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Awkward Davies
Sep 3, 2009


Grimey Drawer

spwrozek posted:

If you put a hole in the shoe rand it probably isn't worth the cost. You can probably find those shoes on sale for the $60 to repair the rand, 1/2 resole, and shipping. I would probably just get new shoes that better fit your needs.

Gym grades don't really compare to outside imo, it is really different climbing outside. It is the best climbing though.

I'm going to get lead certified in January so I can get climbing outside come Spring. Pretty excited for it.

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TheMadMilkman
Dec 10, 2007



Awkward Davies posted:

I was watching one the IFSC comps, and they referred to a section of the route as "boulder-y" and I couldn't figure out why.

"Bouldery" usually just means that it's a difficult strength move, as opposed to a difficult technical move.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



Awkward Davies posted:

I'm going to get lead certified in January so I can get climbing outside come Spring. Pretty excited for it.

Awesome, where will you be headed outdoors?

Awkward Davies
Sep 3, 2009


Grimey Drawer

spwrozek posted:

Awesome, where will you be headed outdoors?

I'm NYC located, so I guess up to the gunks? Not too familiar with the options, and the gunks is the one I hear the most about.

asur
Dec 28, 2012


Awkward Davies posted:

What do you mean when you say "a 15 foot v4 boulder problem"? I was watching one the IFSC comps, and they referred to a section of the route as "boulder-y" and I couldn't figure out why.

He just means that there is a 15 foot section that is about a v4 in difficulty. As Sharks Eat Bear touched on, one of the biggest differences between indoor and outdoor is the difficulty over the route. In both cases you'll have a crux, but indoors the the difficulty over the route will be relatively constant both due to the size of the wall and that it's less fun to climb routes that are easy with one or two hard moves at the grade. Outdoors it's common for the difficulty of the route to vary significantly and thus when describing a route giving the overall grade doesn't tell you very much so people will break the route down and use bouldering grades to give the difficulty for certain sections.

The bouldery thing makes very little sense, but as someone mentioned generally just means that the section requires strength as opposed to technical skill.

Sharks Eat Bear
Dec 25, 2004


Awkward Davies posted:

I'm going to get lead certified in January so I can get climbing outside come Spring. Pretty excited for it.

That's great! Climbing outdoors is the best, but you have to be much more thoughtful about it than climbing at the gym. I'll be a narcissist and quote a couple posts I've made in here about the gym-to-crag transition. Hopefully they're at least marginally useful.

Sharks Eat Bear posted:

first, read this and really absorb it even if it all sounds obvious at first: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/0a/05/c5/0a05c5520c438a662ce5ad4182202a08.jpg i've never climbed in WA, but pretty much across the world you'll be amazed at people's (even fellow climbers') poor manners and habits at crags. don't be one of them!

second, as others have mentioned, i would strongly recommend going with someone who can mentor/guide you around. even if you 'know' how to lead, climbing outdoors is very different than in the gym.

i'd recommend starting with some TRs before leading, so you can get accustomed to the rock, and even TRing any routes you plan on eventually leading first. also, as others have said, definitely adjust your expectations. if you're maxing out at 5.10+ in the gym, you should be happy to get up some 5.7-5.8s and VERY happy to get up 5.9s (in general; can vary from crag to crag and gym to gym). in general, bolts are much more spaced out outdoors, and often times the consequences of a lead fall on easy terrain can actually be more severe, as easier climbs tend to have a lot of ledges that you could deck onto.

you need to know what to do when you get to the anchors, both as the first climber to set up the anchor, and as the last climber to clean it. it's also good to be aware of different types of fixed anchors, as you can encounter entirely different rigs from crag to crag, and even from climb to climb within a crag. you can read about this online or in various books, but there's a lot of dubious/lovely info out there (including in this very thread!) and it's best to have an experienced partner who can show you the rop -- the correct way to do things.

this is a good article, regardless of gender, as it illustrates how many considerations should go into any outdoor climbing trip, which just highlights the importance of having a mentor to learn from. it's a pretty good list, too http://www.chickswithpicks.net/considerations-in-making-the-transition-from-indoor-to-outdoor-climbing/

lastly, you'll probably hear plenty of people say "just go for it, that's how i learned!" or something to that effect. you probably could just go for it and wind up uninjured and learn that way, but i think it's a bad approach. it'll drag out the learning curve, as you don't know what you don't know, and given the importance of risk assessment in climbing (at all levels) i think starting off your outdoor climbing life with a capricious decision like "gently caress it i'm just gonna figure it out while i'm up there" sets a bad and potentially dangerous precedent for your future self!

Sharks Eat Bear posted:

If you really want to get outside, I'd recommend trying to find a mentor (probably via your gym, assuming you don't already have someone you can trust as a mentor) that can take you under their wing, rather than joining a meetup/social group. It's a bit a matter of luck in terms of finding a mentor -- it's mostly just being outgoing and willing to chat it up with strangers, but also I think you need to be able to evaluate the competency of your mentor to a degree. Outdoor climbing experience is a big plus, but not sufficient in itself (there are plenty of incompetent climbers that have been at it for many years).

I'd say once you're getting more comfortable with belaying, the best way to identify a mentor is to look around at the gym regulars and take notice of who seems to be a really attentive, mindful (lead) belayer. They pay attention to their climber, anticipate when to feed/take slack, give soft catches, don't go hands-free on a gri-gri, etc. My bet is that, in general, the best belayer will make the best mentor.

Don't get me wrong -- climbing outdoors is the best, and if you're really interested in climbing, it's the way to go. But TRing and bouldering in a gym for a few months really isn't going to give you the appropriate level of training/competency to be a moderately self-sufficient outdoor climber.

Sharks Eat Bear fucked around with this message at 17:52 on Dec 2, 2015

SplitDestiny
Sep 25, 2004


I learned how to trad climb outdoors on my own without a mentor and I wouldn't really recommend it unless you are extremely detail oriented and really practice everything on the ground and get your poo poo dialed before going up. It's scary enough on your first lead without having to remember everything. Even so, a proper mentor would have gotten me moving along much faster and if I were to do it again, I would find one if possible.

In other news, I onsighted a 12a for the first time this last weekend (sport) in red rocks. Excited to be pushing my grades there but I've really got my eyes set on some big wall ascents in spring in Yosemite so I need to get back to crack...

Chris!
Dec 1, 2004

E

Sharks Eat Bear posted:

That's great! Climbing outdoors is the best, but you have to be much more thoughtful about it than climbing at the gym. I'll be a narcissist and quote a couple posts I've made in here about the gym-to-crag transition. Hopefully they're at least marginally useful.

This is all great advice!

Awkward Davies
Sep 3, 2009


Grimey Drawer

Sharks Eat Bear posted:

That's great! Climbing outdoors is the best, but you have to be much more thoughtful about it than climbing at the gym. I'll be a narcissist and quote a couple posts I've made in here about the gym-to-crag transition. Hopefully they're at least marginally useful.

This is all super helpful, thank you.

Awkward Davies
Sep 3, 2009


Grimey Drawer

I was at the gym tonight and watched a real goony looking idiot (black cargo pants, beard, rented harness, chunky black sneakers and bike gloves) drop an open knife from his ankle sheath while half way up the wall on an auto belay. :psyduck:

crazycello
Jul 22, 2009


Awkward Davies posted:

I was at the gym tonight and watched a real goony looking idiot (black cargo pants, beard, rented harness, chunky black sneakers and bike gloves) drop an open knife from his ankle sheath while half way up the wall on an auto belay. :psyduck:

that was me

French Canadian
Feb 23, 2004

Fluffy cat sensory experience


Anyone climbing in Wisconsin? Is there ice climbing in the winter?! :fyadride:

Keldoclock
Jan 5, 2014

by zen death robot



:psyduck: who climbs indoors with gloves?

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



French Canadian posted:

Anyone climbing in Wisconsin? Is there ice climbing in the winter?! :fyadride:

Not sure about Wisconsin but there is a lot of ice in the UP on lake superior. It just needs to actually get cold though, been very warm.

Rime
Nov 2, 2011


I'm really bored doing 11a's inside and my gyms two artifical cracks are worn down glassy garbage which never get cleaned.

So tell me the secret to climbing outdoors in the winter while not losing my fingers to frostbite, so I can show up to some meetups already informed. Preferably how crack works in this weather, cracks are my crack.

Cracklife.

Niyqor
Dec 1, 2003

Paid for by the meat council of America

Hand warmers in chalk bag and pockets
.

French Canadian
Feb 23, 2004

Fluffy cat sensory experience


Tape gloves with integrated hand warmers

henne
May 9, 2009

by exmarx


Handwarmers in your chalk bag, try to find the ballance between numb enough to jam hard and still able to unrack a cam without dropping it.

I love climbing at smith in the cold because you can jam fingers into tight pockets and it don't hurt.

Put a thick sock OVER your shoe and cut out the toe and heel, works better than socks in the shoes

FistLips
Dec 14, 2004

Must I dream and always see your face?

Magnus Midtbø placed third in the Norwegian bouldering championships this weekend. Dissatisfied with the result, he left his bronze medal at the hotel before heading home. Is it just me, or is that really poor sportsmanship?
"I compete to win, but I do appreciate others having a shot. I just wish it happened in another way than this - winning this was like playing bingo" he says in an interview.

The competition can be seen here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQyXsRliUUnO38BOKV--KqQ/videos

French Canadian
Feb 23, 2004

Fluffy cat sensory experience


Boulderers are an emotional bunch.

remote control carnivore
May 6, 2009


I finally sucked it up this year and bought a gym membership because I am tired of rebuilding my muscle mass/memory and tendon strength every spring. My hands are so, so hammered. But looking forward to some 5.9 trad leads in the summer!

deong
Jun 13, 2001

I'll see you in heck!


French Canadian posted:

Boulderers are an emotional bunch.

gently caress YOU..

sorry, what do you mean?

Really sorry? don't leave me.


please.

Electoral Surgery
Mar 19, 2010


Can anyone recommend references for setting? The manager at my gym showed me the basics (matching bolts to holds, safety issues, not creating spinners) and let me start setting boulder problems. I'm going to be focusing on putting up training problems for myself.

I read a couple entries of that inactive routecrafting blog, it felt like half of the discussion was going over my head.

Dutymode
Dec 31, 2008


I could post a handout and my notes from a USAC Level 1 clinic, if no one thinks that would be a problem.

ConspicuousEvil
Feb 29, 2004


Pillbug

turevidar posted:

Can anyone recommend references for setting? The manager at my gym showed me the basics (matching bolts to holds, safety issues, not creating spinners) and let me start setting boulder problems. I'm going to be focusing on putting up training problems for myself.

I read a couple entries of that inactive routecrafting blog, it felt like half of the discussion was going over my head.

Read "The Art of Coursesetting" by Louie Anderson.

jackchaos
Aug 6, 2008


I've worked closely with Louie a few times he's a cool dude. Join route setters anonymous on Facebook. Just watch/take notes of the setting videos. The book is great for basics but that's about it. Rule of elbows for reach. Touch the hold at max arm extension then bend your other arm pointing your elbow in the direction you want the next hold. That's about the max distance you'd want to set holds to not make them to reachy. Also forces you to set more technical vs just big power moves.

Endjinneer
Aug 17, 2005


Fallen Rib

Rime posted:

I'm really bored doing 11a's inside and my gyms two artifical cracks are worn down glassy garbage which never get cleaned.

So tell me the secret to climbing outdoors in the winter while not losing my fingers to frostbite, so I can show up to some meetups already informed. Preferably how crack works in this weather, cracks are my crack.

Cracklife.

The back of your neck is a really good place to put your hand if you want to warm it up.

crazycello
Jul 22, 2009


Rime posted:

I'm really bored doing 11a's inside and my gyms two artifical cracks are worn down glassy garbage which never get cleaned.

So tell me the secret to climbing outdoors in the winter while not losing my fingers to frostbite, so I can show up to some meetups already informed. Preferably how crack works in this weather, cracks are my crack.

Cracklife.

Start warming your hands before they're frozen hunks of meat. When it gets to that point, you have to spend way longer heating them up again. A good thermos filled with tea is your friend.

Electoral Surgery
Mar 19, 2010


e: wrong thread

Electoral Surgery fucked around with this message at 05:23 on Dec 25, 2015

Rime
Nov 2, 2011


Went out to the crag, jammed my hands against it, felt the icy touch of death from that harsh granite and nope'd right the gently caress back to a warm shower.

Winter climbing in Canada is not for the bare handed, nope nope nope.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



After a month off I finally got back in the gym yesterday. I felt like my grip strength was pretty good still but stamina was lack. I did ski a ton the day before though so maybe I was just pretty tired too. Took it easy and lead a 9, 10a, 10a, and 10d. The best part is that it was fun! I am glad I took the time off even if I lose a bit of strength.

no broccoli please
Apr 20, 2007

no broccoli please you are nice here is a Nathaniel Hawthorne avatar

Got a harness for Christmas! Goodbye rental fees, hello falling in comfort! Petzl Corax, so nice.

compton ass terry
Nov 20, 2006

Do you know where I'm from?

Never been up to Colorado. Is it possible to boulder in the Denver area in early March or is it too cold?

I assume it's pretty easy to rent pads up there? Suggestions for good V2-V3 climbing spots in the area?

Bud Manstrong
Dec 11, 2003

The Curse of the Flying Criosphinx


compton rear end terry posted:

Never been up to Colorado. Is it possible to boulder in the Denver area in early March or is it too cold?

I assume it's pretty easy to rent pads up there? Suggestions for good V2-V3 climbing spots in the area?

Depends. March and April see the most snow around here, but usually it's doable. The Morrison boulders are climbable year round on the north side in the cave, and March might be okay for the Dark Side (south side). If you're lucky, Three Sisters will be clear. It's about 35 minutes from Denver, but there's a ton of good stuff in that range. The Satellite Boulders are up in Boulder, about a half hour drive and a nice 20-minute approach hike up a hill to get you warmed up. They're usually climbable in March; gamera009 would know better than I would. I usually don't make it up there til April or so.

Denver Bouldering Club rents mats, and if the weather is garbage, it's a fun gym.

gamera009
Apr 7, 2005



Bud Manstrong posted:

Depends. March and April see the most snow around here, but usually it's doable. The Morrison boulders are climbable year round on the north side in the cave, and March might be okay for the Dark Side (south side). If you're lucky, Three Sisters will be clear. It's about 35 minutes from Denver, but there's a ton of good stuff in that range. The Satellite Boulders are up in Boulder, about a half hour drive and a nice 20-minute approach hike up a hill to get you warmed up. They're usually climbable in March; gamera009 would know better than I would. I usually don't make it up there til April or so.

Denver Bouldering Club rents mats, and if the weather is garbage, it's a fun gym.

Satellites will def be open if there hasn't been a heavy rain. I have five crash pads and am nearly always up for working in the boulders there or my own projects.

Flagstaff is also a constant option.

Both will feature a lot of good textured sandstone, but flagstaff is more crystalline.

Boulder is basically my back yard, so if you're looking for some guiding I am always happy to oblige. Also, there are a fair few bouldering goons out my way that are always up for delicious beer post climb.

XIII
Feb 11, 2009


I'd be down to join, if the CO bouldering goons have convinced me to leave the gym and go outside by then.

gamera009
Apr 7, 2005



XIII posted:

I'd be down to join, if the CO bouldering goons have convinced me to leave the gym and go outside by then.

Outside is safer and easier than indoors. Outside, everything is on (except at Flagstaff) and everyone is a lot safer and in safety megamode.

XIII
Feb 11, 2009


gamera009 posted:

Outside is safer and easier than indoors. Outside, everything is on (except at Flagstaff) and everyone is a lot safer and in safety megamode.

All of these points only hurt your case.

P.S. Bud Manstrong and I will be at DBC tonight, then again on Wednesday (along with deong). Join us.

Electoral Surgery
Mar 19, 2010


Hey CO goons, I might be interviewing for a job in Denver. What do people go for bouldering? I'm assuming everything is snowed in - would I be able to hike around and check things out at least?

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spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



Everything outside is too cold besides shelf on warm days. I had friends go up to three sisters for some reason on new years and all I heard back was it was unbearably cold.

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