna call your machismo out on heat stroke, if they are they are a dick, jesus christ. Good rule is don't hike with dicks

pizzadog fucked around with this message at 17:46 on May 24, 2013

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


Marshmallow Mayhem posted:

Good rule is don't hike with dicks

This, yes. Basically the easiest rule.

We actually had to cut my last trip to colorado short when my friend and I woke up to 4 inches of snow. We decided that walking across melting snowbanks with fresh snow on top and runnning water beneath was more than we felt like dealing with after post holing several times and nearly losing our boots.

Chroisman
Mar 27, 2010


Sorry I keep peppering this thread with really dumb questions, but in terms of a boot, given a choice between nylon and fiberglass shank, is there any preference between the two?

Marman1209
Jun 14, 2005
NonSequar got me this account for no damned reason.

MMD3 posted:

I've got an arc'teryx gamma soft shell that I've had for like 4 years or so now and it's one of my favorite jackets I've ever owned... I also have a pair of Beta AR pants and they fit incredibly well and keep me completely dry. I've never had one of their hard shells but I'm sure they're amazing. If you can spend the dough I'm sure you won't be disappointed.

I can't remember the last time I washed one of my shells. I'm not usually crawling around in mud or anything though so I'm not sure how long you'd go before you hit 4 washes or whatever.

It's not the mud you have a worry about, it's you. Take it from someone that has handled many delaminating hard shells: wash your jackets.

Reformed Tomboy
Feb 2, 2005

chu~~

Marman1209 posted:

It's not the mud you have a worry about, it's you. Take it from someone that has handled many delaminating hard shells: wash your jackets.

Seconding this. Washing and drying your Gore and DWR jackets is part of their proper care and helps them last longer.

PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.


How often?

Marman1209
Jun 14, 2005
NonSequar got me this account for no damned reason.

PRADA SLUT posted:

How often?

It depends on use and how sweaty you get in it, but I would do twice a year as a minimum for using it as a regular commuter jacket with some light hiking trips throw in.

Do more? Wash more.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



I did the Sleeping Bear Dunes hike today, out to Lake Michigan, and drat was that the most strenuous ~4 miles I've ever hiked. The "trail" was just loose sand, and the dunes are incredibly steep. It was worth it for the views, though. I'll get some photos posted as soon as I develop the pictures.

tuyop
Sep 14, 2006

Every second that we're not growing BASIL is a second wasted


Fun Shoe

I wash my Arc'teryx stuff when it becomes visibly dirty or noticeably funky. In the past this was once every few months, now I've been using it a lot less so I haven't washed it in like eight months.

Reformed Tomboy
Feb 2, 2005

chu~~

PRADA SLUT posted:

How often?

I wash my Atom SV that I wear daily, weekly. But I also take it to the climbing gym and it gets chalk all over it. High use = more frequent washing.

Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




Sorry or lack of photos, guys, but internet is pretty sporadic here. I've also been busy as all hell with this field school. I'm just finishing in Bali now after 3 weeks of work, and wrote my finals this morning. We hiked up Mt. Batur to watch the sunrise yesterday. I managed to upload a whopping two photos from that so far:





Business of Ferrets posted:

Aren't you the one who somehow lacks the ability to regulate heat? That sounds like a nightmare in Borneo's climate.

Something really interesting happened here. I learned to sweat. And boy, did I ever loving sweat. I was pouring buckets constantly. I got so much sunscreen, bug spray, and salt in my eyes that half the time I was finding it hard to see where I was going.

Except on Mt. Batur. It was cold enough to see your breath, lots of people were bundled up, and I went right back to not sweating, red faced, horribly overheating. I just about stripped down to my bikini top and shorts on the ascent, and it was pretty cold. I think my body gets confused in cooler climates and refuses to regulate heat. I've been doing pretty okay here for the most part, because the humidity and heat is a different kind of overheating discomfort. It feels more normal.

krispykremessuck
Jul 22, 2005

unlike most veterans and SA members $10 is not a meaningful expenditure for me

I'm gonna have me a swag Bar-B-Q

If I hadn't had my ice axe with me, I'd have probably busted my leg today. Or worse.

Other than one kinda lovely moment, though, it was pretty good. I just wish it had been clear. There's a poo poo ton of snow still on the ground in the Olympic Mountains in Washington, if anyone is making any trips this weekend. It was also loving snowing on top of Valhalla. Heavily.

Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Picnic Princess posted:

Sorry or lack of photos, guys, but internet is pretty sporadic here. I've also been busy as all hell with this field school. I'm just finishing in Bali now after 3 weeks of work, and wrote my finals this morning. We hiked up Mt. Batur to watch the sunrise yesterday. I managed to upload a whopping two photos from that so far:






Something really interesting happened here. I learned to sweat. And boy, did I ever loving sweat. I was pouring buckets constantly. I got so much sunscreen, bug spray, and salt in my eyes that half the time I was finding it hard to see where I was going.

Except on Mt. Batur. It was cold enough to see your breath, lots of people were bundled up, and I went right back to not sweating, red faced, horribly overheating. I just about stripped down to my bikini top and shorts on the ascent, and it was pretty cold. I think my body gets confused in cooler climates and refuses to regulate heat. I've been doing pretty okay here for the most part, because the humidity and heat is a different kind of overheating discomfort. It feels more normal.

Stunning pictures. The night sky in the first one must have been amazing in order to show up so well in a photograph!

krispykremessuck
Jul 22, 2005

unlike most veterans and SA members $10 is not a meaningful expenditure for me

I'm gonna have me a swag Bar-B-Q

So I'll be "hiking" this in the next month:




I think I might need to check my definition of hiking.

edit:

From Seattle looking west:

krispykremessuck fucked around with this message at 17:07 on May 27, 2013

Philip J Fry
Apr 25, 2007

go outside and have a blast


The Brothers

Probably my favorite summit; I always enjoy camping out at Lena Lake the day before.

krispykremessuck
Jul 22, 2005

unlike most veterans and SA members $10 is not a meaningful expenditure for me

I'm gonna have me a swag Bar-B-Q

Philip J Fry posted:

The Brothers

Probably my favorite summit; I always enjoy camping out at Lena Lake the day before.

We're probably going to camp where the trail starts to peter out at like 3000'. Dunno yet, plans aren't solid. I'm really pretty excited about it, though, because it puts me that much closer to being ready for Olympus in August. Then Eldorado Peak

Whatever the case, I just hope it isn't cloudy when I get up there.

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Currently planning a trip to do some basic camping around Grant Village in Yellowstone at the end of August with my parents, and then going to a wedding in Grand Targhee (that will have one night of camping), and then off for a 4-5 night backpacking trip in the Wind Rivers

Time Cowboy
Nov 4, 2007

But Tarzan... The strangest thing has happened! I'm as bare... as the day I was born!

Over the weekend my buddy and I hiked the Pinnacle (on the AT in Pennsylvania) plus a couple more piddly trails in the Philly area. It's no Bali or Yellowstone, but drat it, it was pretty.



Ferns are one of my favorite things about PA. They're freakin' everywhere. It's like the place knows it peaked in the Carboniferous and doesn't want to let go.




My buddy at the Pinnacle.




Lots of tulip poplar flowers got blown down in the windstorm the previous night.




Hey little guy.

krispykremessuck
Jul 22, 2005

unlike most veterans and SA members $10 is not a meaningful expenditure for me

I'm gonna have me a swag Bar-B-Q

By the way, for anyone planning to hike/climb in the Olympics in Washington, I highly suggest the Olympic Mountains Trail Guide by Robert L. Wood.

The third and most recent addition was published in 2000, but covers major NF road washouts and such. The only things it doesn't cover are extremely recent developments like the removal of the Elwha River Dam and such.

Washington hiking goons probably already know about it, but if you're looking to travel here for hiking, or are hiking incidentally to travelling here for other reasons, the Washington Trails Association and NW Hikers.net are great resources for routes, current conditions, and trail reports. NW Hikers covers more than just Washington, which is nice, and you can get optional gear-shaming threads if you like, too!

For bigger summits, there's also SummitPost.




edit: /\/\/\/\ Pinnacle Looks like a great hike. I wish we had your weather on Saturday here. Instead we were socked in with light snow/fog.

Here's me commenting that I "think the snow isn't very deep" about two minutes before almost falling into a 6-8 foot hole next to a rock:



And here's where we set out for in the morning, but stopped because of weather: Valhalla Peak (5345'), and we were just about at Fifty-fifty Pass (5050' heh)

PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.


Does anyone know a fairly easy overnight hike in northern Oregon-ish?

I'm taking MY GIRLFRIEND and I don't want anything too extreme. This would be her first overnight with me.

MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

PRADA SLUT posted:

Does anyone know a fairly easy overnight hike in northern Oregon-ish?

I'm taking MY GIRLFRIEND and I don't want anything too extreme. This would be her first overnight with me.

Unfortunately hood still has too much snow on it to do most overnights above timberline, I've been meaning to go to goat rocks as I hear its
Great for overnight but that might be a good option in southern Washington. I'll think of some more good ones.

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



krispykremessuck posted:

I'm hardly a mountaineer, but the most common injury I see up here is rolled ankles and sprains. Those normally aren't that gnarly, but when you're a couple miles in with no way to contact EMS and by yourself or just +1 on a low-traffic trail, that can turn into a really bad situation quickly. Especially if you cut yourself up on sharp basalt scree in the process.

The OP stressed it in this thread, and I doubt people here are lacking the good sense, but most strains, sprains, fractures, and cuts I've seen were a direct result of improper footwear.
Everyone I know has helped dummies with ruined ankles down trails. One person I know managed to double fracture her ankle on a pretty flat trail, wearing hiking boots.

I always carry a ton of poo poo that seems useless until someone needs it.

Otten
Oct 9, 2004



Marshmallow Mayhem posted:

I hiked Olancha Peak this past weekend, it was hard/the longest dayhike I've ever done. It's a high Sierra peak directly off the PCT but with no trail. It's one of the Sierra emblem peaks and its the first prominence you see driving up the 395 through Olancha, before you get to Lone Pine and see Whitney. Extremely steep summit, 1600 feet rise in 1 mile, no trail. Hiked sunrise to 10pm.


You are hardcore! I did this trail just to the pass on Saturday and it kicked my rear end. Only saw two other people the whole day, which I loved. But I somehow managed to forget a spot sunscreen-ing up (I always do) and sunburned the backs of my knees

PhantomOfTheCopier
Aug 13, 2008

Pikabooze!


PRADA SLUT posted:

I mean a system to prevent forgetting things in your other pack because you're taking a different one out than last time. Clean out your pack of "transferrable" items after going out and throw it all in a stuff sack?
I entirely repack my bag before every trip, just to make sure that all items are present and in their proper place. Single items that move between various bags won't be forgotten, and you'll be less likely to forget where they actually are once you get on the trail. This also gives you a chance to readjust all straps (that you loosened after your last trip; right?) and do a cursory inspection for broken zippers, or those that are caked with mud, potential tears, and so forth.

krispykremessuck posted:

If I hadn't had my ice axe with me, I'd have probably busted my leg today. Or worse.

Other than one kinda lovely moment, though, it was pretty good. I just wish it had been clear. There's a poo poo ton of snow still on the ground in the Olympic Mountains in Washington, if anyone is making any trips this weekend. It was also loving snowing on top of Valhalla. Heavily.
I have yet to get myself to the Olympic Mountains, but there are yearly WTA posts of people shocked that the alpine lakes are still covered with snow in March (duhh, of course they are!) in April (yep, pretty much) and in May (okay, sometimes, or the lake will be fine but the trail will still have snow). Heck, even I got myself on a mountain last week without my Microspikes and needed them. These places where you're standing on eight feet of fluff that collapses down beside boulders... I'm always concerned I'll break something. In fact, there are a few places where water is clearly running underneath the snow; I wonder how often people fall through and drown or suffocate.

It is one of the things I love here, though, that if I really want to go snowshoeing, it's pretty easy even in June, and sometimes in July (depending on the destination). I still call it "hiking", even though I was glissading ten days ago, we still have live avalanche chutes to watch, it's probably still snowing in some places at night an hour out of town, and many other beautiful reminders of winter.

I have a goon hiking buddy, and I do my share of pushing when we manage to get out, but I believe I already explained my policy: If you question twice that you should be somewhere, turn around and go home. People that don't end up on the back of milk cartons.

BeefofAges
Jun 5, 2004

Cry 'Havoc!', and let slip the cows of war.



I've recovered enough from my hip surgery that I can start hiking a little! I'm super excited to get back out there.

Chroisman
Mar 27, 2010


PhantomOfTheCopier posted:

I entirely repack my bag before every trip, just to make sure that all items are present and in their proper place. Single items that move between various bags won't be forgotten, and you'll be less likely to forget where they actually are once you get on the trail. This also gives you a chance to readjust all straps (that you loosened after your last trip; right?) and do a cursory inspection for broken zippers, or those that are caked with mud, potential tears, and so forth.


I also do this. It's also good to give a lot of your gear a good wipe down after you walk anyway so you'll probably have to completely unpack if you want to do that. What I find also helps is that I have a standard packing list that has everything I usually bring, and I modify it once off if I need something additional.

If you only have a couple of things that move around a fair bit and is standard wherever you go, another thing I find helps is just to memorise the number of things you constantly move and just count them every time. Then you only need to think about what you're missing if your count is off.

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MrSaturn
Sep 8, 2004

Go ahead, laugh. They all laugh at first...

(note: This post is Mod-approved... and crossposted to the mountain bike thread and the bicycle megathread. Thanks Shine!)

Hey guys, a favor if I might ask --

So alongside my job currently, I'm a student in a graduate program for Human Computer Interaction. I'm working with a research group to collect some information from people who frequent trails for biking/hiking/running, etc, to see if there might be a way to enhance the trailgoing experience in some way with a mobile app (not a GPS tracking app a la garmin/map my ride/strava).

If you've got a couple minutes, I'd appreciate it if you'd take my research group's quick survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/PHSSRML

I'd be more than happy to share our results and findings once all is said and done - this is primary for research and coursework, and not to make money for me or anyone affiliated with this research.

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