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Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



The North Tower posted:

It was the time they threw pee balloons on the other group of kids the previous summer :spergin:

So what you're saying is that I need to rewatch all five seasons all over again? Okay you talked me into it, quit with the hard sell!

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UFOTacoMan
Sep 22, 2005








Basebf555
Feb 29, 2008

The greatest sensual pleasure there is is to know the desires of another!



Fun Shoe

In the last scene between Michael and Dukie I always felt like Michael really did remember Six flags(it was only like a year ago after all), but he couldn't talk about it or even think about it without feeling some heavy emotions, which is something he's decided he can't afford anymore. Like if he reminisced with Dukie for a minute about Six Flags he wouldn't be able to just drop him off and drive away. He's fully embraced a life where he can no longer afford to show any kind of weakness whatsoever.

Of course I realize nobody will read anything I just said because an inch above it is Omar Pony.

Brock Samson
May 13, 2003

I let you know me, see me. I gave you a rare gift, but you didn't want it.


It's all in the clop, yo.

Kevyn
Mar 5, 2003

I just want to smile. Just once. I'd like to just, one time, go to Disney World and smile like the other boys and girls.

It wasn't the Six Flags trip that Michael couldn't remember. It was the time they threw piss balloons at another group of kids for beating on Dukie.

Not Al-Qaeda
Mar 20, 2012


what the gently caress how did mcnulty end up on a boat end of s1. lester told him not to answer truthfully if they ask where he doesn't want to go.

HORATIO HORNBLOWER
Sep 21, 2002

no ambition,
no talent,
no chance


Not Al-Qaeda posted:

what the gently caress how did mcnulty end up on a boat end of s1. lester told him not to answer truthfully if they ask where he doesn't want to go.

He'd already spilled it to Landsman.

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



Not Al-Qaeda posted:

what the gently caress how did mcnulty end up on a boat end of s1. lester told him not to answer truthfully if they ask where he doesn't want to go.

He'd already let slip to Landsman earlier in the season that he hated boats and would prefer to end up walking a beat again. In season 2 he even complains to Bunk that he knows it was Jay who let the bosses know.

The sad thing is in season 4 he is walking a beat again and he's the happiest we've ever seen him in the show.

Edit: Beaten like Kenard

Boywhiz88
Sep 11, 2005

floating 26" off da ground. BURR!


I was at my parents for NYE. Threw on the first episode to check the transfer. They really did a great job. I did laugh at how the credits clearly show where the 4:3 ended. All in all, looking forward to an Apple TV and the Wire HDD in a few weeks

kaworu
Jul 23, 2004



I am totally getting sucked into a rewatch, right from the beginning. God, this show is so loving good.

One thing I am really noticing (this is either my third or fourth rewatch in the last 7 or 8 years) is how much Lester Freeman is just the living, beating heart of the entire show from nearly the very beginning to the very end. And he's often right there with the audience, because he's probably one of the characters on the show who has the broadest, most truthful perspective on how hosed everything truly is - which makes him, in many ways, the only real consistent audience surrogate from the first season all the way through the last.

Yeah, he's got a bit of that "magical negro" crap going on, but at least they hang a lampshade on it once in a while by playing with that trope within the show. I honestly think that if I were to choose one scene, out of the entire show, to point to as my favorite/most satisfying, it would be the one where Lester (with a bemused Bunk watching) wordlessly figures out what's been happening to all of Marlo's bodies, and then declares "This is a tomb." Something about that moment always stuck out as ominously real, like... there is this light-hearted attitude that Snoop has about the work she does, and yet she's doing these incredibly dark and hosed up things. Lester figuring that out in the dead calm of a bright and frigid mid-winter day is just perfect.

frenton
Aug 15, 2005

devil soup


I love that scene a lot too. "Lex is in there."

Kevyn
Mar 5, 2003

I just want to smile. Just once. I'd like to just, one time, go to Disney World and smile like the other boys and girls.

The bodies in the vacants is a great example of something The Wire did that sets it apart. Any other cop show would have made it a big mystery all season long and kept the audience guessing along with the police, only for it to finally be revealed with a big OMG *ta-da* moment in the finale. It's a cheap trope. Here, we know from the beginning where Marlo is hiding his bodies and it's because this show gives us multiple viewpoints on every issue and plot device.

NOTinuyasha
Oct 17, 2006

 


The Great Twist

TommyGun85 posted:

it should be listed in the credits

It's not, I don't think music is ever listed in the credits. I've pulled everything from IMDB but that particular track isn't listed anywhere.

TommyGun85
Jun 5, 2013


NOTinuyasha posted:

It's not, I don't think music is ever listed in the credits. I've pulled everything from IMDB but that particular track isn't listed anywhere.

is it the greek song youre looking for?

NOTinuyasha
Oct 17, 2006

 


The Great Twist

TommyGun85 posted:

is it the greek song youre looking for?

You're off by a few episodes, and characters, and places.

Basebf555 posted:

Of course I realize nobody will read anything I just said because an inch above it is Omar Pony.

If it makes you feel any better, I scrolled down the reply page and noticed your post.

theblackw0lf
Apr 14, 2003

"...creating a vision of the sort of society you want to have in miniature"

Came across this article from 2012 on how Sonja Sohn used the show to start programs that help struggling youth in Baltimore

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...mKVQ_story.html

Apologies if it's been posted before, but I found it too inspiring not to share.

Bleh Maestro
Aug 30, 2003


I'm almost through the HD re-watch and they did a really good job on it. I started having some thoughts about an interesting aspect I would love to see: something like Marlo or Avon's childhood and background, how they came up and especially someone like Marlo or Chris just how they got so ruthless and powerful.

We saw a little of it with someone like Michael, but really didn't get to see the full transformation, and he wasn't really set to be as powerful, intimidating, or nearly as cold blooded as Marlo I don't think.

Hard Clumping
Mar 19, 2008

Y'ALL BREADY
FOR THIS


Bleh Maestro posted:

I'm almost through the HD re-watch and they did a really good job on it. I started having some thoughts about an interesting aspect I would love to see: something like Marlo or Avon's childhood and background, how they came up and especially someone like Marlo or Chris just how they got so ruthless and powerful.

We saw a little of it with someone like Michael, but really didn't get to see the full transformation, and he wasn't really set to be as powerful, intimidating, or nearly as cold blooded as Marlo I don't think.

Michael was never meant to be a proto-Marlo. He was just working towards the lives of himself and his own with no real desire for power.

Avon's and Marlo's childhoods were very different. They make mention several times during seasons 1-3 that the game has changed a lot since Avon and Stringer were kids - violence was extremely rare back then, and everybody seemed to have more of an honor code and a sense of family. Some of that honor still exists (remember how everybody completely lost their mind whenever the Sunday truce was broken?)

That perceived change may partially be a rose-tinted glasses sort of thing, but the game might also have been exacerbated and warped over time by the war on drugs.

Marlo, though - no family there, no warm feelings or hugs, just power. His vague past really helps to cement how terrifying he is - you got rid of the enemy you know and a complete monster takes his place.

What I'm getting at is that a show about Marlo or Avon's childhood would be worthless in exactly the same way prequels in general are worthless - it would just show you stuff you can already glean perfectly well from the source material without contextually improving the original at all. You know everything you need to know about their back stories from The Wire itself, with the added immediate benefit of a current-day lens. You get a sense of where these people came from and what effect it ultimately has on them in one fell swoop.

Also note that they already did a series of The Wire prequel webisodes - some of them are good, but one of them focused on Prop Joe as a kid and it was a godawful farce where he was for some reason a suave and savvy cartoon character. Even Omar's was more poignant and fitting.

Otis Reddit
Nov 14, 2006


every one of those little prequel shorts was painfully bad, except maybe the one where bunk and mcnulty are farting.

Unmerciful
Sep 14, 2008



Hard Clumping posted:

Michael was never meant to be a proto-Marlo. He was just working towards the lives of himself and his own with no real desire for power.

I think that's right but also Michael always reflected the most prized qualities of the people around him. Marlo saw someone with the force of character to be a future kingpin, Chris saw a methodical and detached killer, Cutty saw a talented boxer, etc. Michael was the character who it seemed could have gone on to do anything - it was only in the last episode that it became clear what path he had been on this whole time.

PostNouveau
Sep 3, 2011

VY till I die


Grimey Drawer

freebooter posted:

I remember saying nobody in the Wire apart from rear end in a top hat characters like Rawl and Valczek get happy endings, but that's definitely not true. Off the top of my head Bubbles, Carver and Daniels are all in an indisputably better place by the end of the series than they were at the start.

edit - I remember somebody saying that, not me.

Namond and Bunny

And of course Randy, who has now learned to see through the system's bullshit and will surely use this knowledge to lead a fulfilling, self-actualized life.

KORNOLOGY
Aug 9, 2006


Hard Clumping posted:

Michael was never meant to be a proto-Marlo. He was just working towards the lives of himself and his own with no real desire for power.

Avon's and Marlo's childhoods were very different. They make mention several times during seasons 1-3 that the game has changed a lot since Avon and Stringer were kids - violence was extremely rare back then, and everybody seemed to have more of an honor code and a sense of family. Some of that honor still exists (remember how everybody completely lost their mind whenever the Sunday truce was broken?)

That perceived change may partially be a rose-tinted glasses sort of thing, but the game might also have been exacerbated and warped over time by the war on drugs.

Marlo, though - no family there, no warm feelings or hugs, just power. His vague past really helps to cement how terrifying he is - you got rid of the enemy you know and a complete monster takes his place.

What I'm getting at is that a show about Marlo or Avon's childhood would be worthless in exactly the same way prequels in general are worthless - it would just show you stuff you can already glean perfectly well from the source material without contextually improving the original at all. You know everything you need to know about their back stories from The Wire itself, with the added immediate benefit of a current-day lens. You get a sense of where these people came from and what effect it ultimately has on them in one fell swoop.

Also note that they already did a series of The Wire prequel webisodes - some of them are good, but one of them focused on Prop Joe as a kid and it was a godawful farce where he was for some reason a suave and savvy cartoon character. Even Omar's was more poignant and fitting.

In one interview the actor that plays Marlo says Marlo sees a lot of himself in Michael, that Michael was meant for bigger things by Marlo's emotions even if not possible in the story. Not exactly an integral part of understanding the plot, but definitely something important for people re-watching for how Marlo sees himself and the people around him.

twerking on the railroad
Jun 23, 2007

Get on my level


Hard Clumping posted:

Michael was never meant to be a proto-Marlo. He was just working towards the lives of himself and his own with no real desire for power.

I always took Kenard to be a proto-Marlo.

bucketybuck
Apr 8, 2012


Skeesix posted:

I always took Kenard to be a proto-Marlo.

To me Kenard just seems to be a wildcard, a loose cannon who is violent enough but doesn't really seem controlled enough to be a boss. In fact the first comparison that comes to mind is Bird.

Kenard would more than likely end up as an enforcer. And yes I'm aware I'm talking about a little kid here!

thepokey
Jul 20, 2004

Let me start off with a basket of chips. Then move on to the pollo asado taco.

After years of pleading with my Dad to watch the Wire and him constantly telling me "it just doesn't sound like my kind of thing" (last said right after he finished watching Fargo, so its not like he doesn't know good TV) he finally relented and told me over Christmas that he burnt through the first 7 episodes in two days. Its my turn to be a proud doting son. Most proud moment was when he went into the pharmacist the other day telling me he was going in for the re-up :unsmith:

Bleh Maestro
Aug 30, 2003


thepokey posted:

After years of pleading with my Dad to watch the Wire and him constantly telling me "it just doesn't sound like my kind of thing" (last said right after he finished watching Fargo, so its not like he doesn't know good TV) he finally relented and told me over Christmas that he burnt through the first 7 episodes in two days. Its my turn to be a proud doting son. Most proud moment was when he went into the pharmacist the other day telling me he was going in for the re-up :unsmith:

This just made me :lol: so hard. I wish my folks would watch it.

About Kenard, becoming more like Bird or more like Marlo, I think it could definitely go either way since he's so young and you can't really know, but he will definitely turn out as cold as either of them. I guess that's kind of what I was getting at in trying to see the background there. Why is Kenard so hard at age 8 or 10 when the rest of the kids really aren't that bad until their teens or so and even then a lot of them are just acting hard or putting on a front so they don't get targeted as weak.

It came out in the scene when he and the other little kids are loving with the cat (makes me mad every time) and the rest of them run off when Omar strolls by but Kenard obviously doesn't.

Basebf555
Feb 29, 2008

The greatest sensual pleasure there is is to know the desires of another!



Fun Shoe

I don't think there was supposed to be a 1-to-1 analogue to Marlo because I feel like a big message in his character is that the system/the game is producing kids like him constantly. Each generation has its Marlos, and they all cannibalize each other until there's one left standing. Like, maybe Kennard will grow up to be a Marlo-like figure, or maybe he'll be a little slow or a little late one day and be murdered before he ever gets close to the throne, in which case another kid with unimaginable childhood trauma will step up to the plate because there's no shortage of them.

Crumbletron
Jul 21, 2006



IT'S YOUR BOY JESUS, MANE


thepokey posted:

After years of pleading with my Dad to watch the Wire and him constantly telling me "it just doesn't sound like my kind of thing" (last said right after he finished watching Fargo, so its not like he doesn't know good TV) he finally relented and told me over Christmas that he burnt through the first 7 episodes in two days. Its my turn to be a proud doting son. Most proud moment was when he went into the pharmacist the other day telling me he was going in for the re-up :unsmith:

Wait until you get a parent asking to borrow your boxset for their friends :3:

kaworu
Jul 23, 2004



Oh man. I just go to the point in season 2 in my "rewatch" of the new widescreen remaster where you have that odd, wordless scene/montage of Kima and Daniels at dinner with their wives (right after taking the case in the southeast in lieu of pursuing a more profitable law career, to the disappointment of Cheryl/Marla) and the camera just rotates around, alternating between all four characters as Cheryl and Marla get more and more upset and pissed off.

In the original 4:3 I never liked this bit. I always thought it was just a bit too ambitious/weird/out of step in terms of cinematography and direction for the show - this just really isn't the way information is generally conveyed on The Wire, and with the box-like aspect ratio the rotating camera just didn't work for me.

But in the 16:9, it's a *totally* different story. The whole scene actually works on a visual level, and so its presence and significance actually make more sense. Now the characters are framed by the candlesticks on the table as the camera rotates, and the differences between the two apartments are more pronounced, and the facial expressions and whats being communicated is clearer because the rotating is way less distracting due to the overall clarity of visual fidelity. Now it actually *feels* like you're at the dinner table. It's probably one of the best instances of the 16:9 taking a moment I always disliked from the original show and turning it into something like a lot.

Philthy
Jan 28, 2003



Pillbug

I just saw that scene as well, and I honestly didn't even remember it with the first watch through. I was laughing my rear end off this time.

Subraji
Mar 28, 2006

He's got an 'ead like a fuckin' orange. Baldy, Mancy 'eaded twat.

Where do you guys fall on the HD re-release? I'm working through it now, after having read a glaring article about it, am not totally sure what all the fuss is about. I don't feel like anything is "lost" despite the show originally being shot for and in 4:3.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

BUST A LOAF
IN THIS
YEAST CONFECTION


Grimey Drawer

Feel free to browse the last couple pages for opinions about it. Spoiler: it's mostly pretty great. There are a handful of shots that were very framed for 4:3 that look weird (especially in the pilot), but that's it. The rest is nice and comes down to weird personal preferences. See: the scene being discussed above.

Subraji
Mar 28, 2006

He's got an 'ead like a fuckin' orange. Baldy, Mancy 'eaded twat.

grilldos posted:

Feel free to browse the last couple pages for opinions about it.

Oh, I've read it all. Now that more time has passed, I was just curious what people were feeling about it beyond the first few episodes or the first season.

Hard Clumping
Mar 19, 2008

Y'ALL BREADY
FOR THIS


Subraji posted:

Oh, I've read it all. Now that more time has passed, I was just curious what people were feeling about it beyond the first few episodes or the first season.

Now that more time has passed? Since earlier today?

Phenotype
Jul 24, 2007

You must defeat Sheng Long to stand a chance.



Bleh Maestro posted:

Why is Kenard so hard at age 8 or 10 when the rest of the kids really aren't that bad until their teens or so and even then a lot of them are just acting hard or putting on a front so they don't get targeted as weak.

I think Kenard was just sociopathic. It's what made the difference between Avon and Stringer and Marlo and his crew, and even the difference between Marlo and Snoop or Chris. Kenard probably started acting hard because he was imitating the older kids on the corner, like everyone else, and when he took a few beatings and poo poo became real, it turned out he was one of the few who respond much differently to violence than most people. It means he certainly has the potential to end up like Marlo or one of the big killers, but I thought it also showed how that kind of sociopath was rewarded by their environment, getting to run the biggest drug gang or kill the superhero while he was buying cigarettes.

That DICK!
Sep 28, 2010



does anyone have a link to the really long "sheeeeeeeeeeeit"

ChairMaster
Aug 22, 2009

by R. Guyovich


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70eU840lc38

tweet my meat
Oct 2, 2013

yospos


Clay Davis is the best character on The Wire.

Jose Oquendo
Jun 20, 2004

At the end of 2018, a study was published by London Metropolitan University showing that certain bacteria, normally present only in intestinal tracts or feces, were found on McDonald's self-service screens.




The only thing funnier than Davis' 'sheeeeeit' is when Carcetti's aide, Norman Wilson does an impression of it.

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Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



Andre Royo (Bubbles) and Isiah Whitlock (Clay Davis) both appeared in really interesting roles with great potential as recurring characters in Agent Carter and Gotham respectively recently.

They were both killed after one episode :smith:

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