Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

(call/cc call/cc)


syzygy86 posted:

Taking minutes to to alt-tab sounds like a different problem. Desktop responsiveness has nothing to do with VT-d (although you can passthrough a video card, its a non-trivial setup).

Nope. You are wrong. VT-d causes drastic performance differences. I can invite you over to my house, have you watch me enable and disable VT-d in the BIOS on various laptops and desktops, and observe the performance differences if you'd like. I didn't say alt+tabbing takes minutes. Pressing the Windows key in Unity and then typing "terminal" might end up hanging for minutes sometimes, on the right versions of Ubuntu. Alt-tabbing merely takes between some noticeable amount of lag and a few seconds of lag, depending on desktop environment.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Proud Christian Mom
Dec 20, 2006


NeoSeeker posted:

Yeah I really don't care about having to lower settings or anything. And thinking about it more I guess you're right about it being to heavy and unwieldy. Although I do know about traveling weighed down by stuff, 8 pounds ain't poo poo. But I guess I'll just go with the lenovo Y500 and build a new machine before star citizen comes out.


Being able to take it to school is only one part of the mobility factor. I enjoy the idea of being able to set up basically anywhere instantaneously and be able to start gaming right then and there. You can't take your desktop outside on the patio and set it up every time you want to play outside.

http://www.xoticpc.com/sager-np8250-clevo-p157sm-p-5839.html?wconfigure=yes

Odd Mutant
Jun 21, 2007






QuarkJets posted:

What's worst about gaming laptops is that Haswell's integrated graphics are so good that you could easily get by with just that and claim to have a "gaming" machine in something light and thin. You just don't get to have the pretentious joy of being able to play AAA titles at 60 fps at max quality, you have to scale back a bunch of settings instead.

A real gamer can make do
Oh yeah, I remember the awesome days of somehow playing Team Fortress 2 on low specs on a 2008 Thinkpad. It looked charmingly like a PSX title, but it ran super smooth for whatever reason.

But while I can make due with running something like Civ 5 on low settings now, I want be able to run Civ 6 on really low settings in the future. :V

I'm going to wait for the W230ST or whatever it's called. Yeah, short battery life. But I honestly don't care about battery life, if there's not a power outlet nearby I'm probably not in an area where I'd want to use a laptop for four hours anyways.

edit: And like the Iris Pro 5200 looks like an awesome cross between efficiency and gpu power, doesn't seem like a whole lot of promising laptops are using it yet. I'd probably buy a Thinkpad with one in a flash, but it doesn't seem like they're going to do a refresh with them anytime soon.

Odd Mutant fucked around with this message at 21:21 on Jun 29, 2013

InstantInfidel
Jan 8, 2010

BEST I EVER SPENT

NeoSeeker posted:

Yeah I really don't care about having to lower settings or anything. And thinking about it more I guess you're right about it being to heavy and unwieldy. Although I do know about traveling weighed down by stuff, 8 pounds ain't poo poo. But I guess I'll just go with the lenovo Y500 and build a new machine before star citizen comes out.


Being able to take it to school is only one part of the mobility factor. I enjoy the idea of being able to set up basically anywhere instantaneously and be able to start gaming right then and there. You can't take your desktop outside on the patio and set it up every time you want to play outside.

Unless something has changed, the Y500 has the 650M, right? GT3e/HD5200 Pro/Haswell nearly matches that performance and will drastically increase your battery life since you eliminate the power draw of the GPU. If you can, wait until early August when Back to School sales have started and Haswell laptops are more prolific. You'll spend less and get more.

Odd Mutant
Jun 21, 2007






The Y500 has an SLI 750M now, which seems nice if you can get it for $900-$1000.

But, y'know. It's still an Y500.

QuarkJets
Sep 8, 2008

It's a handshake in progress


Mutation posted:

Oh yeah, I remember the awesome days of somehow playing Team Fortress 2 on low specs on a 2008 Thinkpad. It looked charmingly like a PSX title, but it ran super smooth for whatever reason.

But while I can make due with running something like Civ 5 on low settings now, I want be able to run Civ 6 on really low settings in the future. :V

With Haswell you should already be able to run Civ 5 at much better than really low settings. The Civ series doesn't make particularly huge leaps in graphics requirements, a Haswell would probably be able to run Civ 6 in a few years on really low settings but at half the price of an mGPU top of the line gaming laptop

Proud Christian Mom
Dec 20, 2006


Mutation posted:

The Y500 has an SLI 750M now, which seems nice if you can get it for $900-$1000.

But, y'know. It's still an Y500.

The one universal no is SLI laptops

DrDork
Dec 29, 2003
commanding officer of the Army of Dorkness

QuarkJets posted:

With Haswell you should already be able to run Civ 5 at much better than really low settings. The Civ series doesn't make particularly huge leaps in graphics requirements, a Haswell would probably be able to run Civ 6 in a few years on really low settings but at half the price of an mGPU top of the line gaming laptop
I can (and do) run Civ5 at 1600x900 on my T430 w/GF630 equivalent. You have to turn a few of the graphics options down, but it doesn't really make a big difference. Honestly, the crushing part of Civ 5 is how long it takes for AI civs to take their turns during end-game. We're talking a minute plus. So yeah, pretty much anything you get these days will be able to run Civ 5 as far as the graphics department goes.

And yeah, SLI in a laptop is a hilarious way to part a fool from his money. Due to thermal issues, most SLI setups are not all that much faster than their single-card versions, while being more expensive and managing worse thermals.

Revol
Jul 31, 2003

EHCIARF EMERC...
EHCIARF EMERC...


Aww crap. I just saw that a new version of the XPS 12 is coming with Haswell, 'in the coming weeks'. Articles were saying that around June 3rd. I really hope it comes out by the time my employee membership bonus 17% comes in two weeks on July 6th.

Edit: Engadget article from June 4th says it begins to ship in most regions July 9th. That would work perfectly for me. So, to recap: XPS 12 with Haswell, that brings battery life from 5-6 hours to 8-9 hours and a "1.6 times" performance increase will tentatively release July 9th at the same price. Oh, and NFC.

Revol fucked around with this message at 22:42 on Jun 29, 2013

QuarkJets
Sep 8, 2008

It's a handshake in progress


DrDork posted:

I can (and do) run Civ5 at 1600x900 on my T430 w/GF630 equivalent. You have to turn a few of the graphics options down, but it doesn't really make a big difference. Honestly, the crushing part of Civ 5 is how long it takes for AI civs to take their turns during end-game. We're talking a minute plus. So yeah, pretty much anything you get these days will be able to run Civ 5 as far as the graphics department goes.

And yeah, SLI in a laptop is a hilarious way to part a fool from his money. Due to thermal issues, most SLI setups are not all that much faster than their single-card versions, while being more expensive and managing worse thermals.

Exactly; Civ has never been a GPU-intensive game, it just needs a lot of CPU power for crunching all of that end of game action

Odd Mutant
Jun 21, 2007






Okay fine, the Civ series are well optimized for laptops. :p

I'd also like to be able to play Battlefield 5 / Destiny on very low settings in the future.

Point is, I want to future proof my laptop to play entertaining future games at reasonably ugly settings.

OXBALLS DOT COM
Sep 11, 2005

by FactsAreUseless


Young Orc

Mutation posted:

Okay fine, the Civ series are well optimized for laptops. :p

I'd also like to be able to play Battlefield 5 / Destiny on very low settings in the future.

Point is, I want to future proof my laptop to play entertaining future games at reasonably ugly settings.

Please don't say the f-word in a computer thread.

The only way to do this is spend less money now and buy a new computer when a game you can't play comes out.

InstantInfidel
Jan 8, 2010

BEST I EVER SPENT

Mutation posted:

Okay fine, the Civ series are well optimized for laptops. :p

I'd also like to be able to play Battlefield 5 / Destiny on very low settings in the future.

Point is, I want to future proof my laptop to play entertaining future games at reasonably ugly settings.

You literally cannot do this. New consoles removing the artificial restrictions on software development limits mean your laptop will be an outdated boat anchor in two year's time. This is only even *remotely* possible if you get something like a 780M, but then you've got a desktop replacement and not a laptop.

DrDork
Dec 29, 2003
commanding officer of the Army of Dorkness

Mutation posted:

I'd also like to be able to play Battlefield 5 / Destiny on very low settings in the future.

Point is, I want to future proof my laptop to play entertaining future games at reasonably ugly settings.
You can't. Realistically the best solution for you is to take the $1500 you would have spent on a gaming laptop and buy a $1000 middle of the road laptop. In two years sell the laptop for $500, take the other $500 that you didn't spend originally, and buy a new $1000 laptop again. That'll give you better performance in two years than buying a top-of-the-line one right now will.

Think about it. 2 years ago a $1500 gaming laptop would have had something like a GTS 360M. Today that's about equivalent to a 630/635/640M LE depending on the game. That means it'd be only slightly faster (if at all) than the HD4600 IGP that some Haswell processors are packing--and obviously the CPU is slower and battery performance a crap-ton worse. With Intel taking graphics performance seriously, this scenario is likely to repeat itself. So, yeah.

Revol
Jul 31, 2003

EHCIARF EMERC...
EHCIARF EMERC...


Mutation posted:

Point is, I want to future proof my laptop to play entertaining future games at reasonably ugly settings.

That is literally impossible. The way to future proof a desktop is... well, it's inherent. Future proof is either upgradability, or buying an outrageous $1000 video card that is still only a few years ahead of what we have now. Otherwise, you can only get the best you can get now, and hope that it lasts as long as possible. For the kinds of games you're talking about, that can be very difficult. A few years ago, it would've been another story. But the next generation of consoles are influencing these new games, and we simply don't know what these games will bring to the PC.

I think the best game you can try to gauge this with is Witcher 2. The PC version of this game is, in many ways, a next-generation console game. So much of next-generation console graphics are going to be dealing with filters and atmospheric effects. Witcher 2 PC has this in spades, while the console version does not. I imagine the kind of graphics features that Witcher 2 PC saw are going to become standard for next-generation gaming, and will even be taken to the next level.

Odd Mutant
Jun 21, 2007






Fine, I'll buy a lousy Haswell Thinkpad.

syzygy86
Feb 1, 2008



shrughes posted:

Nope. You are wrong. VT-d causes drastic performance differences. I can invite you over to my house, have you watch me enable and disable VT-d in the BIOS on various laptops and desktops, and observe the performance differences if you'd like. I didn't say alt+tabbing takes minutes. Pressing the Windows key in Unity and then typing "terminal" might end up hanging for minutes sometimes, on the right versions of Ubuntu. Alt-tabbing merely takes between some noticeable amount of lag and a few seconds of lag, depending on desktop environment.

Are you sure the setting you're toggling is VT-d? Can you provide links to information that can show these supposed drastic performance differences? The Unity dash is slow as hell when you don't have 3D support in the VM. If you have 3D support, which doesn't require VT-d, it'll run just dandy (although other desktop environments are generally faster anyway). You might want to read up on what VT-d actually is before you claim it provides drastic performance increases for basic desktop responsiveness.

Delta-Wye
Sep 29, 2005

Represent!

Mutation posted:

Fine, I'll buy a lousy Haswell Thinkpad.

Why not buy a nice Haswell Thinkpad?

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

(call/cc call/cc)


syzygy86 posted:

Are you sure the setting you're toggling is VT-d? Can you provide links to information that can show these supposed drastic performance differences? The Unity dash is slow as hell when you don't have 3D support in the VM. If you have 3D support, which doesn't require VT-d, it'll run just dandy (although other desktop environments are generally faster anyway). You might want to read up on what VT-d actually is before you claim it provides drastic performance increases for basic desktop responsiveness.

When I last checked this, I had 3D support turned on, graphics memory slid up to 128 MB, with 3D acceleration enabled, running a Unity VM in Virtualbox, and turning on and off VT-d resulted in the drastic performance differences in a full-screened VM.

I just checked again today on a different machine, and in Ubuntu 12.04, neither 3D settings nor VT-d in any combination had any effect on performance! Turning 3D acceleration on and off, tweaking its memory allocated to it, didn't change anything. Note that the VT-d performance difference came with the observation that the differences were much more visible in VirtualBox than VMware Player. So that's at least _part_ of where to assign blame. I'm now running a newer version of VirtualBox than before, and maybe that's what eliminated the differences.

SoggyGravy
Jul 14, 2008

MAXIMUM
OVERGOON


I know you guys love Yoga 13" and MBA 13" but what is the consensus on which to go with (both seem similarly priced). Is it the debate between touchscreen Yoga with its "modes" of operation versus mac OSX and itunes or is there more to it?

EDIT: seems haswell is the difference so is MBA 13" def recommended over Yoga when in comparison if you don't care about windows vs mac osx?

SoggyGravy fucked around with this message at 12:24 on Jun 30, 2013

Char
Jan 5, 2013


I lack the ability to filter through the specs and see if a laptop is what I'd want: the Lenovo Y510p looks like a good candidate (even if I'd have to somehow import it from the USA).
I'd use it for running a bunch of VMs, light coding tasks, network administration mostly.

Considering a T430 is 1200-1500 Euro here in Italy, managing to smuggle one of those at 900$ would be a steal.

Edit: or a Y410p.

Schmetterling
Apr 1, 2011



I've basically decided that I want one of the new Macbook Airs, but now I need to choose exactly which type. I want 13" and 8gb ram for sure, but I don't know whether to go for the i5 or the i7. I also don't know whether the 128gb ssd would be big enough, or whether I should spend the extra for the 256gb. Any advice?

Cost is a big issue; with education discount and applecare the i5/128gb is $1511, i5/256gb is $1707, i7/128gb is $1668, and the i7/256gb is $1978.

shrughes
Oct 11, 2008

(call/cc call/cc)


If cost is a big issue then don't get a MacBook Air.

Anyway the 256GB upgrade is infinitely more useful than the i7 upgrade.

Mu Zeta
Oct 17, 2002

Me crush ass to dust



Schmetterling posted:

I've basically decided that I want one of the new Macbook Airs, but now I need to choose exactly which type. I want 13" and 8gb ram for sure, but I don't know whether to go for the i5 or the i7. I also don't know whether the 128gb ssd would be big enough, or whether I should spend the extra for the 256gb. Any advice?

Cost is a big issue; with education discount and applecare the i5/128gb is $1511, i5/256gb is $1707, i7/128gb is $1668, and the i7/256gb is $1978.

You can also just buy the Applecare later. You have a year to get it.

I would buy the i5/256gigs. The i7 isn't worth it unless you know you need it.

OXBALLS DOT COM
Sep 11, 2005

by FactsAreUseless


Young Orc

SoggyGravy posted:

I know you guys love Yoga 13" and MBA 13" but what is the consensus on which to go with (both seem similarly priced). Is it the debate between touchscreen Yoga with its "modes" of operation versus mac OSX and itunes or is there more to it?

EDIT: seems haswell is the difference so is MBA 13" def recommended over Yoga when in comparison if you don't care about windows vs mac osx?

If you ask me, MBA 100% over the Yoga. Touch is dumb. Ideapads aren't particularly great, and the Yoga I saw didn't impress me much.

Schmetterling
Apr 1, 2011



shrughes posted:

If cost is a big issue then don't get a MacBook Air.

Anyway the 256GB upgrade is infinitely more useful than the i7 upgrade.

Thing is, in Australia it's equally as expensive to get a Thinkpad or Dell. So I thought I'd go with a pretty one.


Mu Zeta posted:

You can also just buy the Applecare later. You have a year to get it.

I would buy the i5/256gigs. The i7 isn't worth it unless you know you need it.

I hadn't thought of that! Would I still be able to get the education discount if I leave it for a while?

Mu Zeta
Oct 17, 2002

Me crush ass to dust



Yes. You can just do it at any Apple Store if you bring proof you're in college.

edit: I'm assuming it's the same in Australia, but I don't think you guys have official Apple Stores yet. You could probably just get it at the Apple online store,

Gnamra
Apr 27, 2011


I'm looking for a laptop with alot of power and durability, and I don't want to import a laptop due to keyboard differences and 25% VAT. I'll be using the laptop for school and gaming. I've been browsing a bit and I'd like some feedback on these:

Acer Aspire V3-772G http://www.komplett.no/k/ki.aspx?sku=779552#extra
  • Intel Core i7 4702MQ
  • 1600 x 900 Resolution
  • 8 GB ( 2 x 4 GB ) RAM
  • NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M 4 GB DDR3 VRAM
  • // isn't 4GB massively overkill for such a small resolution?
MSI GE60 15.6" Full HD http://www.komplett.no/k/ki.aspx?sku=781361#extra
  • Intel Core i7 4700MQ
  • 1920 x 1080 Resolution
  • 8GB RAM
  • NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M - 2 GB GDDR5 SDRAM
MSI GE70 17.3" Full HD http://www.komplett.no/k/ki.aspx?sku=781359#extra
  • Intel Core i7 4700MQ
  • 1920 x 1080 Resolution
  • 8GB RAM
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 765M - 2 GB GDDR5 SDRAM

I'm linking to the Norwegian site because when I checked newegg and some other sites and the specs were different.
I was going to link to a google translated version of the site, but the tabs on the site hosed it up so it didn't work.

Translating it with google chrome works though.

I'm concerned about the build quality, I have no experience with MSI laptops and very little experience with Acer aspire laptops. I don't want any screws to come loose or the screen to loosen and flop back and forth easily.

One of the worst ones I've had to endure was an acer travelmate(I think it was a 2420), the screen would move several centimeters and it looked like the screen was about to fall off.

Gnamra fucked around with this message at 15:22 on Jun 30, 2013

Boar It
Jul 29, 2011

Mesmerizing eyebrows is my specialty


My parents are in dire need of a good laptop and since I'm keen on the haswell processors I figured I can clean up my current laptop which will do just fine for my parents needs, and get myself a new one. (Current one has i7 sandybrige and a 540M)

I will never buy an ASUS laptop again though. Hardware is great but the bloatware ruined my laptop from day one. Explore.exe crashed whenever I tried to enter the C drive so I couldn't access the hdd at all. All thanks to ASUS Webstorage. I should've formatted it from the start which I will do from now on but still. gently caress you ASUS, I expect my damned laptop to at least WORK when I first start it.

Thinking of getting a fancy MSI GE60 with the new haswell i7 and a 750M or whatever it is called. It costs.. ~$1386. Converted from the Swedish price so don't be surprised at the price.

Here's the translated store page for the full specs:
http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=sv&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.komplett.se%2Fk%2Fki.aspx%3Fsku%3D781361

There is a slightly cheaper version of the same laptop with a 660M and an i5 ivy bridge. I bet the 750M is just a rebranded 660M though.

Anyone have any opinion about MSI? Seems like a pretty solid laptop. It is just hard to find reviews on specific laptops since there are a million variatons of each.

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





Mutation posted:

Point is, I want to future proof my laptop to play entertaining future games at reasonably ugly settings.

Nope. Not going to happen.

The closest thing you can do to "future proof" your laptop is to buy a high end laptop 2-3 years after a major console release, i.e. 2008 or 2016, when mobile hardware catches up to the current generation of console hardware.

Buying a "gaming laptop" six months before they release a new generation of console hardware (which pegs the system requirements for 6-8 years) is pretty much the absolute worst time to buy in to a non-upgradable mobile gaming platform. At the absolute minimum, if you have to, limp along your existing device at least until next summer, or get a tablet until then.

TL;DR right now-this winter is the absolute lowest point on the price/gaming longevity value curve

Boar It
Jul 29, 2011

Mesmerizing eyebrows is my specialty


Hadlock posted:

Nope. Not going to happen.

The closest thing you can do to "future proof" your laptop is to buy a high end laptop 2-3 years after a major console release, i.e. 2008 or 2016, when mobile hardware catches up to the current generation of console hardware.

Buying a "gaming laptop" six months before they release a new generation of console hardware (which pegs the system requirements for 6-8 years) is pretty much the absolute worst time to buy in to a non-upgradable mobile gaming platform. At the absolute minimum, if you have to, limp along your existing device at least until next summer, or get a tablet until then.

TL;DR right now-this winter is the absolute lowest point on the price/gaming longevity value curve

Uh, what. Laptops can be more powerful than next generation consoles already. Don't get me wrong I like consoles but having to wait until 2016 to get a gaming laptop doesn't make sense.

fookolt
Mar 13, 2012

Where there is power
There is resistance


Gnamra posted:

I'm looking for a laptop with alot of power and durability, and I don't want to import a laptop due to keyboard differences and 25% VAT. I'll be using the laptop for school and gaming. I've been browsing a bit and I'd like some feedback on these:

Acer Aspire V3-772G http://www.komplett.no/k/ki.aspx?sku=779552#extra
  • Intel Core i7 4702MQ
  • 1600 x 900 Resolution
  • 8 GB ( 2 x 4 GB ) RAM
  • NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M 4 GB DDR3 VRAM
  • // isn't 4GB massively overkill for such a small resolution?
MSI GE60 15.6" Full HD http://www.komplett.no/k/ki.aspx?sku=781361#extra
  • Intel Core i7 4700MQ
  • 1920 x 1080 Resolution
  • 8GB RAM
  • NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M - 2 GB GDDR5 SDRAM
MSI GE70 17.3" Full HD http://www.komplett.no/k/ki.aspx?sku=781359#extra
  • Intel Core i7 4700MQ
  • 1920 x 1080 Resolution
  • 8GB RAM
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 765M - 2 GB GDDR5 SDRAM

I'm linking to the Norwegian site because when I checked newegg and some other sites and the specs were different.
I was going to link to a google translated version of the site, but the tabs on the site hosed it up so it didn't work.

Translating it with google chrome works though.

I'm concerned about the build quality, I have no experience with MSI laptops and very little experience with Acer aspire laptops. I don't want any screws to come loose or the screen to loosen and flop back and forth easily.

One of the worst ones I've had to endure was an acer travelmate(I think it was a 2420), the screen would move several centimeters and it looked like the screen was about to fall off.

What games are you going to play? Are you thinking of using your laptop in class/at the library or is it going to stay on your desk?

InstantInfidel
Jan 8, 2010

BEST I EVER SPENT

Torabi posted:

Uh, what. Laptops can be more powerful than next generation consoles already. Don't get me wrong I like consoles but having to wait until 2016 to get a gaming laptop doesn't make sense.

Yeah, on paper. In reality, the console can focus all of its compute power towards a single, specific goal because the entire thing- the hardware, the OS, and the software- is dedicated to doing that single specific task. A computer has to deal with hundreds of pieces of background bullshit in Windows/OSX, what amounts to a series of maybe-stable hacks that we call drivers for multiple pieces of hardware, and on top of that, deal with a game that may or may not even be optimized for the architecture it's being played on.

Buying a gaming laptop any time in the next year is, actually, probably stupid idea as instead of just a bad one.

Boar It
Jul 29, 2011

Mesmerizing eyebrows is my specialty


InstantInfidel posted:

Yeah, on paper. In reality, the console can focus all of its compute power towards a single, specific goal because the entire thing- the hardware, the OS, and the software- is dedicated to doing that single specific task. A computer has to deal with hundreds of pieces of background bullshit in Windows/OSX, what amounts to a series of maybe-stable hacks that we call drivers for multiple pieces of hardware, and on top of that, deal with a game that may or may not even be optimized for the architecture it's being played on.

Buying a gaming laptop any time in the next year is, actually, probably stupid idea as instead of just a bad one.

Perhaps. I'd rather not wait that long since I do other things and I have a stationary pc for gaming. My current laptop that I consider kinda crap runs far cry 3 on mediun/high.

Gnamra posted:


MSI GE60 15.6" Full HD http://www.komplett.no/k/ki.aspx?sku=781361#extra
  • Intel Core i7 4700MQ
  • 1920 x 1080 Resolution
  • 8GB RAM
  • NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M - 2 GB GDDR5 SDRAM


That's the one I'm looking at too. Unsure about build quality as well.

Boar It fucked around with this message at 18:22 on Jun 30, 2013

DrDork
Dec 29, 2003
commanding officer of the Army of Dorkness

InstantInfidel posted:

Buying a gaming laptop any time in the next year is, actually, probably stupid idea as instead of just a bad one.
I'm not sure I'd be that pessimistic. What you say about the consoles is true--within 6 months after they hit, we can expect to see "next gen" titles that'll really stress current hardware. However, it's not like when the consoles drop, the next day laptop-makers will all reveal the super-secret laptop GPUs that will magically allow them to keep up. Just ain't gonna happen.

Gaming laptops usually can't play AAA titles on high/max settings for more than a year or two anyhow, and new consoles dropping won't really change that--if you buy now, it'll be another ~12 months before you really see games pushing the hardware you bought, and after that you'll start seeing your laptop's age. Buy in a year and you just start the same thing shifted by a year: you'll get ~12 months of being able to play whatever with good performance, and then slip and slide your way into obsolescence at about the two year mark.

You can't future-proof your laptop, but at the same time waiting doesn't really buy you a whole lot, either.

DrDork
Dec 29, 2003
commanding officer of the Army of Dorkness

Torabi posted:

Perhaps. I'd rather not wait that long since I do other things and I have a stationary pc for gaming. My current laptop that I consider kinda crap runs far cry 3 on mediun/high.
Then why are you considering getting a gaming laptop? Get a solid middle of the road laptop for half the price and when in a year you find a game that it doesn't run as perfectly as you'd like, play it on your desktop.

InstantInfidel
Jan 8, 2010

BEST I EVER SPENT

Torabi posted:


That's the one I'm looking at too. Unsure about build quality as well.

Anandtech reviewed a larger version of that and had very negative things to say. I linked to the review in the last couple of pages. The CPU's also going to outstrip the GPU, you'd be fine with an i5 if you're going with the 750M, unless you plan to do anything CPU intensive.

Boar It
Jul 29, 2011

Mesmerizing eyebrows is my specialty


DrDork posted:

Then why are you considering getting a gaming laptop? Get a solid middle of the road laptop for half the price and when in a year you find a game that it doesn't run as perfectly as you'd like, play it on your desktop.

It's because I'm an idiot who wants a Haswell laptop and so far there are only gaming laptops with it so far.

InstantInfidel posted:

Anandtech reviewed a larger version of that and had very negative things to say. I linked to the review in the last couple of pages. The CPU's also going to outstrip the GPU, you'd be fine with an i5 if you're going with the 750M, unless you plan to do anything CPU intensive.

Well that sucks. I like to fiddle with 3ds max and Adobe programs so an i7 sure would be nice.

Boar It fucked around with this message at 19:22 on Jun 30, 2013

Gnamra
Apr 27, 2011


fookolt posted:

What games are you going to play? Are you thinking of using your laptop in class/at the library or is it going to stay on your desk?

I will be playing World of Warcraft, and probably some more demanding games. I will be using my laptop in class, yes. However I will be using and developing quite resource intensive programs in school, I want a powerful laptop because I'm a bit stingy when it comes to FPS in games. I'll be traveling a bit and I don't want to have drag my stationary pc across Norway each time, spending the extra money on a powerful laptop is worth the trouble it saves me.

Gnamra fucked around with this message at 20:38 on Jun 30, 2013

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Gnomedolf
Jun 8, 2013

Freelance Gynecologist

Mu Zeta posted:

You can also just buy the Applecare later. You have a year to get it.

I would buy the i5/256gigs. The i7 isn't worth it unless you know you need it.

If you live in Florida, you can't buy Applecare after the fact. It must be bought at time of computer purchase. It's some stupid state law. That's what I was told by Apple when I tried that once.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply