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Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


I'm just kind of trying to decide if I'd want/like a longer pad or not. Still leaning towards the regular size, it just means not much extra head to toe room. On the other hand, I usually only use all of that when I'm on my back which isn't my preferred sleeping position.

On the other, other hand we're about to have our first kid so I have no idea what my backpacking schedule will look like next year...kinda wish I had squeezed in another trip this fall but that's tough to do with all the other prep stuff that has to be done, etc

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Tigren
Oct 3, 2003


Levitate posted:

I'm just kind of trying to decide if I'd want/like a longer pad or not. Still leaning towards the regular size, it just means not much extra head to toe room. On the other hand, I usually only use all of that when I'm on my back which isn't my preferred sleeping position.

On the other, other hand we're about to have our first kid so I have no idea what my backpacking schedule will look like next year...kinda wish I had squeezed in another trip this fall but that's tough to do with all the other prep stuff that has to be done, etc

My feeling is to always err on the side of comfort when it comes to sleep. If I'm not well rested, the next day of hiking is miserable and I don't enjoy it as much. An extra 4 ounces on my back is worth having a better time.

Ihmemies
Oct 6, 2012



Tigren posted:

My feeling is to always err on the side of comfort when it comes to sleep. If I'm not well rested, the next day of hiking is miserable and I don't enjoy it as much. An extra 4 ounces on my back is worth having a better time.

Definitely. On the longer trips you get used to whatever because you're just so drat tired, but the first nights are bad when you wake aching every hour. You can migitate that somewhat by trying to find a soft campsite, but good pads are just so much easier.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


I went on a short dayhike yesterday with my wife, dog and friend. We tried to go somewhere new other than the I90 and 2 corridors out of Seattle which are always busy on weekends. This was an awesome hike with an incredible payoff and 2 other people on the trail.

From the peak you could see Mt Baker (150 miles away), Glacier Peak, Mt Stewart, Mt Rainier and the Olympics. Rainier seemed so goddam loving huge that the photos don't do it justice. Absolutely perfect day and crazy to see snow so early and so low.







Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Verman posted:

Rainier seemed so goddam loving huge that the photos don't do it justice.

If you're ever in Tacoma get a view of it from the waterfront. From sea level it just looms over the city.

Rime
Nov 2, 2011



I grew up in the Canadian Rockies and Ranier is loving huge.

Guest2553
Aug 3, 2012


I just went to Ranier this weekend! It was loving rad even though I only went like five miles. The group I was with wasn't ready or equipped to deal with the snow, but I just wanted to go outside and wasn't disappointed. It totes reaffirms that buying a buttload of cold weather gear was A Good Decision.

Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




Rime posted:

I grew up in the Canadian Rockies and Ranier is loving huge.

I spend all my time in the Canadian Rockies and I saw Rainier from a plane once and yes, it is goddamn huge. It's prominence is 13,211'. Which significantly beats Mt. Robson with a prominence of 9281'. And Robson blows my mind every time I'm standing at it's base. The only thing that makes me think Robson is super badass is that it's prominence is basically all cliffbands. So when you're standing at it's base, you're looking practically straight up.

Picnic Princess fucked around with this message at 06:49 on Oct 24, 2016

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



I picked up a pair of trekking poles yesterday, then did about 6 miles of hilly terrain in SE Michigan. They were really nice, and a fair bit of the hike was near or after dark, so the stability was helpful.

I can't believe I was so disdainful of these things for so long.

Electoral Surgery
Mar 19, 2010


What type of batteries are good in cold weather? Can I find that type in AAA format or will I have to switch to a headlamp that uses some weird battery shape?

I'll mostly be using them for night climbing and hiking.

bonds0097
Oct 23, 2010

I would cry but I don't think I can spare the moisture.

Pillbug

Anyone ever done an IWLS course and have an opinion of them? Thinking of signing up for the 20 day course in Argentina in January in hopes of getting some relevant skills I can apply to future summiting adventures.

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


Electoral Surgery posted:

What type of batteries are good in cold weather? Can I find that type in AAA format or will I have to switch to a headlamp that uses some weird battery shape?

I'll mostly be using them for night climbing and hiking.

I think the most important thing is trying to keep them warm. Sleep with them in your bag with you, carry them next to your body, etc. Lithium batteries are supposedly better performing in cold weather.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



If you leave them out, just stick them in your armpit for ten minutes before you put them in your headlamp. It's cold, but it works.

n8r
Jul 3, 2003

I helped Lowtax become a cyborg and all I got was this lousy avatar

a foolish pianist posted:

If you leave them out, just stick them in your armpit for ten minutes before you put them in your headlamp. It's cold, but it works.

Just plug em for a bit. With practice you can get 4-5 up there at once.

Pryor on Fire
May 14, 2013


The only thing that cold does to lithium batteries is make them more efficient, it's not 1972 anymore don't think about it too much

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


Watching a movie called "backcountry" right before going to bed.

It's a lovely horror/suspense movie on showtime. Not a great movie, bad acting, hot female lead, lots of terrible avoidable mistakes but it taps into one of my worst fears ... bears. It really captures the anxiety of hearing every little stick break through the night and there's a scene of a bear pushing his face against the tent wall while they sleep that freaked me out more than the mauling.

The other thing was that they had 45-50l packs but had bacon, potatoes, a coffee pot, an axe, frying pan, champagne, beer etc with a fairly large tent but the dude can't bring a map.

I think I was more angry through the movie than anything. I had a running list of mistakes going through my head that drove me crazy and distracted me.

No map or compass
Going off trail
Bringing an inexperienced person too deep on their first trip
Not bringing enough food
Poor food hanging
Not turning back after an injury
Getting confrontational with strangers on the trail
Hanging bloody clothing near your camp site
Pushing through without knowing where you're going
Not retracing your steps the moment you realize you're lost
Running from a bear
Investigating bad smells in the woods
Hiding in your tent during a bear encounter
Ignoring the suggestion of the Rangers per closed areas
And the list goes on

Cheesemaster200
Feb 11, 2004

Guard of the Citadel

Going to be in the vicinity of Great Smokey Mountain NP next weekend for work and I am considering spending a night or two car camping there and doing some day hiking. Anyone know how crowded the first come first serve campgrounds are going to be in the middle of November? Will I have a hard time getting a site?

Also, what would be a good day hike that time of year? I will be by myself, which is why I am not backpacking, so I don't want to go some place too off the beaten path (e.g. if I break my ankle, someone would be along within a reasonable amount of time).

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Looks like I am going on an overnight biking trip this weekend as I cannot convince my friends that just hiking is better. We are only doing like 20m a day but I am very worried about my rear end and balls. My friends claim I will be fine but I am still worried. Other then walking around in a cloud if Gold Bond, what else can I do?

StarkingBarfish
Jun 25, 2006

Novus Ordo Seclorum


chamois cream is what you want. It's available in most high-ish end bike shops.

charliebravo77
Jun 11, 2003



20 miles is like an hour and a half or two of riding at a fairly slow pace (unless you're talking MTB with lots of terrain). The need for chamois cream is pretty butt/bib/shorts specific, I've done 100 miles and haven't needed anything for chafing. Sore sit bones are another story though. Balls shouldn't hurt with proper bike fit and rear end/sit bones shouldn't be too bad after an hour and a half in the saddle even if you haven't ridden much before.

charliebravo77 fucked around with this message at 14:49 on Nov 3, 2016

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

OK, I was wrong about 20 miles apparently it's 35 to 40 a day which they promised will not break me. I'm very suspicious of any hobby so I have to lube my rear end up for beforehand so we shall see how it goes I guess.

I am a little excited at the idea of being able to carry so much more weight.

khysanth
Jun 9, 2009

Still love you, Homar



Yea your sit bones are going to hurt for a few days. The pain will sort of numb away but can be really bad at the start of the 2nd or 3rd day when you first hop in the saddle.

Crazyeyes
Nov 5, 2009

If I were human, I believe my response would be: 'go to hell'.


Ibuprofen, my friend. Be sure to eat something with it though, as it can be harsh on an empty stomach.

theroachman
Sep 1, 2006

You're never fully dressed without a smile...

I was looking at 2p tents today as I'm thinking about doing a few solo overnighters this winter and I don't own a tent yet.

Of the brands that are available to me here in Belgium, MSR stood out as the one with the best price/weight ratio. Especially the Hubba Hubba and the FreeLite 2 as they're both under 2kg and under 500€, including footprint. Sounds almost too good to be true, compared to the other brands I've checked out. How is their quality?

I've had Hilleberg recommended to me as a good brand but they're heavier, super expensive (upwards of 800€) and have a tunnel design which is awkward to get inside.

Other brands I've seen in passing are Fjallraven, Vaude and The North Face.

Atticus_1354
Dec 9, 2006

Don't you go near that dog, you understand? Don't go near him, he's just as dangerous dead as alive.


bongwizzard posted:

OK, I was wrong about 20 miles apparently it's 35 to 40 a day which they promised will not break me. I'm very suspicious of any hobby so I have to lube my rear end up for beforehand so we shall see how it goes I guess.

I am a little excited at the idea of being able to carry so much more weight.

The big one is to make sure the bike and seat fit you. Are you borrowing a bike? It would be worth it to take yourself and the bike to a bike shop where they can fit you all together.

Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




Verman posted:

Watching a movie called "backcountry" right before going to bed.

It's a lovely horror/suspense movie on showtime. Not a great movie, bad acting, hot female lead, lots of terrible avoidable mistakes but it taps into one of my worst fears ... bears. It really captures the anxiety of hearing every little stick break through the night and there's a scene of a bear pushing his face against the tent wall while they sleep that freaked me out more than the mauling.

The other thing was that they had 45-50l packs but had bacon, potatoes, a coffee pot, an axe, frying pan, champagne, beer etc with a fairly large tent but the dude can't bring a map.

I think I was more angry through the movie than anything. I had a running list of mistakes going through my head that drove me crazy and distracted me.

No map or compass
Going off trail
Bringing an inexperienced person too deep on their first trip
Not bringing enough food
Poor food hanging
Not turning back after an injury
Getting confrontational with strangers on the trail
Hanging bloody clothing near your camp site
Pushing through without knowing where you're going
Not retracing your steps the moment you realize you're lost
Running from a bear
Investigating bad smells in the woods
Hiding in your tent during a bear encounter
Ignoring the suggestion of the Rangers per closed areas
And the list goes on

I watched Grizzly Man a couple days before going backpacking in the Rockies and a bear approached our tent in the middle of the night. That was an intense experience.

That movie sounds like a good one for students in my program to watch.

"If you do any of the following, you should probably just transfer out. Go into sport and rec management or something, I don't know. But you don't belong here."

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


Picnic Princess posted:

I watched Grizzly Man a couple days before going backpacking in the Rockies and a bear approached our tent in the middle of the night. That was an intense experience.

That movie sounds like a good one for students in my program to watch.

"If you do any of the following, you should probably just transfer out. Go into sport and rec management or something, I don't know. But you don't belong here."

That's actually a really good idea. Have them watch the movie and take notes of mistakes and things that catch their attention. I could see it being useful to a wilderness/survival class.

All said it's beautifully shot, maybe not Wild level cinematography but it got me to finish it and I've certainly seen worse. I'm a bit biased towards outdoor films so I'll pretty much watch anything related to hiking, camping, survival etc.

Freaquency
May 10, 2007

"Yes I can hear you, I don't have ear cancer!"

theroachman posted:

I was looking at 2p tents today as I'm thinking about doing a few solo overnighters this winter and I don't own a tent yet.

Of the brands that are available to me here in Belgium, MSR stood out as the one with the best price/weight ratio. Especially the Hubba Hubba and the FreeLite 2 as they're both under 2kg and under 500€, including footprint. Sounds almost too good to be true, compared to the other brands I've checked out. How is their quality?

I've had Hilleberg recommended to me as a good brand but they're heavier, super expensive (upwards of 800€) and have a tunnel design which is awkward to get inside.

Other brands I've seen in passing are Fjallraven, Vaude and The North Face.

I own the MSR Hubba Hubba and it's really solidly built, easy to carry, and easy to put up. I'm 6'3" and just barely fit with maybe 8 inches of space at my feet for storage. It fits 2 sleeping pads+bags side by side, but it's pretty tight so make sure you like the person with you if you're not going solo. Mine has only seen two seasons worth of moderate backpacking, but it seems like it'll hold up - no cuts in the nylon, broken straps, or anything like that.

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Atticus_1354 posted:

The big one is to make sure the bike and seat fit you. Are you borrowing a bike? It would be worth it to take yourself and the bike to a bike shop where they can fit you all together.

I am renting one so I hope to have it fit properly. It's only an overnight in any case. It seems crazy to go 70 miles in two days though, I hope we have some time to fart around a bit.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


You'll be fine. My guess is that you'll only be riding 2-3 hours per day.

Day 2 will suck because your butt will be sore from day 1.

But really, that's not a lot of mileage on a bike. And you can coast.

Alan_Shore
Dec 2, 2004



Oh man, I love Grizzly Man! An amazing film. The incredible thing is that despite being crazy and doing things you just do NOT do, he wasnt killed by one of "his' bears, and maybe if he hadn't been forced to stay longer he'd still be living it up with his bear family (2% chance of this happening).

Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




If I was looking into backpacking for 10 days in Oregon, Idaho, or Wyoming at the end of August, where would I want to go?

jamal
Apr 15, 2003

I'll set the building on fire

Picnic Princess posted:

Oregon, Idaho, or Wyoming

Don't know, Frank Church, Tetons, seem like the obvious answers.

Rodenthar Drothman
May 14, 2013

I think I will continue
watching this twilight world
as long as time flows.

jamal posted:

Don't know, Frank Church, Tetons, seem like the obvious answers.

Is there 10 days of backpacking in the tetons? There might be in the mountains south, but I'm not sure.

Time Cowboy
Nov 4, 2007

But Tarzan... The strangest thing has happened! I'm as bare... as the day I was born!

I haven't been to that region in almost twenty years, but my dream trips would probably be Wallowas/Eagle Cap in OR, Frank Church in ID, Wind River Range in WY.

George H.W. Cunt
Oct 6, 2010



Yellowstone and Grand Tetons sounds like a fun time

Feedbacker
Nov 20, 2004



Picnic Princess posted:

If I was looking into backpacking for 10 days in Oregon, Idaho, or Wyoming at the end of August, where would I want to go?

In Wyoming, the Wind River Range.

Officer Sandvich
Feb 14, 2010


Picnic Princess posted:

If I was looking into backpacking for 10 days in Oregon, Idaho, or Wyoming at the end of August, where would I want to go?

Washington State

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Officer Sandvich posted:

Washington State

Yeah, you could do something like the Wonderland or PCT Section J + 3 days of something else or any other number if ridiculous Washington backpacks that will blow away nearly anything else.

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Mokelumne Trekka
Nov 22, 2015

Soon.


I've been living in CA for 5 years and thoroughly hiked here. Also been to UT, CO, AZ, and OR.

But damnit, still no Washington. I want to go there on a long break (specifically Thanksgiving) but I hear Mt. Rainer and such are hard to hike during Nov-Mar. is it feasible? I've had moderate experience hiking in snowy conditions but it sounds dangerous up there this time of year, plus inaccessible roads. etc.

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