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canis minor
May 4, 2011



Covert Ops Wizard posted:

If someone needs to spot you while bouldering at the gym you're at the wrong gym. The bouldering area should be padded and huge pads provided. Spotting is for pushing someone away from an outcrop onto a 3x3 pad, there's no need for that in a gym setting. One of the worst things I've seen at a comp was a guy who was a favorite to win fell backwards off the wall, and had some dumbshit spotter push his head into his knee. Concussion, bloody nose, out of the game. There was no need for it, he would have landed on that 5x7 pad completely fine otherwise. So yeah, I would nicely tell them not to do that.

Maybe I've not used the proper terms (sorry, not a native english speaker here) - spotting as, when climbing with rope - knowing when to loosen / tighten the rope; nothing about free climbing.
But when I climb without a rope (and that's what the second part of my post was about) and I do indeed see somebody afraid for me, I generally do stop and speak my mind. The same when somebody starts moving ropes around me.

Sorry for the confusion!

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Petey
Nov 25, 2005

For who knows what is good for a person in life, during the few and meaningless days they pass through like a shadow? Who can tell them what will happen under the sun after they are gone?

Year of the Monkey posted:

You have a pair of shoes that have lasted you six years?! Have they been re-soled during that time? I go through at least a sole a year! I know I'm a bumbly but I didn't think I was being that careless. How long do shoes last for everyone else?

Re cleaning them: I just use soap and water where appropriate. It's pretty understandable if you're climbing outdoors a lot.

They're 6 years old, but I took a several year hiatus in there; I got them in 2006 (when I was climbing regularly) and then didn't climb much between 2007-2012. I'm only asking because the point of failure for me seems to be my feet as often as not, and it's not because I'm not trusting them.

gamera009
Apr 7, 2005



Nothing wrong with spotting, even in the gym. Even with big pads and floors that are nice mats, things go wrong. Having a spotter on taller problems or ceilings where turning an ankle, or landing on the neck and head is possible is essential.

I have seen far too many people, even incredibly gifted climbers, take a bad fall without a spotter and end up with an injury (torn ACL in one case). Then there's the issue of climbing in an environment where there are people around - not everyone is going to fall directly down below themselves, so it's a good idea to have someone around to ensure nobody lands on a bystander.

Bad spotting is bad, and there's no disagreement with that statement, but I argue that a good spotter is an effective way of reducing the chances of serious injury. You want them outside, there's no reason to avoid them inside if you're climbing just as hard.

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Petey posted:

Mine - which are 6 years old at this point - seem to be permanently dusty / chalkdusty to the point where the traction seems to be suffering. However, if this isn't a straightforward question, then there may well be something wrong with my shoes as opposed to them being dirty / dusty / etc.

I climb three days a week in a gym for roughly 3 hours each day. As a result I need to get my shoes resoled at least once a year, and typically cycle through 3 different pairs while one or two of them are out of commission. Maybe that's why I've never found myself needing to clean them? The only times they get dirty are when I am climbing outdoors, and as I said before I just brush them clean in those cases. I also only get to go on maybe 6 or 7 outdoor climbing trips a year (multi-day at least), so they don't see a whole lot of outdoor action. I don't walk around in them at the crag (I take them off after each climb/pitch), so that helps too.

Edit: I just saw that your 6 year old shoes were not used much during 5 of those years. Whew! I thought maybe I was crazy for a minute there with how long my shoes last.

Covert Ops Wizard
Dec 27, 2006



eithedog posted:

Maybe I've not used the proper terms (sorry, not a native english speaker here) - spotting as, when climbing with rope - knowing when to loosen / tighten the rope; nothing about free climbing.
But when I climb without a rope (and that's what the second part of my post was about) and I do indeed see somebody afraid for me, I generally do stop and speak my mind. The same when somebody starts moving ropes around me.

Sorry for the confusion!

No worries dude! In English, spotting is when you're keeping an eye on a friend while they're bouldering or free climbing to make sure if they fall they land on a mat, when you're working with a rope it's called belaying, that's probably where I got confused.

gamera009 posted:

Nothing wrong with spotting, even in the gym. Even with big pads and floors that are nice mats, things go wrong. Having a spotter on taller problems or ceilings where turning an ankle, or landing on the neck and head is possible is essential.

I have seen far too many people, even incredibly gifted climbers, take a bad fall without a spotter and end up with an injury (torn ACL in one case). Then there's the issue of climbing in an environment where there are people around - not everyone is going to fall directly down below themselves, so it's a good idea to have someone around to ensure nobody lands on a bystander.

Bad spotting is bad, and there's no disagreement with that statement, but I argue that a good spotter is an effective way of reducing the chances of serious injury. You want them outside, there's no reason to avoid them inside if you're climbing just as hard.

I agree, but I think there's way more bad spotters in a gym than good, and it's easier to say climb within your limits and intelligently than let you rely on the guy who is more interested in catching you by the seat of your yoga pants (if you're a lady) or the well meaning idiot who pushes the pad closer to the wall and ineffectually tries to hug you when you come off. So while I totally see where you're coming from it's easier to say no spotters because most people have never been trained or have limited experience beyond awkwardly imitating what others do.

Me personally, I don't want any spotters when I'm in the gym. I know how to fall and I've taken enough huge falls and nastier headers on concrete skating pools and parks that climbing in the gym will never come close unless some idiot decides to get under me.

beat9
Aug 19, 2005



Can anyone recommend a good place for bouldering in/near London? I`m off for a couple of days next week with a friend and we wanted to get some bouldering done while there. Also a good place to rent some gear i.e. crash pads.

I didn`t see any mention of it the last couple of pages so thought I`d ask.

jryand
Jun 18, 2013


I used to climb a bunch when I was younger, but I gradually stopped, I dunno why

So recently I joined this new gym about 15 minutes from my house, i bought new shoes since I grew out of my old ones, but luckily my old harness still fits
I'm going to visit my sister out in mammoth california, and she said there are some great rocks out there, so that'll be fun

After my first week I've been picking it back up again surprisingly fast, although im definitely still out of shape and rusty

is there anything you'd suggest to help me improve?

Magnus Manfist
Mar 10, 2013


beat9 posted:

Can anyone recommend a good place for bouldering in/near London? I`m off for a couple of days next week with a friend and we wanted to get some bouldering done while there. Also a good place to rent some gear i.e. crash pads.

I didn`t see any mention of it the last couple of pages so thought I`d ask.

Are you looking for outdoors, or gyms? There's a poo poo load of gyms but I haven't been outdoors anywhere near here, I suspect you'd have to go out a decent way

Chris!
Dec 1, 2004

E

There's the southern sandstone for some good bouldering in Kent - probably 45 mins or an hour or so from London (maybe a bit further, never done that journey myself as I come from the other direction). Look up Bowles rocks and Harrison's Rock, I've done Bowles and it's pretty great.

For indoor bouldering there are tons of gyms in London but I don't know any specific ones myself, White Spider is meant to be good for top roping.

Booyah-
Dec 21, 2004



I'm selling some near-mint condition Moccasyms size 11 in SA Mart. $70 shipped!
Good shoe, but after using Sportiva Pythons I can't go back to something flatter for bouldering.

http://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3559831

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Chris! posted:

There's the southern sandstone for some good bouldering in Kent - probably 45 mins or an hour or so from London (maybe a bit further, never done that journey myself as I come from the other direction). Look up Bowles rocks and Harrison's Rock, I've done Bowles and it's pretty great.

For indoor bouldering there are tons of gyms in London but I don't know any specific ones myself, White Spider is meant to be good for top roping.

For indoor bouldering The Arch 2 (nicknamed the biscuit) near London bridge is by far the best in London, and I'd hazard to throw out there one of the best in the country. The quality and variety of route setting is top par and they even hosted a British qualifier there last year/earlier this year. The training area is also amazing.

matryx
Jul 22, 2005

I think I just had an evilgasm...

I'm at the biscuit factory 2-3 times a week [Bermondsey Tube Station is the closest tube btw] and would recommend it as much if not more than my previous favourite at Mile End Climbing Wall. I used to live closer to there so it was more convenient, and the walls are higher, though the setting tends to be more brute-force at ME over the biscuit.
I climb Tues/Thurs after work and often first thing on sunday morning so give a holler if you see me (Male, 6'2ish, usually long bright purple hair) as I'll always climb with anyone. Though right now I'm wussing out of basically everything as I don't want to risk injury before I get married next month.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


matryx posted:

I'm at the biscuit factory 2-3 times a week [Bermondsey Tube Station is the closest tube btw] and would recommend it as much if not more than my previous favourite at Mile End Climbing Wall. I used to live closer to there so it was more convenient, and the walls are higher, though the setting tends to be more brute-force at ME over the biscuit.
I climb Tues/Thurs after work and often first thing on sunday morning so give a holler if you see me (Male, 6'2ish, usually long bright purple hair) as I'll always climb with anyone. Though right now I'm wussing out of basically everything as I don't want to risk injury before I get married next month.

I should be back in London next month and hopefully back at the biscuit (providing all is well with my ankle) so I'll say hello if I see you. I'll be weak as a kitten too as it's coming up to 3 months since I've been able to climb :smith:

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Ha, so I just opened up an unmarked envelope in some post I was forwarded and its from the end of March after I went to A&E for my ankle injury. It turns out that what was originally diagnosed as "just a ruptured tendon" and told to rest and then walk off, had in fact also fractured the ankle bone and I was asked to come in to sort out proper treatment.

I love the NHS, no markings on the envelope, no sense of urgency or any indication it was a medical document.

I'm in between permanent living arrangements at the minute and the injuries clinic here told me to go away and register with a new doctor so they could get my records and then refer me to a bone specialist, guess I'll wait a couple of weeks till I'm back in London, it's been a few months, few more weeks can't hurt.

I doubt there is much they can do now aside from either say "It's healed by itself" or "yeah that's going to need surgery".

I sincerely hope its not the second option as it's already been so long since I've been able to climb and I was hoping to get back on the wall when I get back to London :(

Claes Oldenburger
Apr 23, 2010

Metal magician!
:black101:



Went out for my first outdoor climb last weekend! The group went to Mount Nemo, about an hour south of Toronto near Burlington. Luckily we had some lead climbers to set up the top ropes and get things rolling, and we climbed all day.

I knew it was going to be fun but WOW. I did a 5.8ish and a 5.9ish (I'm currently at 5.10- in the gym) as well as a crack climb (proper term?) and absolutely loved it. I didn't do the taping hands and jamming them into the crack thing but it was still fun nonetheless. It has really given me a whole new thing to strive for when I go to the gym.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Claes Oldenburger posted:

I knew it was going to be fun but WOW. I did a 5.8ish and a 5.9ish (I'm currently at 5.10- in the gym) as well as a crack climb (proper term?) and absolutely loved it. I didn't do the taping hands and jamming them into the crack thing but it was still fun nonetheless. It has really given me a whole new thing to strive for when I go to the gym.

Your lingo was solid, glad you had fun.

Chris!
Dec 1, 2004

E

I fell trying to make the last hold on a steep incline last night, and jarred my neck when I fell. It was my first "proper" climb of the night as well, and a climb I've completed before without trouble - I drove myself to hospital as the back of my neck started to tingle and hurt on the drive home.

Because of the height I fell from I was immediately put onto a stretcher and had my head strapped up with a brace and big foam things. Had my whole spine checked, including a sweet rectal examination, and was X-Rayed as well. The whole thing took about 5 hours, without being able to move my head an inch. My girlfriend drove down and read dumb jokes from the Internet to me.

Thankfully there's no bone or nerve damage that they can see, just a pulled muscle in my neck. I'm basically walking around like a robot today, can't really twist my head. The Doctor didn't actually think it would take too long to heal - about a week.

Don't know how long I'll have to take off from climbing. Stupid inclines.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


In relation to the indoor spotting chat earlier, this was posted a couple of days ago:

http://www.climbingbusinessjournal.com/spotting-maybe-not/

spandexcajun
Feb 28, 2005

Suck the head for a little extra cajun flavor

Fallen Rib

Found a great video on trad leading / swapping leads. This is the best thing of the sort I have seen online so far.

Want to know how those guys climb without bolts in the rocks? This is pretty much exactly how I was taught and what I do (You could argue that the first belay station was not very multi-directional and I have never cloved in one of the points of my cordellet, but these things are always debatable and there are 100 ways to skin a cat)

http://vimeo.com/33940152

In other news I climbed the 1st flatiron. I lead the first pitch of 5 and on the second pitch it started raining like a mother fucker. Not a little drizzle, a full on downpour. We thought of trying to bail but decided to just go for it. My partner lead the pitch in the rain and I followed, that was something else.... the climbing was easy but it's mostly run out (like 4 or 5 pieces of pro for a full 60m rope length) slabby friction climbing. After around 20 - 30 min it stopped and we had a great time topping out. We each got to lead 2 pitches and did a little simul-climbing at the end. I did not like climbing in the rain but it was not as bad as I would have thought. Would have been better if I had not forgotten a rain jacket :) climbing 4 - 5 pitches and 1000+feet is pretty cool. 1 down 4 to go (I would like to climb all the named flatirons this summer)

Have fun, stay safe, and dry!

Covert Ops Wizard
Dec 27, 2006



Chris! posted:

I fell trying to make the last hold on a steep incline last night, and jarred my neck when I fell. It was my first "proper" climb of the night as well, and a climb I've completed before without trouble - I drove myself to hospital as the back of my neck started to tingle and hurt on the drive home.

Because of the height I fell from I was immediately put onto a stretcher and had my head strapped up with a brace and big foam things. Had my whole spine checked, including a sweet rectal examination, and was X-Rayed as well. The whole thing took about 5 hours, without being able to move my head an inch. My girlfriend drove down and read dumb jokes from the Internet to me.

Thankfully there's no bone or nerve damage that they can see, just a pulled muscle in my neck. I'm basically walking around like a robot today, can't really twist my head. The Doctor didn't actually think it would take too long to heal - about a week.

Don't know how long I'll have to take off from climbing. Stupid inclines.

I have terrible luck with my neck as well, sorry to hear you got got. You were bouldering I'm assuming? Otherwise it sounds like you got the worst catch in the world or were climbing on a static line or something crazy like that

Chris!
Dec 1, 2004

E

Covert Ops Wizard posted:

I have terrible luck with my neck as well, sorry to hear you got got. You were bouldering I'm assuming? Otherwise it sounds like you got the worst catch in the world or were climbing on a static line or something crazy like that

Yes, this was bouldering inside! Thankfully it wasn't outdoors.

As it was on a steep incline and I really wasn't expecting to fall (as dumb as that sounds) I fell pretty awkwardly - rather than bending at the waist, my body fell parallel with the incline wall, so all the force went into snapping my neck forward. Lucky it wasn't worse.

Neck feels like it's getting stiffer and more painful (especially at the end of the day), I guess that's normal though. Gutted that I can't get out and climb, hoping it heals fast.

Pander
Oct 9, 2007

Fear is the glue that holds society together. It's what makes people suppress their worst impulses. Fear is power.

And at the end of fear, oblivion.





Apologies if this question is stupid, but is the (apparently) greater risk of injury in bouldering worth taking vs sport/trad climbing? I mean, I guess this bundles a few assumptions and a few more questions into it too (ARE injuries more common during bouldering? What kind? Is it an experience issue or is it equally likely that anyone bouldering risks injury?), but it just seems anecdotally from reading this thread that bouldering carries a higher risk.

I've tried bouldering a few times, and I guess due to inexperience and lack of dynamic strength I couldn't do a whole hell of a lot beyond the easiest stuff.
But it didn't seem crazy different from the sport climbing I do, especially for routes that have nasty overhangs. So I guess I'm just curious as to why people would opt to boulder over trad/sport climb given the (again, assumed) greater risk of injury.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


spandexcajun posted:



In other news I climbed the 1st flatiron. I lead the first pitch of 5 and on the second pitch it started raining like a mother fucker. Not a little drizzle, a full on downpour. We thought of trying to bail but decided to just go for it.

Going into your story I thought you were this guy. I'm glad you weren't that guy.

Yall should strive to avoid being that guy, unless you really and in a bad situation, then definitely call rescue, but try not to get into horrible situations.

Chris!
Dec 1, 2004

E

Pander posted:

Apologies if this question is stupid, but is the (apparently) greater risk of injury in bouldering worth taking vs sport/trad climbing? I mean, I guess this bundles a few assumptions and a few more questions into it too (ARE injuries more common during bouldering? What kind? Is it an experience issue or is it equally likely that anyone bouldering risks injury?), but it just seems anecdotally from reading this thread that bouldering carries a higher risk.

I've tried bouldering a few times, and I guess due to inexperience and lack of dynamic strength I couldn't do a whole hell of a lot beyond the easiest stuff.
But it didn't seem crazy different from the sport climbing I do, especially for routes that have nasty overhangs. So I guess I'm just curious as to why people would opt to boulder over trad/sport climb given the (again, assumed) greater risk of injury.

For me the bouldering gym is 25 minutes away, the nearest roped climbing is an hour - the nearest outdoor climbing is about an hour as well, so it's purely how convenient it is to get there.

Aside from that, if I go bouldering for an hour and a half I could potentially climb the whole time, whereas when I go roped up for the same amount of time, I'll spend 45 minutes belaying my partner.

I think that minor bouldering injuries are probably more common than trad or sport climbing, but if you're sensible the risk isn't HUGE, especially indoors where you have thick crash pads beneath you. (Says the guy still icing his neck).

Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.


Don't make a backup with that much slack.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


Pander posted:

I've tried bouldering a few times, and I guess due to inexperience and lack of dynamic strength I couldn't do a whole hell of a lot beyond the easiest stuff.
But it didn't seem crazy different from the sport climbing I do, especially for routes that have nasty overhangs. So I guess I'm just curious as to why people would opt to boulder over trad/sport climb given the (again, assumed) greater risk of injury.
Bouldering is a different experience, it is more social than other forms of climbing, and it is more focused on difficulty and problem solving. Bouldering is better for solo sessions, and is a great way to improve your sport/trad climbing. I don't know the stats, but my experience is that tendon injuries are more likely bouldering, and probably ankle injuries as well. But I think you would be surprised by how safe it ends up being, and you always have the ability to stop climbing before you get higher, which gives you a lot of control over the danger.

I think if you look at rescue stats (http://www.rockymountainrescue.org/Climbing_Rescues_Causes_Injuries_Trends_Boulder.php), bouldering accounts for 7% of rescues in Boulder county. Some confounding factors are popularity (more people=more injuries independent of risk level), and maybe ease of self rescue (bouldering areas are often right off of nice trails, especially around Boulder).



tldr; bouldering = fun and is probably less dangerous than you think, but certainly has real risks

pbpancho
Feb 17, 2004
-=International Sales=-

modig posted:

Going into your story I thought you were this guy. I'm glad you weren't that guy.

Yall should strive to avoid being that guy, unless you really and in a bad situation, then definitely call rescue, but try not to get into horrible situations.

What a bunch of goddamn morons.

azreal
Sep 2, 2011



So went to the indoor gym today and hit the bouldering area pretty hard...tore up my hands pretty good. Is this normal, and what's the best way to treat it?

azreal fucked around with this message at 02:45 on Jul 19, 2013

deck
Jul 13, 2006



It's normal if you haven't climbed in a while. Climb more.

spandexcajun
Feb 28, 2005

Suck the head for a little extra cajun flavor

Fallen Rib

modig posted:

Going into your story I thought you were this guy. I'm glad you weren't that guy.

Yall should strive to avoid being that guy, unless you really and in a bad situation, then definitely call rescue, but try not to get into horrible situations.

Wow, we were on Fandango as well. We got off route half way up and probably switched the the direct face. What's the story with that group? But drat, those kids had no idea did they? That guy was not even wet.... we were climbing in a straight up downpour, not hiding under a flake :) The lighting was a little scary, but I have been in much worse in high alpine hikes (ozone smell, hair standing up, ice axe buzzing) They also have the same rope I have. I hate it, it's to stiff and handles like crap. You think things like that won't bother you much but they do, should have just spent the extra $40 and got a 9.8 or something.

pbpancho posted:

What a bunch of goddamn morons.

Yep, I don't understand the rescue thing, I mean they had lights or at least one light and it stopped raining... should have just rapped down. Oh well hope they learned something and take the opportunity to become better prepared next time. Who am I loving kidding that guy has no chance, I mean he was practically bragging about getting rescued.

So, in addition to technique, strength, climbing skill and all that, please try to know what you are doing out there. Self rescue is the best rescue.

Covert Ops Wizard
Dec 27, 2006



azreal posted:

So went to the indoor gym today and hit the bouldering area pretty hard...tore up my hands pretty good. Is this normal, and what's the best way to treat it?



Yes. If you have BABY HANDS!

Seriously though it's just part of climbing, you get ripped up, they callous over and after a while your hands become so tough you don't really feel it anymore.

modig posted:

tldr; bouldering = fun and is probably less dangerous than you think, but certainly has real risks

In my purely anecdotal experience, bouldering injuries are more common but usually not very serious. Roped climbing is safer in that it's less likely to get hurt, but if something goes wrong even just 30 feet up it can be very ugly.

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


azreal posted:

So went to the indoor gym today and hit the bouldering area pretty hard...tore up my hands pretty good. Is this normal, and what's the best way to treat it?


If you want to climb again soon then when the skin hardens a bit on those callouses you can file them down to stop them catching as much.

Also, I sincerely hope you weren't wearing those rings while climbing.

matryx
Jul 22, 2005

I think I just had an evilgasm...

azreal posted:

So went to the indoor gym today and hit the bouldering area pretty hard...tore up my hands pretty good. Is this normal, and what's the best way to treat it?



If you're new to bouldering then yes this is somewhat normal. You may be gripping too hard and causing blisters which are then ripping, so you could practice being alittle more relaxed with your hand work.
Best way to treat it though is to keep climbing (though stop if you end up bleeding until healed and stuff).
This was said just above, but please never ever wear rings while climbing. I'm hoping they're just back on for this photo but if they are not I'll just suggest you never research "de-gloving" and hope that just the name of the injury will be enough to gut-wrenchingly inspire you to always take off your rings. Even if just bouldering you can totally get a ring snagged on something. This is not just for your benefit. I wouldn't wish just witnessing that on anyone let alone experiencing it.

azreal
Sep 2, 2011



Yeah, I had the rings on while I was climbing...probably not the smartest thing I've done, but I'll be sure to take them off next time because degloving sounds brutal.

Over gripping sounds right. I definitely wasn't using my legs enough; It seemed like I was pulling up with my arms more than I was pushing up with my legs (if that makes sense).

azreal fucked around with this message at 20:23 on Jul 19, 2013

jiggerypokery
Feb 1, 2012

...But I could hardly wait six months with a red hot jape like that under me belt.

Just got back from a 2 month trip to the Frankenjura! Holy poo poo that place is incredible!

I guess the lingering WW2 stigma makes Germany a never thought of trip destination here in the UK, no one talks about it. It is amazing though. 10k routes or something. The classics are polished but there is so much to do its unbelievable.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


jiggerypokery posted:

Just got back from a 2 month trip to the Frankenjura! Holy poo poo that place is incredible!

I guess the lingering WW2 stigma makes Germany a never thought of trip destination here in the UK, no one talks about it. It is amazing though. 10k routes or something. The classics are polished but there is so much to do its unbelievable.

Will you be posting some pictures?

gamera009
Apr 7, 2005



Spent the morning with spwrozek at Cascade Crag.

Super relaxed.







P1020319 by :v:, on Flickr

Not shown afterwards: Avery beer and food at the tap room and discussing the perils of snowboarding.

modig
Aug 20, 2002


gamera009 posted:

Spent the morning with spwrozek at Cascade Crag.

Super relaxed.







P1020319 by :v:, on Flickr

Not shown afterwards: Avery beer and food at the tap room and discussing the perils of snowboarding.

I just looked that place up, gamera knows how to rock the buisness casual climbing for real.

gamera009
Apr 7, 2005



modig posted:

I just looked that place up, gamera knows how to rock the buisness casual climbing for real.

You know I am king of biz-caz.

I even brought donuts!

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spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



We also brought my wife, good mix of easy and hard(er) stuff.

The bolting there was crazy though without a guidebook.

Also you always bring donuts... Which is good.

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