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Jeffrey of YOSPOS
Dec 22, 2005

GET LOSE, YOU CAN'T COMPARE WITH MY POWERS


Kevyn posted:

There was also the scene where the homicide detectives lied to Bodie about having his prints on one of the guns he threw off the bridge.

And Valchek lifting prints off the photos of the van he was being sent.
That is a pretty hilarious collection of not-useful ways to use fingerprints.

Did they get fingerprints off the can to match little man after he shot kima? Or was it saliva? I'm not sure if they said.

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grobbo
May 29, 2014


'Did you use a name?'
'Was a time I'd have used Smith 'n' Wesson. Man, I'm just saying, I don't know how you regular folks do it.'

I'm rewatching this show for the third time with my partner, and this thread is fast becoming one of my go-to consults, along with Sepinwall's blog (hi!).

I just want to take a few lines to pay tribute to my favourite character of all, because I think he's someone who often gets lost in the mix (the Guardian's Re-Ups for Season 3 pretty much forget he exists): Dennis 'Cutty' Wise.

Partly, that's understandable, because Cutty's character arc plays out with a speed and clarity that stands apart from the rest of the show. Unlike most of the other Wire characters, Cutty is someone who sets out to achieve something real, and (by and large) succeeds. His story completes itself satisfactorily in astonishingly short order (compare to Carv's arc, which has a lot of parallels but takes pretty much the entire run) and as a result, it's easily dismissed.

But that's exactly why Chad Coleman's performance is so genuinely extraordinary - playing an inarticulate, even clumsily-spoken man who has nobody he can truly open up to about his feelings (at least until the Deacon comes along), Coleman has to do a lot of the work with his eyes and tersely pursed lips, and he conveys a huge range of emotions with almost nothing. In his very first scene in the prison, his uncertainty about a return to the game and regret for the long years he's spent in jail (I think he only mutters 'I dunno, man' when Avon spouts his 'you only do two days' mantra) come across with barely a word spoken.

And something far more powerful comes quietly through in subsequent scenes - Cutty's decency, and the inner strength and determination that drives him to buff up an old suit to visit his ex-girlfriend, and turn up in the boiling heat for thankless day labouring, and eventually step away from the Game itself.

In themselves, these qualities make him a compelling enough character, but in the context of the show...drat it, by the first time Season 3 rolled around for me, I *needed* Cutty. As a viewer, I needed to find some hope after two seasons of frustration, stagnation, and despair.

His storyline is a deep breath of clean air in that regard, but it never cheats. In true Wire form, it's an 'inglorious redemption'. Cutty finds a reason to go on living, but there are good days and bad days - and he remains human, faltering on his path to figure out exactly what it means to be a father to the corner boys, all of whom have their own issues (poor Cutty, with his old-fashioned good cheer, doesn't understand that it's his paternal friendliness that's driving Michael away from him)

I'll remember him for as long as I remember this series - with deep fondness, as a genuinely good man. One who disproves one of the Wire's own cynical idioms - in Cutty's life, there *is* a second act. It's hard, and it's day-by-day, and there's no moment of instant redemption, but it's the one that truly matters.

Stare-Out
Mar 11, 2010

not all who wander are lost


Cutty is definitely one of the highlights of the show, yeah. Along with Bubbles he's someone who is innately good, just in a bad place and in the end manages to get to a place where he can express it. One of the very few upbeat character arcs in the show.

E: One of the most pleasant and cathartic moments in the show is when Bunny corrects the nurse about Cutty and how he got shot trying to "pull a kid off the corner."

Stare-Out fucked around with this message at 21:45 on Jan 6, 2017

Jeffrey of YOSPOS
Dec 22, 2005

GET LOSE, YOU CAN'T COMPARE WITH MY POWERS


Wait......does Alan Sepinwall post here?

Grumpwagon
May 5, 2007
I am a giant assfuck who needs to harden the fuck up.



Jeffrey of YOSPOS posted:

That is a pretty hilarious collection of not-useful ways to use fingerprints.

Did they get fingerprints off the can to match little man after he shot kima? Or was it saliva? I'm not sure if they said.

Yeah, I was going to post this. It is prints.

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



Yeah Cutty is excellent and it is really wonderful seeing him succeed and become a genuinely better person. Not that he doesn't have his failures along the way, but that is what makes his eventual success all the sweeter. He gets out of jail and despite everything going against him he becomes a contributing member of society... or rather, the community. Society pretty much abandoned him a long time ago but he finds hope and redemption in helping those who are growing up abandoned like he did through the only way he really can - that sweet science.

I always found it interesting that everybody who helps him does so out of self-interest (even if it is well-intentioned self interest) apart from Avon and arguably the Deacon. The latter does push him somewhat early towards the Church but quickly backs off when he realizes that isn't going to fly. Odell Watkins and Marla Daniels are genuinely helpful but both are doing it for their own designs (Odell to test Marla, Marla to prove herself to Odell, both for eventual political success), the system is largely indifferent (the parole officer and the drug testing office in particular) but Avon just listens to what Cutty has to say, laughs when he realizes how little he is asking for, hands over far more than he needs to and casually dismisses the idea of being recognized for it (which Cutty goes ahead and does anyway :3:).

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Stare-Out posted:

Cutty is definitely one of the highlights of the show, yeah. Along with Bubbles he's someone who is innately good, just in a bad place and in the end manages to get to a place where he can express it. One of the very few upbeat character arcs in the show.

E: One of the most pleasant and cathartic moments in the show is when Bunny corrects the nurse about Cutty and how he got shot trying to "pull a kid off the corner."

It's a nice touch in that scene that cutty doesn't even try to explain it himself. IIRC in that scene, while the nurse is talking down to him, he's just laughing like "I wouldn't believe me either"

Stare-Out
Mar 11, 2010

not all who wander are lost


Jerusalem posted:

Avon just listens to what Cutty has to say, laughs when he realizes how little he is asking for, hands over far more than he needs to and casually dismisses the idea of being recognized for it (which Cutty goes ahead and does anyway :3:).
I love that moment. Cutty tries so hard to sell it to Avon and when he says the amount and Slim and Avon look at each other and Avon casually tells Slim to give Cutty $15,000 like it's nothing is such a great moment.

Ainsley McTree posted:

It's a nice touch in that scene that cutty doesn't even try to explain it himself. IIRC in that scene, while the nurse is talking down to him, he's just laughing like "I wouldn't believe me either"
And you see Cutty and the nurse together in the S4 end montage. :3:

Stare-Out fucked around with this message at 22:09 on Jan 6, 2017

Unzip and Attack
Mar 3, 2008

USPOL May

Jerusalem posted:

Avon just listens to what Cutty has to say, laughs when he realizes how little he is asking for, hands over far more than he needs to and casually dismisses the idea of being recognized for it (which Cutty goes ahead and does anyway :3:).

This is my single favorite moment in the entire series. The way Avon treats Cutty in general gives him (Avon) a heroic aspect that contrasts heavily against Marlo.

R-Type
Oct 10, 2005

by FactsAreUseless


Marlo was complete psychopathic gutter trash that got lucky. I would have liked to see him get clipped before the curtain went down.

8-Bit Scholar
Jan 23, 2016

by FactsAreUseless


So I watched Season 2 again and it struck me on a second viewing just how useless the dock workers are. Like, functionally speaking, their jobs seem redundant. Unloading boxes probably will always require human hands, but even then you just look at their whole world and life and they're basically just alcoholic layabouts with delusions of a golden age on the horizon and nothing but nostalgia on their lips.

It makes for a contrast with the utterly voiceless sex workers, who could use the sort of passion and loyalty Frank gives to his union in their own defense, but instead they are easily discarded by everyone in the cast. Disposable to the utmost. It's quite striking, especially when you contrast this to Avon's criminal enterprise. Season 3 demonstrates a bit of the daily life of the "king" in that regard--he gives money to community upkeep, and even with a war brewing, he's clearly intent on putting his wealth and power to work improving at least some of what he considers his intimate territory. He is doing what Sobotka wants to do.

Why Avon is successful and Sobotka was not is I think a very interesting question. If you want to maintain the capitalism-critical interpretation of the Wire, perhaps Avon was just a better player of the market because he was a full time criminal?

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



Frank (and the Dockworkers as a whole) are one of the (many) casualties of capitalism. They and their families going back generations were fed the line of,"Your hard work contributes to the value of our economy and our society, you and the work you do make you good and virtuous people, you are to be commended and valued. We need you and your labor to accomplish what we need to do, and we'll pay you well for the work, and you should take great pride in it."

Then the very second (the very millisecond) automation became economically feasible the companies stopped giving any poo poo about their workers whatsoever, leaving behind people who had generations invested into wrapping their entire identity around the work they did. There are plenty of shots on empty factories in season 2, numerous references to what they "used" to do, of characters pointing to these derelicts and declaring with obvious pride that their fathers or grandfathers worked there. Yeah the dockworkers are largely (not entirely) redundant now and a lot of the automation is more efficient and far safer but you can't blame the workers for not understanding or being willing to give up what they've spent their entire lives believing/being told that their work was more than just a job, it was a way of life and a vital part of society.

That's why it is so interesting to see a lot of these white working class guys shifting to selling drugs just like a lot of black youth does in areas where they've also been largely abandoned by society - neither of those groups do it because they're lazy or naturally criminally inclined, but because for most of them there is literally nothing else for them except for MAYBE some horrible below minimum wage job(s) with unreliable hours and no job security. When society no longer provides a function for groups in society, those groups find a way to function for themselves.

8-Bit Scholar
Jan 23, 2016

by FactsAreUseless


No, I get all that. I guess what I'm poorly attempting to articulate is more that...

Well, when I first watched Season 2, I felt really bad for these guys. You get caught up in all their silly antics and it's kind of a nice break from teh dreary realities of Homicide and murders. It's on second viewing where I find this feel-good feeling more hollow and forced. The desperation is also more clearly visible. Consider the Greek, Frank's money, and the man apparently bankrolling the only effort to keep the dockworkers' jobs intact, even for a short period of time:

The Greek finds great value in Frank's capacity to smuggle poo poo for him, but Frank sees his value as preserving this noble tradition of work, this specific work at that. It's all wrong. Frank's biggest value is that of a smuggler--it is his only way out. Given how shallow and pathetic the stevedores' world is (perhaps not all of their own doing, I get that) it stands into sharp relief, though, that all you hear are these loud-mouthed drunks waxing nostalgic over eggs and beer whereas the prostitutes don't speak. I mean, I don't think any of the sex slaves or workers speak a single line of dialogue in any scene where they aren't dead. Even the immigrants McNulty finds are largely incapable of speaking English. They lack a voice.

Frank is committing despicable actions, thoughtless to their gruesome consequences until they're shoved into his face, and he's doing it to preserve a way of life that's grown redundant and corpulant. Yet his people have a voice, he is their voice. Those girls are dying to keep his docks afloat.

I think you're intended to feel sympathy for the plight of the stevedores, but I find the story is just as effective if you consider them to be a more negative faction, a culture lingering well past its expiration date, and in the process proving to be a source of criminal infection to an already sickly city.

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



Oh yeah I get you now, and you're right, especially about the women. I find it really interesting how deliberate that voicelessness feels, outside of Beadie nobody really gives them much of a second thought and their plight is by far the more immediate and real. Yeah the stevedores are in a lovely situation but they're still free to go where they like and do what they want, whereas the women are literal slaves. The closest we get to hearing one of them voice their own opinions comes when McNulty goes to speak with some who have already been arrested, and they immediately clam up (or rather, their spokesperson shouts the others down) when they realize there is nothing to be gained for themselves by helping him, that he is in effect just using them once again for his own benefit/purposes.

COMPAGNIE TOMMY
Jan 24, 2016

by Fluffdaddy


It was weird that the words "human trafficking" were never really uttered in S2.

Plucky Brit
Nov 7, 2009

Swing low, sweet chariot


cool new Polack jokes posted:

It was weird that the words "human trafficking" were never really uttered in S2.

They did use the words "white slavery" though. Significant emphasis on the white

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

The stevedores are hampered by nostalgia, looking back has kept them from moving forward so they sit about in limbo waiting for the past.

COMPAGNIE TOMMY
Jan 24, 2016

by Fluffdaddy


Plucky Brit posted:

They did use the words "white slavery" though. Significant emphasis on the white

Just odd that not only did they not place emphasis on it, they had no apparent interest in prosecuting the crime- just the prostitution aspect. It doesn't matter what you're smuggling a person to do- the fact you're doing it is itself the crime. But it's funnier to have a prostitution sting. Thaaat's McNulty! :newlol:

Jeffrey of YOSPOS
Dec 22, 2005

GET LOSE, YOU CAN'T COMPARE WITH MY POWERS


cool new Polack jokes posted:

Just odd that not only did they not place emphasis on it, they had no apparent interest in prosecuting the crime- just the prostitution aspect. It doesn't matter what you're smuggling a person to do- the fact you're doing it is itself the crime. But it's funnier to have a prostitution sting. Thaaat's McNulty! :newlol:
Trying to prosecute the crime was like, the plot for much of the season. They talk about weirdness like how you can wiretap phones for drug trafficking, but not woman trafficking. Like, Valchek doesn't care, Burrell doesn't care, but daniels and lester and co clearly do.

I guess, until the case goes cold, most of the focus is on how they were murdered rather than either the prostitution or the trafficking, but that makes sense.

Jeffrey of YOSPOS fucked around with this message at 20:57 on Jan 9, 2017

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

The woman wasn't an American citizen, neither was the murderer. Maybe when your business is solving murder they don't all have the same importance. Not defending them, but to them it is literally a job they do every day.

Ginette Reno
Nov 18, 2006

Hey Sid Do you believe in UFOs, astral projections, mental telepathy, ESP, clairvoyance, spirit photography, telekinetic movement, full trance mediums, the Loch Ness monster, and the theory of Atlantis?

Fun Shoe

Michael annoys me because I don't feel like the show earned his transformation into Omar. It feels really clumsy how he busts in and rubs the drug dealers and starts making wise cracks like Omar too. Michael was never the type to joke around like that. It felt hamfisted in a way the Wire normally isn't. Like I get that Michael is supposed to be following Omar's path but he's not supposed to be a word for word clone of him.

deoju
Jul 11, 2004

All the pieces matter.


Nap Ghost

Jeffrey of YOSPOS posted:

Like, Valchek doesn't care, Burrell doesn't care, but daniels and lester and co clearly do.

Burrell also tells them to flush any list of clients they might find, fearing their might be connected people on it. And I want to say he and Valchek chuckle in a sleazy way that suggests they may have been clients in another scene.

deoju fucked around with this message at 21:26 on Jan 9, 2017

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



Ginette Reno posted:

Michael annoys me because I don't feel like the show earned his transformation into Omar. It feels really clumsy how he busts in and rubs the drug dealers and starts making wise cracks like Omar too. Michael was never the type to joke around like that. It felt hamfisted in a way the Wire normally isn't. Like I get that Michael is supposed to be following Omar's path but he's not supposed to be a word for word clone of him.

I actually felt like this was a pretty good look at the liberating sensation Michael was feeling once freed from all the constraints and expectations being piled on him by such a wide variety of people. When we first meet the character it's during school holidays and he's far happier and quite often wisecracks or make jokes ("You heard about that boy Deez? Yeah... Deez Nuts!"). But as the show progresses and he's back in school, his stepdad is back in the picture, Cutty is creeping him out, Randy is being called a snitch, Namond is getting in too deep to the drugs, Dukie needs a home to live, Marlo has taken an interest in him, Chris and Snoop are training him etc.... well you see him clamming up and becoming emotionally guarded. Once Chris is in prison, his friends are out of his life, his little brother is taken care off, Snoop and his stepdad are dead etc.... he's basically free. Sure he's on the run and has nothing, but he no longer has any of that relentless pressure on him and he actually becomes happier/more carefree like he was during the Summer holidays he no longer remembers.

It's sure as hell not a happy ending, but I feel like he is happier than he has been in a long time.

Aces High
Mar 26, 2010

Nah! A little chocolate will do






I can't remember, do we see where Randy ends up? I don't mean after the fire and stuff I mean at the end of The Wire. We know where Dukie is, he's basically going to be the next Bubbles, Namond got out completely, Micheal is the new Omar but what happened to Randy?

Is that ultimately the point? He gets forgotten like so many other people by the system that we don't get some idea of where his life will end up?

algebra testes
Mar 5, 2011




Lipstick Apathy

Aces High posted:

I can't remember, do we see where Randy ends up? I don't mean after the fire and stuff I mean at the end of The Wire. We know where Dukie is, he's basically going to be the next Bubbles, Namond got out completely, Micheal is the new Omar but what happened to Randy?

Is that ultimately the point? He gets forgotten like so many other people by the system that we don't get some idea of where his life will end up?

No you see him in a foster home and he's this angry hosed up kid, so it's a real bummer ending for him.

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



Yeah we only see him in that one scene but it might as well be a different character, and that's the tragedy. The bright young kid who had dreams of owning his own store (kinda like Stringer) is just another angry "thug" who doesn't trust anybody in authority and puts up a front of indifference to anything to prevent showing weakness.

grilldos
Mar 27, 2004

BUST A LOAF
IN THIS
YEAST CONFECTION


Grimey Drawer

Jerusalem posted:

I actually felt like this was a pretty good look at the liberating sensation Michael was feeling once freed from all the constraints and expectations being piled on him by such a wide variety of people. When we first meet the character it's during school holidays and he's far happier and quite often wisecracks or make jokes ("You heard about that boy Deez? Yeah... Deez Nuts!"). But as the show progresses and he's back in school, his stepdad is back in the picture, Cutty is creeping him out, Randy is being called a snitch, Namond is getting in too deep to the drugs, Dukie needs a home to live, Marlo has taken an interest in him, Chris and Snoop are training him etc.... well you see him clamming up and becoming emotionally guarded. Once Chris is in prison, his friends are out of his life, his little brother is taken care off, Snoop and his stepdad are dead etc.... he's basically free. Sure he's on the run and has nothing, but he no longer has any of that relentless pressure on him and he actually becomes happier/more carefree like he was during the Summer holidays he no longer remembers.

It's sure as hell not a happy ending, but I feel like he is happier than he has been in a long time.

There is a circular, poetic flair to Michael's arc that I think works very well, bookended by his happiness, in this case evidenced through his humor. If you choose to really read into things, Michael is left with the possibility of having one less weakness than Omar -- specifically, a family member he regularly sees. If he can leave his brother behind, the world, however small his is, is his oyster.

Which is particularly depressing.

STAC Goat
Mar 12, 2008

Watching you sleep.

Butt first, let's
check the feeds.



I'm 100% fine with the narrative of Michael becoming Omar complete with the kind of peace and happiness that Omar had in his responsibility free outlaw life, it just ended up being a little too on the nose in the final presentation. Like they should have given him a different gun or something and not force the comparison so much. They trusted their audience to get nuance for five years, they should have just let us make that final connection on our own without him suddenly picking up Omar's signature characteristics.

But its a small stumble. Its just one of the many small stumbles in S5 that make that season feel a little less than and kind of "rushed."

8-Bit Scholar
Jan 23, 2016

by FactsAreUseless


I do like how Omar becomes more and more unbelievable up into the fifth season. Like, Marlo is a terrifying force of nature in his own right, taking over the streets body by body, vacant by vacant, and the police keep getting schooled each time they try to bring him in. The only problem Marlo has is Omar, who is like the road runner to his coyote. Omar just keeps messing up Marlo's plans, and literally pulls "spiderman poo poo" to evade his clutches.

Worse, Marlo's name is quickly forgotten but Omar's rings out. He's something greater than the king. He's a legend.

Maybe Michael is picking up on that, playing the legend for himself, seeing how he likes what it feels. I suspect if he ever had his own show or story, you could easily chart him breaking out into his own style of stick-up man over the next few years, but him playing homage to Omar is probably intended to reflect just how deeply Omar "won" his battle with Marlo. Michael was Marlo's soldier, trained by his guys, but in the end he'd rather remember Omar, proving again whose legacy and reputation ultimately endured.

Stare-Out
Mar 11, 2010

not all who wander are lost


One of my favorite things about the show is that for years to come, Omar will be remembered and feared by everyone on the streets but all Marlo managed to do was have a short reign of terror and he gets forgotten pretty much the minute he's forced off the streets. In the end, Omar wins.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Stare-Out posted:

One of my favorite things about the show is that for years to come, Omar will be remembered and feared by everyone on the streets but all Marlo managed to do was have a short reign of terror and he gets forgotten pretty much the minute he's forced off the streets. In the end, Omar wins.

And in the end, even he almost goes into the grave with the wrong toe tag on his foot.

Der Kyhe
Jun 25, 2008

Think something witty and pretend it's written here.



Stare-Out posted:

One of my favorite things about the show is that for years to come, Omar will be remembered and feared by everyone on the streets but all Marlo managed to do was have a short reign of terror and he gets forgotten pretty much the minute he's forced off the streets. In the end, Omar wins.

I also like that it is heavily implied that Marlo will gently caress up his cabinet deal of being untouchable because of his bad temper, and will become just another rear end in a top hat incarcerated with life without parole. No two days in jail for him.

Strawman
Feb 9, 2008

Tortuga means turtle, and that's me. I take my time but I always win.



8-Bit Scholar posted:

I do like how Omar becomes more and more unbelievable up into the fifth season. Like, Marlo is a terrifying force of nature in his own right, taking over the streets body by body, vacant by vacant, and the police keep getting schooled each time they try to bring him in. The only problem Marlo has is Omar, who is like the road runner to his coyote. Omar just keeps messing up Marlo's plans, and literally pulls "spiderman poo poo" to evade his clutches.

Worse, Marlo's name is quickly forgotten but Omar's rings out. He's something greater than the king. He's a legend.

Maybe Michael is picking up on that, playing the legend for himself, seeing how he likes what it feels. I suspect if he ever had his own show or story, you could easily chart him breaking out into his own style of stick-up man over the next few years, but him playing homage to Omar is probably intended to reflect just how deeply Omar "won" his battle with Marlo. Michael was Marlo's soldier, trained by his guys, but in the end he'd rather remember Omar, proving again whose legacy and reputation ultimately endured.

And Omar was taken out by the character most likely to become 'the new Marlo', who's take down of Omar is forgotten, as his legend grows greater with every retelling in the wake of his death.

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



8-Bit Scholar posted:

I do like how Omar becomes more and more unbelievable up into the fifth season.

You're probably already aware, but one of my favorite things about Omar's "Spider-man poo poo..... doesn't seem believable..." stuff in season 5 is that the writers toned it down from what actually happened to Donnie Andrews, the real life guy who provided one of the inspirations for Omar's character. That guy got surrounded by armed guys and leaped from a great height, and he not only survived but had NO injuries. Makes it kind of hilarious whenever I read somebody saying that Omar got unbelievable in season 5.

8-Bit Scholar
Jan 23, 2016

by FactsAreUseless


Jerusalem posted:

You're probably already aware, but one of my favorite things about Omar's "Spider-man poo poo..... doesn't seem believable..." stuff in season 5 is that the writers toned it down from what actually happened to Donnie Andrews, the real life guy who provided one of the inspirations for Omar's character. That guy got surrounded by armed guys and leaped from a great height, and he not only survived but had NO injuries. Makes it kind of hilarious whenever I read somebody saying that Omar got unbelievable in season 5.

I kinda find it more strange that he'd return most of all. Omar had loyalties in Baltimore, but he skipped town to New York pretty quickly and it seemed he returned to Baltimore largely on whim than anything else (or else New York was too hot even for him). He had his network, but I kind of felt like they were rehashing the Brandon motivation again, giving Omar a character who is motivated it seems first and foremost by revenge.

It's a fine excuse for a story to bring him out of his comfy "retirement" but I found it pretty hard to believe that he'd even be able to get word of what happened where he was at, let alone to leave his comfort and take up a brand new fight in a city where literally every major criminal faction has impetus to kill him.

Like, isn't he in Aruba? That's pretty far away from the poor neighborhoods of Baltimore.

STAC Goat
Mar 12, 2008

Watching you sleep.

Butt first, let's
check the feeds.



Omar seemed like he just couldn't stay away because staying away would be essentially running and hiding. Omar's ego and pride was too big for him to do that. He loved being the King. It was what he was about. Letting everyone know that he had been run out of town by Avon or Marlo would have just eaten him up. Plus it goes back to all the early season stuff about how Wallace and all the low rise boys and the dock workers just see Baltimore as their everything. When you see the world like that its hard to ever really walk away.

As far as him getting word in Aruba, I mean the show was awhile ago but not THAT long ago. There's email and cell phones.

Pocket Billiards
Aug 29, 2007
.

Michael's transformation into an Omar type of stickup man is no where near as hamfisted as Dukie becoming a junkie I thought.

I mean all the elements are there - addict parents, no prospects on the corner, education, work, etc. But unless I missed something it just jumps from working and then living with the arabbers to shooting heroin. Up until that point you really don't see any indication that he has much to with the drugs at all, other than a bit of work on the corner that Prez sees.

Jack2142
Jul 17, 2014

Shitposting in Seattle



algebra testes posted:

No you see him in a foster home and he's this angry hosed up kid, so it's a real bummer ending for him.

Randy I always figured would end up like Bodie or maybe if he lives long enough Stringer? He probably would end up involved in the drug trade and probably be pretty good at it and rise up in an organization or set one up on his own. After all he always dreamed of running his own store, so why not a drug operation.

awesmoe
Nov 30, 2005



Pillbug

Pocket Billiards posted:

Michael's transformation into an Omar type of stickup man is no where near as hamfisted as Dukie becoming a junkie I thought.

I mean all the elements are there - addict parents, no prospects on the corner, education, work, etc. But unless I missed something it just jumps from working and then living with the arabbers to shooting heroin. Up until that point you really don't see any indication that he has much to with the drugs at all, other than a bit of work on the corner that Prez sees.

what's he gonna to, NOT take the one magical substance that will make him forget about his lovely failure of a life?

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The Muppets On PCP
Nov 12, 2016

by Fluffdaddy


Jack2142 posted:

Randy I always figured would end up like Bodie or maybe if he lives long enough Stringer? He probably would end up involved in the drug trade and probably be pretty good at it and rise up in an organization or set one up on his own. After all he always dreamed of running his own store, so why not a drug operation.

randy's the next prop joe

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