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PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.


I'm looking for a flat, zero-drop, no arch support winter boot for the cold, rain, maybe light snow.

I have some minimuses which I love, but I need something a bit more suited to cold weather.

I get that he sole of these theoretical boots will be thicker since it's made to insulate, I'm more just looking for no support and no drop.

PRADA SLUT fucked around with this message at 16:09 on Dec 7, 2016

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Alan_Shore
Dec 2, 2004



They caught the two people responsible for the fires:

http://wkrg.com/2016/12/07/two-juveniles-arrested-for-smoky-mountain-wildfire/

It'll be interesting to see what comes out of this. They might even be charged as adults.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


For anyone wanting an awesome light stove, the msr pocket rocket is on amazon for $20 right now. That's 50% off is regular price of $40.

Vivian Darkbloom
Jul 14, 2004



Verman posted:

For anyone wanting an awesome light stove, the msr pocket rocket is on amazon for $20 right now. That's 50% off is regular price of $40.

How well does it work with no windscreen? I have a Snow Peak one with an optional windscreen that's really mandatory in the mountains.

Terrifying Effigies
Oct 22, 2008

Problems look mighty small from 150 miles up.



bongwizzard posted:

So, is there like a good online resource for looking up trails and such? I would like to plan a few 3-4 night trips in the coming year but I am fussy and would love to be able to like sort a list by "mostly follows a river" or something. I live in the mid atlantic and the part of the AT around here I have seen are not super interesting to me and other than just clicking around google maps looking for parks, then searching for trail maps, I haven't found a really good way to find new places.

Depends on what part of the mid-Atlantic you're looking into, but as far as websites go:

PA: http://www.pahikes.com/
- Good PA hikes with a number of overnight options

VA/MD/WV/NC: http://www.hikingupward.com/
- Mostly VA and NC focused, includes a really great Google Map with filters to search on streams, views, camp sites, etc

PA/MD/VA/WV: http://www.midatlantichikes.com/
- The guy who runs it has entries for pretty much *every* trail in the states listed, but the site interface hasn't been updated since 2005.

You might also want to check out your local AT Chapter as they usually put out material on other trails in the area.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


Vivian Darkbloom posted:

How well does it work with no windscreen? I have a Snow Peak one with an optional windscreen that's really mandatory in the mountains.

Personally I've never had enough of an issue with wind but I don't tend to make camp in crazy windy places. I would assume like any other stove that a wind screen would help in those conditions.

Natty Ninefingers
Feb 17, 2011


Does anyone have a recommendation for a pair of boots with a budget of 155? I do hike, but the heaviest usage they'll see is all weather five mile walks to work. Long term durability and waterproof important, but weight less so than usual. Right now I can keep or return a pair of merrell Moab fst waterproofs. They seem good, but I just wish they went a little further up the ankle, two laces rather than one. Any thoughts or suggestions?

gohuskies
Oct 23, 2010

I spend a lot of time making posts to justify why I'm not a self centered shithead that just wants to act like COVID isn't a thing.

Natty Ninefingers posted:

Does anyone have a recommendation for a pair of boots with a budget of 155? I do hike, but the heaviest usage they'll see is all weather five mile walks to work. Long term durability and waterproof important, but weight less so than usual. Right now I can keep or return a pair of merrell Moab fst waterproofs. They seem good, but I just wish they went a little further up the ankle, two laces rather than one. Any thoughts or suggestions?

Salomon Quest 4D is one of the most commonly recommended "general" hiking boots. I liked mine but I have shifted to either wearing trail runners or full blown mountaineering boots depending on whether it's a tough snowy objective or not.

PhantomOfTheCopier
Aug 13, 2008

Pikabooze!


Does anyone else find that there are very few people in the world who have the "stamina" to be hikers? It obviously takes a while to collect data, because hiking is a "slow process", but I can't seem to find a hiking buddy that can manage more than a season or part of it.

My current buddy has probably done 50mi this year, but only 8mi with me and I wanted to use the improved weather to get him back to snowshoeing, but he went up to Baker and broke a rib instead. Last year when he was starting, I recommend building slowly, alternating distance and elevation hikes... and he did a few 15 milers then was at the doctors for RSI, knee injury, ankle issues (because he was convinced trail runners were the best choice).

Previous buddies... Yoga destroyed knee, can't manage 5mi. Wants 1mi with awesome pictures of peaks. "Class 3 looks about right, anyplace we can basically drive to that's like 20min from the parking lot?"

Yeah I'm being purposefully cruel, and placing some blame on people for accidents. Yes I try to help them start slow, mix views wth exercise. Shrug.

Also, hello again thread! Just caught up. Been too busy with stuff. Trying to get to 300mi this year, and it's gonna be close. Currently at 285mi, with 115kft ascent.

Stanley Goodspeed
Dec 26, 2005
What, the feet thing?


Maybe join a Meetup group or troll your local REI or REI analog for hikes that are your style. If you meet anyone who isn't a turd and can keep up then see if they want to do it again but this time with you!

Otherwise yeah you need to tailor the trips to whoever sucks the most in your group. If that makes the trip lovely or impossible, get rid of them and (for that trip / forever) run the numbers again. Good luck finding like minded and ability folks!

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

Currenty laying in bed trying to decide now early to kick our guest room door open to go wake up my hiking buddy, who may be feeling the first hints of a hangover. Every time we decide to have a little sleepover to get an early start this happens.

The plan today is only 6-10 miles, but its gonna start in the 60's and drop into the 40's, with rain the entire time. Gonna be fun!

Flambeau
Aug 5, 2015


Plaster Town Cop

Was really looking forward to getting some hiking in with my brother over Christmas break, but with schedule changes I dont think we'll be able to get out. Hell, I dont think I'll even be able to go anywhere by myself for like 3 weeks.

Guest2553
Aug 3, 2012


PhantomOfTheCopier posted:

Does anyone else find that there are very few people in the world who have the "stamina" to be hikers?

Anecdotal, but relevant cross-post:

Guest2553 posted:

It's me, I'm the idiot with the wrong gear. I did the military route of the Vierdaagse Nijmegen with all the associated garbage military gear that goes along with it. Impermeable leather boots with waffle insoles? Check. A rucksack that can't be adjusted to sit straight and would always put most of its weight on one shoulder? Check. Heavy uniform that doesn't breathe and collects enough sweat to built a salt lick? Check. Part of a team of 11 people that has to stick together, each with their own different strides and pacing? Aw yeah, son. All to march a distance about equal to a marathon over cobblestone for four straight days, not including the 500+ miles of endurance training in the 10 weeks leading up to the march itself.

I was fortunate in that I'm built for endurance hikes because that poo poo broke a lot of people, now that I think about it. Multiple stress fractures in metatarsals, skin sloughing and/or toenails popping off when socks were removed, open sores forming on hot spots on feet/back/thighs etc. One dude chafed so bad he had to walk bow legged and the entire crotch of his combats was a blossom of blood, but god bless him he powered through every day and finished it. The worst I got was some foot fungus after a flip flop broke on the way to the living petri dish of a shower they had at the camp. Oh well.

I liked it so much I did it twice

PhantomOfTheCopier
Aug 13, 2008

Pikabooze!


tldr: Mere Bloviation.

Guest2553 posted:

Anecdotal, but relevant cross-post:
Haha, a thing of beauty.

"Man's got to know his limitations", says Dirty Harry, and in hiking everyone has them. Speed differences amongst hikers must be significant before leading to buddy problems, because every hike will invariably come with variations; there are days where you're tired and slow, others where you're energized but methodical, and some where you throw fury to the wind along with the attempt to outrun it. Such daily differences are unlikely to matter if average paces are close enough to permit something akin to a coordinated arrival.

What appears to matter more is "the definition of hiking". I've tried to find words to quickly describe what it is I do, but it seems that there's no way to comprehend "advanced hiker" if one doesn't even understand "hiking". When I say "marathon hiker", people usually start to grasp why my preparation for a Saturday morning starts with food I eat Thursday night and why I don't go drinking Friday night. When they discover that I carry spikes and snowshoes, they start to see that hiking might be more than walking a gravel path in a city park for thirty minutes and gaining five feet of elevation. When they learn that most of my hikes start a few minutes before dawn, then they feel silly for asking to go with me.

This weekend is a good example of why I even bother the search. I had no inspiration, but had a buddy existed, accountability for a quick five miles would have kicked in. I try to choose places that are extendable with buddies, so we can get up there and realize we want to keep going.

I checked MeetUp a couple months ago and found no calendar entries for the hiking groups. Everyone has given up for the year because they imagine the Seattle grey sky means they won't be able to win the contest for "best picture of Rainier taken from a poor trail that is overused". Perhaps this is one of the reasons I generally have not taken pictures, to avoid giving people a false impression of hiking reality... that the views are always great, but it's not a matter of going to a particular spot to be rewarded with a particular view, it's a matter of immersing oneself in an environment that is saturated with things to see. (I did start taking pictures on September, more on this some other time.)

I'm happy to see people in city parks, to see that trails closer to town represent well spent money on maintenance and upkeep needed from heavy use. On days where I'm lazy, I will pass some of those users on my way back.

On the other hand, perhaps hiking has been good training for the lack of hiking buddies. Over 250mi this year were solo, and I usually don't see anyone except near the end of my hikes. In my snowshoeing so far this year, there have been no tracks, no signs of recent hikers. I have done short 4mi hikes, double summits, even a few triples, gone farther than planned, had two days with unplanned second hikes , given up and turned around early. I have found new trails, abandoned paths, ongoing construction. I have glanced downward knowing that I'll pass people on their way up, but they never appear. I have passed those starting their 3mi RT and smiled secretly as I finish my 14th mile. I have seen full parking lots, but have greeted Lone Rock twice (2/14 and 11/24 ). I have looked down the 300ft dropoffs and known that my body would never be found, I have greeted slugs and birds and snakes drinking from streams that disappear with the crowds, and I have stood in places deserted for days or weeks and seen the perfect alignment of clouds and fog to make a perfect picture for a calendar and just closed my eyes and committed the view to memory.

I am a hiker. As the mountains remain, so also shall I be there.

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


I think pretty much anyone can be a hiker and it doesn't take much special endurance or anything, but people are just super bad at taking care of themselves and knowing their limits or building their limits. Packing a 60+ lb pack and then saying "oh I have bad knees that's just my lot in life" when if you knocked 20 lbs off you'd probably be fine. Not taking care of their feet, etc...I see a lot of people with those issues that would be easy to fix and then sure maybe they're not going to be putting in 30 mile days but they'd be just fine doing some solid backpacking

Being able to hike long distances just means you got in shape for it and you have the right gear IMO

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



I didn't realize John Muir was still alive. I have usually used coordination with other people as an excuse to not go hiking. Thanks for the reminder that my feet will still move without a second set at my side.

Re: Hiking partners, I'd rather have somebody with a slow steady pace than someone who talks too much to be immersed in the surroundings. Even to the point of only being able to go six miles before setting up camp again.

CopperHound fucked around with this message at 18:04 on Dec 18, 2016

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENIÈRE IN ME


I'd probably do more backpacking if I was single...even though my wife likes backpacking it's just tougher to squeeze in everything with all the other stuff going on. We do try to go hiking nearby though.

I'd be perfectly happy to go backpacking by myself but doesn't really work out that way now

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


Same here. If I was single I would probably backpack more often, or maybe even if she enjoyed backpacking. Luckily I still get out enough and she comes on day hikes with me every few weeks.

Making friends as adults can be difficult. I'm infinitely more picky with who I choose to spend my time with now and have a hard time tolerating someone I can't stand. Hiking is one of my favorite past times so spending it with lovely people isn't my cup of tea. After living in Seattle for a year and a half now, I have maybe 5-6 people that I would hike with on a normal basis, all met through different channels. My wife, a hockey teammate, one if his coworkers, a husband of my wife's coworker, two friends who recently moved here ...

For me, hiking is tricky for a first time hangout. It's physically demanding, can cause stress with finding your way, requires teamwork and you need to rely on one another if something happens. I like to know the people im with at least a little bit before going out into the woods with them. Do they litter? Do they want to talk the whole time? Do they panic easily/how do they handle stress? Are they annoying? Can you trust them? Are they reliable/on time? Do they have any experience? I think I would meet up with someone in town first and have some drinks to get to know them first.

Not as important if you're going through tame areas but I like to really get out and if we run into an elk or a bear, I would like to know that this person won't run or freak out and get us killed.

On the lesser side of things my wife's coworker came with us once, talked about work the whole time and started playing music on her phones speaker when things got quiet.

Just give it time, try to branch out and look up things like the mountaineers, meet up, etc to see if you can find other like minded people to hike with. It will happen eventually.

Verman fucked around with this message at 00:34 on Dec 19, 2016

PhantomOfTheCopier
Aug 13, 2008

Pikabooze!


Thanks for the positive feedback and suggestions. It's certainly more productive than the thrashing I've come to expect on SA.

I push hard when I'm hiking alone, but relax a great deal and lower my expectations with others. Which means "let them lead and I'll just be able to coast". That seems enough to get started. Everything else is about making sure they don't topple the mountain down on you, and that the bears only find them tasty.

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

I like to get a good buzz on and wander around the woods to look at interesting stuff, maybe catch a fish, maybe pet a doggie if I meet one.

Today I was all psyched for rain hike but to my disappointment, it was like 60 and party sunny all day. We did about 8 miles, I got to pet three doggies. We got back to the car with maybe two hours of sunlight left and I was pretty psyched to be able to fish the reservoir we were parked next to for a little bit. Literally 10 minutes into the fishing the storm front that was scheduled for the morning decided to blow in and the temp dropped about 15° and the wind swept up around 20 mph.

I only got one bass, but I got it right off this great weed line I had spotted on the hike in and spent all day talking about how excited I was to fish that we line, then Bam three casts in I got a nice little 2 pound bass. It's highly pleasing to be able to look at a spot and just loving know that there's a fish holding there.

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


I'm the same way with bird hunting. Sometimes I'll drive by an area and think "man of only I had Stanley (my bird dog) with me and free time to hunt it"

A few years back while grouse hunting in the upper peninsula of Michigan, I found myself about a mile deep off the two track and into a quiet wooded area with a good deal of low feed and cover. It just felt perfect. I walked in and put up a bird every 20 feet or so. There were so many birds our dog had never been on that many at one time. He didn't know which one to follow and they just kept coming.

Verman fucked around with this message at 01:34 on Dec 19, 2016

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Verman posted:

I'm the same way with bird hunting. Sometimes I'll drive by an area and think "man of only I had Stanley (my bird dog) with me and free time to hunt it"

A few years back while grouse hunting in the upper peninsula of Michigan, I found myself about a mile deep off the two track and into a quiet wooded area with a good deal of low feed and cover. It just felt perfect. I walked in and put up a bird every 20 feet or so. There were so many birds our dog had never been on that many at one time. He didn't know which one to follow and they just kept coming.

You should really tell me where this is so I can bring my dog and verify your claims....

Verman
Jul 4, 2005
Third time is a charm right?


Yooper posted:

You should really tell me where this is so I can bring my dog and verify your claims....

I'll pm you. Hopefully it hasn't been clear cut. The last time I was up there (2 years ago) they had marked so much of that area to be forested. The very tree my step dad had his game camera on was spray painted for removal.

I'm not sure if that spot will even be there anymore.

Also be careful, we saw some spruce grouse in that area which are protected in michigan. In the thick stuff is really hard to distinguish spruce from the others at a split second. I saw a dead spruce grouse carcass (assuming wolves at the time) when I was driving through the Baraga plains. The only thing left was the head (red eye) some feet, a wing, the gizzard? full of pine needles and a pile of feathers. And a lot of large dog tracks.

Instead of payment I will gladly accept a photo of said dog.

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Verman posted:

Instead of payment I will gladly accept a photo of said dog.

Thanks! I've hunted pretty drat close to that spot before.



Only one of those dogs hunts, but he won't sit still unless we have a treat and there's no way the fat one can let a treat opportunity pass.

Electoral Surgery
Mar 19, 2010


Alan_Shore posted:

I just calculated my gear weight, and it's incredible what stupid money will get you: backpack, stuff sacks, hammock and underquilt = 2.6KG. I'm probably gonna get the Enlightened Equipment Revelation sleeping bag, so altogether that's 3.2KG. That's so light! Ultralite is the way to go for sure.

if you're going to sell your fancy ultralight gear in America instead of fly it home when you finish/give up, post it here.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



bongwizzard posted:

I like to get a good buzz on and wander around the woods to look at interesting stuff, maybe catch a fish, maybe pet a doggie if I meet one.

You have articulated my life motto in the most compact way possible. I'm probably going to get this tattooed around my bicep.

PhantomOfTheCopier
Aug 13, 2008

Pikabooze!


Hiking and backpacking: Stoners petting fuzzy outdoor creatures.

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

PhantomOfTheCopier posted:

Hiking and backpacking: Stoners petting fuzzy outdoor creatures.

Seems legit.

Picnic Princess
Feb 9, 2008

I was under direct orders not to die




Yikes, one of my good friends was scrambling an easy summit here when he and his 2 buddies triggered an avalanche. They were really lucky and stayed on the surface but slid over some small cliff bands. They also had SPOT so were able to call for help. He has his AST level 1 just like me, but accidents do still happen. I'm just glad he's okay.

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

I bought a pair of Lowa backpacking boots and I cant seem to get them to be comfortable. With the stock insoles the bottoms of my feet feel like they were spanked with a ruler after like 6-8 miles. For most of my other shoes I use blue or black Superfeet insoles but neither of them seemed to be much better. I love the boots otherwise and other then the bottoms of my feet, they are super comfortable and my ankles, shins, and knees have never felt better. Anyone have an insole that like, maybe something with a bit of padding?

Stanley Goodspeed
Dec 26, 2005
What, the feet thing?


Really not sure about the durability of them but those Dr Scholl's gel inserts made my heavy, garbage Army boots pretty comfortable back in the day so they might help your situation?

PhantomOfTheCopier
Aug 13, 2008

Pikabooze!


Return them.

Adding insoles changes the fit of the foot in the box, and then you end up scraping off the top of your feet instead.

That said, I'm convinced no boot will ever work without modification and adjustment. Definitely try some drug store cheepos, because they may just work.

When I got my new booties, my feet were sliding around until I remembered to transfer the heel lifts. I just have some heel cushions but they're enough for my foot to lock into the boot. I still tape in places, but taping the entire bottom of your foot is not right.


vvv I have some solid rubber heel inserts, they have little holes presumably to let air through, but they aren't gel. They feel a little bit weird because your heel is elevated slightly, but they push my foot up enough so that I can lock it in place tying across the top of my foot. You should be able to mostly keep your foot stationary without using the lacing on the upper/above ankle part, though of course that helps on steep uphills. I'll try to remember to check for a label later.

PhantomOfTheCopier fucked around with this message at 00:03 on Dec 22, 2016

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






I have some great new Salomons, but my heel slips in them. I'm gonna try some different socks this week before I go on a backpacking trip next weekend, but do you think heel lifts would help? I've never tried them.

bongwizzard
May 19, 2005

Then one day I meet a man,
He came to me and said,
"Hard work good and hard work fine,
but first take care of head"

Grimey Drawer

PhantomOfTheCopier posted:

Return them.

Adding insoles changes the fit of the foot in the box, and then you end up scraping off the top of your feet instead.

That said, I'm convinced no boot will ever work without modification and adjustment. Definitely try some drug store cheepos, because they may just work.


Eh, I use insoles in most all of my "serious" shoes, but my normal ones don't work and I am not into spending a ton looking for ones that do. It took years and hundreds to settle on the Superfeet and it is a huge bummer they are not the answer.

cheese
Jan 7, 2004

Shop around for doctors! Always fucking shop for doctors. Doctors are stupid assholes. And they get by because people are cowed by their mystical bullshit quality of being able to maintain a 3.0 GPA at some Guatemalan medical college for 3 semesters. Find one that makes sense.


I'm really a 12 extra wide who wears size 13's and puts SOLE Signature insoles in basically every shoe I wear. The only thing I've found that helps my really high arches - even Superfeet Green's didn't save me.

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Fitzy Fitz posted:

I have some great new Salomons, but my heel slips in them. I'm gonna try some different socks this week before I go on a backpacking trip next weekend, but do you think heel lifts would help? I've never tried them.

I have this same problem with my new Salomons too. Whatever fabric they used on the new ones is rougher/scratchier where on the older pair I have (and still wear) its much plusher and softer.

Electoral Surgery
Mar 19, 2010


Can anybody recommend a pair of warm slippers/booties/etc? I want something to throw on quickly between attempts when I'm climbing in winter so I can get feeling back in my toes. A thick sole like the north face boots isn't necessary, but it would be cool if it could stand on hard snow/ice without soaking through.

"use the boots you hiked in with" is the obvious answer but they're surprisingly difficult to get on/off when I'm not wearing socks, and if I leave the laces loose I'm always tripping when one boot gets snagged on the other's lace hooks.

theroachman
Sep 1, 2006

You're never fully dressed without a smile...

Socks+crocs perhaps?

bonds0097
Oct 23, 2010

I would cry but I don't think I can spare the moisture.

Pillbug

Would a pair of Down Booties like Mountain Hardwear's fit the bill?

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Business of Ferrets
Mar 2, 2008

Good to see that everything is back to normal.

Electoral Surgery posted:

Can anybody recommend a pair of warm slippers/booties/etc? I want something to throw on quickly between attempts when I'm climbing in winter so I can get feeling back in my toes. A thick sole like the north face boots isn't necessary, but it would be cool if it could stand on hard snow/ice without soaking through.

"use the boots you hiked in with" is the obvious answer but they're surprisingly difficult to get on/off when I'm not wearing socks, and if I leave the laces loose I'm always tripping when one boot gets snagged on the other's lace hooks.

In winter I use an oversized pair of rock shoes over a thick wool sock. Does wonders.

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