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tortilla_chip
Jun 13, 2007

k-partite



1/3 of the way up Shelter from the Storm at Arrow Canyon, NV

tortilla_chip fucked around with this message at 18:25 on Feb 23, 2015

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Sigmund Fraud
Jul 31, 2005



gamera009 posted:

Any recommendations for building volumes for walls?

I'm in the midst of converting part of my garage to climbing gym and I'm trying to figure out how to put in some kind of modular volume that I can bolt in and remove easily.
Is your wall going to have a matrix of bolt holes? Then it might be easiest to make a volume with a bolt hole in the middle and then just add a screw to keep it from turning then.

This seems like a good guide. It relies on screws to keep the volume in place through. If you make a solid base for the volume some extra 1 by 2, and add a flat top you should be able to bolt a smaller hold straight into the wall. You can then keep it from turning by adding a screw or two.

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


We use volumes from EP that have ~1/2" thick baseboard with slots for standard cap screws to attach to the wall and fiberglass volume bit that attaches to the base via wood screws. The fiberglass makes up the shape of the volume and has T nuts bonded in. Works pretty well, you can pull the bulk of the volume off to make getting it on the wall easier, and the wood screws do a good job of combating twisting and bending of the fiberglass. The bases are made specific to volumes so there isn't a gap between the volume and the wall.

Frequent Handies
Nov 26, 2006

      



Endjinneer posted:

Learn how to place and clean tricams using someone else's, if you can. They're brilliant bits of gear but absolute bastards for getting stuck. I find you have to kind of trip them up to get them out. Other than that, enjoy. Placing trad gear well is a strange kind of art in itself.

Hah, the one I put down ended up being pretty tough to take out.

The fella who took me out had a double rack of cams and had me go up with those instead. Did a ledgy 5.7 and sewed it up with 15 pieces (12 of which were cams) - he went after me and took photos of each one to show what was good/bad. My hex placement was bloody awful.

Electoral Surgery
Mar 19, 2010


Today I got on a boulder problem that I couldn't get two moves into a month ago - three pinchy holds followed by a couple of crimps. I sent it on my first try. Getting strong is awesome. I found myself just naturally doing some body positioning and flagging that never occurred to me when I tried the problem weeks ago.

I don't have anything meaningful to add. Climbing is fun and everyone should climb a lot. I'm looking forward to heading outdoors when the northeast warms up.

big scary monsters
Sep 2, 2011

-~Skullwave~-


There was finger injury chat last page so maybe this is of interest, can't remember where I got the link but it's some testing on the biomechanics of the finger including some nice explanations of how injuries can occur. Warning: some images of a dissected hand. http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/c...iomechanics.pdf

Their conclusions reinforce the idea that slipping off a hold and forcing the fingers open when crimping is a major injury risk (also how I got both my pulley injuries). I think it's by some of the same people behind One Move Too Many, which was until Dave MacLeod's new book as far as I know the only real scientific look at climbing injuries.

big scary monsters fucked around with this message at 03:32 on Feb 24, 2015

Cybor Tap
Jul 13, 2001



Hey ya'll. I'm back! Spring is around the corner and I'm planning my 30th birthday party trip down to the Red River Gorge in late March. Hopefully Mother Gaia will make the sun come out and warm my poor little fingers.

I haven't really climbed in the past... 2 months. Sigh. I have been lifting regularly, but time to throw the weight vest on and get super climber swole (read: skinny and awkward).

Anybody have ideas for the editing the OP with new/better information? I was thinking about linking these nice intro to climbing videos.

http://www.howcast.com/videos/512716-How-to-Rock-Climb-with-Cliff-Simanski-Rock-Climbing

Ok so maybe he's a buddy of mine. But he's really really loving strong and these videos are a good intro.

www.amazon.com
Nov 5, 2012


I ran across a bunch of those videos on youtube.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



Sent a 5.11c on lead tonight, took two takes just to figure out two sections. Also completed my first V5 so that was cool. Good night tonight.

Tsietisin
Jul 2, 2004

Time passes quickly on the weekend.

Went to the climbing centre again today. So far it looks like I am averaging about twice a week.

Todaty however I had to finish early. I have done about 3 relatively easy ascents but after coming down for the third time my arms were in agony and I could barely move them.

DIdn't feel like a pulled muscle and the ache went away after a couple of hours.

Is this something that I am likely to experience when I am just starting out. Are there an exercises that may prevent or assist with this in the future?

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Tsietisin posted:

Went to the climbing centre again today. So far it looks like I am averaging about twice a week.

Todaty however I had to finish early. I have done about 3 relatively easy ascents but after coming down for the third time my arms were in agony and I could barely move them.

DIdn't feel like a pulled muscle and the ache went away after a couple of hours.

Is this something that I am likely to experience when I am just starting out. Are there an exercises that may prevent or assist with this in the future?

Twice a week is pretty good, you will get stronger pretty quickly if you keep that up. I find three days a week to be ideal, but so long as you are going regularly you will get stronger fast, especially at first. As to the tired arms, it really depends on what sort of tiredness you were dealing with. If the main issue for you was that your forearms were totally pumped, then I would say you probably started out on climbs that were too hard. Warming up on some easy stuff, even if that has to be super casual bouldering or something will help you to be able to climb longer on any particular day. If you hop right on something "at your level' without warming up, you can get pumped right away and it kind of screws you for your next few climbs. (That is not to mention the significant added injury risk.)

If on the other hand it was general muscle fatigue throughout your arms/shoulders/back, then that's just pretty normal and you'll get stronger over time. Eat lots of protein.

Tsietisin
Jul 2, 2004

Time passes quickly on the weekend.

Generally I will start the session off with something to warm my body up. jogging on the spot, juping jacks, etc.

Then I will go to some low wall traversals to work on techinique a little, then head to bouldering to tackle the problems there. After about 20 minutes of this I tend to go to the top rope walls.

I was feeling alright following the bouldering, but it was after the ascents that my arms went. I suspect that this time it happened because where I would usually when I would Belay for someone else, I had one of the staff belay for me constantly, so I did the three ascents in a row without much of a break in between.

I'll next go on Monday and take it a little slower.

French Canadian
Feb 23, 2004

Fluffy cat sensory experience


Jumping jacks... Like full on playground p.e style?

Tsietisin
Jul 2, 2004

Time passes quickly on the weekend.

Precisely that. Something to get me warmed up, get the limbs moving, etc.

Endjinneer
Aug 17, 2005


Fallen Rib

tortilla_chip posted:



1/3 of the way up Shelter from the Storm at Arrow Canyon, NV

Nice! What's the deal with the quickdraws on the routes either side of you? Are they crag swag or in-situ or something?

Dmaonk
Oct 15, 2007

Chinese Starcraft tomato ninja image

Tsietisin posted:

Went to the climbing centre again today. So far it looks like I am averaging about twice a week.

Todaty however I had to finish early. I have done about 3 relatively easy ascents but after coming down for the third time my arms were in agony and I could barely move them.

DIdn't feel like a pulled muscle and the ache went away after a couple of hours.

Is this something that I am likely to experience when I am just starting out. Are there an exercises that may prevent or assist with this in the future?

Where was the agony located? Around your elbows?

Tsietisin
Jul 2, 2004

Time passes quickly on the weekend.

It was mostly around the bicep area. Felt like I barely had the strength to lift my arms.

Discomancer
Aug 31, 2001

I'm on a cupcake caper!

Tsietisin posted:

It was mostly around the bicep area. Felt like I barely had the strength to lift my arms.

If it's pain, don't keep climbing on it, it is easy to get overuse injuries and you're not likely to heal with continued use. Wait, and do your warmup/stretches--it takes longer than you'd think to heal. Don't climb through the pain, you'll only gently caress things up worse. Does this sound familiar? http://www.drjuliansaunders.com/resources/feature_articles/dodgy_elbows/

Not medical advice: a lot of new climbers get muscle imbalances and just need to do more dips.

tortilla_chip
Jun 13, 2007

k-partite

Endjinneer posted:

Nice! What's the deal with the quickdraws on the routes either side of you? Are they crag swag or in-situ or something?

Some of the routes are fixed, some just happened to be up at the time.

Dmaonk
Oct 15, 2007

Chinese Starcraft tomato ninja image

Tsietisin posted:

It was mostly around the bicep area. Felt like I barely had the strength to lift my arms.

Like Discomancer said, don't climb through the pain. Warm up properly, consider resting five minutes between routes, work your triceps through dips or push-ups. The broscience explanation is basically that your bicep is "over-activated" compared to your tricep, which pulls on the elbow tendons, keeping them taut. Check the link posted above and google "climber's elbow".

Tsietisin
Jul 2, 2004

Time passes quickly on the weekend.

Dmaonk posted:

Like Discomancer said, don't climb through the pain. Warm up properly, consider resting five minutes between routes, work your triceps through dips or push-ups. The broscience explanation is basically that your bicep is "over-activated" compared to your tricep, which pulls on the elbow tendons, keeping them taut. Check the link posted above and google "climber's elbow".

Thankfully, I heeded the advice given everywhere and as soon as I started to feel pain, I stopped.

I've been resting up today. I'll be heading out again tomorrow and will see how things go.

jackchaos
Aug 6, 2008


If your near San Diego come down to the grotto right now for the Setters Showdown! I got to watch John long ride a unicycle.

Chris!
Dec 1, 2004

E

I'm looking to buy some new climbing shoes, but struggling to find something I'm happy with.

My main climbing shoe has been Red Chilli Spirits, which I've been really happy with, but the rubber has worn completely away and I think I need something a little more technical now - I wore a friend's shoes and found I could heel-hook far easier in them (but they were too narrow).

I'm currently climbing in my backup pair, Boreal Jokers, but they're not really good enough I don't think - they feel way too stiff for me, like I can barely feel holds under my toes.

Last night I climbed in La Sportiva Miura lace-ups, found them decent to climb in but way too narrow for my feet.

I'd like something that I can climb for long periods in and are still fairly comfy. I mostly lead climb, with some bouldering, mostly indoors (due to location), but take several climbing holidays throughout the year, where I climb on limestone, gritstone, granite etc, and climb on the southern sandstone regularly throughout the summer.

Essentially I want something that's good at everything but mostly leading, technical, comfy for long days and also reasonably wide-ish at the front. Am I being a picky bitch, dreaming of a wonder shoe that doesn't exist?

Still B.A.E
Mar 24, 2012



Chris! posted:

I'm looking to buy some new climbing shoes,

Try some scarpa vapours, scarpa shoes tend to be quite wide and by all accounts they're a great all round technical shoe.

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Chris! posted:

I'm looking to buy some new climbing shoes, but struggling to find something I'm happy with.

My main climbing shoe has been Red Chilli Spirits, which I've been really happy with, but the rubber has worn completely away and I think I need something a little more technical now - I wore a friend's shoes and found I could heel-hook far easier in them (but they were too narrow).

I'm currently climbing in my backup pair, Boreal Jokers, but they're not really good enough I don't think - they feel way too stiff for me, like I can barely feel holds under my toes.

Last night I climbed in La Sportiva Miura lace-ups, found them decent to climb in but way too narrow for my feet.

I'd like something that I can climb for long periods in and are still fairly comfy. I mostly lead climb, with some bouldering, mostly indoors (due to location), but take several climbing holidays throughout the year, where I climb on limestone, gritstone, granite etc, and climb on the southern sandstone regularly throughout the summer.

Essentially I want something that's good at everything but mostly leading, technical, comfy for long days and also reasonably wide-ish at the front. Am I being a picky bitch, dreaming of a wonder shoe that doesn't exist?

If you are in the US and don't have a store nearby with a wide selection, try Zappos. I haven't done this personally, because I don't seem to have much trouble finding climbing shoes, but I know folks who have ordered 6 or 8 pairs of climbing shoes from Zappos to try on, and then returned all but one. Zappos return policy is fantastic, and they have free shipping both ways. Just make sure you do it right at the start of a new credit card cycle so you don't get stuck paying for them all and then being reimbursed the next month.

gamera009
Apr 7, 2005



Scarpa Helix are my go-to wall shoes.

Good enough for 5.11 ad comfy enough to have on for 4-5 hour stretches.

By comparison, I boulder in evolv shamans or talons for the extra wide toebox.

Chris!
Dec 1, 2004

E

Thanks for all the replies!

Still B.A.E posted:

Try some scarpa vapours, scarpa shoes tend to be quite wide and by all accounts they're a great all round technical shoe.

These look pretty perfect actually, I'm going to try some on at the weekend, hopefully they fit well.

armorer posted:

If you are in the US and don't have a store nearby with a wide selection, try Zappos.

That sounds great, but I'm not in the US. I'm going to have to resort to trying them on in a shop then buying online I think, if there's a big saving.

Mahlertov Cocktail
Mar 1, 2010

I ate your Mahler avatar! Hahahaha!

Gonna pipe in as usual and say that I love my Scarpa Vapors!

magicalmako
Feb 13, 2005


Shoulder impingements suck.

www.amazon.com
Nov 5, 2012


I got beet up by two 5.8's today. The first was going good until the last 2-3 moves where my lack of crimp ability (maybe some lack of trust in my foot grip) stopped me in my tracks. The second just left me confused. Although the fact I thought they might be possible for me was great. Progress has felt almost exponential up to this point where just 3 or 4 weeks ago the easiest felt like a struggle, if i could even make it up a 30 foot wall rainbowing. It's nice to go back to those after a short time and wonder how those were ever difficult in the least.... 5.5 to 5.7 doesn't seem to be as big a difference, in hindsight than, of 5.7 to 5.8 because of a higher number of crimps. Keeping the goals small and attainable I think in 2 weeks I would like to be able to clean most 5.8's just as most 5.7 have started to come more easily and natural.

TLDR:
I'm stoked on what seems to be great progress in only 4-5 weeks.


Any gear suggestions were appeciated. I bought everything I needed for my birthday and I'm happy with all of it.

Speleothing
May 6, 2008

Spare batteries are pretty key.

Gonna go against the trend and say Tenaya Masai or Ra, depending on your preference for laces or velcro

armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

www.amazon.com posted:

TLDR:
I'm stoked on what seems to be great progress in only 4-5 weeks.

Nice work! This next bit I am saying, not to be a downer, but just to set expectations:

At some point your rapid progress will plateau, and you'll have to start working harder to push up through the number grades. A lot of early progress can be made through better technique, which can be learned pretty quickly. At a certain point though you really do need more strength (finger/back/arm/etc), or conversely to lose some weight, and those things takes time. You need more refined technique as well, and things like "efficiency of movement" which take longer to develop. You are actually burning in new reflexes.

Your 2 week goal to be sending 5.8 may be totally realistic. But (again - this is entirely to set expectations) 6 weeks to go from 5.5 to 5.8 definitely does not equal 6 more weeks to go from 5.8 to 5.11. I don't think that you have that expectation, but it can be frustrating when you get stuck on a grade for a while. When your progress does slow, and "the next number grade" feels really hard compared to whatever you are climbing, the satisfaction when you finally progress is that much better.

petrol blue
Feb 9, 2013

sugar and spice
and
ethanol slammers


First try at bouldering today - noticed an indoor place 5m walk from my flat a few months ago, finally got round to booking the intro session (along with the bf, who's 6'4", and got to really abuse his silly reach). Really enjoyed it, though I might not be saying that tomorrow - forearms are gonna be sore as hell. Worth it, though!

Chris!
Dec 1, 2004

E

Shoe update: after advice in this thread, I went with the Scarpa Vapour v's. Thanks for your recommendations!

Tried a bunch of shoes on but they seemed to fit me best, they were a really comfortable fit but I bought them smaller than I'm used to so hoping it works out.

Trying them out indoors tomorrow, I'm going on a 5 day climbing trip to Poland in May so hoping to have them broken in by then.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



Sent my first 11 outside. It was a bunch of burly moves through the roof. Took a nice fall and a take on it but think I will go back to try to send it clean in the near future.

http://www.mountainproject.com/v/curious-george-goes-climbing/109949573

Frequent Handies
Nov 26, 2006

      



spwrozek posted:

Sent my first 11 outside. It was a bunch of burly moves through the roof. Took a nice fall and a take on it but think I will go back to try to send it clean in the near future.

http://www.mountainproject.com/v/curious-george-goes-climbing/109949573

Nice one. That looks like a really fun route.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



pac man frogs posted:

Nice one. That looks like a really fun route.

It was definitely powerful and the rock was sharp. The crux move was super reachy for me at 5'7". It would be sweet if it was longer but good for what it was.

jackchaos
Aug 6, 2008



Who likes caves

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



Some photos that others took of me. Didn't even know they were.





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www.amazon.com
Nov 5, 2012


armorer posted:

Nice work! This next bit I am saying, not to be a downer, but just to set expectations:

At some point your rapid progress will plateau, and you'll have to start working harder to push up through the number grades. A lot of early progress can be made through better technique, which can be learned pretty quickly. At a certain point though you really do need more strength (finger/back/arm/etc), or conversely to lose some weight, and those things takes time. You need more refined technique as well, and things like "efficiency of movement" which take longer to develop. You are actually burning in new reflexes.

Your 2 week goal to be sending 5.8 may be totally realistic. But (again - this is entirely to set expectations) 6 weeks to go from 5.5 to 5.8 definitely does not equal 6 more weeks to go from 5.8 to 5.11. I don't think that you have that expectation, but it can be frustrating when you get stuck on a grade for a while. When your progress does slow, and "the next number grade" feels really hard compared to whatever you are climbing, the satisfaction when you finally progress is that much better.

Oh for sure. I imagine I'll be stuck for a while after this jump.

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