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Chris!
Dec 1, 2004

E

spwrozek posted:

If you are on overhung routes where you could fall bad, maybe land on your neck you should really have a spotter. He could have tapped you under the pits and on your feet you land.

Really people should always use a spotter, the gym gives a false sense of security with all the padding.

The overhang was probably 2ft from the crash mat - I've attempted the problem a few times (and completed only once) and fallen a couple times previously, with no issues at all. I just fell in a stupid way this time (flailing my arms like a fool).

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jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

It happens. Having spotters is overrated anyways. They only have a function when there is an obsitcal that you need to be diverted from should you fall off (Another boulder, a poorly placed volume if you are indoors for example). In this situation you would probably have just him em in the face!

I'm glad you enjoyed my blog post. I'll try and post something weekly or so. Hopefully others can learn from what is working for me and what isn't as I go.

jiggerypokery fucked around with this message at 18:16 on Mar 30, 2013

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



If it is that close to the ground then yeah my comment was pointless.

I still think a good spotter is key though.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Someone recently asked me to spot them while they did a route than involved standing up on a box volume tilted about 35 degrees with no hands.

I had no idea what they expected me to do because all the damage would have been done when their foot slipped and they smashed their face on all the holds/volume.

ZeroDays
Feb 11, 2007

the fuck you know about what i need on my mind mother fucker

My bouldering gym actively discourages spotting because apart from being mostly useless, it may end up in two people being injured instead of one.

TrinityOfDeath
Mar 18, 2009


ZeroDays posted:

My bouldering gym actively discourages spotting because apart from being mostly useless, it may end up in two people being injured instead of one.

This is crazy. Just like you practice bouldering indoors to go outdoors later, you practice spotting indoors for when you go outdoors and the landings are not made of soft foam. The place we boulder outdoors in Ohio has terrible landings with steep angles and lots of sharp rocks. The spottter(s) have to be on point to make sure the climber falls onto the pad safely. You should not learn this outside, but rather you should learn in the safety of the bouldering gym how to safely spot someone. 99% of the time inside it is useless, but you also learn how they fall, when they tend to fall, when to move the pad, and how to aim them safely onto the pad. You do not have to be all up in their business in the gym, but you can help keep your partner from injuring themselves if they have that freak fall. Rock climbing is already dangerous and laziness in the gym should not contribute to that.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

I see what your saying but a large part (nearly all) the skill involved in spotting is identifying where and when it is nesiccary. At the end of the day the most serious indoor climbing injuries are often from climbers landing on each other. A small inconsequential fall for a climber of just a few feet is enough to paralyse someone they land on if they are standing in the wrong place. I'm definatly not saying don't spot indoors all I am saying is it's not a skill you 'practice' for use out doors. It's either nessicary in a given situation or it's not regardless of where you are. The skill is just identifying where.

AriTheDog
Jul 29, 2003
Famously tasty.

jiggerypokery posted:

I see what your saying but a large part (nearly all) the skill involved in spotting is identifying where and when it is nesiccary. At the end of the day the most serious indoor climbing injuries are often from climbers landing on each other. A small inconsequential fall for a climber of just a few feet is enough to paralyse someone they land on if they are standing in the wrong place. I'm definatly not saying don't spot indoors all I am saying is it's not a skill you 'practice' for use out doors. It's either nessicary in a given situation or it's not regardless of where you are. The skill is just identifying where.

So how are you supposed to learn to spot safely then? Or to learn when to spot?

ultimatemike
May 10, 2005

Little Joe? Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion, man.


I actually got injured once because I was working on the lip of a bouldering problem and some fuckwit I didn't even know "spotted me" by just trying to loving catch me in his hands which ended up holding my knee in the air while the rest of me fell. Holy poo poo was I pissed.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

ultimatemike posted:

I actually got injured once because I was working on the lip of a bouldering problem and some fuckwit I didn't even know "spotted me" by just trying to loving catch me in his hands which ended up holding my knee in the air while the rest of me fell. Holy poo poo was I pissed.

That kind of thing happens all the time and it is precisely the problem with spotting.

AriTheDog posted:

So how are you supposed to learn to spot safely then? Or to learn when to spot?

Most walls make sure your aware of what it is when you join, or require you to do an induction with someone qualified. If a wall (gym in the USA) doesn't require you to sign a paper that says your competent with basic safty when someone joins they could be liable if that person causes injury and could potentially be sued. If a person lies about it when they sign the paper it's their problem.

In other words a more experienced climber should have taught a novice the principles before they should be allowed to boulder unsupervised indoors, and if you take less experienced climbers out with you it's your responsibility to ensure their competence.

Of course you can always just not get on problems that require it if your worried about it!

gamera009
Apr 7, 2005



Most of the people I have climbed with insist on spotting. I also insist on spotting on problems that may be sketchy, even if it's just a few feet from the ground. Being able to grab someone and prevent landing on their head, face, neck, or twist wrong on their ankles is important as hell. Improper spotting led to me dislocating an ankle, but proper spotting has also saved me from highballs and sketchy falls.

The problem with most spotters is that they're not told how to spot, how to react dynamically to spot appropriately, and most also believe that catching under the pits is the best way to spot (it isn't).

I suppose we could have this derail for the rest of the thread - it's like people that ride their bicycle without a helmet, or lead without a helmet, but I think safety is a real priority outside and I always insist that the people I climb with (if I haven't climbed with them before) know how to spot and can spot well.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



^^^^^ I was about to same the same thing. It's not a problem with spotting, it's a problem with lovely gyms not teaching people how to spot. A good spot is crucial, and gently caress anyone who says otherwise.

gamera009
Apr 7, 2005



a foolish pianist posted:

^^^^^ I was about to same the same thing. It's not a problem with spotting, it's a problem with lovely gyms not teaching people how to spot. A good spot is crucial, and gently caress anyone who says otherwise.

Word. :c00l::hf::c00l:

I think there's a huge bro-mentality of "spotting is for pussies" that I get at a lot of gyms, especially at places like The Spot, where of all places it shouldn't be the case. All people bouldering should know that the mental safety net of a good spotter can give that additional boost where you're on a hard problem that you might not have otherwise because you're preoccupied with your own safety. Being able to trust your spotter and know that you'll be safe gives a lot of power and drive when you're in the middle of some terrible crux. Plus, you know, safe if you have a good spotter.

The strange thing is that lots of people are okay with spotting a lady at the gym, and I've seen plenty of bros hop to their feet to give a spot, but when there's a guy on the wall (I've had this happen a ton of times) or if I ask for a spot (when my friends aren't around) on a cruxy, sketchy move, I generally have to wait a second before someone finally gets up and spots (usually with the "fine, I guess I'll do it" look). I try to be mindful and give plenty of spots and tell people that I have their back when they're on something that looks sketchy and I've always been thanked afterwards. I have yet to hear, "why did you loving spot me, you dick - it made me afraid of coming off the problem."

I think pianist is right in the statement that a lot of gyms nowadays don't teach proper spotting technique and that, coupled with the idea that guys spotting each other is "gay as hell," makes for a disaster. I'm willing to bet that a lot of people, when asked how to spot someone, would assume that spotting is just catching a dude in the pits when they come off a problem, or that spotting for a vertical fall is the same as a lateral movement, or spotting dynoing.

I don't really understand why you wouldn't want to teach someone how to be safe, I guess.

egyptian rat race
Jul 13, 2007

Lowtax Spine Fund 2019


Ultra Carp

I have a climbing friend who is planning on taking a bucket list sort of trip to the Sierras in 2014-15, and he's left the door open for me to tag along. IIRC he climbs in the 5.11-12 range outdoors, and he's been active for years. His main target for the trip is a multi-pitch 5.10b with "lots of straight in finger jamming", with backpacking and camping at altitude. I can definitely handle the backpacking. I also have my own basic gear and screw around at bouldering walls and rock gyms a few times a year... but I've never been on anything worse than an exposed scramble outdoors. I'm used to being roped in and exposed to heights for work, but I have no real reference point for the difficulty involved here.

If I go for broke, switch up my training, invest in a hang board an keep cranking out pull ups... Is it even possible for me to get to that level of climbing in a year or two? Do I need to have some natural talent to climb that grade, or can I work my way up?

Fontoyn
Aug 25, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Diver Dick posted:

I have a climbing friend who is planning on taking a bucket list sort of trip to the Sierras in 2014-15, and he's left the door open for me to tag along. IIRC he climbs in the 5.11-12 range outdoors, and he's been active for years. His main target for the trip is a multi-pitch 5.10b with "lots of straight in finger jamming", with backpacking and camping at altitude. I can definitely handle the backpacking. I also have my own basic gear and screw around at bouldering walls and rock gyms a few times a year... but I've never been on anything worse than an exposed scramble outdoors. I'm used to being roped in and exposed to heights for work, but I have no real reference point for the difficulty involved here.

If I go for broke, switch up my training, invest in a hang board an keep cranking out pull ups... Is it even possible for me to get to that level of climbing in a year or two? Do I need to have some natural talent to climb that grade, or can I work my way up?

I'm actually in the same boat and would definitely like to know. I've got a really good strength base but I'm still managing only v2s/3s at the moment.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



Getting to 5.10b in a year should not be an issue. If you plan the pitches right he can do the harder ones also.

I think the biggest problem you have will be getting your hands ready for non stop jamming. Most gyms I have been to can't really prepare you for it.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



10b in a year should be doable. Even if you don't quite get there, though, you could still second the climbs. Just keep a couple of appropriately sized pieces on your harness and aid through the cruxes.

gamera009
Apr 7, 2005



spwrozek posted:

Getting to 5.10b in a year should not be an issue. If you plan the pitches right he can do the harder ones also.

I think the biggest problem you have will be getting your hands ready for non stop jamming. Most gyms I have been to can't really prepare you for it.

I hear beating your hands with a rubber mallet is pretty good for that.

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Got outside for the first time this year over the weekend. Me and some friends hit up the New River Gorge. Weather was great on Friday and Saturday, although below freezing over night so tent camping was a wee bit chilly. The main point of this post is:

Get back outside, the weather is fine!

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Fanzay posted:

I need a new harness, does anyone have any reccomendations?

I have one of these: http://www.backcountry.com/petzl-hirundos-harness-mens and am a big fan.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.


Me too, best sport harness going. I don't use it for trad though because It's only got two gear loops. If you ever climb on gear having 4 or more really helps. I also have: http://www.sportsdirect.com/dmm-renegade-harness-788129 but I can't recommend one.

It has a adjustable waist line that kind of runs through the whole thing. It means you have to pay particular attention to where it is. Normal harnesses don't sit right if you have them too low or not done up correctly but the Renegade sits perfectly when it is way way too low. Call it good or bad design whatever you like but at the climbing wall I work I have to stop people and get them to adjust it more than any other harness by miles. (Partly due to them being so popular).

Same goes for any harness though. No one makes crap harnesses any more so just make sure it fits above your hips comfortably and your in.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


jiggerypokery posted:

Me too, best sport harness going. I don't use it for trad though because It's only got two gear loops. If you ever climb on gear having 4 or more really helps. I also have: http://www.sportsdirect.com/dmm-renegade-harness-788129 but I can't recommend one.

I think I got confused about which Petzl harness I have because I forgot the name, and the Hirundos has nearly identical colors to mine. I actually have a Petzl Sama (http://www.backcountry.com/petzl-sama-harness-mens-ptz0190). It has 4 gear loops, and otherwise looks just like the other one. Maybe it's a bit heavier? Not sure. I think Petzl's harnesses aren't super differentiated.

Pander
Oct 9, 2007

Fear is the glue that holds society together. It's what makes people suppress their worst impulses. Fear is power.

And at the end of fear, oblivion.





modig posted:

I think I got confused about which Petzl harness I have because I forgot the name, and the Hirundos has nearly identical colors to mine. I actually have a Petzl Sama (http://www.backcountry.com/petzl-sama-harness-mens-ptz0190). It has 4 gear loops, and otherwise looks just like the other one. Maybe it's a bit heavier? Not sure. I think Petzl's harnesses aren't super differentiated.

I love my Petzl Sama. Easy to get on. Fits well. Good support. Loops for hanging anything. Auto-double-back. Center loop makes belaying a cinch. Not crazy expensive (~$60).

I finally chimneyed last night up about 10 feet at the local gym. First time ever! I've been too heavy/weak/tall to do it before (6'4", 200 lbs), with my largest problem being that I couldn't use my arms to shore up strength for the multiple tiny little steps up I take (since I can't bend my knees for poo poo being too tall). Felt pretty cool. Hope to go up the full 35' next time maybe. Tiring, but awesome.

I'm about ready to sign up for a personalized class, because I think I'm plateauing in terms of skill. My strength's still improving, and my balance/technique is light years better than it was 3 months ago even, but I'm stuck being able to do most 5.9s and very few 5.10s at the gym (which I find grades harder than my last gym). It's $50 for an hour of instruction for g/f and I together. Sound like a good deal, or should I instead read and keep practicing on my own?

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Pander posted:

It's $50 for an hour of instruction for g/f and I together. Sound like a good deal, or should I instead read and keep practicing on my own?

An hour with a decent instructor will make your next three months miles more productive than they would have otherwise been. You'll get a good idea of technique to work on and you will see big gains. You wont climb 5.10 immediately after the session but it will definatly speed things along.

At the level your at the instruction you will require will actually be really generic and not nessicarily worth doing on a 1:2 coach - client ratio. You could save a fair bit of money booking on a 1:6 movement and technique course and still get just as much out of it or perhaps even more. You might get 2 hours for the same price for example.

I guess it depends what you want out of the session. If you want bang for buck join a movement and technique class, if you want a nice time with your girlfriend just go 1:2. Both will be good for your climbing.

Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.

modig posted:

I think I got confused about which Petzl harness I have because I forgot the name, and the Hirundos has nearly identical colors to mine. I actually have a Petzl Sama (http://www.backcountry.com/petzl-sama-harness-mens-ptz0190). It has 4 gear loops, and otherwise looks just like the other one. Maybe it's a bit heavier? Not sure. I think Petzl's harnesses aren't super differentiated.

Get the Adjama instead, adjustable leg loops are absolutely the best and it's otherwise the same. Though I personally am a fan of BD's Aspect.

Discomancer
Aug 31, 2001

I'm on a cupcake caper!

I've had the Adjama and the Sama. They're both great, but I think the adjustable leg straps made the Adjama a more comfortable harness overall. It does not come in Badass Orange though, so that's a strike against it.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Speleothing posted:

Get the Adjama instead, adjustable leg loops are absolutely the best and it's otherwise the same. Though I personally am a fan of BD's Aspect.

I actually went with the Sama just to not have adjustable leg loops. I like the elastic, and I've never had a situation where my harness didn't fit fine. When do you actually adjust the loops?

SplitDestiny
Sep 25, 2004


New backpack time!

I'm looking for a new backpack. What size and recommendations do you guys have for someone who is starting to get more into trad and needs an all purpose backpack.

For instance, I'll probably be doing snakedike in yosemite later this year so I'll need to be able to carry my gear and food. Also, being able to truck around to various multipitch routes is needed. Would I need a bag that separates into a smaller wall bag?

PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.


I know the best way to get better is to climb, but are there any exercises that help? Core and shoulder workouts?

I'm looking for something for when some reason I can't climb.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

I can't climb at the moment due to the fact I am recovering from a knee op. Check my blog a page back for some ideas maybe. Anything you do to improve upper body and core strength will have a long term positive impact on your climbing. It won't make you climb better as you say, you need to climb to learn to apply your new found strength.

Number one thing you can work on is finger strength, but if you cant put a fingerboard up core is very important.

TRX is the best core workout gizmo out there at the moment, but if you don't want to buy one there is loads of good core stuff you can do with no equipment.

I have this app on my Iphone I use for ideas when I cant climb. Basically lots of core exercises that you don't need equipment for.
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.leafcutterstudios.yayog&hl=en

jiggerypokery fucked around with this message at 08:33 on Apr 3, 2013

JustAnother Fat Guy
Dec 22, 2009

Go to hell, and take your cheap suit with you!

Diver Dick posted:

I have a climbing friend who is planning on taking a bucket list sort of trip to the Sierras in 2014-15, and he's left the door open for me to tag along. IIRC he climbs in the 5.11-12 range outdoors, and he's been active for years. His main target for the trip is a multi-pitch 5.10b with "lots of straight in finger jamming", with backpacking and camping at altitude. I can definitely handle the backpacking. I also have my own basic gear and screw around at bouldering walls and rock gyms a few times a year... but I've never been on anything worse than an exposed scramble outdoors. I'm used to being roped in and exposed to heights for work, but I have no real reference point for the difficulty involved here.

If I go for broke, switch up my training, invest in a hang board an keep cranking out pull ups... Is it even possible for me to get to that level of climbing in a year or two? Do I need to have some natural talent to climb that grade, or can I work my way up?

Crack climbing is a different type of climbing in my opinion it's so different to your average gym climbers repertoire. I know friends who can climb E6's outdoors which are face climbs but an E2 crack will completely mince them, or they will end up trying to layback it or some other "rookie" mistake.

Just get outside and start crack climbing, a 5.10b crack climb isn't actually that difficult once you practice the technique over and over again, and get your ankles and wrists used to being jammed in at horrifying angles. It hurts like a bitch at first and you will run up quite the bill with tape, but it's worth it. Crack climbing in my opinion is one of the best types of climbing as so many people are poo poo at it. I see 70 year olds climbing E2 cracks solo at some of the gritstone edges here in England. All about the technique bro. Get the gently caress out there and just climb as many cracks on top rope as you can with your friend, it will loving hurt the first few weeks, but no pain no gain. Then step up to leading, and after a while soloing them is not out of the question as once you get it right crack climbing feels so solid.

Another point that was raised was make sure you do know how to swap a lead safely, and get your friend to teach you. Most good climbers are very happy to accommodate people with less experience.

JustAnother Fat Guy fucked around with this message at 10:11 on Apr 3, 2013

Thorkel
Oct 12, 2012


armorer posted:

Got outside for the first time this year over the weekend. Me and some friends hit up the New River Gorge. Weather was great on Friday and Saturday, although below freezing over night so tent camping was a wee bit chilly. The main point of this post is:

Get back outside, the weather is fine!

Nice, where'd you climb? I was at Sandstonia on Saturday. Did you camp at the AAC campground?

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

SplitDestiny posted:

New backpack time!

I'm looking for a new backpack. What size and recommendations do you guys have for someone who is starting to get more into trad and needs an all purpose backpack.

For instance, I'll probably be doing snakedike in yosemite later this year so I'll need to be able to carry my gear and food. Also, being able to truck around to various multipitch routes is needed. Would I need a bag that separates into a smaller wall bag?

I have a Petzl Bug, and while it is quite small I get a lot of use out of it. Being small, I can bring it up multi pitch routes with me and it doesn't interfere with my harness. It doesn't hold all my gear though. If I need to bring a bunch of gear to the wall I end up slinging some of it and clipping some of it to the loops on the bag.

And Thorkel:

We hit up Bubba City on Friday. I had never been there before, and honestly wasn't that impressed (although we only really hit Ames Wall). Saturday we were on Endless Wall near Legacy and Discombobulated. We took off late Saturday night, and missed the rain that came through Sunday.

Edit: we camped at Chestnut Creek

Grisly Grotto
Jun 17, 2003

Are sure you should fight tonight? You don't look well.


bragpost!

After being stuck doing v1s and v2s for a couple of months at my gym, tonight I finally sent a v4 I've been working at for the past month. Hadn't really got close to doing the crux before, but tonight it all clicked and it was (relatively) easy! Made some good progress on a few other problems too. So uh, keep at it if you're plateauing I guess.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

PRADA SLUT posted:

I know the best way to get better is to climb, but are there any exercises that help? Core and shoulder workouts?

I'm looking for something for when some reason I can't climb.

Yoga. Great for shoulder, back, and core strength and for lower body flexibility

Bhodi
Dec 9, 2007

Oh, it's just a cat.


Pillbug

Squats! Lunges! From a crouch, put one leg out in front of you, then slowly stand up on the other leg, back straight, through a 5 count without bouncing. Then, go back down.

Tons of climbers can't do it, which means they're using arm assist when they could just be standing up on a hold. "My legs are strong enough", my rear end.

Edit: As Shine says, don't neglect leg day!

Bhodi fucked around with this message at 15:43 on Apr 3, 2013

Pander
Oct 9, 2007

Fear is the glue that holds society together. It's what makes people suppress their worst impulses. Fear is power.

And at the end of fear, oblivion.





How do you climb cracks without swearing to god that your wrists will just SNAP and your radius will soon be sticking out of your arm flesh if you miss a move?

I get terrified of losing my balance and breaking my arm/hand/wrist/ankle/whatever if I have it jammed in a crack

tortilla_chip
Jun 13, 2007

k-partite

Drive elbows down and knees in?

Edit: Oh and spend a week at Indian Creek each year.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Pander posted:

How do you climb cracks without swearing to god that your wrists will just SNAP and your radius will soon be sticking out of your arm flesh if you miss a move?

I get terrified of losing my balance and breaking my arm/hand/wrist/ankle/whatever if I have it jammed in a crack

You're not moving dynamically from jams, really, and you can hang comfortably from hand jams or finger locks with a little practice.

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Petey
Nov 25, 2005

For who knows what is good for a person in life, during the few and meaningless days they pass through like a shadow? Who can tell them what will happen under the sun after they are gone?

Pander posted:

How do you climb cracks without swearing to god that your wrists will just SNAP and your radius will soon be sticking out of your arm flesh if you miss a move?

I get terrified of losing my balance and breaking my arm/hand/wrist/ankle/whatever if I have it jammed in a crack

Just close your eyes, relax, and try not to think of Kevin Ware.

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