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spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



That is most likely not from the rope running but from webbing or cord. If you setup on sandstone like that make sure the anchor is over the edge and bring a small piece of carpet to put under the webbing or cord where it touches the rock.

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Manstrocity
Apr 28, 2009


spwrozek posted:

That is most likely not from the rope running but from webbing or cord. If you setup on sandstone like that make sure the anchor is over the edge and bring a small piece of carpet to put under the webbing or cord where it touches the rock.

I guess it might be really soft rock, but I didn't think it would really wear like that if the master point were below the edge. Seems more likely to be from running rope over it. Either way.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



Manstrocity posted:

I guess it might be really soft rock, but I didn't think it would really wear like that if the master point were below the edge. Seems more likely to be from running rope over it. Either way.

It is possible but that is what the local crag in Michigan that is sandstone looks like and it is all from not having carpet under the webbing or cord.

Also don't run the rope on the rock obviously.

spwrozek fucked around with this message at 02:05 on Mar 21, 2014

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Watch Wide Boyz for free until the 7th of April. It's good: http://hotaches.com/free-climbing-film/

George H.W. Cunt
Oct 6, 2010



Intergortion posted:

Watch Wide Boyz for free until the 7th of April. It's good: http://hotaches.com/free-climbing-film/

That was really cool to watch

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



Sharma's latest adventure: http://www.redbull.com/en/adventure/stories/1331640225886/into-the-light-climbing-out-of-a-cave-in-oman

Anyone up for some cave multi pich?

French Canadian
Feb 23, 2004

Fluffy cat sensory experience



Nifty but I wish it were more detailed. Maybe it will be in the next Reel Rock film.

Side note, I sent Acid Wash V7 in Bishop this weekend!

crazycello
Jul 22, 2009


So I'm a novice climber with what I think is a minor A2 pulley injury on my ring finger. At what point should I be looking to hop back on the wall? I have pretty much full range of motion in the finger without pain when it's not under load, but for example, if I hang off an object there is slight pain, and my hand with the injury opens much much slower than my good hand after holding on a grip.

ConspicuousEvil
Feb 29, 2004


Pillbug

crazycello posted:

So I'm a novice climber with what I think is a minor A2 pulley injury on my ring finger. At what point should I be looking to hop back on the wall? I have pretty much full range of motion in the finger without pain when it's not under load, but for example, if I hang off an object there is slight pain, and my hand with the injury opens much much slower than my good hand after holding on a grip.

Couple of questions. First: Was there a distinct move you injured it on, if so how, or did you just notice it after a session? On a scale of 1-10 how badly does it hurt, especially when you push on it with your finger? Does it hurt when you grad a particular kind of hold, but not others? How badly does it hurt on that kind of hold? What are you doing to help it recover already?

jackchaos
Aug 6, 2008


Just picked up 250 holds for my wall! And super cheap! So stoked.

guppy
Sep 21, 2004

sting like a byob

I took an outdoor sport lead clinic at my rock gym and it ruled. (That is, the class was not held outdoors, nor was it on lead climbing technique -- it was outdoor-specific stuff like how to clean routes, ways to descend, how to set up an anchor system so you don't die while you're setting up your descent, that kind of thing.) It ruled and I wanna do it more. Got a lot more practice of both that and basic lead climb/belay technique before I do though. Hoping I'll consider myself reliable enough to get out there this upcoming outdoor season, I've never really been.

crazycello
Jul 22, 2009


ConspicuousEvil posted:

Couple of questions. First: Was there a distinct move you injured it on, if so how, or did you just notice it after a session? On a scale of 1-10 how badly does it hurt, especially when you push on it with your finger? Does it hurt when you grad a particular kind of hold, but not others? How badly does it hurt on that kind of hold? What are you doing to help it recover already?

I didn't notice it until after a session so I can't answer if it was on a distinct move. Then I went out and climbed on it another session because I thought, "Well it's just the lower digit of my ring finger", which was probably a bad idea. Luckily, it doesn't seem that much worse off.

If I push on the injured area with a finger, there's a dull pain, but it's not all that bad. Maybe a 3-5 range. I haven't been on the wall for six days and don't really remember what aggravates it the most, but pullups at the gym made it achy so I cut that short, and holding any heavier weight didn't make it feel good. If I squeeze one of these things with just my thumb and ring finger, it doesn't feel great.

My current rehab is just 'not climbing' and massaging the area. Again, range of motion is still good and pain free as long as I'm not putting it under load.

Thanks and sorry that I don't have more details.

ConspicuousEvil
Feb 29, 2004


Pillbug

crazycello posted:

I didn't notice it until after a session so I can't answer if it was on a distinct move. Then I went out and climbed on it another session because I thought, "Well it's just the lower digit of my ring finger", which was probably a bad idea. Luckily, it doesn't seem that much worse off.

If I push on the injured area with a finger, there's a dull pain, but it's not all that bad. Maybe a 3-5 range. I haven't been on the wall for six days and don't really remember what aggravates it the most, but pullups at the gym made it achy so I cut that short, and holding any heavier weight didn't make it feel good. If I squeeze one of these things with just my thumb and ring finger, it doesn't feel great.

My current rehab is just 'not climbing' and massaging the area. Again, range of motion is still good and pain free as long as I'm not putting it under load.

Thanks and sorry that I don't have more details.

No worries, that's good info. First off, I've had many pulley injuries anywhere from slight strains to full-on ruptures. I will say every time I hurt myself it was from improper warming up. I will also say in preface to this advice that I come from the Dave MacLeod school of injury rehab. If you don't know who he is check out his blog.

In terms of rehab, massaging with heavy pressure is good. When you're massaging it should hurt, but your range of motion, especially with serious injuries should improve after. The idea is that you're breaking up the developing scar tissue. You should also be icing it to decrease inflammation. I usually take a bowl with ice and water and do 15-20 minutes twice a day. Lastly, you should be stretching your fingers. on the injured finger hold your thumb at the base of the finger where it joins the hand at the top with your index finger on the palm side of the injured finger. push the finger back until you feel it really stretching. Then move your thumb and index up to the next joint of your finger and repeat for all three joints. This should also be done every time before and after climbing.

Finally, not climbing is the most recommended rehab advice given and in my opinion the most misguided. If you can climb without serious pain, then climb. Be really careful with your warm-ups, NEVER close crimp in an uncontrolled way. And climb until you feel a low level ache, and don't climb above that level. I think the reason people say don't climb is because, at least for beginners, it's very hard to climb in a controlled way that will help them rehab, but not prevent injury.

I've tried both climbing and not climbing for rehab. In my experience, not climbing does help the injury come back to 100% a little bit faster and I mean only a little bit. As for climbing while injured I've noticed it takes slightly longer for the injury to return to 100%, but my climbing is back at a much higher level than with not climbing.

Just be overly careful and conscious of what you're doing to warm up, what you're doing while climbing, and to recover.

Papercut
Aug 24, 2005

The quickest substitution in the history of the NBA

Men's and Women's highlights from ABS Nationals:
http://vimeo.com/88063120
http://vimeo.com/88145860

These people are pretty good climbers.

Also RIP Sean Leary. Guess it's inevitable when you live like these guys, but such a sad loss. This guy was incredible.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGwXbA3gMP0

Baldbeard
Mar 26, 2011



ConspicuousEvil posted:

Just be overly careful and conscious of what you're doing to warm up, what you're doing while climbing, and to recover.

Yeah, this is the most important part if you are going to climb while rehabbing. While your finger is recovering, it is much more susceptible to further/re-injuries which are usually much more severe.

I've had success with this kind of stuff http://amzn.com/B001763OS6 for improving blood flow. Very convenient because you only need one hand to use it, so you just walk around your house and work this stuff without thinking about it.

George H.W. Cunt
Oct 6, 2010



Papercut posted:

Men's and Women's highlights from ABS Nationals:
http://vimeo.com/88063120
http://vimeo.com/88145860

These people are pretty good climbers.

Also RIP Sean Leary. Guess it's inevitable when you live like these guys, but such a sad loss. This guy was incredible.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGwXbA3gMP0

drat he left behind a pregnant wife too. That really sucks.

crazycello
Jul 22, 2009






Thanks guys!

GobiasIndustries
Dec 14, 2007



Lipstick Apathy

I'm pretty new to climbing, and just got belay certified at my local climbing gym last week. My first time climbing with a group went well, but I managed to give myself pretty bad rope burns on the skin between my thumb and index finger from belaying; has this happened to anyone else when they were first learning or did I just really mess up? I think I was trying so hard to not lose track of the rope that I was sliding my hand up the rope every time rather than letting go. It hurts to open doors

Tarnien
Jul 4, 2003
Champion of the World!!!

That'll happen from time to time. Your technique will improve/you'll develop callouses over time, so I wouldn't worry about it. If it keeps bugging you, just get some belay gloves. Alternatively, tape over that area at the start of the day, and it should help.

Endjinneer
Aug 17, 2005


Fallen Rib

Maybe walk your hands up the passive end of the rope rather than sliding them, to make sure you fully let go with the moving hand?
You're not messing up, you're just being cautious about a new skill. Keeping an iron hard grip on the rope with both hands at all times feels more secure but isn't really necessary.

Irving
Jun 21, 2003


GobiasIndustries posted:

I'm pretty new to climbing, and just got belay certified at my local climbing gym last week. My first time climbing with a group went well, but I managed to give myself pretty bad rope burns on the skin between my thumb and index finger from belaying; has this happened to anyone else when they were first learning or did I just really mess up? I think I was trying so hard to not lose track of the rope that I was sliding my hand up the rope every time rather than letting go. It hurts to open doors

Did you get that when you were belaying or lowering? When you lower, the position of the rope will provide the braking, not friction from your hand. If someone is coming down too fast, just pull the rope down and your belay device will do the rest.

deck
Jul 13, 2006



French Canadian posted:

Side note, I sent Acid Wash V7 in Bishop this weekend!

The rightward high start, or are you triple-downgrading the full leftward line.

Both answers seem plausible

Colonel J
Jan 3, 2008


My gym is resetting the walls this coming weekend and I reached my objective this morning, right in time: complete all the V1s in the same session!

After about three weeks, my fingers are starting to form pretty rough calluses. However I didn't see this coming; my fingertips are starting to give. I guess there's always a new "weakest point" in my hands that will be ripped to shreds until eventually everything is a nice thick leather.

French Canadian
Feb 23, 2004

Fluffy cat sensory experience


deck posted:

The rightward high start, or are you triple-downgrading the full leftward line.

Both answers seem plausible

The rightward-heading stand start, indeed. Tried the v9 sit start addon afterward since it's only an extra move or two and I had good beta, but the crazy drop knee kept blowing off. Maybe next time.

I do know the leftward v10...a guy was working it while I was there. A bit beyond me right now!

Ingenium
Jan 12, 2008

THIS WAS SURELY THE WORK OF A MASTER CRIMINAL.


At what point do you guys get new climbing shoes? I have been using some Evolv Defy's for about a year and a half and I am unsure if I should be upgrading at this point. I do mainly V2s/V3s right now, so would a upgrade possibly help or am I being a baby about should learn to hold a foothold better on these.

Unoriginal Name
Aug 1, 2006


Ingenium posted:

At what point do you guys get new climbing shoes? I have been using some Evolv Defy's for about a year and a half and I am unsure if I should be upgrading at this point. I do mainly V2s/V3s right now, so would a upgrade possibly help or am I being a baby about should learn to hold a foothold better on these.

My completely unbiased opinion is that evolv's of all kinds smell like the devil's rear end in a top hat.

(Upgrade when you wear out the toes)

Ingenium
Jan 12, 2008

THIS WAS SURELY THE WORK OF A MASTER CRIMINAL.


Unoriginal Name posted:

My completely unbiased opinion is that evolv's of all kinds smell like the devil's rear end in a top hat.

(Upgrade when you wear out the toes)

Mine are not the exception, they are pretty bad despite hand washing them. Was looking at maybe picking up some Five Ten Anasazi VCS and hoping they wont fill the truck of my car with stink.

Booyah-
Dec 21, 2004



Ingenium posted:

Mine are not the exception, they are pretty bad despite hand washing them. Was looking at maybe picking up some Five Ten Anasazi VCS and hoping they wont fill the truck of my car with stink.

The Anasazi Moccs I have still smell like new leather, and I've had them about a year. I think the quality of their leather must be pretty good.

jackchaos
Aug 6, 2008


Unoriginal Name posted:

My completely unbiased opinion is that evolv's of all kinds smell like the devil's rear end in a top hat.

guppy
Sep 21, 2004

sting like a byob

Unoriginal Name posted:

My completely unbiased opinion is that evolv's of all kinds smell like the devil's rear end in a top hat.

(Upgrade when you wear out the toes)

My shoes are Evolv Defys as well, and I've seriously considered upgrading for that reason alone. Hard to justify when they're still in decent shape though.

French Canadian
Feb 23, 2004

Fluffy cat sensory experience


Evolv stink is exactly why I switched to Sportivas.

I try not to upgrade but rather resole these days. Unless I actually go through the underlying rand...

Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.

Yeah, you should resole when you have shoe you like. If it's possible, sometimes it's just too far gone.
But upgrading from literally the cheapest climbing shoe that exists is generally a good idea after you are no longer a beginner. I recommend La Sport Katanas, Scarpa Vapor Vs, or Tenaya Ras as all-rounders for intermediate-advanced climbers. Obviously, you may want specialized shoes for certain tasks.::

Also, you can put Evolvs through the laundry, which supposedly works really well. Though I just climb in leather and skip the stank problem.

GobiasIndustries
Dec 14, 2007



Lipstick Apathy

Irving posted:

Did you get that when you were belaying or lowering? When you lower, the position of the rope will provide the braking, not friction from your hand. If someone is coming down too fast, just pull the rope down and your belay device will do the rest.

It was when I was belaying. I was keeping my hand too close to the rope while bringing it back to the belay device and the constant dragging is what caused it. Lowering was totally fine. I went again yesterday and didn't have any major problems; I think it's just a practice/comfort thing.

George H.W. Cunt
Oct 6, 2010



GobiasIndustries posted:

I'm pretty new to climbing, and just got belay certified at my local climbing gym last week. My first time climbing with a group went well, but I managed to give myself pretty bad rope burns on the skin between my thumb and index finger from belaying; has this happened to anyone else when they were first learning or did I just really mess up? I think I was trying so hard to not lose track of the rope that I was sliding my hand up the rope every time rather than letting go. It hurts to open doors

I went on a date where not only did she manage to get her hair braid sucked into the ATC but also the skin between the thumb and index finger a little later. You're not alone. Belaying can be kinda tricky at first but it comes with practice.

GobiasIndustries
Dec 14, 2007



Lipstick Apathy

SaltLick posted:

I went on a date where not only did she manage to get her hair braid sucked into the ATC but also the skin between the thumb and index finger a little later. You're not alone. Belaying can be kinda tricky at first but it comes with practice.

Ha, well I guess it could have been worse! Yeah belaying was not a very natural motion for me so it definitely took actually doing with with a person on the other side of the rope, but it's getting easier the more I do it. Wish I could say the same about my actual skill, but I'm sure the more I go the easier it'll start to get.. got my first 5.9 under my belt!

CoasterMaster
Aug 13, 2003

The Emperor of the Rides



Nap Ghost

I'm going to be in Boston with a few hours to kill Thursday morning/afternoon, so I was thinking about checking out one of the local rock climbing gyms. It looks like there are three:

- Boston Rock Gym
- Boston Rock Spot
- MetroRock

I'm not traveling with anyone else, so I'm really focused on climbing with auto-belays and I prefer taller walls to shorter (duh). I've checked out some Yelp reviews, but it's hard to tell how big each one is and how many auto-belay devices each gym has.

I can consistently climb 5.8s on 'first glance' and some 5.9s on a good day (and possibly even a 5.10) . Can someone write some words about those gyms and tell me which one I should check out?

Recycle Bin
Feb 7, 2001

I'd rather be a pig than a fascist

Finally getting back in to climbing now that LA.B has opened up in Los Angeles. Any LA goons go there?

Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



I'll be in Japan for three weeks, namely Tokyo and Hiroshima and plan to bring my shoes. Any good indoor gyms I should check out? I assume there are no sport crags nearby which would justify me bringing a rope and quickies...

dewer
Sep 2, 2011


CoasterMaster posted:

I'm going to be in Boston with a few hours to kill Thursday morning/afternoon, so I was thinking about checking out one of the local rock climbing gyms. It looks like there are three:

- Boston Rock Gym
- Boston Rock Spot
- MetroRock

I'm not traveling with anyone else, so I'm really focused on climbing with auto-belays and I prefer taller walls to shorter (duh). I've checked out some Yelp reviews, but it's hard to tell how big each one is and how many auto-belay devices each gym has.

I can consistently climb 5.8s on 'first glance' and some 5.9s on a good day (and possibly even a 5.10) . Can someone write some words about those gyms and tell me which one I should check out?

Last time I was at Boston Rock Gym they had somewhere between 3 - 5 auto belays up at any point in time, though BRG's walls are fairly short. It's the oldest gym of the three. I've never been to Rock Spot. I honestly can't remember if Metro had auto-belays, I've only been twice.

I'd say check out the central rock gym in Watertown, but they don't have any auto-belays.

You also skipped over Brooklyn Boulders Sommerville. I've never been but I think they have auto-belays.

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Pedestrian Xing
Jul 18, 2007



Eat Bum Zen posted:

Wait muscle fibers die off?

Yeah, when you work your muscles near their limit, individual fibers can break. Its part of what makes you feel sore the next day. Your body then replaces them with stronger or multiple fibers which is how you gain muscle mass and strength from repeated exercise. A similar process happens in your bones too.

E: wow didn't see a whole page after that

Pedestrian Xing fucked around with this message at 12:43 on Apr 9, 2014

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