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JAY ZERO SUM GAME
Oct 18, 2005

Walter.
I know you know how to do this.
Get up.




Please don't hike in jeans. Don't assume good weather all day, and jeans are awful and dangerous in bad weather, especially Colorado this time of year.

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ATP5G1
Jun 22, 2005


Fun Shoe

I'd be coming from Philadelphia into Denver and driving to the cabin from there. I guess I'm just loathe to drop a bunch of money on gear when it's unlikely I'll be going hiking that often. I'm also dropping weight, so whatever fits me now probably won't in a month or two.

The Read Menace
Apr 4, 2003



I live in the San Diego area and I have hiked a bunch of the nearby trails (Mt Woodson, Iron Mountain, El Cajon Mtn/El Capitan, Dripping Srpings, many others). I would like to move up to backpacking but I don't really want to go by myself. If anybody is looking for somebody to go on backpacking trips I have a pretty flexible schedule. All I have to do is go to school, and I'm not going this summer so I hope to get a lot of hiking in. Add me to the list if you will OP.

LogisticEarth
Mar 28, 2004

Someone once told me, "Time is a flat circle".


ATP5G1 posted:

I'd be coming from Philadelphia into Denver and driving to the cabin from there. I guess I'm just loathe to drop a bunch of money on gear when it's unlikely I'll be going hiking that often. I'm also dropping weight, so whatever fits me now probably won't in a month or two.

Just get any cheapo synthetic fiber pants will be better than jeans. You don't need to go spend $80 on super duper hiking pants.

REI has some hiking pants on sale on their website right now:
http://www.rei.com/product/767573/white-sierra-convertible-trail-pants-mens-32-inseam-special-buy

beefnoodle
Aug 7, 2004

IGNORE ME! I'M JUST AN OLD WET RAG


REI just tightened up their return policies:

REI Gearmail posted:

Since 1938, getting you outfitted with the right gear to enjoy your
outdoor adventures has been our number one goal. We have earned
a well-deserved reputation for our friendly expertise, and our 100%
guarantee means that we stand behind everything we sell.

REI has one of the best return policies in retail, and we remain committed
to your satisfaction with everything you buy at REI. We also have a
small, but growing, number of customers who stretch our policy beyond
its intended purpose. To ensure that we can continue to offer our 100%
Satisfaction Guarantee, we're updating our policy: You have one year
from purchase to return or exchange any item you're not satisfied with,
except items purchased from REI-OUTLET, which must be returned
within 30 days of purchase.
If you want to learn more, please click here.
These updates enable us to maintain our robust policy and, as always,
stand behind all purchases made at REI and REI-OUTLET.

We are committed to getting you into the very best gear and apparel for
your outdoor adventures. This means offering you great service and
standing behind the products we sell. That was the case in 1938, and it
remains true today. I thank you for your support and patronage of REI
and wish you a season of unforgettable outdoor experiences.
Tim Spangler
Senior Vice President, Retail

JAY ZERO SUM GAME
Oct 18, 2005

Walter.
I know you know how to do this.
Get up.




I'm fine with the changes except the "30 day exchange for outlet items." I understand it's all a cash saving move with respect to abusers, and that's fine, but the Outlet one is lovely. I live far away from REI and only go once or twice a year, and use that time to return outlet items that don't fit right/etc., entirely within the spirit of the policy.

The 30 day bit is because they're items they're discontinuing and just want to write off. Lame.

remote control carnivore
May 6, 2009


JAY ZERO SUM GAME posted:

Please don't hike in jeans. Don't assume good weather all day, and jeans are awful and dangerous in bad weather, especially Colorado this time of year.

This, forever, but cotton in general. Please do not wear cotton hiking.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


JAY ZERO SUM GAME posted:

I'm fine with the changes except the "30 day exchange for outlet items." I understand it's all a cash saving move with respect to abusers, and that's fine, but the Outlet one is lovely. I live far away from REI and only go once or twice a year, and use that time to return outlet items that don't fit right/etc., entirely within the spirit of the policy.

The 30 day bit is because they're items they're discontinuing and just want to write off. Lame.

How dare they continue to have an absolutely remarkable and unparalleled return policy compared to nearly every other company in existence.



(you can send returns through the mail too)

mastershakeman
Oct 28, 2008


Yeah, I can't blame REI at all for shortening their policy from lifetime to yearly. Even allowing for worn items to be returned is absolutely amazing, I'm sure a lot of people took advantage of that.

Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.

Hypnolobster posted:

How dare they continue to have an absolutely remarkable and unparalleled return policy compared to nearly every other company in existence.



(you can send returns through the mail too)

It's about loving time. Their return policy was bad for small businesses. It's still more generous than I was expecting when I first heard that it was changing. (Who doesn't allow returns through the mail?)

MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

I've never abused that policy, haven't even ever returned anything after a year I don't think.... I don't mind that they're making it stricter at all, I just hope they still have the flexibility to be reasonable when people return things for legitimate reasons past the 1 year mark.

mastershakeman
Oct 28, 2008


What would even be a legitimate reason after a year?

Reformed Tomboy
Feb 2, 2005

chu~~

mastershakeman posted:

What would even be a legitimate reason after a year?

It doesn't fit and you're tired of putting up with it.

I returned a pair of shoes about month ago that I bought three years ago. I couldn't wear them for longer than an hour, and I felt bad when I thought about returning them after the first year so I kept them despite their issues. Finally I was sick of it and just returned them. Glad I did too, because I didn't hear they were going to change the policy.

MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

I would say a more legitimate reason is just wear. you purchase a high performance apparel piece that starts breaking down after 18 months or something say.

stupid puma
Apr 25, 2005



I've never returned any used REI stuff but I liked the idea of being able to return things that I might use a couple of times a year a little longer than a year after purchase. It's not often that a water purifier or something I rarely use shows a defect on first or second use. Looking at the return area of my local REI and seeing the reasons people return stuff from a couple years ago, it's not surprising they did this though.

LogisticEarth
Mar 28, 2004

Someone once told me, "Time is a flat circle".


MMD3 posted:

I would say a more legitimate reason is just wear. you purchase a high performance apparel piece that starts breaking down after 18 months or something say.

Isn't that something that would be covered more through warranties and directly dealing with the manufacturer? REI does sell a lot of house brands though. I forget, do they have warranties/guarantees on their own stuff?

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



The REI in one of the northern Detroit suburbs had a canoe on the scratch and dent rack that someone had bought, used for four years, and returned. It was crazy that someone would take a perfectly good boat back to the shop like that, but I guess that's one of the abuses they're talking about.

ATP5G1
Jun 22, 2005


Fun Shoe

I have more hiking questions. Do you have recommendations for a basic emergency kit? I have the following:

- magnesium fire starter
- iodine tablets (was going to buy a Lifestraw but it won't arrive in time)
- silver emergency blanket
- Ace wrap

We have a first aid kit, but it's the generic big kind you get at a pharmacy. That's going to be OK? We're using two daypack-sized backpacks, not camping packs, so we can't carry a ton.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Ibuprofen. Pain killer and anti-inflammatory. It's crucial for sprains and such.

JAY ZERO SUM GAME
Oct 18, 2005

Walter.
I know you know how to do this.
Get up.




First aid is pretty much: small bandages (good ones that can handle sweat), maybe a gauze pad and small amount of tape, ibuprofen, maybe tiny tweezers, antibiotic, antiseptic wipes, unlubricated condom, moleskin.

Really, anything worse and you're gonna have to head out and you either 1) can and do or 2) can't and send help/die.

Iodine tablets, space blanket are kinda part of the basic 10 in my opinion. gently caress magnesium fire starters, just carry two lighters and cotton balls soaked in vaseline in a film canister or some other similar tiny kindling.

Don't carry some huge first aid kid from a pharmacy you'll never use it.

SplitDestiny
Sep 25, 2004


Does anyone have experience with the GoLite Wolf Creek L2? It seems like a comparable tent to the Hubba Hubba and the Half dome tent but lighter and just as capable.

I plan to mostly take my tent on climbing/backpack trips and wind tends to be a problem anywhere the climbing gets interesting...

MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

LogisticEarth posted:

Isn't that something that would be covered more through warranties and directly dealing with the manufacturer? REI does sell a lot of house brands though. I forget, do they have warranties/guarantees on their own stuff?

yes, but historically REI has handled all of that for you. and that's one thing I've always really appreciated, I'd rather have all warranty issues handled by the retailer where I bought the product since they already have a history with them a process in place for sending things back and forth. I'm terrible about mailing anything out and I'd much rather just drop by REI and let them know that the product I purchased from them has developed a leak or whatever.


Speaking of product returns. Does anybody have much experience with Patagonia? I have a down sweater jacket that is only a year and a half old, I bought it at a Patagonia store here in Portland and it's developed a hole that is leaking down. Normally I'd say, oh, my fault, I snagged it on something and just let it ride but the hole is right over where the cinch is for the waist drawcord so it's clear that just the placement of the cinch caused for too much abrasion in the fabric. It seems like it could be a design flaw that could be fixed pretty easily with just some reenforcing there or a repositioning of the cinch.

Is this something that is worth bringing in to Patagonia or am I being an rear end for thinking that's on them?

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


I would say that it never hurts to ask.

Dr. Video Games 0089
Apr 15, 2004

“Silent Blue - .random.”



Planning to backpack in Yosemite later this month. Low ranges from 45F-60F.

I need opinions on insulation.

For my torso, I have this base layer: http://www.rei.com/product/842738/rei-lightweight-polartec-power-dry-half-zip-top-mens
On top of that, I plan to wear this hiking shirt : http://www.rei.com/product/827486/columbia-silver-ridge-shirt-mens
Then I have a North Face Shell to wear over it as well.

For my legs, I have boxer briefs, thermal long johns, zip-off hiking shorts/pants, wigwam hiking socks, and trail shoes. I'll also carry a beanie and gloves if I need the extra warmth.

I pretty wore that exact set-up when I camped 3 nights at around 35F-50F plus some gloves. If you were in my position, would you invest in proper insulation clothing for the torso and legs?

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Seems plenty to me for those temperatures...maybe my legs just don't get particularly cold but I've been fine just wearing long underwear and hiking pants at night with temperatures getting down to at or below freezing. The sleeping bag you have probably makes a difference

For 45+ I probably wouldn't even wear pants, just long underwear...

e: for torso I usually wear long underwear, a shirt on top of that, and then I have a light fleece on top of that. If it' really cold, I put on another shirt. Again, your sleeping bag is probably a big factor in this. If it's a good one with a low temperature rating, then you probably don't need more. If it's a little light for those temps, it's probably cheaper to get some heavier long underwear or something rather than buy a whole new sleeping bag

Levitate fucked around with this message at 17:52 on Jun 5, 2013

Marta Velasquez
Mar 9, 2013

Good thing I was feeling suicidal this morning...


Fallen Rib

I'm just starting getting into hiking this year. After years of trying to get someone to go with me, I finally got someone (my fiancée) to go with me, but something happened recently and she can't go for medical reasons.

I live near an LL Bean. I bought a White Mountain pack, intending to carry both of our gear. I know it's not the best arrangement, but it was the condition I had to agree to get anyone to hike with.

I walk for miles all around town and have done a day trip or two along a small segment of the Appalachian trail. I've decided that I'm just going to do day trips alone. I originally was going to hike alone, but my fiancée was worried. Now that she's seen a trail, she knows that they're not as scary as she thought they were. I don't know what she was imagining.

Now that I'm not intending on carrying someone else's gear and only going on day trips for a while (although I'd like to do multi-day trip some time in the future, but I don't know when), I'm thinking about exchanging my pack for something smaller. Is that a good idea, or should I keep the pack I have? I'm not looking to go ultralight, but I don't know if I need such a large pack if I'm not bringing a lot of food, cooking supplies, a sleeping bag, etc.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.



68 litres isn't exactly getting into an extended expedition sized pack. Frankly, I'm not sure how you'd fit two people's gear in there. It will work just fine for your gear for a 1-3 night backpacking trip, though.

But for what you want to do, just get a decent day pack. You don't need to go fancy, anything with structured/padded straps that have some kind of a shape to them (not just thin rectangles hanging off the top of the pack), a hip belt, and a padded back for some support will be fine. If it's hydration bladder compatible so much the better.

You shouldn't have issue finding a pack like that for $50 $50-75 or so. I've been using a Lafuma pack that I got for like $20 at Sierra Trading Post for a decade now, and I adore the thing. I think my $20 even got me a hydration bladder.

stealie72 fucked around with this message at 17:49 on Jun 6, 2013

MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

stealie72 posted:

68 litres isn't exactly getting into an extended expedition sized pack. Frankly, I'm not sure how you'd fit two people's gear in there. It will work just fine for your gear for a 1-3 night backpacking trip, though.

But for what you want to do, just get a decent day pack. You don't need to go fancy, anything with structured/padded straps that have some kind of a shape to them (not just thin rectangles hanging off the top of the pack), a hip belt, and a padded back for some support will be fine. If it's hydration bladder compatible so much the better.

You shouldn't have issue finding a pack like that for $50 $50-75 or so. I've been using a Lafuma pack that I got for like $20 at Sierra Trading Post for a decade now, and I adore the thing. I think my $20 even got me a hydration bladder.

This ^^

I've been really happy with my Camelbak pack for daypacks, all of their cycling/mountain biking packs feel very well designed for day hikes. They have just enough room for a hydration bladder, a jacket, your sunglasses/camera, and enough food to get you through the day. The plus side is they come with a good quality 2-3L hydration pack, the down-side is they're on the spendy side.

If you don't mind looking for a sale or picking up an odd color (brighter colors always go on sale) you can get them for a reasonable price on amazon or in a shop.

I've been using an older model of this one for day hikes and biking for the past couple of years and it's served me great:
http://shop.camelbak.com/blowfish/d/1028

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2J3MaIKwwE

If you don't mind this yellow one you can pick it up for $56 on amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Camelbak-Hydr...s=camelbak+mule

MMD3 fucked around with this message at 18:56 on Jun 6, 2013

Bo_Bashy
Jul 11, 2011


Me and a buddy are planning a backpacking trip through Olympic this August. We're from Texas and have very little insight on the park. Can anyone on here suggest a 4-5 day loop that we could do? We have to end up back where we start unless you can catch rides around the park from strangers. Any information would help.

Bud Manstrong
Dec 11, 2003

The Curse of the Flying Criosphinx


Do the High Divide loop. I did it last year when the Enchantments were smoked out; the big Wenatchee fires were during our permit week. It's beautiful and there are tons of side trip opportunities. The loop itself is short, but the side trips and variety of ecosystems really make it. PM me for more details if you're interested. Watch out for goats. They'll kill you.

Marta Velasquez
Mar 9, 2013

Good thing I was feeling suicidal this morning...


Fallen Rib

stealie72 posted:

68 litres isn't exactly getting into an extended expedition sized pack. Frankly, I'm not sure how you'd fit two people's gear in there. It will work just fine for your gear for a 1-3 night backpacking trip, though.

By two people's gear, I meant as a day pack for two people with maybe some room for an extra sheet to have a picnic or something.

stealie72 posted:

You shouldn't have issue finding a pack like that for $50 $50-75 or so. I've been using a Lafuma pack that I got for like $20 at Sierra Trading Post for a decade now, and I adore the thing. I think my $20 even got me a hydration bladder.

MMD3 posted:

I've been really happy with my Camelbak pack for daypacks, all of their cycling/mountain biking packs feel very well designed for day hikes. They have just enough room for a hydration bladder, a jacket, your sunglasses/camera, and enough food to get you through the day. The plus side is they come with a good quality 2-3L hydration pack, the down-side is they're on the spendy side.
If you don't mind this yellow one you can pick it up for $56 on amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Camelbak-Hydr...s=camelbak+mule

I didn't know Camelbak was a brand of pack. I thought it was the name of the hydration system that went in to other packs.

The people at LL Bean took my bag back. I originally paid for part of the pack with a gift card, so I still have LL Bean credit after the return. It turns out that I also have an REI in the area near LL Bean, so I'm going to look there, too.

Because this is my first pack, I'd rather go to the store so I can try it on before I but it. Maybe it the future I'll buy one online. I don't mind spending $75 if I know it will last me. I'll check out what is available while keeping an eye out for what you've mentioned.

One more thing: I'd like to bring my DSLR with me on the trail. Are there any packs that are good for that? I've seen padded camera cases to put in any pack and I've seen packs that are made to only hold tons of camera equipment. I haven't seen anything in between the two extremes, so I don't think they exist.

MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

contrapants posted:

I didn't know Camelbak was a brand of pack. I thought it was the name of the hydration system that went in to other packs.

One more thing: I'd like to bring my DSLR with me on the trail. Are there any packs that are good for that? I've seen padded camera cases to put in any pack and I've seen packs that are made to only hold tons of camera equipment. I haven't seen anything in between the two extremes, so I don't think they exist.

They originally just made the hydration bladders but have since started making a large line of packs in various sizes for holding their system. The running ones are super minimal and don't hold a ton of water or gear but they've got enough room for like a few energy bars and your keys or whatever, the cycling ones are what I tend to feel are the right size for light hike day packs.

I've been backpacking with my dslr for several years now and I think the best way to do it is just to buy a camera wrap like this http://www.amazon.com/camera-photo/dp/B00009R88F and maybe a few extra for lenses if you carry more than one lens. Then I just make sure I have my dslr at the top of the pack and I don't set my pack down hard when I'm stopping for a break. Lowe Pro makes some good packs that you could feasibly use for backpacking but I think you'll be better served just buying something more specific to hiking and then wrap your camera in something protective to keep it from banging around.

Marta Velasquez
Mar 9, 2013

Good thing I was feeling suicidal this morning...


Fallen Rib

MMD3 posted:

I've been backpacking with my dslr for several years now and I think the best way to do it is just to buy a camera wrap like this http://www.amazon.com/camera-photo/dp/B00009R88F and maybe a few extra for lenses if you carry more than one lens. Then I just make sure I have my dslr at the top of the pack and I don't set my pack down hard when I'm stopping for a break. Lowe Pro makes some good packs that you could feasibly use for backpacking but I think you'll be better served just buying something more specific to hiking and then wrap your camera in something protective to keep it from banging around.

I noticed the Lowepro packs. They seem like they'd be great for a professional photographer. That is not me.

I figured that protecting the camera and putting it at the top of my pack was going to be the best method. All the padding camera cases I found were camera-specific, though, and only for the kit lens. That generic protectic wrap is exactly what I was looking for. I was searching for "camera case" and "camera bag." I didn't think to search for a more general term.


Thanks, everyone!

spf3million
Sep 27, 2007

hit 'em with the rhythm

Those camera wraps look pretty legit. I've always wanted to try one of these as well.

MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

Saint Fu posted:

Those camera wraps look pretty legit. I've always wanted to try one of these as well.

Interesting idea but I'm not sure how much I'd want my ~3.5lb camera body + lens strapped to a single shoulder strap for any extended period of time. Might be good for around town but seems like it'd be pretty cumbersome for backpacking.

spf3million
Sep 27, 2007

hit 'em with the rhythm

It might work better for smaller Rebel sized cameras. A 5D and a 70-200 would certainly be awkward.

I struggle with how to carry my gear while hiking as well. I typically just end up putting it in the pack on the top for easier access, never had any damage issues.

MMD3
May 16, 2006

Montmartre -> Portland

Saint Fu posted:

It might work better for smaller Rebel sized cameras. A 5D and a 70-200 would certainly be awkward.

I struggle with how to carry my gear while hiking as well. I typically just end up putting it in the pack on the top for easier access, never had any damage issues.

Yeah, I have a 5D MkII and typically carry my 16-35 on hikes for landscape stuff. Pretty bulky and heavy for keeping out for long.

spf3million
Sep 27, 2007

hit 'em with the rhythm

That being said, I do like the idea of it being out all the time for easy access. Such a pain to unstrap, put the bag down, open the zipper, take out the camera, etc. etc.

Plus it looks like it would be secured pretty well with the proplate thingy so wouldn't bounce around much. Might be uncomfortable because the weight would be uneven though.

Marta Velasquez
Mar 9, 2013

Good thing I was feeling suicidal this morning...


Fallen Rib

Saint Fu posted:

It might work better for smaller Rebel sized cameras. A 5D and a 70-200 would certainly be awkward.

I have a Rebel XSi, but I tend to keep a telephoto lens on it for bird photography. I think I'd still prefer to stop and take it out of my pack than risk a banging my exposed camera into something.

The example scenarios on the site are great. They would be excellent for sports photography and times where you'd need to switch cameras quickly. Too many in addition to wearing a pack and you'd end up looking like you were drawn by Rob Liefeld, though.

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Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




I couldn't imagine going anywhere without my D7000. My weight priorities are: 1. Water 2. Food 3.Camera 4. Everything else.

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