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Bud Manstrong
Dec 11, 2003

The Curse of the Flying Criosphinx


Basalt columns?

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tortilla_chip
Jun 13, 2007

k-partite

I spent a fair amount of time climbing at Vantage while attending UI. Spokane was the major climbing hub for us, but as many have noted Vantage was often dry when the PNW was getting nuked by rain. The camping at Vantage can get very busy, especially if there is a show at the Gorge. While the columnar basalt style is somewhat repetitive, there's also some fun steeper stuff below the rim rock. The "future move" down at the Powerhouse wall remains pretty memorable, and I think the route it's on is only 5.10.

Rime
Nov 2, 2011



Yeah, there's a huge variety of rock there and a number of new crags which are only on mountain project. You got columns, blocks, overhanging chunks, the works. It's great, if you can climb Trad you'll pretty much never have to wait for a route on a busy weekend.

The Trad here is wack scary when you're used to squamish granite tho, especially knowing that whole routes have zippered and killed experienced leaders before.

There is only one toilet tho so on a weekend like last where there was 400+ people, it's better to drive ten minutes to George. :barf:

Electoral Surgery
Mar 19, 2010


Rime posted:

The Trad here is wack scary when you're used to squamish granite tho, especially knowing that whole routes have zippered and killed experienced leaders before.

What the hell? What makes all the protection so bad? Is the rock really loose and fragile, are all the cracks flaring?

tortilla_chip
Jun 13, 2007

k-partite

Not sure if this was a reference to Goran? The accident report is linked below.

http://publications.americanalpinec...ulee-Air-Guitar

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



I sucked yesterday on two routes. woo.

emtoor
Feb 11, 2010


Anyone happen to have a .PDF of 'The Zoo' area next to Smith Rock? Tried searching for this thing on Google but no luck.

MacMillan
Dec 21, 2013

You're just the afterbirth, Eli. You slithered out on your mother's filth. They should have put you in a glass jar on a mantlepiece.

Heya guys,

My team and I have some unused shoes that we're trying to sell, does anyone know of a resource to do this? Geartrade hasn't been a big help as of yet..

If anyone is interested, this is what we have:

- Five Ten Arrowhead: US Men's 11, No box. ($110 + free shipping)
- Five Ten Arrowhead: US Men's 7.5, No box. ($110 + free shipping)
- Five Ten Dragon: US Men's 11, No box. ($120 + free shipping)
- so iLL Runner LV (Women's) - US 7, box. ($85 + free shipping)
- so iLL The Street: US Men's 10, box. ($95 + free shipping)
- La Sportiva Solution: EU 37, box. ($110 + free shipping)

Also have a myriad of La Sportiva shoes that we'll put up soon after we have a sale. I will post the info/prices really soon.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



Mountain Project for sale forum will probably get them off your hand.

crazycello
Jul 22, 2009


MacMillan posted:

Heya guys,

My team and I have some unused shoes that we're trying to sell, does anyone know of a resource to do this? Geartrade hasn't been a big help as of yet..

If anyone is interested, this is what we have:

- Five Ten Arrowhead: US Men's 11, No box. ($110 + free shipping)
- Five Ten Arrowhead: US Men's 7.5, No box. ($110 + free shipping)
- Five Ten Dragon: US Men's 11, No box. ($120 + free shipping)
- so iLL Runner LV (Women's) - US 7, box. ($85 + free shipping)
- so iLL The Street: US Men's 10, box. ($95 + free shipping)
- La Sportiva Solution: EU 37, box. ($110 + free shipping)

Also have a myriad of La Sportiva shoes that we'll put up soon after we have a sale. I will post the info/prices really soon.

Keep me updated if you're trying to unload any Otaki's in 43 or 42.5

Also has anyone climbed Yangshuo? I'm heading there for a few weeks in May.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



I was right at the crux of a climb down at shelf road and had to stop pulling hard and figure out a more techy beta....


...Because all of the sudden I seriously had to poop. If I kept pulling I am pretty sure I would have pooped my pants. Still got the onsight though :getin:.


I climbed good today. Onsighted the classic Regrooveable 11b which made me very happy.

SeaborneClink
Aug 27, 2010

MAWP... MAWP!


Well poo poo, Ueli Steck died on Everest today. :ohdear:

Cause of death is at this point officially unknown, but it is rumored that he had fallen over 1,000m between Base Camp and Camp 2. He was planning on summiting Everest later in May and Lhotse as well. His body has been recovered and flown out. :rip:

El Marrow
Jan 21, 2009

Everybody here is just as dead as you.

SeaborneClink posted:

Well poo poo, Ueli Steck died on Everest today. :ohdear:

Cause of death is at this point officially unknown, but it is rumored that he had fallen over 1,000m between Base Camp and Camp 2. He was planning on summiting Everest later in May and Lhotse as well. His body has been recovered and flown out. :rip:

This absolutely kills me. Ueli is who got me interested in climbing when I first tried sport in Georgia. Now here I am in Washington after moving here for the sole purpose of getting into alpine climbing watching the climbing community lament his passing. It's really strange how this sport moves back and forth between victory and tragedy.

Rime
Nov 2, 2011



It's a sunny and beautiful 2 degrees in Squamish, and I'm shivering my rear end off waiting for my compatriots to wake the gently caress up so we can climb. Why even bother camping here overnight if you aren't going to get out of bed before 10am, Jesus loving wept. :cripes:

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



That is a bummer. I went up to Lumpy Ridge yesterday and did Loose Ends. Great climb. We were on the rock by 9 which is pretty good for a 1hr 45min drive and then a hour hike in.

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


Has anyone got any experience with climbing after an inguinal hernia repair? In theory you can go back to everything you were doing before by 6 weeks but I've seen people on various sites claiming it actually takes a lot longer than that. My doc insists that six weeks will be fine but I'm not sure he really knows what it's like to do roof routes or whatever.

I've also got some buddies organising a via ferrata trip to Italy 7.5 weeks after the op. Do I have any chance of going along? If it helps I'm 35 and reasonably strong and fit.

crazycello
Jul 22, 2009


Zephro posted:

Has anyone got any experience with climbing after an inguinal hernia repair? In theory you can go back to everything you were doing before by 6 weeks but I've seen people on various sites claiming it actually takes a lot longer than that. My doc insists that six weeks will be fine but I'm not sure he really knows what it's like to do roof routes or whatever.

I've also got some buddies organising a via ferrata trip to Italy 7.5 weeks after the op. Do I have any chance of going along? If it helps I'm 35 and reasonably strong and fit.

The hernia healing thing is about avoiding activities that drastically increase your intra abdominal pressure, like a valsalva maneuver, ab exercises, or taking a strenuous poop. Gauge it based on what you think you'll be climbing, but I would think that unless you're cranking out strenuous roof boulder problems you should be fine.

No clue what the specific via ferrata is like, but the one I'm familiar with in the rockies would not be an issue that far out post op if you're under 50 and not obese.

Zephro
Nov 23, 2000

I suppose I could part with one and still be feared...


crazycello posted:

The hernia healing thing is about avoiding activities that drastically increase your intra abdominal pressure, like a valsalva maneuver, ab exercises, or taking a strenuous poop. Gauge it based on what you think you'll be climbing, but I would think that unless you're cranking out strenuous roof boulder problems you should be fine.

No clue what the specific via ferrata is like, but the one I'm familiar with in the rockies would not be an issue that far out post op if you're under 50 and not obese.
Thanks, that's really helpful. Bouldering routes are exactly what I like doing, roofs included :( I guess I'll just take it really easy and stick to verticals and slabs for a while. Though I've heard that even raising your legs for a big step-up on a slab can be a PITA for a few months after the surgery.

El Marrow
Jan 21, 2009

Everybody here is just as dead as you.

Rime posted:

It's a sunny and beautiful 2 degrees in Squamish, and I'm shivering my rear end off waiting for my compatriots to wake the gently caress up so we can climb. Why even bother camping here overnight if you aren't going to get out of bed before 10am, Jesus loving wept. :cripes:

That's been frustrating me since I moved to the Northwest. People here espouse this lifestyle of being outside all the time, but in practice sleep in until noon or so and sit in front of a TV. I'm really confused by this area of the country, and in the meantime I'm sitting here wanting to climb.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



For the first time in 9 years climbing I got my leg caught behind the rope. I was on the arete and when I fell I started to swing and my leg that was furthest from the rope swung behind it and I flipped and got some not great rope burn. Luckily I didn't hit my head or anything. I ended up sending it after that but still freaky.

El Marrow
Jan 21, 2009

Everybody here is just as dead as you.

spwrozek posted:

For the first time in 9 years climbing I got my leg caught behind the rope. I was on the arete and when I fell I started to swing and my leg that was furthest from the rope swung behind it and I flipped and got some not great rope burn. Luckily I didn't hit my head or anything. I ended up sending it after that but still freaky.

Do you climb in a helmet?

Pantsmaster Bill
May 7, 2007



Hi thread, I'm based in the UK but heading over to Atlanta for a wedding in November. I'll be headed up to NC after that (Banner Elk/Boone area) and was wondering if we could get any climbing done while we are out there.

Will the weather be good enough for outdoor climbing? Any recommended areas to go (we will probably need a guide or to hire gear). If not, any recommended climbing gyms to check out?

whodatwhere
Aug 24, 2013



I have a sort of technical question, my labmate and I were going over various toprope setups. The way that I have typically done it in the past(trees are common for TR anchors here) is with static line- backed up fig-8 on one leg and webbing around second tree with a backed up clove hitch on a locker joining the webbing and static line. But, assuming you have enough static rope, is there any reason you can't do another fig-8 and just clove hitch a locker on that loop? So the same line. The clove hitch is just for easy adjusting for the master point. Hopefully my lovely mspaint diagram can clear up what I'm asking. The issue I see is that the carabiner is essentially going to be pulling and weighting the knot, maybe in theory rolling the figure-8? Maybe a bowline/EDK are better for that approach, or that approach is just no good because of the carabiner pulling on the knot to begin with?
Thanks

vs

El Marrow
Jan 21, 2009

Everybody here is just as dead as you.

Pantsmaster Bill posted:

Hi thread, I'm based in the UK but heading over to Atlanta for a wedding in November. I'll be headed up to NC after that (Banner Elk/Boone area) and was wondering if we could get any climbing done while we are out there.

Will the weather be good enough for outdoor climbing? Any recommended areas to go (we will probably need a guide or to hire gear). If not, any recommended climbing gyms to check out?

I just moved away from Atlanta and climbed there for years. In terms of gyms, check out Stone Summit. It's one of, if not the largest climbing gym in the country.

If you're looking to get outside, you really need to head up to Jasper, TN and go to Foster Falls. It's absolutely incredible around this time of year. The crag starts with a 75-foot waterfall the drops into a hidden lagoon with a beach. The face behind the waterfall tends to stay somewhat dry, so you can deep water solo underneath the falls up to about 60 feet.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/F...13!4d-85.676007



Aside from that, there are the following areas in descending order of how rad I think they are:

Horse Pens 40
https://www.google.com/maps/place/H...5!4d-86.3078811

Rocktown
https://www.google.com/maps/place/R...91!4d-85.389948

Sand Rock
https://www.google.com/maps/place/C...3!4d-85.8188161

Mt. Yonah
https://www.google.com/maps/place/M...5!4d-83.7254602

Boat Rock
https://www.google.com/maps/place/B...781!4d-84.56408

El Marrow fucked around with this message at 16:30 on May 9, 2017

El Marrow
Jan 21, 2009

Everybody here is just as dead as you.

whodatwhere posted:

I have a sort of technical question, my labmate and I were going over various toprope setups. The way that I have typically done it in the past(trees are common for TR anchors here) is with static line- backed up fig-8 on one leg and webbing around second tree with a backed up clove hitch on a locker joining the webbing and static line. But, assuming you have enough static rope, is there any reason you can't do another fig-8 and just clove hitch a locker on that loop? So the same line. The clove hitch is just for easy adjusting for the master point. Hopefully my lovely mspaint diagram can clear up what I'm asking. The issue I see is that the carabiner is essentially going to be pulling and weighting the knot, maybe in theory rolling the figure-8? Maybe a bowline/EDK are better for that approach, or that approach is just no good because of the carabiner pulling on the knot to begin with?
Thanks

Please don't use a clove hitch to back anything up on an anchor unless you're setting up a snow anchor in the alpine or unless you're building a top-down belay on trad gear.

Why not just set up two long sewn runners on each tree and join them at a master point?

El Marrow fucked around with this message at 16:38 on May 9, 2017

whodatwhere
Aug 24, 2013



El Marrow posted:

Please don't use a clove hitch to back anything up on an anchor unless you're setting up a snow anchor in the alpine.

Why not just set up two long sewn runners on each tree and join them at a master point?

? I'm not using a clove hitch to back-up anything. It's a part of the second 'leg' of the anchor. And I'm talking about when the trees are too far away from the edge and a significant amount of static rope is needed. I found this video with essentially the exact system I use.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLn59-1PzA0

El Marrow
Jan 21, 2009

Everybody here is just as dead as you.

whodatwhere posted:

? I'm not using a clove hitch to back-up anything. It's a part of the second 'leg' of the anchor. And I'm talking about when the trees are too far away from the edge and a significant amount of static rope is needed. I found this video with essentially the exact system I use.

Firstly, the guide in that video is using only a prusik to protect himself while building an anchor which I think is ludicrous. There's really no reason not to carry a personal tether with a locker.

I think I see what you mean, but I guess my main question is what would be wrong with only using one tree or perhaps using stoppers / horn + runner / cams instead of a tree as an anchor if it's so far away. It just seems like quite the engineering project for a TR anchor, which kinda goes against the "T" (timely) in ERNEST

Edited because I didn't really provide an answer:

To be honest, I'd just go buy two huge lengths of webbing, water knot around each tree and run to an equalized master point. Webbing is dirt cheap, and in my opinion, the fewer components to an anchor that is ERNEST, the better.

El Marrow fucked around with this message at 17:42 on May 9, 2017

stoicheian
Aug 10, 2007


Pantsmaster Bill posted:

Hi thread, I'm based in the UK but heading over to Atlanta for a wedding in November. I'll be headed up to NC after that (Banner Elk/Boone area) and was wondering if we could get any climbing done while we are out there.

Will the weather be good enough for outdoor climbing? Any recommended areas to go (we will probably need a guide or to hire gear). If not, any recommended climbing gyms to check out?


November is usually great climbing weather in the southern US. If you are sport climbing, I would recommend looking at Sandrock, Alabama (2 hr drive, no approach) foster falls, Tennessee (2.5 hr) or if you have the time, Obed (4 hr, harder, lots of roofs).

You can easily do any of these areas with a guide book and talking to the other climbers.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



El Marrow posted:

Do you climb in a helmet?

Not in the gym. I was thinking about it more and I pretty sure my heal grabbed a draw which flipped me and allowed the rope to get my leg. It really is weird since my right leg caught and the rope was left of my left leg. I think it was just an awkward swinging fall that somehow got my leg in there.

Pantsmaster Bill posted:

Hi thread, I'm based in the UK but heading over to Atlanta for a wedding in November. I'll be headed up to NC after that (Banner Elk/Boone area) and was wondering if we could get any climbing done while we are out there.

Will the weather be good enough for outdoor climbing? Any recommended areas to go (we will probably need a guide or to hire gear). If not, any recommended climbing gyms to check out?

The weather will always be variable that time of year but you will definitely want to hit up Linville Gorge. There is a guide service in Boone called Rock Dimensions. Linville has lots of awesome, tough multipitch climbs to get after.


whodatwhere posted:

I have a sort of technical question, my labmate and I were going over various toprope setups. The way that I have typically done it in the past(trees are common for TR anchors here) is with static line- backed up fig-8 on one leg and webbing around second tree with a backed up clove hitch on a locker joining the webbing and static line. But, assuming you have enough static rope, is there any reason you can't do another fig-8 and just clove hitch a locker on that loop? So the same line. The clove hitch is just for easy adjusting for the master point. Hopefully my lovely mspaint diagram can clear up what I'm asking. The issue I see is that the carabiner is essentially going to be pulling and weighting the knot, maybe in theory rolling the figure-8? Maybe a bowline/EDK are better for that approach, or that approach is just no good because of the carabiner pulling on the knot to begin with?
Thanks

vs


El Marrow posted:

To be honest, I'd just go buy two huge lengths of webbing, water knot around each tree and run to an equalized master point. Webbing is dirt cheap, and in my opinion, the fewer components to an anchor that is ERNEST, the better.


Agree you should have 2 long pieces of webbing or static line. Bring them around the trees to a masterpoint over the edge of the cliff. A lot easier all around.

whodatwhere
Aug 24, 2013



spwrozek posted:






Agree you should have 2 long pieces of webbing or static line. Bring them around the trees to a masterpoint over the edge of the cliff. A lot easier all around.

But that's what I just described. The blue in those pictures is static line.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



OK, Maybe I am not getting what you are saying/drawing. When I lived near a place with lots of TRing from trees I went with 2 40' pieces of webbing that I would tie around trees and bring to a masterpoint. No extra cloves or carabiners. Your system might be simple if I saw it in person but it is making me confused at the moment.

E: Your backed up figure 8 is a figure 8 follow through around the tree with a fishermans backup? I think that was my confusion. I guess in your second picture why not just do that on both trees and be done (other than a lack of adjust-ability). Your first option is a lot easier for sure. I couldn't watch that video, just horrendous sound.

spwrozek fucked around with this message at 01:08 on May 10, 2017

whodatwhere
Aug 24, 2013



Yea, that's right about the fig-8. Yea, the clove hitch is really just to make adjusting the leg lengths/masterpoint height/etc easier. The crux(hehe) of my question is- is it ok to have a loaded carabiner above a knot(either a fig-8,bowline,edk,etc)? So the knot is making a loop but the carabiner is clipped on the loop above the knot.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



I can't see it being much different than clipping into the shelf to belay up your second on a multipitch climb. Should be fine.

El Marrow
Jan 21, 2009

Everybody here is just as dead as you.

whodatwhere posted:

Yea, that's right about the fig-8. Yea, the clove hitch is really just to make adjusting the leg lengths/masterpoint height/etc easier. The crux(hehe) of my question is- is it ok to have a loaded carabiner above a knot(either a fig-8,bowline,edk,etc)? So the knot is making a loop but the carabiner is clipped on the loop above the knot.


spwrozek posted:

I can't see it being much different than clipping into the shelf to belay up your second on a multipitch climb. Should be fine.

Ahhhh. I see what you mean now. I had the same confusion as spwrozek. Yeah you're probably good to go.

spwrozek posted:

Not in the gym. I was thinking about it more and I pretty sure my heal grabbed a draw which flipped me and allowed the rope to get my leg. It really is weird since my right leg caught and the rope was left of my left leg. I think it was just an awkward swinging fall that somehow got my leg in there.

Yeah neither do I. No judgement here! That sounds like a gnarly fall.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



El Marrow posted:

Yeah neither do I. No judgement here! That sounds like a gnarly fall.

Yeah, it was rather unexpected. The good news is I am OK and hopefully I am able to avoid it in the future, even though I still can't believe that leg got back there.

El Marrow
Jan 21, 2009

Everybody here is just as dead as you.

spwrozek posted:

Yeah, it was rather unexpected. The good news is I am OK and hopefully I am able to avoid it in the future, even though I still can't believe that leg got back there.

Weird things happen while climbing. I busted my head open a few weeks ago while hiking back into the crag with food and beer from a nearby store. Not on rock like one would think, but by an errant pointy branch on the trail leading back in.

A few stitches and a CT scan later, I was good to go. More embarrassing than anything else to be honest.

Rime
Nov 2, 2011



Maaaaan, I had the sketchiest adventure on the weekend. End of a day of hard Trad, we're wandering around the Smoke Bluffs looking for something fun. Come across this 30m upward-trending traverse called Wonderland which has a good 200' drop below it the whole way. Strong breeze is blowing, book calls it a mega-classic, we're stoked.

Buddy leads it and takes a long time, a really long time. I notice that we've got the midmarker in the rope in the device by the time he gives me the tug signal that he's anchored in.

I head out, the route is just amazing. Really great climbing. Then it gets ultra manky and I notice I haven't passed any gear to collect in a while and that there is none up ahead, and decide it would be best if I didn't fall now. That'd be a nasty rear end pendulum. I think it was close to a 15m runout in this janky-rear end mud and grass filled crack before I hit another cam.

Then the clincher: I'm gastoning my way up a vertical fist crack to the top, when I look up and see him belaying me, white as a sheet, off a couple of the saddest looking trees I've ever seen. Barely clinging to life on the bluff, really.

Never have I felt such pressure to not gently caress up a Gaston. :stonk:

Turns out he'd massively misread the route beta and wandered way off course, and upon topping out with no anchors in sight he'd had to rig the sketchiest goddamn belay off the only available features (the two half-dead trees).

We walked off agreeing that that was mutually the scariest bullshit we'd ever climbed and more than enough excitement for one day.

El Marrow
Jan 21, 2009

Everybody here is just as dead as you.

Rime posted:

Then the clincher: I'm gastoning my way up a vertical fist crack to the top, when I look up and see him belaying me, white as a sheet, off a couple of the saddest looking trees I've ever seen. Barely clinging to life on the bluff, really.

Wow. That's insane that he belayed you up instead of just walking off and saying "Nah not worth it, dude."

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

This is just one of the reasons why I use radios when trad climbing unknown routes.

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Sharks Eat Bear
Dec 25, 2004


Rime posted:

Maaaaan, I had the sketchiest adventure on the weekend. End of a day of hard Trad, we're wandering around the Smoke Bluffs looking for something fun. Come across this 30m upward-trending traverse called Wonderland which has a good 200' drop below it the whole way. Strong breeze is blowing, book calls it a mega-classic, we're stoked.

Buddy leads it and takes a long time, a really long time. I notice that we've got the midmarker in the rope in the device by the time he gives me the tug signal that he's anchored in.

I head out, the route is just amazing. Really great climbing. Then it gets ultra manky and I notice I haven't passed any gear to collect in a while and that there is none up ahead, and decide it would be best if I didn't fall now. That'd be a nasty rear end pendulum. I think it was close to a 15m runout in this janky-rear end mud and grass filled crack before I hit another cam.

Then the clincher: I'm gastoning my way up a vertical fist crack to the top, when I look up and see him belaying me, white as a sheet, off a couple of the saddest looking trees I've ever seen. Barely clinging to life on the bluff, really.

Never have I felt such pressure to not gently caress up a Gaston. :stonk:

Turns out he'd massively misread the route beta and wandered way off course, and upon topping out with no anchors in sight he'd had to rig the sketchiest goddamn belay off the only available features (the two half-dead trees).

We walked off agreeing that that was mutually the scariest bullshit we'd ever climbed and more than enough excitement for one day.

that sounds pretty hosed up

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