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Baldbeard
Mar 26, 2011



Pander posted:


Drop-knees, keeping knees bent to stay low, and locking into holds...that stuff's still pretty hard for me. Is a drop-knee supposed to make you feel like you're about to have some joint shatter?

Definitely not. Drop knees seem counter-intuitive when you first start using them, but they are actually really comfortable when done correctly and make it easier to get where you want to go.

Let's say your foot is on a hold with your toes directly facing the wall and you need to get low. If you bend your knee, your knee is just going to go forward into the wall. So you would have to turn your hips and your foot, and bend your knee slightly to the side. That's a good starting maneuver to practice drop knees.

Also, locking off is important. You shouldn't be in a shaky position too often. A lot of the time you can almost "sit" on the back of your leg, or push your hip into the wall. Many impressive and technical looking static moves are a lot of locking and resting on your own body to reduce the muscular load.

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Reformed Tomboy
Feb 2, 2005

chu~~

Irving posted:

Anyone in southern California know when Sender One is opening? They've had some preview events, but I can't seem to find out when they're actually doing their grand opening.

http://www.senderoneclimbing.com/

I heard a rumor they'll open in late May. Which seems to be supported on their calendar for yoga classes, which begin the last week in May.

Pander
Oct 9, 2007

Fear is the glue that holds society together. It's what makes people suppress their worst impulses. Fear is power.

And at the end of fear, oblivion.





Baldbeard posted:

Definitely not. Drop knees seem counter-intuitive when you first start using them, but they are actually really comfortable when done correctly and make it easier to get where you want to go.

Let's say your foot is on a hold with your toes directly facing the wall and you need to get low. If you bend your knee, your knee is just going to go forward into the wall. So you would have to turn your hips and your foot, and bend your knee slightly to the side. That's a good starting maneuver to practice drop knees.

Also, locking off is important. You shouldn't be in a shaky position too often. A lot of the time you can almost "sit" on the back of your leg, or push your hip into the wall. Many impressive and technical looking static moves are a lot of locking and resting on your own body to reduce the muscular load.
Thanks for the info...I'll give it a shot tonight.


Typically each week I climb 3 times, and 1 time it's just the easier autobelays, running through them fast to get endurance. 1 time it's going to the harder top-ropes to build technique. Then the last time it's either autobelays or top-ropes depending on what I want to work on.

Right now I'm still working to develop strength, particularly upper-body. Is intentionally NOT locking off a good way to help get tired/build muscle? Like, when I do those quicker autobelay routes, should I maybe do them wrong technique-wise on purpose since that'd require more muscle use to make up for the poor technique?

Baldbeard
Mar 26, 2011



Pander posted:

Thanks for the info...I'll give it a shot tonight.


Typically each week I climb 3 times, and 1 time it's just the easier autobelays, running through them fast to get endurance. 1 time it's going to the harder top-ropes to build technique. Then the last time it's either autobelays or top-ropes depending on what I want to work on.

Right now I'm still working to develop strength, particularly upper-body. Is intentionally NOT locking off a good way to help get tired/build muscle? Like, when I do those quicker autobelay routes, should I maybe do them wrong technique-wise on purpose since that'd require more muscle use to make up for the poor technique?

Always focus on technique over everything else. Not locking off on purpose would definitely increase your strength, same as any other isometric exercise, like freezing in a pullup half way up or whatever. But your time will always be better spent focusing on proper technique, most any strength you need to climb will happen as you climb. The only time I'd personally recommend specific training would be intense core exercises.

I go 2-3 times a week too, and I usually try to force myself to make one of those days a 'training day' where I work on technique within my grade rather than "performing" and trying to complete 1st time projects.

Pander
Oct 9, 2007

Fear is the glue that holds society together. It's what makes people suppress their worst impulses. Fear is power.

And at the end of fear, oblivion.





Baldbeard posted:

Always focus on technique over everything else. Not locking off on purpose would definitely increase your strength, same as any other isometric exercise, like freezing in a pullup half way up or whatever. But your time will always be better spent focusing on proper technique, most any strength you need to climb will happen as you climb. The only time I'd personally recommend specific training would be intense core exercises.

I go 2-3 times a week too, and I usually try to force myself to make one of those days a 'training day' where I work on technique within my grade rather than "performing" and trying to complete 1st time projects.
I'd use poor technique to increase muscle strength as a means of catching up, more or less. I've always had relatively small upper-body muscles compared to lower-body, and figured climbing could help reverse that. It's been a noticible thing, as my pull-ups have gone from a lifetime high of 1-in-a-row to about 7-in-a-row lately, and I can one-arm hang off a good jug (IF I ABSOLUTELY HAVE TO, I try to avoid it) off either arm now.

I still recognize how important technique is compared to strength when climbing, it's just me trying to find a shortcut to a 'better workout' vs 'better climbing'.

Baldbeard
Mar 26, 2011



I see what you mean. If you boulder hard and eat accordingly you will definitely gain a lot of muscle either way. Technique is something that everyone always has to work on to progress though, so choosing to focus on strength over technique won't ever allow you to climb harder stuff as quickly as making technique your main focus.

That said, I can totally understand switching it up for the sake of a workout.

Pander
Oct 9, 2007

Fear is the glue that holds society together. It's what makes people suppress their worst impulses. Fear is power.

And at the end of fear, oblivion.





Baldbeard posted:

I see what you mean. If you boulder hard and eat accordingly you will definitely gain a lot of muscle either way. Technique is something that everyone always has to work on to progress though, so choosing to focus on strength over technique won't ever allow you to climb harder stuff as quickly as making technique your main focus.

That said, I can totally understand switching it up for the sake of a workout.

It was academic anyway. Since the autobelays were full (I swear every night I go there's a boy scout troupe party or some poo poo...) g/f and I did some top-ropes. Cleaned a 5.10a, which is usually just past where I plateaued. Almost did another, but it was my last climb of the night and I just didn't have the strength left to pass the crux. Still, I feel the class I took really hammered home some good technique that I was otherwise spitballing. I really hope to complete a 5.10b/c at some point soon.

canvasbagfight
Aug 20, 2005
renovating. please excuse our mess.

I think it's really just about climbing until those techniques you mention become second nature and you apply them/try to apply them in situations without even thinking. Then you can focus on other stuff like the next hold, or breathing regularly, etc. That's what it was for me and inside flagging.

Fontoyn
Aug 25, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Okay, more beginner climber advice posts.

I'm about 200lbs with a lot of muscle/fat that is useless for climbing but I like climbing anyway. I am just now completing v2/3s on the bouldering wall and want to know:

What are some drills I can use to improve my technique? I can't attend any classes on climbing but I'm just now focusing on carefully finding footholds instead of grinding down the wall towards them.

What are common mistakes I should avoid?

My forearms are getting stupid-rear end strong but I know skinnier guy will always beat me. I just want to get to the point where I can boulder v5s at least and people keep telling me grip strength is less important than technique to getting there.

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Fontoyn posted:

Okay, more beginner climber advice posts.

I'm about 200lbs with a lot of muscle/fat that is useless for climbing but I like climbing anyway. I am just now completing v2/3s on the bouldering wall and want to know:

What are some drills I can use to improve my technique? I can't attend any classes on climbing but I'm just now focusing on carefully finding footholds instead of grinding down the wall towards them.

What are common mistakes I should avoid?

My forearms are getting stupid-rear end strong but I know skinnier guy will always beat me. I just want to get to the point where I can boulder v5s at least and people keep telling me grip strength is less important than technique to getting there.

I quite like 'silent feet', where the aim is to place your feet as you climb without them making any noise, and not moving your foot once it is placed. This encourages precise, controlled first time foot placements, and will eventually become more habitual. It's easy enough to just do it for 20 minutes per session whilst you warm up.

Baldbeard
Mar 26, 2011



Fontoyn posted:

Okay, more beginner climber advice posts.

I'm about 200lbs with a lot of muscle/fat that is useless for climbing but I like climbing anyway. I am just now completing v2/3s on the bouldering wall and want to know:

What are some drills I can use to improve my technique? I can't attend any classes on climbing but I'm just now focusing on carefully finding footholds instead of grinding down the wall towards them.

What are common mistakes I should avoid?

My forearms are getting stupid-rear end strong but I know skinnier guy will always beat me. I just want to get to the point where I can boulder v5s at least and people keep telling me grip strength is less important than technique to getting there.

-Take plenty of rest between attempts.
-Make the meat of your session routes within your grade, rather than solely struggling to break through to the next grade.
-After you complete a challenging route, revisit it often until it is cake. Redoing routes is great because you can focus entirely on movements since you already have the beta memorized. This helps a lot with technique.
-Keep your arms straight and lock off whenever possible. It's cliche, but look at how monkeys climb.
-Do VB/V0s and try to skip as many holds as possible. This is a surprisingly good simulation of harder reachy routes you will encounter. Big static moves force you to plan the whole movement out, rather than just lunge and go, smashing everything and dragging your body across the wall.

Overall. Just climb. When you are resting, watch other climbers.

Frown Town
Sep 10, 2009

does not even lift
SWAG SWAG SWAG YOLO


Fontoyn posted:

Okay, more beginner climber advice posts.

I'm about 200lbs with a lot of muscle/fat that is useless for climbing but I like climbing anyway. I am just now completing v2/3s on the bouldering wall and want to know:

What are some drills I can use to improve my technique? I can't attend any classes on climbing but I'm just now focusing on carefully finding footholds instead of grinding down the wall towards them.

What are common mistakes I should avoid?

My forearms are getting stupid-rear end strong but I know skinnier guy will always beat me. I just want to get to the point where I can boulder v5s at least and people keep telling me grip strength is less important than technique to getting there.

Hey! I was around 175-180 at my heaviest, and a 5'4 female powerlifter-turned-climber. Was not definitely easy, but here's some tips as a strong-but-heavy (and short) climber:

1.) seconding Baldbeard - straight arms, lock off. Rely on your skeletal structure to keep you on the wall rather than pulling yourself in with the strength of your biceps/forearms. Keep your hips kinda close to the wall and you'll naturally form this straightened-arm approach. Sink down into your legs for stability and strength, and remember to stand up with your legs first (and your arms secondarily).
2.) core exercises are very helpful - hanging from the hangboard and tapping the wall with my feet was really challenging but very useful - look up hangboard drills
3.) Downclimb when you can. Slowly and methodically.
4.) Practice climbing statically; you probably have the strength for dynamic movement already but static technique will give you the biggest payoff as a beginner: Be meticulous and thrifty with your movements as you start out. Think about how to position your body in the most energy efficient way possible. Sometimes this does mean skipping holds so you're not wasting energy on baby steps. Good climbers know where their feet are going, and are precise about where the best place to stick their foot is on the hold - you don't want to be fumbling with your feet after you plant on a foothold. Similarly, you don't really want to fumble much with your hands either; I have a bad habit of tugging and repositioning my hands, when I should ideally just grab a hold the right way from the start.
5.) This is general advice to all climbers, but I think it's important for beginners: know your limits, rest when it's necessary, take time off, and don't get injured. Injuries as a beginner suck in particular because you lose way more momentum. You'll have plenty of time as an intermediate/advanced climber to gently caress up your ankles, wrists, and finger tendons, so take it easy as a beginner. :)

e: Now I'm running closer to 165, and the difference is huge between that and bouldering at 180. Weight loss and technique improvements have really helped me become a better climber; people wrongfully assume that I'm stronger. That might be the case a little bit, only because my strength-to-weight ratio has probably improved; but I think it's mostly technique.

Frown Town fucked around with this message at 21:00 on Apr 30, 2013

pokchu
Aug 22, 2007
D:

I kind of disagree with some of the previous training advice. Being as efficient and technically correct as possible is great up to a point, but there comes a level where it won't make you any physically stronger (or at least not with any speed.) once you send whatever you're working on, and are confident in your ability to do so, start climbing in ways to maximize your gains. Straight armed is your weakest position, so try to keep arms flexed and locked off there. Outdoors you will almost always be able to find two feet, so train indoors using only one foot at all times. Keep body tension at a maximum by staying squared up with the wall: no back stepping. And moving staticly isn't the end -all be-All of climbing. If you try to be static ALL the time, you aren't training contact strength and technique. Jimmy Webb sets at TBA in Chattanooga and I overheard a guy complaining to him about just that fact about a route jimmy set. He was told "then I guess you can't send it."

There are all sorts of styles of climbing and it never hurts to work on every aspect. Finger strength, core, and technique are all important, use the gym to train them all, don't ignore some facets for others.

Covert Ops Wizard
Dec 27, 2006



pokchu posted:

I kind of disagree with some of the previous training advice. Being as efficient and technically correct as possible is great up to a point, but there comes a level where it won't make you any physically stronger (or at least not with any speed.) once you send whatever you're working on, and are confident in your ability to do so, start climbing in ways to maximize your gains. Straight armed is your weakest position, so try to keep arms flexed and locked off there. Outdoors you will almost always be able to find two feet, so train indoors using only one foot at all times. Keep body tension at a maximum by staying squared up with the wall: no back stepping. And moving staticly isn't the end -all be-All of climbing. If you try to be static ALL the time, you aren't training contact strength and technique. Jimmy Webb sets at TBA in Chattanooga and I overheard a guy complaining to him about just that fact about a route jimmy set. He was told "then I guess you can't send it."

There are all sorts of styles of climbing and it never hurts to work on every aspect. Finger strength, core, and technique are all important, use the gym to train them all, don't ignore some facets for others.

I would disagree and just say keep using the best technique you can and work on harder/different problems. I agree on stepping out of your wheelhouse though. It reminds me of watching a boulderer friend of mine try to attack a top-rope route, he blasted up the first 15 feet with strong, confident moves that totally hosed him for the rest of the route, even though the moves were waaaaaaaay easier than what he usually climbed. He'd never learned to climb efficiently. The same can be said for people who never do slopers because they're strong at crimps, like another friend of mine. I can understand how it's frustrating when you're doing v4 crimpy problems but a v3 with some big rounded off holds throw you every time.

Frown Town
Sep 10, 2009

does not even lift
SWAG SWAG SWAG YOLO


pokchu posted:

Being as efficient and technically correct as possible is great up to a point, but there comes a level where it won't make you any physically stronger (or at least not with any speed.) once you send whatever you're working on, and are confident in your ability to do so, start climbing in ways to maximize your gains.

There are all sorts of styles of climbing and it never hurts to work on every aspect. Finger strength, core, and technique are all important, use the gym to train them all, don't ignore some facets for others.

Well, sure.
But you're going to hose yourself as a beginner if you try to muscle through everything + lock off all the time. Especially if you weigh 200 lbs; brute forcing 200 lbs isn't fun or easy if you don't have technique to back it up. Specifically, Fontoyn's already strong, and while I'm sure climbing-specific strength is important, so is mastering basic technique (and I'd argue start static before you start doing tons of dynamic movements). You'll have time to blast through problems once you're confident with moving as efficiently as possible through them first.

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.



Fontoyn posted:

Okay, more beginner climber advice posts.

I'm about 200lbs with a lot of muscle/fat that is useless for climbing but I like climbing anyway. I am just now completing v2/3s on the bouldering wall and want to know:

What are some drills I can use to improve my technique? I can't attend any classes on climbing but I'm just now focusing on carefully finding footholds instead of grinding down the wall towards them.

What are common mistakes I should avoid?

My forearms are getting stupid-rear end strong but I know skinnier guy will always beat me. I just want to get to the point where I can boulder v5s at least and people keep telling me grip strength is less important than technique to getting there.

I don't want to sound like a sales guy but this DVD I have to recommend.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_s...ham%2Caps%2C324 <- it's not perfect but this DVD is far far better than trying to interpret tonnes of second hand advice. It not only tells you the same stuff everyone else tells you but it shows you how to actually apply it to your climbing training, the order to apply and why you should. Climbing technique is all about the whole picture. Theres loads to it.

If someone tells you silent feet thats great, or strait arms save you energy (you americans seem to call that lock-off which as far as I know is precisely what you should not be doing!) thats all well and good by why? You want to boulder and these things are both to do with saving energy and preventing anaerobic systems kicking in. What Gresham does is explain to you how through decelerating your foot before making contact with the hold you can make contact then apply increasing pressure without momentum. Therefore you foot sticks better, you can weight it properly and you don't degrade your expensive boot rubber as fast. If you are doing it correctly it happens to be silent but silent isn't the point.

The second dvd is all about periodisation of training and stuff, its only useful if you want to be a total wod and come up with monthly training plans. Most people don't bother.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



The Self-Coached Climber is another great resource. It's got lots of things to think about with respect to technique, motion, center of gravity, all sorts of stuff.

jackchaos
Aug 6, 2008


The end all advice is just climb. There is no drill our exercise that is going to make you stronger and build technique faster then just climbing. Try to climb with others ask questions on how they move. That's the easiest way to pick up a new technique. Ie didn't know what a drop knee was till I saw someone do it and I tried to replicate the movement and realized the method to madness.

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Portland Metro Area Goons - I'll be out there in late July with my wife, and am looking for some advice regarding outdoor climbing spots. Last year I was out around that time and went to Smith Rock for two days. I loved it, but a lot of it was too difficult for my wife (you really need to climb 5.11 or 5.12 to get the most out of Smith Rock) so we had to stick to only a few sections. She also got sketched out by the misery ridge trail. It turns out she doesn't like trails with a lot of exposure and loose material underfoot, but we can just avoid that next time.

I may just head there again (I have the guide book already), but I was wondering what other options people would suggest. I would prefer not to bring out trad gear on the plane, and can pretty reliably sport lead up to 5.11d. After that I like to have someone stronger on hand to clean up my messes... My wife will probably just TR stuff that I put up, going up to around 5.10c. If there are moderate sport routes, she would have a go at them on lead though.

I have read about a number of other areas out there like Broughton Bluff, Carver Cliffs, and Beacon Rock but I don't know how much sport stuff to expect in those areas.

I guess I'm asking - Should I just take a few days and drive back out to Smith Rock? Or should I make a few day trips to some of these other areas instead?

Fontoyn
Aug 25, 2009

by Y Kant Ozma Post


Taking everyone's advice at a different level. I treat climbing like sport training, so there are days I focus on technique and days I try to gas myself out.

jiggerypokery posted:

I don't want to sound like a sales guy but this DVD I have to recommend.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_s...ham%2Caps%2C324 <- it's not perfect but this DVD is far far better than trying to interpret tonnes of second hand advice. It not only tells you the same stuff everyone else tells you but it shows you how to actually apply it to your climbing training, the order to apply and why you should. Climbing technique is all about the whole picture. Theres loads to it.

If someone tells you silent feet thats great, or strait arms save you energy (you americans seem to call that lock-off which as far as I know is precisely what you should not be doing!) thats all well and good by why? You want to boulder and these things are both to do with saving energy and preventing anaerobic systems kicking in. What Gresham does is explain to you how through decelerating your foot before making contact with the hold you can make contact then apply increasing pressure without momentum. Therefore you foot sticks better, you can weight it properly and you don't degrade your expensive boot rubber as fast. If you are doing it correctly it happens to be silent but silent isn't the point.

The second dvd is all about periodisation of training and stuff, its only useful if you want to be a total wod and come up with monthly training plans. Most people don't bother.

So don't lock off?

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

pokchu posted:

I kind of disagree with some of the previous training advice. Being as efficient and technically correct as possible is great up to a point, but there comes a level where it won't make you any physically stronger (or at least not with any speed.) once you send whatever you're working on, and are confident in your ability to do so, start climbing in ways to maximize your gains. Straight armed is your weakest position, so try to keep arms flexed and locked off there. Outdoors you will almost always be able to find two feet, so train indoors using only one foot at all times. Keep body tension at a maximum by staying squared up with the wall: no back stepping. And moving staticly isn't the end -all be-All of climbing. If you try to be static ALL the time, you aren't training contact strength and technique. Jimmy Webb sets at TBA in Chattanooga and I overheard a guy complaining to him about just that fact about a route jimmy set. He was told "then I guess you can't send it."

There are all sorts of styles of climbing and it never hurts to work on every aspect. Finger strength, core, and technique are all important, use the gym to train them all, don't ignore some facets for others.

The main problem with climbing sloppy and dynamic is that you're much MUCH more likely to injure yourself that way, and nothing hurts progress more than injuries.

Baldbeard
Mar 26, 2011




Your arms are strongest (or hardest to move) when they are either fully extended or full contracted, that's why it's called locking off or locking in. From what I understand, the worst position for your arms is exactly in between the two, where your elbow is pointing out and you are "chicken winging".

I've never heard anyone say locking off is bad before, as it's the most efficient way to idle between arm movements or feet movements.
Think about going across monkey bars. You lock your arms open, hang, and use your skeletal system to swing from hold to hold. If you try to go across in a chinup type position, flexing the whole way, you would burn out and probably hurt yourself in just a few seconds.

Big strong guys who climb in gyms usually overuse their strength and try to "pull" themselves up the wall, because that's what's comfortable to them. Usually smearing and slipping all the way to the top. This works great until you get to V3-V4, but then it becomes all about technique and balance and raw strength is not even that important. That's why you will constantly hear people say climbing is basically the only exercise that will make you better at climbing, and doing a million pullups at home will hardly make a difference. Only exception is core exercises, as these give you the strength you need to pull your hips and legs around for heel-hooks and big reachy stuff where you need to practically plank.

Baldbeard fucked around with this message at 23:57 on May 1, 2013

pokchu
Aug 22, 2007
D:

Papercut posted:

The main problem with climbing sloppy and dynamic is that you're much MUCH more likely to injure yourself that way, and nothing hurts progress more than injuries.

Except that "sloppy" and "dynamic" aren't mutually inclusive. You can easily be dynamic and controlled.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

pokchu posted:

Except that "sloppy" and "dynamic" aren't mutually inclusive. You can easily be dynamic and controlled.

What did you mean by not climbing "technically correct" if you didn't mean sloppy?

jackchaos
Aug 6, 2008



I like to think like Bruce Lee, in the aspect of core. In that all of your power links back to it so yes adding to my previous statement core and climbing! Only things you need. In the ballpark of locking off, I am a static climber and this is my number one tool. Being able to lock of and use your legs to leverage up make all the difference in the world. I feel more in control and like I'm using less energy. When honestly climbing comes down to levers.

Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.

Papercut posted:

What did you mean by not climbing "technically correct" if you didn't mean sloppy?

He meant the most efficient way possible, you can do things the hard way and not be sloppy.

What he's saying is that once you're easily sending the hard routes at your gym, you need to set yourself challenges. It's terrible advice for beginners, since they'll figure it out themselves once they've been climbing for long enough for it to matter.

pokchu
Aug 22, 2007
D:

Reread what I wrote. There comes a point (For me it was around v6) where technical expertise isn't enough. I simply wasn't strong enough to continue applying the skills and movements I had learned. From there, I began training in a less efficient way in order to increase grip strength and core (primarily.) if every time you go to the gym you focus on maximum efficiency, and sending whatever projects you are working on, eventually you'll probably hit a wall.

It may be different for a person like me, who lives in an area with plentiful rock very nearby, and being able to treat the gym as a supplement and training ground, rather than progression. But for me, and for others I know, a lot of future progress came from untying myself from the notion that I had to climb a certain way, or that there was a "correct" way to climb. In the end, it's about doing what you have to do to get up and over a stone, be it a cliff or a boulder. I'm a short guy, and for me, that meant learning how to use contact strength and dynamic movement effectively (and efficiently, in its own way.)

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Oh yeah in that case that makes sense, we've talked in this thread about all sorts of weird ways to handicap yourself in order to improve your climbing (climbing with your arms in PVC tubes, climbing without using your fingers, etc). For me at the gym I like to do at least one endurance day per week where I'm climbing pyramids (including down-climbing everything)instead of working on a project. In general I definitely get a better workout when I'm not trying to finish a particular problem and instead focusing on improving specific weaknesses.

I still avoid dynamic stuff unless it's really interesting because I always injure myself and because IMO static climbing just looks a lot cooler (in an aesthetic sense).

pokchu
Aug 22, 2007
D:

I honestly wish I could climb that way. Around here the rock is either too-easy slab, or horrendous throw-and-lock-offs, with some exceptions. Gym setting tends to end up that way, too, especially on 45 to 60 degree walls. What helped me the most was learning how to properly stick those moves: enough force and momentum to go "past" the intended hold, and hitting it already with bent arm and a bunch of flex. Hard on the tendons, very campus board like.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


armorer posted:

Portland Metro Area Goons - I'll be out there in late July with my wife, and am looking for some advice regarding outdoor climbing spots. Last year I was out around that time and went to Smith Rock for two days. I loved it, but a lot of it was too difficult for my wife (you really need to climb 5.11 or 5.12 to get the most out of Smith Rock) so we had to stick to only a few sections. She also got sketched out by the misery ridge trail. It turns out she doesn't like trails with a lot of exposure and loose material underfoot, but we can just avoid that next time.

I guess I'm asking - Should I just take a few days and drive back out to Smith Rock? Or should I make a few day trips to some of these other areas instead?

Smith has a lot of great moderate climbing, you just have to look for it, it's not in the main climbing areas. Bunch of fun stuff in the marsupials, adit rock, pheonix butress, spiderman butress and mesa verde wall all come to mind. If you wife likes multipitching, there are a ton of fun easy multipitch routes all over smith. Where Ever I may Roam is 5.9 and great, White Satin and Lost in Space are both amazing and 5.10b/c ish. Smith is so big and so many people in the area crank its easy to get stuck in the popular hard areas. Take some time and explore the park. If you have the Smith Rock Select guide look at getting the full version by Allan Watts. The new version has details on climbing all over the park while the Select is pretty minimal in content.

Last time I was at carver it was mostly bouldering with some roped climbing. The climbing was either easy or real hard. Check in at PRG for legal situation at Carver, you may have to sign something to be allowed on the land.

Never been to Broughton Bluff and as far as I know Beacon Rock is almost all trad. I don't know much about these places but look into French's Dome, Bolo (or something, its on Hood somewhere) and Ozone as well. Places I've heard of that are within a few hours of Hood. I don't think the Madrone Wall is open again yet but look at that just in case?

Hope I've been some help, I might be climbing out there at the same time so maybe we'll run into each other or something.

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

henne posted:

Hope I've been some help, I might be climbing out there at the same time so maybe we'll run into each other or something.

Quite helpful, thanks. You nudged me in the direction of just going to Smith again (which is what I wanted to do anyway.) I have the Allan Watts guidebook - it's rather incredible. I think I was a bit daunted by it the last time I was out there, and I spent too much time listening to everyone say "climb out of the sun!" and too little time focusing on what areas lined up best with our climbing abilities.

I would love to climb Wherever I may Roam, but I think my wife may get really sketched out going through Asterisk pass.

tortilla_chip
Jun 13, 2007

k-partite

armorer posted:

Portland climbing

If the weather is good on Mt Hood, check out French's Dome.

Edit: Broughton sucks. Fun goes to die there. Carver requires the purchase of a pass (private land). Don't bring dogs to Carver.

tortilla_chip fucked around with this message at 16:46 on May 2, 2013

Reformed Tomboy
Feb 2, 2005

chu~~

Irving posted:

Anyone in southern California know when Sender One is opening? They've had some preview events, but I can't seem to find out when they're actually doing their grand opening.

http://www.senderoneclimbing.com/

Reformed Tomboy posted:

I heard a rumor they'll open in late May. Which seems to be supported on their calendar for yoga classes, which begin the last week in May.

Actually, this came up at work today. Soft opening (what ever the hell that means) June 1st, grand opening June 15th.

canvasbagfight
Aug 20, 2005
renovating. please excuse our mess.

Reformed Tomboy posted:

Actually, this came up at work today. Soft opening (what ever the hell that means) June 1st, grand opening June 15th.
I think it just means they have 2 weeks to get all the kinks worked out all low profile like. I'm super jealous- wish I could go down there.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


armorer posted:

I would love to climb Wherever I may Roam, but I think my wife may get really sketched out going through Asterisk pass.

Climb White Satin or Lost in Space which are on the front side of astrix, rap down to the base of where ever I may roam, climb it, then rap back down and walk around the smith rock group and climb at phoenix butt on the way out would be a fun day of lots of 5.9 - 5.10c climbing and no trip over astrix. There is like a move or two of 5.10c on lost in space that can be french freed if you have to.

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

henne posted:

Climb White Satin or Lost in Space which are on the front side of astrix, rap down to the base of where ever I may roam, climb it, then rap back down and walk around the smith rock group and climb at phoenix butt on the way out would be a fun day of lots of 5.9 - 5.10c climbing and no trip over astrix. There is like a move or two of 5.10c on lost in space that can be french freed if you have to.

Awesome, thanks! I will go over the guide book to get that plan set in my head.

gamera009
Apr 7, 2005



Boulder goons up for outdoors on Sunday morning? Should be brisk enough at Satellites for good friction.

I really want to find that 100 ft traverse behind that area.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



gamera009 posted:

Boulder goons up for outdoors on Sunday morning? Should be brisk enough at Satellites for good friction.

I really want to find that 100 ft traverse behind that area.

I could probably come out if it is early. I assume we would be bouldering? (I haven't climbed in boulder really) I can bring a crash pad. Also if there are V0-V2 available it would be ideal for me since I haven't climbed in 5 months.

FiestaDePantalones
May 13, 2005

Kicked in the pants by TFLC

Is there some database where I could possibly find some EU (Italy, around Milan) people to climb with? I've gone to a couple gyms and have major issues communicating, and would love to find some english speaking climbers who do outdoor as well. I'm pretty new to climbing but can't even really take any classes due to the language barrier.

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gamera009
Apr 7, 2005



spwrozek posted:

I could probably come out if it is early. I assume we would be bouldering? (I haven't climbed in boulder really) I can bring a crash pad. Also if there are V0-V2 available it would be ideal for me since I haven't climbed in 5 months.

I was hoping to hit the area around 9:30-10am. That sound good for you?

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