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Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



Corrected now, thanks. You have to admit that Omar investigating his own death would have been a pretty wild plot-twist.

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grading essays nude
Oct 24, 2009

so why dont we
put him into a canan
and shoot him into the trolls base where
ever it is and let him kill all of them. its
so perfect that it can't go wrong.

i think its the best plan i
have ever heard in my life

I like that Omar's weakness is foreshadowed in season 4 as well. When he witnesses Michael selling his soul to Marlo, he makes no note of it, saying "he just a kid." (Which makes Michael becoming the new Omar ironic.) possibly because of this, he doesn't recognize Michael after the apartment shootout.

At first it's sad watching him hobble around, literally on his last legs. But now I realize Omar's last stand was actually the most badass thing he did in the series. I mean, even though they know he's crippled, Chris and Snoop are still genuinely too terrified of him to tell Marlo and provoke an open confrontation.

It really was the perfect ending, I mean as much as I would have loved to have seen a final showdown between him and Marlo, there's no way they could have done it that wouldn't have been cheesy, even by Omar standards. Actually, I think even if Omar hadn't broken his leg this would have been the ideal ending.

grading essays nude fucked around with this message at 22:49 on Dec 31, 2013

escape artist
Sep 24, 2005

Slow train coming


I just want to point out that Kenard killing Omar was foreshadowed in Season 3. Remember the kids with the stick, arguing about who's turn it was to play Omar, when Bunk was investigating Tosha's murder? Yeah, take a closer look. It's Kenard.

Radiohead71
Sep 15, 2007



Kenard was also the kid that was about to set the cat on fire was he not? He is obviously messed up a bit.

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



I do mention both those things in the write-up!

Regardless, they're points well worth bringing up again, because they play so well into Omar's fate. Kenard, for all his bluster, is still a child. An incredibly hosed up child to be sure, but still a child. He buys totally into the myth of Omar (remember all the kids talking about the supernatural powers that Chris has?) and seeing the reality is a huge disappointment to him, a bring-down to reality that leaves him feeling hollow and disappointed enough to feel like he could kill Omar himself. But killing a human being (any human being, let alone Omar) is a vastly different thing to torturing cats out of boredom while egged on by his peers. That look of shock on Kenard's face is incredible, the realization of what he has done, the horror of it all - that moment is basically the death of whatever was left of Kenard's childhood. Eventually he is arrested, he'll spend time in some kind of juvenile detention that will just make things worse, and by the time he gets out he'll be a shark-eyed, dead-faced killer like Marlo. It's as inevitable as the tide, the only saving grace for him would be intense treatment of the kind that Bunny's special class tried to give to at-risk kids, and we all saw how much support that got even when they were bringing their own grant money along for the ride :sigh:

Jerusalem fucked around with this message at 23:43 on Dec 31, 2013

escape artist
Sep 24, 2005

Slow train coming


Jerusalem posted:

I do mention both those things in the write-up!

Regardless, they're points well worth bringing up again, because they play so well into Omar's fate. Kenard, for all his bluster, is still a child. An incredibly hosed up child to be sure, but still a child. He buys totally into the myth of Omar (remember all the kids talking about the supernatural powers that Chris has?) and seeing the reality is a huge disappointment to him, a bring-down to reality that leaves him feeling hollow and disappointed enough to feel like he could kill Omar himself. But killing a human being (any human being, let alone Omar) is a vastly different thing to torturing cats out of boredom while egged on by his peers. That look of shock on Kenard's face is incredible, the realization of what he has done, the horror of it all - that moment is basically the death of whatever was left of Kenard's childhood. Eventually he is arrested, he'll spend time in some kind of juvenile detention that will just make things worse, and by the time he gets out he'll be a shark-eyed, dead-faced killer like Marlo. It's an inevitable as the tide, the only saving grace for him would be intense treatment of the kind that Bunny's special class tried to give to at-risk kids, and we all saw how much support that got even when they were bringing their own grant money along for the ride :sigh:


I've got nasty vertigo right now, so I only skimmed your post. Just wanted to make sure it was pointed out, because it blew my loving mind when I realized it.

Dangerous Person
Apr 4, 2011

Not dead yet

escape artist posted:

I just want to point out that Kenard killing Omar was foreshadowed in Season 3. Remember the kids with the stick, arguing about who's turn it was to play Omar, when Bunk was investigating Tosha's murder? Yeah, take a closer look. It's Kenard.

Didn't they say that this was just a lucky coincidence?

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



Dangerous Person posted:

Didn't they say that this was just a lucky coincidence?

Yes, but lucky coincidence of casting or not, it still plays out very well in terms of seeing the impact of Omar's actions and reputation on his eventual fate.

grading essays nude
Oct 24, 2009

so why dont we
put him into a canan
and shoot him into the trolls base where
ever it is and let him kill all of them. its
so perfect that it can't go wrong.

i think its the best plan i
have ever heard in my life

Dangerous Person posted:

Didn't they say that this was just a lucky coincidence?

Yes and no. At the time of the first Kenard episode, the character was not named and they had no idea whether Thuliso Dingwall would actually be a good kid actor long term. At the same time, Simon has said that the idea of Omar being killed by an unknown kid was an idea they had for awhile, though it wouldn't necessarily be Kenard. Apparently the very decision to kill Omar was fought in the writers room to the last minute.

Stairmaster
Jun 8, 2012

nope just me lain


I have to say it'd probably have been more shocking if Omar had actually lived. I don't know if it'd have been any better though. Did they ever say what they might have done had they not killed omar off?

Ixtlilton
Mar 10, 2012

How to Draw
by Rube Goldberg



Ooh, we're at Omar's death, what a great scene and build-up. The one thing that stood out to me about it that I didn't see discussed was the juxtaposition of his final holdup of Marlo's stash house vs. the much earlier scene with Omar going out to buy some milk in his pajamas and just getting a bag of drugs tossed out the window when he leaned against the wall outside. It just really highlights his fall and how uncertain his position is now, and interestingly I feel we got to see that Omar was legitimately afraid for the first time in a long time. The armor of myth finally beginning to crack, he was nothing more than another gunman. Some tragic stuff.

escape artist
Sep 24, 2005

Slow train coming


cletepurcel posted:

Yes and no. At the time of the first Kenard episode, the character was not named and they had no idea whether Thuliso Dingwall would actually be a good kid actor long term. At the same time, Simon has said that the idea of Omar being killed by an unknown kid was an idea they had for awhile, though it wouldn't necessarily be Kenard. Apparently the very decision to kill Omar was fought in the writers room to the last minute.

Interestingly enough, Omar was supposed to die in Season 1, but they loved Michael K. Williams so much that they kept him.

I didn't know it was a coincidence, but it is still pretty cool. I feel like, even if it wasn't Dingwall specifically, it's still foreshadowing Omar's demise.

MrBling
Aug 21, 2003

Oozing machismo

comes along bort posted:

Actually, Prince George's County is significantly larger than Baltimore (and has been for almost 20 years) and more importantly a lot wealthier since it's a DC suburb. In the past decade especially gentrification's pushed out a lot of the former black residents of DC, but the inflated real estate values gave them a lot of money that goes a lot further out in PG, which is in large part why it's the wealthiest majority black county in the country, with about a third the poverty rate of Baltimore's. All of which makes it really weird that's the place the show singled out as being in similar dire straits when it was going through a boom period when the show was produced.

This might simply be a function of the show being based on older source material, since there are a lot of instances where it doesn't seem like David Simon really updated things from his book and the various stories/people he knew from back then.

Octorok
Mar 27, 2007

Hideous Anime Dog


On the subject of Omar, bit of an odd thing but when Omar is taken to see Brandon's corpse in the morgue, it cuts to black and white when we see the body. Somehow, I thought it meant that Omar was colorblind, but it never got addressed again, so I wondered if it was just a Season 1 stylistic choice.

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



Just a stylistic choice. Season 1 has a number of them (normally taken from the point of view of some kind of surveillance camera) but they're pretty jarring - that Omar/Brandon one in particular - and got dropped for the rest of the series, apart from a single callback in season 5.

grading essays nude
Oct 24, 2009

so why dont we
put him into a canan
and shoot him into the trolls base where
ever it is and let him kill all of them. its
so perfect that it can't go wrong.

i think its the best plan i
have ever heard in my life

Jerusalem posted:

Just a stylistic choice. Season 1 has a number of them (normally taken from the point of view of some kind of surveillance camera) but they're pretty jarring - that Omar/Brandon one in particular - and got dropped for the rest of the series, apart from a single callback in season 5.

Both instances involve Omar at a morgue, though.

Worth noting as well that the pilot and the final episode are particularly heavy on those type of shots and both are directed by Clark Johnson.

empty baggie
Oct 22, 2003



Pretty sure I just saw Wallace in a trailer for a Zach Efron movie and I'm not sure how I feel about that...

Frostwerks
Sep 24, 2007

by Lowtax


empty baggie posted:

Pretty sure I just saw Wallace in a trailer for a Zach Efron movie and I'm not sure how I feel about that...

Where's Wallace, String?


Oh. Oh really? Wow. He was better off dead.

Boywhiz88
Sep 11, 2005

floating 26" off da ground. BURR!


Frostwerks posted:

Where's Wallace, String?


Oh. Oh really? Wow. He was better off dead.

He was the lead for Fruitvale Station, I think he's doing OK.

Sneaky Fast
Apr 24, 2013



Boywhiz88 posted:

He was the lead for Fruitvale Station, I think he's doing OK.

Was that any good?

Grumpwagon
May 5, 2007
I am a giant assfuck who needs to harden the fuck up.



Sneaky Fast posted:

Was that any good?

Pretty decent. Not spectacular, but MBJ was good in it.

grading essays nude
Oct 24, 2009

so why dont we
put him into a canan
and shoot him into the trolls base where
ever it is and let him kill all of them. its
so perfect that it can't go wrong.

i think its the best plan i
have ever heard in my life

Don't forget his 2 season starring run on Friday Night Lights.

Actually I'd say Michael D. Jordan has probably had one of the better post-Wire careers.

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



cletepurcel posted:

Don't forget his 2 season starring run on Friday Night Lights.

Actually I'd say Michael D. Jordan has probably had one of the better post-Wire careers.

I guess Idris Elba has probably had the best? Then Aidan Gillen? Actually Michael Williams in Boardwalk Empire is probably a bigger deal than Gillen in Game of Thrones.

empty baggie
Oct 22, 2003



Domenick Lombardozzi seems to pop up in various shows and movies occasionally, though nothing particularly memorable. Wood Harris and his brother are gonna be in the upcoming season of Justified.

Jean Eric Burn
Nov 10, 2007



Idris Elba can still be James Bond one day. There is still hope.

Just kidding, China is too huge of a box office market these days and, well, you know the problem there :smith:

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



He can still be Doctor Who, too!

Sneaky Fast
Apr 24, 2013



I gotta say Idris only has like 3 emotions in his acting bag.

Bird in a Blender
Nov 17, 2005

It's amazing what they can do with computers these days.



Idris Elba as Bond would be amazing mostly for the crazy reaction racists would have, and you know there would be a lot of it. I think he'd fit that role pretty well too.

Ainsley McTree
Feb 19, 2004




Eh. I'm not saying he'd be bad, but between The Wire and Luther I know Idris Elba from too much other stuff to think of him as Bond. I'd rather see someone who's not already so iconic in my brain (which I guess I'm using as a eupemism for "typecast", not that that's fair to Idris Elba).

edit: but yeah, I'd love a black Bond if for no other reason than to drive racists crazy. Let's make him bisexual or something too, that should be even more fun.

Thaddius the Large
Jul 5, 2006

It's in the five-hole!


Ainsley McTree posted:

Eh. I'm not saying he'd be bad, but between The Wire and Luther I know Idris Elba from too much other stuff to think of him as Bond. I'd rather see someone who's not already so iconic in my brain (which I guess I'm using as a eupemism for "typecast", not that that's fair to Idris Elba).

edit: but yeah, I'd love a black Bond if for no other reason than to drive racists crazy. Let's make him bisexual or something too, that should be even more fun.

Just make a prequel to Skyfall with Javier Bordem's character as a Bond, say that MI5 passed his name along to Craig's character when Bordem's went rogue and we're in business.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



Sneaky Fast posted:

I gotta say Idris only has like 3 emotions in his acting bag.

There was a 2 part BBC show called Idris Elba King of Speed on back in Dec if you want to see him acting like a normal dude having fun driving cars.

Alec Bald Snatch
Sep 12, 2012

by exmarx


Idris Elba would make an excellent Bond purely because he's a smooth operator with a British accent. That's the one job requirement. For gently caress's sake Roger Moore was Bond.


e: When he beds numerous ladies with double entendre names the audience won't have to suspend disbelief because Idris Elba getting balls deep in that poo poo is the most plausible thing on this planet.

Alec Bald Snatch fucked around with this message at 00:42 on Jan 8, 2014

clockworx
Oct 15, 2005
The Internet Whore made me buy this account

comes along bort posted:

e: When he beds numerous ladies with double entendre names the audience won't have to suspend disbelief because Idris Elba getting balls deep in that poo poo is the most plausible thing on this planet.

:smug: : "I'm an XL"
:shlick: : "No doubt"

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



Just bumping this thread to apologize for the delay, I'll have a write up for the penultimate episode in the next day or two.

twerking on the railroad
Jun 23, 2007

Get on my level


comes along bort posted:

Idris Elba would make an excellent Bond purely because he's a smooth operator with a British accent. That's the one job requirement. For gently caress's sake Roger Moore was Bond.


e: When he beds numerous ladies with double entendre names the audience won't have to suspend disbelief because Idris Elba getting balls deep in that poo poo is the most plausible thing on this planet.

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



Season 5, Episode 9 - Late Editions

Snoop posted:

Deserve got nuthin' to do with it.

At the MCU, Lester Freamon FINALLY gets the good news/break he has been hoping for. After all his assurances to McNulty that he could bring down the Stanfield case, it looks like he may have finally cracked it. His illegal wiretap has picked up one of Marlo's clock codes, only this one is pointing to a completely new location different from the others that his surveillance teams have been keeping an eye on. Putting in a call to Sydnor, he has him move everybody else to the new location, even as Marlo puts through the code to more of his Lieutenants, each one marked pertinent by Lester (even though nobody will EVER see any of this as part of the evidence gathered against Marlo) as it comes in. He suspects that they've finally found the main stash for Marlo's organization, a stash that is currently supplying both the West Side and East Side of Baltimore. He calls McNulty to let him know it's on, they finally have Marlo where they want him.

Lester joins Sydnor and others at a large, decrepit old warehouse (one of the many frequent signs of the decay happening to Baltimore's once vibrant industry) where he gets caught up on what has been happening. Officer Brown spotted Chris Partlow parked near a warehouse, and they saw him meet with Marlo who then left, leaving Chris to go inside. Lester explains this is no mere re-up, this is a resupply from the connection, and Chris has gone in to check out that everything is secure to his satisfaction before giving the go-ahead for the lieutenants like Marlo to come in and pick up their re-supply which will then go to their stash houses, and THEN become re-ups for the various corner dealers. This is big, and Lester asks them to ignore Chris and focus on the likes of Monk, follow him and see where he goes, pull him over and arrest him if he spots them, get his hands on their phones and don't let them wipe anything on them - the case is in the phones. The trouble is, he'll need a Title III in order to see what is in those phones, and that means it is time for him to "fess up."

At Levy's office, a despondent O-Dog is accepting his fate during a meeting with Snoop, Levy and Herc. He is to take the gun charge for Snoop and Chris, which he isn't at all happy about. Snoop gives him a smack and reminds him that as he's currently on crutches, he is useless to them in any other capacity. Levy is more diplomatic, reminding O-Dog that with his limited priors he is likely to only serve 2-3 years, and he will be amply compensated financially for doing it. Still complaining, he reminds Snoop he's already been shot for them and now he has to go to jail for them too, and she snaps back a rather depressing truth - why doesn't he go get a job at Wal-Mart and see if they'll take care of him when he's laid up with a work-related injury. Herc smirks at the chiding, and Levy warns O-Dog to familiarize himself with the details of the weapons, because the details matter. Snoop and O-Dog leave together, Snoop surprisingly nodding to Herc as she goes, perhaps thinking of him as a fellow soldier now, even if he is Levy's soldier. He nods back, but once she's gone he comments that in the police force, if you get shot you get light duty and your own choice of your next assignment. Levy's comment is also depressingly true - Marlo runs a tighter ship.



Chris and two other very large men enter the warehouse and meet with the Greek's men, ordering the truck inside to be opened. There are six refrigerators in cardboard boxes inside, and in each refrigerator are 20 kilos of the highest quality drugs it is possible to get in the city. 120 kilos, ready to be divided up to corners all over Baltimore, to be sold as is or stepped on to make it last even longer - Marlo already has more money than he'll ever need, and this will bring him even more.... and he doesn't give a poo poo about a single dollar. Chris ignores the jokes from the Greek's men who just want to get out of there and have an early lunch, and heads outside without a word to give the nod to the waiting Monk, who heads inside to collect his part of the shipment. It's all observed by Dozerman and Truck, who give the word to Sydnor, though Dozerman is more concerned that he may be getting bitten by ticks. They watch Monk leave and Cheese arrive, and the truck that brought the drugs in goes out as well. Sydnor tells them to stay on the gate as the truck will now be empty and all the drugs are inside, Bobby and him will follow Monk while Karen waits for Cheese and then follows him.

Gus has lunch with Robert Ruby, the Sun's former London correspondent who has been called back after the London office was shut down. He's sad that he didn't get the full three years in the role, he was loving his time in London and is irritated that they not only closed the office, but sold the building just to get a couple of extra million pounds (remember the paper is still profitable, they're hardly in dire straits). But while Ruby has been called back to Baltimore, the Sun isn't sure exactly what they want him to do yet, so he's waiting on a lunch with Klebanow to find out what the next part of his career will be. In the meantime, Gus has an intriguing proposition for him - he wants him to supply fresh eyes on Scott Templeton's work, he wants to know for better or worse if his own (unspoken) suspicions are true. Ruby agrees though, and returns to the Sun's office and asks for a copy of everything Templeton has written, joking that it's because he's a fan.

The Arabber boosts Dukie up over the wall of a scrapyard to steal scrap, so they can sell it to... a scrapyard! It's a simple con, made possible by Dukie's assistance, though his pants get caught on the barbed wire and he only realizes AFTER getting over the top that he'll have to make his own way back over once he's done stealing things. Still, at least Dukie has something to do, it sure beats wandering the streets aimlessly (and he doesn't even consider going back to school).

Steintorf meets with Acting Commissioner Rawls and Deputy Ops Daniels where he discusses the Mayor's big concern - he campaigned on a double-digit decrease in the crime rate, and not only has there NOT been a drop, but they're looking at record highs, that's simply not good enough! A disbelieving Daniels reminds Steintorf that they've spent the last year on the bones of their rear end, with no funding and no overtime and all their big cases shut down to save money. Steintorf acts confused, pointing out that they're getting their funding NOW, and Rawls patiently explains that the Police Department is a supertanker, you don't just change direction on a dime, you have to slowly make adjustments till you're on your new course. Steintorf is again unmoved, proving Burrell's warning to Rawls that everybody thinks they're an expert when it comes to law enforcement - they just need to increase patrols and create more of a police presence on the streets and the crime rate will go down, come on guys! Daniels speaks passionately on the subject, explaining that this doesn't work and never has, and it's this kind of approach that has put the police department into its current sorry state. What they need is long term support, time to work cases properly, time to teach their rookies how to work those cases etc. Steintorf doesn't take kindly to being lectured, he came here to be the one giving the lecture, and he demands to know where Daniels gets off talking to him like this. Daniels, through gritted teeth, reminds him that Carcetti told him personally that it was a new day in the police force and this bullshit was behind them. Pissed off now, Steintorf reminds HIM that these promises were made before the School Budget crisis, and that they will get that support from Carcetti either as Mayor of Baltimore or Governor of Maryland... but he'll only be the Mayor or the Governor if he can get his double-digit drop in crime.... and it MUST be by the next quarter! Getting up, he says the words that Daniels dreads and Rawls has been expecting ever since he replaced Burrell, as Steintorf tells them to "be creative" - or in others words, he wants the stats juked.



Note that it is Steintorf who comes and gives this "pep talk" to Rawls and Daniels. Why him? Is it to give Carcetti deniability on this carefully worded instruction to be creative? Does Carcetti even know that Steintorf has held this meeting? Or what Steintorf has said to them beyond,"I went to give the police a kick up the rear end"? Carcetti has a thing about wanting to be seen as the good guy, did he (knowingly or unknowingly) employ Steintorf to be the bad cop who pushes his unpopular decisions onto his underlings?

Some good news is coming for Daniels though. He's informed that Lester is insisting on seeing him, and when he goes out to see him he is hit immediately with Lester's "confession". Telling a very carefully constructed version of what has happened, Lester explains that once the Clay Davis case was wrapped up, he and Sydnor spent a couple of weeks following up on the Stanfield case and "developed a source" that now has them in a position to take down the entire organization. Daniels is shocked, but Lester just keeps on pushing on and not giving him time to think, insisting he needs official action on a Title III because this is their only shot at getting everybody all together. Before Daniels can answer, a phonecall from Sydnor ramps up the pressure, he has just arrested Monk and his muscle after they caught them rolling through a red light and Monk panicked at what he thought was a routine traffic stop while his trunk was full of drugs. Monk tried to run, found himself boxed in, and Sydnor found 8 kilos of drugs in the spare tire of his car. Thrilled, Lester lets Daniels what has happened and just how urgent things are now, because while they've caught Monk they need to move fast to catch the rest of Marlo's lieutenants.... oh yeah, and Bunk Moreland has been sitting on a murder warrant for Chris Partlow - Marlo's chief enforcer - as a favor to them (what goes unsaid is that this could lead to the closing of the Vacants Murders cases too, all 22 of them). Daniels is shocked, thrilled and in a little awe, no idea that the whole thing is based on a massive, massive lie, and calls Pearlman and asks her if she is sitting down. "Why?" she asks warily, but this time it is good news.



The raid happens fast, police burst through the gates in an armored vehicle and the Greek's men are captured. Cheese and his muscle are pulled over and Cheese's phone grabbed before he can erase it, while Lester heads into the warehouse and finds a refrigerator filled with kilos of drugs. A swaggering Bunk Moreland is handed Chris Partlow's phone by a uniformed officer after being pulled over and handcuffed, and beams with pleasure as he smokes his cigar, enjoying a rare day of victory. At Marlo's concrete courtyard, he and his soldiers are handcuffed and put on their knees, Marlo's domain now guarded by police as a new King swaggers before them - Lester Freamon. Stopping in front of Marlo, he picks up his phone from the ground, looks him in the eye, then makes a show of spotting the clock over on a ledge. He looks at the clock, looks at Marlo, then walks away having hopefully planted the seed of doubt in his head over just how unbreakable his code is.



That night a frantic Snoop and O-Dog arrive at Michael's house, and they and their driver rush inside where Michael is watching the coverage of the bust on television. It makes for big news of course, Carcetti can barely restrain his smug satisfaction as he explains that over 16 million dollars worth of drugs were confiscated in the bust, and all Snoop, Michael, O-Dog and the driver can do is watch as the sudden collapse of their drug empire is lauded on television. At least one of them sees the bright side though, as O-Dog hopefully asks if he still has the take the guns charge now?

At the press conference, Carcetti continues on into one of his now familiar rousing speeches, so familiar in fact that a bored Bill Zorzi predicts where it is going and mocks it in a quiet whisper to Alma beside him. Nobody can deny the powerful appeal of a table full of drugs and guns though, and what's more impressive is that Carcetti is able to note the possible connection to the Vacants Murders and spout off some bullshit about how they never stopped working that case and how they never give up on ANY case - a day like this is coming for everybody who thinks they can sell drugs in Baltimore. Having happily taken credit after shutting all these cases down to save money, Carcetti ends the Conference in triumph and departs. Alma heads up to Daniels for comment but all he'll offer is a short,"A good day for the good guys." When she pushes him for more, he grumpily reminds her that the last time his name appeared in The Sun it had him doing things he never did, and he complains to her that maybe she should go and look that up before coming to him for comment. It is yet another thread in Scott's story coming undone.

At lockup, Marlo is composed and seemingly unconcerned about his fate - he always knew he'd end up in jail or dead, though he hasn't given up yet, he means to talk to Levy and find out exactly what the warrants against him and the others mean. What Cheese keeps coming back to is the "information received" line, which he correctly theorizes means that somebody has been snitching... correctly in that this is the lie that Freamon has told. But who would be in a position to have that information? Especially on the Devar murder? The only people who know about that are all sitting in this holding cell... except for Snoop and Michael. Nobody for a second suspects Snoop, but Marlo ponders whether Michael's iron on the street might not have turned to rubber in an interrogation room - could he be the one behind it? Chris doesn't think so, he doesn't see Michael being weak and can't see the logic in Michael snitching on Devar, since he would be equally implicated by it. What also goes unspoken is that Chris knows what Devar did to Michael, and he knows that Michael will never feel anything other than gratitude for what Chris did. But Monk is less impressed, especially after the Six Flags incident, and notes that Michael has been complaining openly about some of Marlo's decisions. Marlo is instantly interested in that and Monk eagerly tells him about Michael's doubts about why Junebug needed to be killed... and then goes a step too far in his eagerness and reveals for the first time that Omar was talking poo poo about Marlo on the street. Chris instantly silences him with a glare, but Marlo won't be denied, demanding to know more. Reluctantly Chris explains that Omar was openly goading Marlo, saying he wasn't a man, that he was a bitch who couldn't hang on the street. Chris tries to play it off as nothing, but Marlo - so calm in the face of his Empire's potential collapse - becomes louder and angrier, demanding more information, and neither Monk nor Chris can deny him. Chris glares at Monk as he elaborates exactly what Omar was saying, but Monk can't NOT, and Chris knows it - when Marlo wants something done, it is done.



Marlo has been calm in the face of what should be the worst day of his life, but he loses it as the full impact of Omar's final, unassailable victory sinks deep into him. "MY NAME IS MY NAME!" he rages, eyes bulging, cutting off Chris' attempt to downplay Omar's comments. Barely containing himself, he rages that as soon as they're out he wants the word put out that he never heard what Omar had to say, that he'll step to anyone whether it be Omar or Avon or ANYONE. But even as he declares it, he realizes the futility of his statement, that while nobody will have the guts to say it, nobody will believe that he didn't hear about Omar's many insults as the crippled homosexual raided Marlo's stashhouses and killed his soldiers with impunity. For just the briefest of seconds, for the first and only time in the entire run of the show, we see an unguarded moment as Marlo's dead-eyed confidence breaks and reveals a man who realizes that something is finally beyond his grasp, that he has been beaten and can never, ever have his revenge.



Omar is dead. But Omar has won.

An uneasy quiet follows as Marlo regains his self-control, and Chris quietly tells him that he doesn't see Michael being the snitch. Marlo agrees, he can't see it either, but either out of a cold instinct for self-preservation or simply to punish Chris for withholding information, he asks Chris if he is willing to bet his freedom on it.

At Homicide, Landsman beams at Bunk at his desk and frowns at McNulty at his. He points to Bunk and tells McNulty to look at him - a single detective who sat at his desk, went through his casefile and solved a murder without any fuss or drama. But what has McNulty brought them with his overtime and surveillance teams and cars? Nothing, not a drat thing. McNulty can't argue, while Landsman continues to extol the virtues of Bunk, pointing out that with Chris in cuffs they might get witnesses coming forth on the vacants now. Bunk quickly reminds him that so far they only have ONE murder on Partlow, but Landsman is really only interested in twisting the knife on McNulty. McNulty quietly admits that he has no idea where to progress next now that the killer has stopped calling and killing, and after Landsman and Bunk leave (Bunk doesn't rub it in, but it must be nice that now McNulty has to deal with the giant mess he created to get his way re: Stanfield. Kima isn't so nice, disgusted with McNulty she asks what next? Continue to waste half a district worth of manpower on bullshit? McNulty, showing a painful lack of understanding of the monster that he has created, insists that with no further developments the case will just wind down. Suffering the inevitable letdown when the moment of triumph didn't live up to the imagination, he tries to justify things by pointing out that Marlo is in cuffs, but Kima doesn't give a poo poo about that, telling him,"gently caress Marlo, and gently caress you!" and storming out. Even though Lester was an active participant in this whole thing, McNulty should have listened to the lesson he was given by Freamon in an earlier season - the job will not save you. He has potentially wrecked his relationship with Beadie, as well as his relationships with his friends, and all in pursuit of a case he can take no official credit for, and he's been left with an ungodly mess of a fake case that HE created but has now outlived its usefulness.

At The Sun, Templeton and the Metro Editor Steven Luxenberg sit in a meeting with Whiting and Klebanow to discuss a Pulitzer Prize submission of their homeless coverage. Scott is thrilled at the idea that his story could really be considered a contender for journalistic excellent (especially considering it's basically fanfiction) but Whiting assures him that it is, and beams with pride as he reminds them all he was on the Pulitzer board for a couple of terms and understands how the judging process works. If he does, it speaks poorly of the Pulitzers, as Whiting and Klebanow detail a navel-gazing approach of writing stories about the stories - looking at how people have reacted to their coverage, as well as offering criticisms of the City's response.... oh yeah, and lots of pretty graphs too! The whole scene is sadly another example of the one-dimensional portrayal of the bosses, as they eagerly talk up their chances and throw empty phrases at each other. What's worse is that when Luxenberg asks some pertinent questions about exactly what they are saying about homelessness - beyond the fact that "it's bad" - and Whiting and Klebanow's faces fall in disapproval - how dare he bring journalism into this? Doesn't he know they're trying to be hacks here!?!

The meeting breaks up and Gus observes Whiting and Klebanow patting a beaming Scott on the shoulder as they leave. He calls over Alma to point out the weakness of her quote from Daniels and she explains that he wouldn't play ball based on their story about the knives being out for Burrell, claiming they lied in their quote about him. That's a not unusual response from a public figure who has gotten bad press, but Gus recalls that it was Scott who got him that fantastic quote and only attributed it to Nerese when it was in danger of being cut.

Lester and Freamon stop at the tracks, where Lester drinks happily while McNulty remains uncharacteristically sober. Freamon wants him to drink and be merry, reminding him that they got Marlo, which was all they ever wanted. McNulty wants to know why he feels like poo poo if he got what he wanted, and Freamon - standing before train tracks - tells him it is the journey, not the destination. McNulty has realized too late though what Rawls said earlier about the Department being a supertanker - he got it started on a particular course and now he doesn't know how to change its direction or slow it down. Freamon is untroubled though, convinced in his drunkenness that just like all the other big cases that didn't get any immediate forward progress, the powers that be will just forget about the case and slowly let it die. He cynically (though justifiably) talks about how he was wanted at the press conference, but couldn't bear to be there with the hypocrites who shut them down and then ran out to take the credit when the bracelets went on and the dope went on the table. Realizing that McNulty isn't going to drink or cheer up, he tells him to chauffeur him home, gleefully saying that he hopes Shardene is up, as he is in the mood for love. Lester is happy, but once he sobers up and the high of the case being over sinks in, surely the intelligent and generally wise Lester Freamon will realize just what a big mess they're both still in.

The next day, Michael is attempting to force a little realism on the older Spider, as they argue over Omar's fate. Michael knows it was Kenard, and points out that the police know too and have raided his home three times now (unlike the fake raid he made up to rip off Namond) trying to find him. But Spider has brought into the growing myth of the legendary Omar's dramatic end, insisting that some Pimlico Boys ran up on him with AK-47s blazing in order to bring him down. The legend will only grow with time, and Michael shake shis head in amused disbelief. Snoop pulls up on the corner and greets him, and he walks up to the window and asks what is going on - he's on his Corner, but everybody is locked up and presumably they're either very low on availably drugs or completely out. Snoop tells him that with so much of their muscle locked up, she's going to need him for some serious business - they're taking down Big Walter. Big Nose Big Walter? asks Michael, and Snoop explains it is Skinny Big Walter. Michael asks if he's been witnessing but all Snoop will say is that Marlo says he needs to get got, so he's getting got. She notices Michael furrow his brow at that momentarily and asks if he has a problem with his orders, but he quickly tells her he is fine. I don't doubt he was too, right up until the point that Snoop casually tells him not to bring any weapons, as she'll supply him with a clean Nine to use. He agrees and she departs, leaving Michael to stand on the sunny corner, kids playing in the water of a broken hydrant, his instincts warning him that something is wrong.

But while Michael considers his future, at the Baltimore Urban Debate League one last member of the Fayette Street Mafia is seen enjoying a bright one. Namond Bryce, who at the start of season 4 seemed the most connected to the drug trade and struggled to work within the school system, stands now in a suit speaking confidently and clearly on the issues of HIV/AIDS in Africa, and the disproportionately low levels of funding they are provided. Bunny Colvin and his wife watch with pride, the Deacon in attendence too commenting that Namond has picked up Bunny's way with words but thankfully looks more like his stepmother. They laugh with pleasure as they watch Namond easily hold the attention of the audience, but Bunny's pleasure fades when he hears the auditorium doors open and turns to see Carcetti arriving late to shake some hands, say some words, and get some photos taken. The debate ends, and Carcetti is already set up outside to talk to the media about the wonderful future of Baltimore youth, a victory for the school system, how dare the Governor say bad things about the school system, what about the jump in the third grade scores etc etc. One of the reporters points out that third grade scores often show giant leaps which then aren't sustained in the 5th and 7th grades, leaving unspoken the suggestion that the third grade scores are juked as savagely and regularly as the old police stats used to be - somebody "got creative". Carcetti, distracted by spotting Colvin heading to his car, stumbles through some nice empty phrases about the kids at this debate proving the effectiveness of the school system before excusing himself. He approaches Colvin, who is surprised to see the Mayor, and offers his hand to shake, which Colvin pointedly does NOT do. Why has Carcetti approached him? Perhaps because he can't stand the idea of somebody not loving him, or because he wants to exorcise a little guilt over how he used or ignored Colvin in the past? In any case, he tells him how sorry he is about the failure of Colvin's experiment, and at first you could be forgiven for thinking he's talking about the Special Class at Edward Tilghman. But no, he's talking about Hamsterdam, he's probably completely unaware that Colvin ever did have such a trial class running, and that Steintorf shut it down on his behalf while he was out of the city. Colvin glares at the man who used him for his own political gain, and it is clear there are a lot of things he wants to say (and do) to Carcetti. But then he looks over at the nearby press, thinks about the implications not just for him but his wife and Namond too, and swallows his pride and agrees stonily with Carcetti that there really was nothing that could be done. He ushers them into the car, gets into the passenger side, and they drive away leaving Carcetti behind, as well as the last chance Colvin would probably ever have to tell him off face to face. As they go, an excited Namond asks if Colvin even knows the Mayor, clearly impressed, and that is the last we see of any of those characters. Michael works the Corner; the kid that was Randy is effectively dead, replaced by a hardeyed thug; Dukie is working assistant to a junkie Arabber; little Kenard is in hiding from the police, suspected of murder; Donut is probably still robbing cars somewhere; .....but Namond at least got out, and got a family, and is living a better life. Victories in this show come not in big sweeping gestures like Hamsterdam or McNulty's serial killer, or even in the quality cases against the likes of the Barksdales. They come in small, individual moments, and they are sadly few and far between.



Marlo meets with Levy, where they discuss bail arrangements. Cheese and Monk are likely to get out, but the bail will be high and probably require them selling property to afford it. Chris will get no bail because of the murder warrant, and as Marlo is being charged as the head of the criminal conspiracy, he will get no bail either. Marlo is confused, how can they have him as the head when he never went near either money or drugs? Levy explains the police claim to have a source of information that detailed Marlo was giving coded instructions by phone on where the others should go, which confuses Marlo further since the only ones who were using the code are now behind bars - Snoop never had a phone. When he learns the police are seeking Title III on their phones he is more confused, weren't they tapping his phone? No says Levy, believing the documents he has, there was no wiretap, the source of information provided the resupply date and location... so who other than Cheese, Monk and Chris knew that information? The answer to that is Snoop, but while Marlo didn't believe Michael could be snitching but wasn't willing to bet his freedom on it, he is absolutely and utterly convinced of Snoop's loyalty, there is no possible way she was snitching, even if all the available evidence points to her as the only possible source of information.

McNulty follows through on his bullshit investigation, giving his now extraneous surveillance teams new targets, registered sex offenders within the areas where the "victims" were taken. He can't just send them back to their regular duties, or else they'd start to question why all they EVER did was work the Stanfield case. So without knowing it, they're to sit surveillance for a couple of days on perfectly innocent targets (okay, they're sex offenders, but there is no reason to suspect they've done anything wrong beyond fitting McNulty's fictional killer profile) and then move on to other fake targets. They accept their new targets and move on, watched by a furious Kima, and then Landsman arrives with some bad news for McNulty - another dead homeless man has been found, so McNulty has to go investigate. It's a beating rather than a strangling, though Landsman has no idea (nor does he care) about whether there was a ribbon involved, and McNulty tries to avoid having to waste HIS time (Dozerman and Truck's and Bobby' and Karen's is fine though!), but Landsman has already walked away. Kima says as much, mocking him angrily over not enjoying having HIS time wasted, and he has no choice but to go and investigate the scene.

Gus has lunch with Nerese Campbell, glossing over the damage their story earlier in the year did to her. She understands the importance of working with the press, and though she comments that she can't believe she agreed to lunch with him, she doesn't press the issue. He makes some small talk with her, bringing up the chances of her potential rivals to becoming Mayor - Bond (he's done after the Clay Davis face) and Keiffer (she comments she'll deal with that as it comes) - before shifting in the direction he really wants to discuss with her. He brings up Daniels, asking if she thinks he is ready to be Commissioner, especially after he put the knife in on Burrell. Nerese, not sensing Gus' keen interest, says she was meaning to ask where The Sun got that info from, because she was behind Burrell (till she wasn't) and would have known anybody who was out to bring him down, and Daniels wasn't even a blip on her radar. Acting surprised but not overly interested, he asks for elaboration and she tells him that after the story came out, Daniels was making it clear he DIDN'T want the job.

McNulty arrives at the crime scene, joining Christeson and examining the body. The victim has been beaten badly, and lies in a pool of his own blood near some business cards that have been bagged up by the police. There is a bad smell and McNulty says the victim probably evacuated, a nice callback to Gus and Alma's conversation earlier in the season, confusing Christeson who asks if the victim left and came back. There is no ribbon and no bite marks, so McNulty - who already knew - tells Christeson tough luck, but this one isn't part of the serial killer case, so the rookie will have to work it himself.

Gus returns to The Sun and interrupts Scott's phonecall to ask if he got the military records on Terry Hanning, and Scott tells him there is at least a three week wait (I wonder if even THAT is true?). Gus moves on and asks Luxenberg if he can get him into Walter Reed Medical Hospital to see the veteran who was with Hanning and lost his hands on the day the story was about. Luxenberg warns him that the hospital will want nothing to do with any journalist since a series that the Post did on them made them look like poo poo, but he does have a neighbor who could possibly get Gus an in... so long as he just wants to talk to the vet, not write a story on him. Gus agrees, saying that all he wants to do is scratch an itch.

Herc joins Carver for a "shift-change party", an excuse for the officers to drink some beers, basically. They affectionately insult each other, but Herc is on the lookout for information the whole time, congratulating Carver on the Stanfield bust and asking if it was his number that made the difference - it was a wiretap, right? Carver won't give out any information, and Herc doesn't push it, and they continue to drink and mock each other, Carver jokingly telling Herc that without his contribution the whole city would slide into the bay.

Fletcher sits in the basement with Bubbles, not so much interviewing him as getting his life story. Bubbles' sister calls down to him and he walks to the bottom of the stairs, and she hands him down a bag of soap and deodorant. He thanks her, then brings up he has an anniversary at his "meeting place" coming up, and asks if maybe she would join him, as family sometimes do to show their support. She tells him she can't make plans because of her schedule at the hospital, and he gives a sad smile and tells her okay. For Bubbles, it is probably enough that she is still willing to talk to him, and to bring him things like soap every so often. Lord knows she could be forgiven for wanting to have nothing to do with him at all. He tells Fletcher that she has been through a lot, but Fletcher - who has only known Bubbles while sober - is plainly unsettled by the apparent lack of moral support she is giving.



Lester meets with Clay Davis for his "payment", and when Clay starts talking about lawyers he cuts him off to explain again that he's only interested in following the money. Clay - looking unsettled by his perceived vulnerability after believing he'd come out on top (he did!) - insists though, if you want to follow the money you look to the lawyers. He peels off some names, including Levy's, they don't just collect cash on court fees. They are the guys who take the kingpins money and launder it, who show the street thugs how to work things, they're the only ones that most of the dealers are willing to listen to regarding cash money, and Levy has the most grease of any of them. He takes cash and filters it through projects, developers, politicians etc and makes sure everybody gets a cut... and he is very careful to make sure that the big fish are only nibbled on, never devoured. Avon Barksdale, Prop Joe etc, they're worth too much to Levy to let people bleed them dry, but if you can get around him and directly to a target you can rob them blind. Warming up to his subject, Clay happily recalls the time he bled a fellow called Bell, and Freamon's eyes widen as he takes his drink, recognizing that this was Stringer Bell, who has delusions of making the transition to the legitimate world until Omar and Brother Mouzone blew him away. Freamon has always wanted to pursue the money, but he was always looking at the likes of Clay and Andy Krawcyzk, and they're small potatoes compared to the likes of Levy, who latches on to a Kingpin and keeps them protected from other parasites and the police long enough for him to get as much money as possible from them. So now Freamon knows that, what else can Clay give him on Levy? Clay insists he has nothing but Freamon isn't buying that and threatens to take the head shot to the US Attorney, and Clay frowns, calls him a shakedown artist (takes one to know one) and reveals Levy's biggest secret - he has been buying sealed court documents from a source at the courthouse for years now. That is finally enough for Freamon, who stands up to leave, and Clay - ever the opportunist - complains that it wouldn't hurt Freamon to actually buy a round.

At Walter Reed, Gus watches in fascination as Hanning's friend tests out a new prosthetic arm, a remarkable device that emulates as best as possible a real hand. Gus is impressed, but after putting the vet at ease he almost ruins it by bringing out a tape recorder, and has to reinforce again that he is only interested in establishing that they had their facts right in their original story. He quickly confirms what Hanning has been saying, that the story was mostly right but the stuff about the firefight in the midst of it all was completely wrong. Hanning wouldn't exaggerate or make it up either, the vet insists, you only lie about combat when you weren't there, and Hanning has plenty of stories he could tell... but not about that day.

At the Western District, Kima takes a confused Carver aside into an interrogation room and tells him he made a mistake in letting McNulty shift his surveillance teams onto a different case and cover it in his runsheets. Carver doesn't understand why, defiantly telling her he doesn't care about that since they got to do real policework for a change, and it was drat good work too. Coming to an important decision, Kima tells him to coach his men and make sure they're protecting themselves, they have to say they had no idea what was going on, they just did as they were told and turned in clean runsheets. Carver has no idea what is going on, and Kima - at the door and ready to leave - asks him if he is okay with what he did to Colicchio. Carver admits it felt like poo poo but he had no choice and he is okay with his decision, and Kima takes that as a sign and heads out, ready to do what needs to be done.

At the corner of Calhoun and Riggs, Michael sits in the back of a cab and watches as Snoop meets with Skinny Big Walter, whom she is meant to be killing later that day. After she drives away, Walter and his crew close up shop and head inside, pulling the board on their vacant shut behind them. Michael tells the complaining driver, who doesn't like idling, to leave and go for a walk, handing over a thick roll of cash to convince him. Once he's gone, Michael considers his options - it's clear to him now that Snoop is setting him up... but why?

Bubbles and Fletcher arrive at the Narcotics Anonymous meeting and meet Walon, who welcomes Fletcher but reminds him that he needs to respect the anonymity of those attending - no tape recorder, no note taking etc. Fletcher agrees, saying he's just here for Reginald, which causes Walon to laugh, he had no idea this was Bubbles' real name. They head inside, and Bubbles stands up to speak on this the anniversary of his 12th month sober. He introduces himself as Reginald first and then Bubbles, and observes that his sister is not there, and tells everybody that he understands why his people couldn't be there, especially considering how many times he has burnt them in the past. He then launches into a heartfelt speech, shifting quickly from comedy into tears, speaking at last about the death of Sherrod. It's a wonderfully acted, powerful scene, and words don't do it justice - watch it.



Michael sits on his corner waiting to be picked up by Snoop. She arrives on time and they head on down the road, Michael asking for his gun and Snoop telling him it's waiting for him where they're going, he can get it as they set up.

Greggs comes to Daniels office, and he immediately picks up that something is horribly wrong.

Michael knows too, and he and Snoop have a conversation about what they both know is about to happen without actually talking about it. Michael asks about why they need to kill Big Walter, how do they know he has been snitching, does he really deserve it? What he really means is why do they think HE has been snitching, does HE really deserve it? Snoop says deserve has nothing to do with it, it's just his time, meaning of course that it is Michael's time. With that said, Michael resolves to do what must be done, and insists that she pull over into an alleyway so he can piss, and when she tells him to go in a cup he insists he'll need 10. Pissed off but not knowing that he knows, she pulls over and asks what he is waiting for, is he shy? Michael reaches for the door, then snaps out the gun he was hiding and pulls it right on her. To her credit, she doesn't freak out or breakdown or even curse, she just looks dead on into the gun and doesn't even flinch, caught by surprise but not scared. She comments he was always a smart nigga, but how did he know? He used the lessons they taught him, he was at the target location even earlier than her and saw her with Skinny Big Walter, he knows that all that was waiting for him there was his own death. But he wants to know why, and is infuriated when she says that Chris is locked up over Devar's murder and they assumed he snitched to the police. He yells that he didn't say anything, but she comments that regardless of that he's always carried himself different, stood apart from the rest of them, never just blindly followed orders like he was supposed to - he was NEVER one of them, and he never would be. Turning and looking in the side mirror, she checks her hair and asks him how it looks, and quietly he offers that she looks good... and then he blows her brains out.



Herc meets with Levy to discuss what he has been able to pick up from his old police contacts - the only overtime has been going in connection to the Homeless Killer case. He asked about a wiretap and got an unofficial "feeling" that there was one, which makes sense given what he knows about Lester Freamon - he gets a wire and he works it to death till he has squeezed every last possible piece of evidence out of it..... though Herc assures Levy he has no idea where Freamon could have possibly gotten Marlo's number! Levy considers, only the homeless case is getting hours, and a wiretap requires hours.... so what is going on?

Michael bursts into his house where Dukie is enthusiastically watching Dexter, thinking a serial killer preying on serial killers is a fantastic show. Michael is in control but desperate, they have to pack their stuff and get moving and they need to do it NOW! Bug is frightened, Dukie is confused, but Michael is adamant, they have no time to waste, they have to get their things together and get the hell out of this place - bought by Marlo - as soon as possible.

Daniels, informed of everything by Kima, now shares the bad news at home with a horrified Pearlman. She is aghast, especially as she realizes just how far down the rabbithole McNulty has taken them - the cellphone number they have on the wiretap for the killer... is it Marlo's number? The only way to find out is to go to Daniels' old punishment - Evidence Control.

Michael pulls up in a pleasant looking suburban home in Howard County, to drop off a tearful Bug and a box full of cash for his aunt, who is expecting them... and the money. This is a nice place, where Michael intends Bug to stay, the only safe place he can think of for the brother he loves more than anything else. Dukie tries to make light of it for Bug's sake, telling him he is jealous, and he hugs the sad little boy before Michael takes him up to the lawn. He gives him the box and tells him to tell their Aunt more will come when he needs it, then kneels down and ties his shoelaces for the last time. He tells him not to shed any tears and sends up up the path, where the Aunt brings him inside with a nod, looks to Michael on the lawn, then closes the door on him and the last aspect of a normal family life he had.



At Evidence Control, Officer Polk leads Daniels to the evidence bag he is looking for, and tells him to return it for resealing when it is done. Daniels is pleased to see the useless alcoholic he was saddled with back in season one appears to have sobered and up "landed on his feet", and Polk grunts that it beats working - Evidence Control is probably right up his alley, locked away from anybody with no expectation of having to do anything beyond filing and keeping a seat warm. A better alternative than jumping down a flight of steps and taking early retirement at least. Taking the phone out of the bag, Daniels turns it on and a nervous Pearlman dials the number on her serial killer paperwork... and Marlo Stanfield's phone rings.



Michael drives Dukie to his drop-off point too, and isn't happy about where it is. It's the stables where the Arabbers stay at night, and while Dukie says they give him work, Michael is hearing none of it though, he knows what goes on in there, that they're junkies who spend all day conning money however possible and then getting high at night. Dukie suggests maybe he could stay with Michael, but he's too hot for that to be an option - Marlo's people will be after him now with a vengeance, and Dukie wouldn't survive in that world, and at worst would provide a liability that could take down Michael too. Sitting at a crossroads in both their lives, Dukie retreats to the past, wanting to have at least one last happy moment with his friend who looked out for him for so long - he reminds him of the time last summer when they filled up the water balloons with piss and attacked the Terrace Boys, laughing that he didn't even get in a throw and he still ended up taking a beating. He laughs at the memory, of happier, innocent times. Horrifically though, Michael has no memory of that day, a time when he was a child just like all the others, when things like that were still an acceptable response to an insult. The gulf between Dukie and Michael can't be crossed, and so Dukie says goodbye and gets out of the car. He stands looking down into the stables, and spots an Arabber shooting up, a pathetic sight and hardly one to encourage him to come in. Hesitating, he turns back to look.... but Michael is already gone. Abandoned by his family, fallen through the cracks of the school system, and now parted from his friend and protector, Dukie feels he has no choice, and so he walks on into a horrible future, one more Fayette Street Mafia "soldier" to fall victim to the street.

Jerusalem fucked around with this message at 22:15 on Jan 13, 2014

escape artist
Sep 24, 2005

Slow train coming


I thought Levy said Monk wouldn't get bail because of his prior crimes?

Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



escape artist posted:

I thought Levy said Monk wouldn't get bail because of his prior crimes?

He said Cheese could get out on a high surety bond if he wanted to put up his mother's house, and that Monk could do the same, but Chris had no chance because of the murder warrant.

escape artist
Sep 24, 2005

Slow train coming


Jerusalem posted:

He said Cheese could get out on a high surety bond if he wanted to put up his mother's house, and that Monk could do the same, but Chris had no chance because of the murder warrant.

Gotcha.

Wanna hook up links for the OP?

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Jerusalem
May 20, 2004

Would you be my new best friends?



escape artist posted:

Gotcha.

Wanna hook up links for the OP?

Sure thing :)

Season Five

Episode 1 - More With Less
Episode 2 - Unconfirmed Reports
Episode 3 - Not for Attribution
Episode 4 - Transitions - Part One
Episode 4 - Transitions - Part Two
Episode 5 - React Quotes
Episode 6 - The Dickensian Aspect
Episode 7 - Took
Episode 8 - Clarifications
Episode 9 - Late Editions

Edit: Fixed the incorrect links, sorry!

Jerusalem fucked around with this message at 12:29 on Jan 13, 2014

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