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Nemesis Of Moles
Jul 25, 2007



I just did something very similar and did not have to reactivate or anything. It just booted up fine.

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Gothmog1065
May 14, 2009


Auron posted:

Not sure if this has been covered:

I'm swapping my old CPU/Mobo/Ram in for an Asus Z97A/i5 4690k/8GB Ram, into my existing case, keeping my existing SSD and most everything else as they aren't that old.

With Windows 8.1, this should be fairly straightforward without requiring a reformat correct? Windows/BIOS are in AHCI mode in my current setup, so I should just have to boot up, switch to AHCI mode in bios (if that not defaulted nowdays on motherboards?), select my boot drive, and go right? Possibly have to reactivate? And if I reactivate, do I just have to call microsoft to explain the situation?

I did this recently (Went from an AMD Athlon X2 to an intel i2700k), and it worked without a hitch.

Geoj
May 28, 2008

BITTER POOR PERSON


Chikimiki posted:

Hey folks! So the fan on my trusty old Thinkpad X220 died on me yesterday, and now I get "Fan Error" on boot, making my laptop an expensive paperweight. I'm thus looking for a replacement fan, and I'm searching for a good online shop with cheap shipping to Europe. Googling didn't bring up anything worthwhile, and I'm not exactly keen on buying some used part from ebay...
Thanks for any info!

Might also be worth tearing it apart down to the fan and see if something is obstructing the fan from spinning, you could just have a massive clod of dust that has finally jammed itself between the fan blades and the fan housing.

lollybo
Dec 29, 2008


I'm currently building a computer with this parts list

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.98 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($26.75 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Asus GRYPHON Z97 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($162.88 @ OutletPC)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($77.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Intel 730 Series 480GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($245.36 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 970 4GB Twin Frozr V Video Card ($349.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Rosewill Capstone 450W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1182.93
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-12-17 01:51 EST-0500

However before I can get a new graphics card I will be using a really old 6870 for a while. This card is inefficient and draws about 250W at load compared to 150W. Calculated the wattage requirements (90W for CPU + 50W + 250W GPU) x 1.2 = 468W, which is above the 450W limit. Do you think it would be okay for me to go over the maximum load?

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



lollybo posted:

I'm currently building a computer with this parts list

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.98 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($26.75 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Asus GRYPHON Z97 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($162.88 @ OutletPC)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($77.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Intel 730 Series 480GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($245.36 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 970 4GB Twin Frozr V Video Card ($349.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Cooler Master N200 MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Rosewill Capstone 450W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1182.93
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-12-17 01:51 EST-0500

However before I can get a new graphics card I will be using a really old 6870 for a while. This card is inefficient and draws about 250W at load compared to 150W. Calculated the wattage requirements (90W for CPU + 50W + 250W GPU) x 1.2 = 468W, which is above the 450W limit. Do you think it would be okay for me to go over the maximum load?

It's not okay to try to get your PSU to supply more power than it's rated for. I'd get a 500 or 550 80+ gold rated just to be sure.

lollybo
Dec 29, 2008


Hmmm so when I calculated the wattage I used the max wattage instead of the TDP. The TDP is 150w. Which measurement is generally used to calculate whether a PSU is sufficient?

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

This is what
Arcane Velocity was like.


lollybo posted:

Hmmm so when I calculated the wattage I used the max wattage instead of the TDP. The TDP is 150w. Which measurement is generally used to calculate whether a PSU is sufficient?

The TDP, unless that Board Power is available - Board Power being the maximum power the entire card will draw. TDP only refers to "thermally significant" average power draw for the cooler to cope with.

In your original example, 468W is the lower bounds, but that includes a 20% safety margin for things like hard drives spinning up, transient spikes, and capacitor wear. It's super-duper rare for literally every part to draw its maximum power at the same time, never mind having transient spikes at the same time, and good PSUs can handle an extra 50W or so in brief load spikes anyway. And the capacitor wear part isn't really relevant until the unit has had five years or so of use hours on it. Even if the 6870 drew the max wattage rather than the TDP, the 20% overspec margin means that you can easily run it on a 450W PSU. It's just not super-safe for lower-grade power supplies in the same way.

future ghost
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Gun Saliva

I've never really understood bare-minimum PSU sizing personally. Sizing for just enough might make sense when building, but later on if you want to add another couple drives or overclock or something you'd be hosed and you'll have to also get a new PSU just to pull it off. It's a waste swapping out a major component like that since you can just buy a little over and maybe keep the same PSU through a future PC rebuild, or at least never need to wonder if capacitor aging or another 50W is going to be too much for the system. Going way too far over requirements is usually crazy, but undersizing to bare-minimum will almost guarantee that you'll have to buy a replacement sooner than necessary.

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

This is what
Arcane Velocity was like.


On one hand, yes. On the other, every component today is significantly lower in power use than equivalent parts from four years ago. The GeForce 980 is a 160W part or something and could fit on a 360W Seasonic PSU with a quad core CPU and have enough room left over for as many peripherals as most could reasonably want. By the time you want to replace that CPU, chances are the PSU is aged and out of warranty, so anybody who isn't skilled at soldering high-voltage caps would be replacing it anyway.

SlayVus
Jul 10, 2009


Grimey Drawer

Does anyone know off hand if BNIB laptops from Lenovo's recertified/refurbished store come with a full warranty? On my suggestion, my friend bought one laptop from there a few months ago and the hard drive is dying in it now.

future ghost
Dec 5, 2005

det er noget at leve for

Gun Saliva

SlayVus posted:

Does anyone know off hand if BNIB laptops from Lenovo's recertified/refurbished store come with a full warranty? On my suggestion, my friend bought one laptop from there a few months ago and the hard drive is dying in it now.
Most refurbished laptops come with 1 year warranty from Dell so I imagine it's the same for that one. You'd need to check the site or the purchase documents for the laptop to confirm.

johnny sack
Jan 30, 2004

One day, this team will play to their expectations...

Just not this year..



I am looking to buy an external hard drive such as this one:
http://www.bestbuy.com/site/seagate...uHQ7J7_.9QpWl1Q

Is it possible to format a hard drive in such a way that my wife can use her Apple computer to dump picture files or whatever else she wants to backup and at the same time have me able to dump files from my Windows PC?

If this is possible, will this hard drive do it? If not, is there another one that will? I am trying to avoid having multiple external hard drives and also to have one I can plug into a central location and dump files onto over our network...which this one appears to do.

Rukus
Mar 13, 2007

Hmph.


I'm not familiar with how Seagate has made that a "cloud" external HDD, but from a quick google search it seems to be running some version of Linux to give it NAS capabilities. This could make it not ideal if it won't let both Windows and OS X use the drive at the same time. I'd also be wary of it since it touts remote access features that could be exploitable. If your router has a USB port designed for storage, then a USB external plugged into that might be a better option.

If you were to go the USB route, then you can use any USB HDD and configure it in two different ways. Either partition the drive with separate file systems for each operating system (ie. NTFS for Windows, HFS+ for OS X), or a common file system that both can use (exFAT). If you don't mind two separate, smaller partitions, then make two 2TB paritions on the drive, one being NTFS, the other being HFS+. In both cases you'd then just plug the drive in, create your shares via your router's admin web page, and map the drive as a network location on your computers.

johnny sack
Jan 30, 2004

One day, this team will play to their expectations...

Just not this year..



Thanks for the reply. I like the idea of plugging in the hard drive directly to a router although I am almost positive my router doesn't have a USB port. Would this same thing work using a CAT 5?

I haven't formatted a hard drive in many years. Is it as simple as plugging it into my Windows PC and saying "I want (this portion) NTFS" and then doing the same thing on the Mac saying "I want (this other portion) HFS+"?

If you have a good recommendation for an external drive that would easily do this, I'm all ears. I just haven't done this sort of thing ever and haven't followed the technological changes at all.

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

This is what
Arcane Velocity was like.


Assuming your Windows is later than XP and your Mac is similarly modern, format the whole thing as ExFAT and both operating systems can read and write to it with no problem. If you access it over the network, the format may well actually be totally unimportant - network access generally obscures the underlying disc from the system accessing it.

GreatMrPopo
Apr 17, 2003
i love kami-sama

Here's a question: I've been googling this and yahoo searching, and cant quite get what i need (unless i'm not noticing a link with my answer). Is there a way to/via command or run, make windows 7, upon restart, go to the advanced startup menu? My ssd just wont let me f8 upon restart, its too drat quick!

The reason i want to go to the menu is to disable signatures on devices. I'm trying to trouble shoot why my xbox 360 controller wont respond to any input. I plug it in, it lights up upon receiving power, i dl'd the drivers from windows directly, and it tells me it has trouble verifying the digital signature of the drivers. Through the advanced startup menu, im trying to disable the signature verification. I dont have problems with my other usb devices, such as my wireless kb and mouse, my wacom tablet, and my m-audio box, just my xbox360 controller. Would a complete wipe solve my problems?

Rukus
Mar 13, 2007

Hmph.


johnny sack posted:

Thanks for the reply. I like the idea of plugging in the hard drive directly to a router although I am almost positive my router doesn't have a USB port. Would this same thing work using a CAT 5?
If your router doesn't have a USB port then you would need some kind of device to act as the controller software for the HDD to host the shares and communicate with the network. This makes it a bit less plug-and-play than a router with a USB would due to various devices supporting only certain HDD sizes or formats.

johnny sack posted:

I haven't formatted a hard drive in many years. Is it as simple as plugging it into my Windows PC and saying "I want (this portion) NTFS" and then doing the same thing on the Mac saying "I want (this other portion) HFS+"?
Yup, you would open up Disk Management in Windows, initialize the drive, create the 2TB NTFS partition while leaving the other 2TB initialized. Then plug it into a Mac and open up Disk Utility format the other partition.

Factory Factory posted:

Assuming your Windows is later than XP and your Mac is similarly modern, format the whole thing as ExFAT and both operating systems can read and write to it with no problem. If you access it over the network, the format may well actually be totally unimportant - network access generally obscures the underlying disc from the system accessing it.
Is there still the possibility of data corruption when both OS's are using the same volume? I believe it was more of an issue with USB sticks and physically moving the devices from one computer to another, but that was a few years ago.

kuroshi
Nov 26, 2007



Fun Shoe

Technically, a competent networked drive interface should allow accessing operating systems to utilize file locks so they don't fight each other for access to the drive. Reading a file would lock it from being written to by another user, writing to it would lock it from being accessed at all by other users. Samba/SMBFS is supposed to handle this in a sane manner, but then you'll likely be dealing with three different implementations: likely Samba on the Linux powered drive, Windows with its own official implementation, and OS X with its stank rear end implementation that likes to randomly break the whole OS after a while and force hard reboots or kernel panics. It's little wonder why networked shares that need to be accessed frequently, namely Time Capsule, still require AFP support.

Assuming that your device also somehow supports AFP, then it's a matter of contention between the servers for both SMB and AFP, and down to whether they lock the files locally on the device, so the two protocols don't fight each other in bad ways.

sleepy gary
Jan 11, 2006



Rukus posted:

I'd also be wary of it since it touts remote access features that could be exploitable. If your router has a USB port designed for storage, then a USB external plugged into that might be a better option.

To me, these are pretty much exactly the same thing, security-wise.

Rukus
Mar 13, 2007

Hmph.


DNova posted:

To me, these are pretty much exactly the same thing, security-wise.

Perusing that Seagate's manual suggested that it allowed for remote network access, which I understand it would be listening for remote connections outside the network. I think that's a bit different than a properly secured router that doesn't allow for remote connections (from the WAN port) to its admin page or shares. Though it's probably just as easy to disable it (hopefully).

kode54 posted:

Technically, a competent networked drive interface should allow accessing operating systems to utilize file locks so they don't fight each other for access to the drive. Reading a file would lock it from being written to by another user, writing to it would lock it from being accessed at all by other users. Samba/SMBFS is supposed to handle this in a sane manner, but then you'll likely be dealing with three different implementations: likely Samba on the Linux powered drive, Windows with its own official implementation, and OS X with its stank rear end implementation that likes to randomly break the whole OS after a while and force hard reboots or kernel panics. It's little wonder why networked shares that need to be accessed frequently, namely Time Capsule, still require AFP support.

Assuming that your device also somehow supports AFP, then it's a matter of contention between the servers for both SMB and AFP, and down to whether they lock the files locally on the device, so the two protocols don't fight each other in bad ways.

Gotcha, thanks for the clarification. If johnny sack doesn't plan on using the drive outside of it being a network share (like plugging it directly into these machines) then there shouldn't be too much worrying about the filesystems, right? Sounds more like a (on sale) Synology might be worth checking out then.

Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?



Rukus posted:

Perusing that Seagate's manual suggested that it allowed for remote network access, which I understand it would be listening for remote connections outside the network. I think that's a bit different than a properly secured router that doesn't allow for remote connections (from the WAN port) to its admin page or shares. Though it's probably just as easy to disable it (hopefully).
You don't plug this thing straight into the phone line or the modem or whatever. Any traffic from the NAS is going to go through the router as well. If the router is properly secured, then the NAS won't get any WAN access if you don't want it to, no matter how the NAS itself is configured. Security-wise it's the same thing.

SlayVus
Jul 10, 2009


Grimey Drawer

Friend is having problems with his laptop. Here is his CDI.



It was at 4 sectors last night. Then when I looked at it last night after I told him to run it it was at 5 sectors. I ran a chkdsk c: /f on it and when it was done it went back down to 2 sectors on pending.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



SlayVus posted:

Friend is having problems with his laptop. Here is his CDI.



It was at 4 sectors last night. Then when I looked at it last night after I told him to run it it was at 5 sectors. I ran a chkdsk c: /f on it and when it was done it went back down to 2 sectors on pending.

https://kb.acronis.com/content/9133

quote:

Current Pending Sector Count S.M.A.R.T. parameter is a critical parameter and indicates the current count of unstable sectors (waiting for remapping). The raw value of this attribute indicates the total number of sectors waiting for remapping. Later, when some of these sectors are read successfully, the value is decreased. If errors still occur when reading some sector, the hard drive will try to restore the data, transfer it to the reserved disk area (spare area) and mark this sector as remapped.

Basically the disk has bad sectors that are being remapped. If the number's increasing then going back down it's getting more bad sectors and remapping them to reserved extra space that exists on the disk just for that. Beccause it's getting more of them it's likely that the disk is dying and the controller is attempting to save it by remapping, but it's probably not going to get better without a disk replacement.

I don't know how much he uses the laptop but with only 734 hours on the disk it might be pretty new and should be under warranty if so. If he can afford it, it may be worth replacing with an SSD since you're going to be taking the disk out anyway.

SlayVus
Jul 10, 2009


Grimey Drawer

It's new, he bought it brand new in box from Lenovo's outlet store. It's only a few months old. From what I gathered from Lenovo's site it did come with a 1yr warranty since it was still BNIB.

Edit: Just looked the SN through Lenovo and it still has warranty until June next year.

SlayVus fucked around with this message at 16:26 on Dec 18, 2014

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



SlayVus posted:

It's new, he bought it brand new in box from Lenovo's outlet store. It's only a few months old. From what I gathered from Lenovo's site it did come with a 1yr warranty since it was still BNIB.

I'd definitely contact them about replacement, then, the disk is going bad. If they won't do it western digital might, they have a warranty checker online.

SlayVus
Jul 10, 2009


Grimey Drawer

Do you know or anyone with experience know if Lenovo will just ship a replacement drive? Don't want to send the entirety of the laptop for just a hard drive failure.

Factory Factory
Mar 19, 2010

This is what
Arcane Velocity was like.


GreatMrPopo posted:

Here's a question: I've been googling this and yahoo searching, and cant quite get what i need (unless i'm not noticing a link with my answer). Is there a way to/via command or run, make windows 7, upon restart, go to the advanced startup menu? My ssd just wont let me f8 upon restart, its too drat quick!

The reason i want to go to the menu is to disable signatures on devices. I'm trying to trouble shoot why my xbox 360 controller wont respond to any input. I plug it in, it lights up upon receiving power, i dl'd the drivers from windows directly, and it tells me it has trouble verifying the digital signature of the drivers. Through the advanced startup menu, im trying to disable the signature verification. I dont have problems with my other usb devices, such as my wireless kb and mouse, my wacom tablet, and my m-audio box, just my xbox360 controller. Would a complete wipe solve my problems?

Run the msconfig tool and go to it's boot settings. You can force a safe/diagnostic startup there.

TWBalls
Apr 16, 2003
My medication never lies

johnny sack posted:

Thanks for the reply. I like the idea of plugging in the hard drive directly to a router although I am almost positive my router doesn't have a USB port. Would this same thing work using a CAT 5?

I haven't formatted a hard drive in many years. Is it as simple as plugging it into my Windows PC and saying "I want (this portion) NTFS" and then doing the same thing on the Mac saying "I want (this other portion) HFS+"?

If you have a good recommendation for an external drive that would easily do this, I'm all ears. I just haven't done this sort of thing ever and haven't followed the technological changes at all.

That's just a simple little NAS which you would plug in to your switch and access through a web interface for the initial setup (You would map it as a network drive to actually store/retrieve files). I have an older version (NAS 110) and it's slow as poo poo (12MB/s write speeds). Mine doesn't give an option for the file system (I'm assuming it's Linux based, so probably some version of ext), but I can access it with my Windows desktop, my Macbook and Android phone.

red19fire
May 26, 2010



So I just got an imac (2012, Yosemite) and am making the switch from PC. While it's kind of a mix of software and hardware, I feel like the answer is staring me in the face.

I have a 2 tb NAS drive on my network (synology ds213j if it matters), which has about 750 gigs of work, media, music, etc backed up on it. The whole NAS system was set up with a Win 7 PC. I turned on Time Machine, and after it ran the first time I got an error message on the NAS that the disk was nearly full. I also have crash plan free running afterwards to back up the actual files, but this may be redundant.

From what I understand about TM, does it earmark the entirety of the free space for itself for its hourly backups and such? And could this be the culprit for why the disk reads as full, because of MAC-PC conflicts?

Would it be easier to export the NAS contents to a separate drive and reformat it for Mac? And possibly make a separate partition for time machine/crash plan backups?

Smeef
Aug 15, 2003

I posted my food for USPOL Thanksgiving!





Pillbug

I found an old rear end PC of mine and want to see what's on the HD. I don't have a monitor that will work for it, so am wondering if I can pull the HD, put it in an external case, and connect it to my MacBook. The HD is a WD Caviar Blue, model # WD1600AAJB-00J3A0. Conversely, if there's an easier way to do this, I'm all ears.

Nemesis Of Moles
Jul 25, 2007



It'll depend on the format on the drive.

Smeef
Aug 15, 2003

I posted my food for USPOL Thanksgiving!





Pillbug

It was the boot drive and so is running some version of Windows from approximately 2004-05.

Flipperwaldt
Nov 11, 2011

Won't somebody think of the starving hamsters in China?



Smeef posted:

I found an old rear end PC of mine and want to see what's on the HD. I don't have a monitor that will work for it, so am wondering if I can pull the HD, put it in an external case, and connect it to my MacBook. The HD is a WD Caviar Blue, model # WD1600AAJB-00J3A0. Conversely, if there's an easier way to do this, I'm all ears.
Double check whether your TV doesn't have a vga in, maybe. Some do.

Not sure if I'd try to boot up the machine anyway, if I didn't find a monitor, just to check if the disk spins up. Because if not, why bother. A short push on the power button should bring it to a safe shutdown (or sleep or hibernation) after it has booted up completely.

It's a PATA drive, which makes it a shame to spend money on an enclosure for it. Instead, find a combination USB to PATA/SATA cable, which at least has a chance to see some different use later on in life. Should be cheaper than an enclosure to.

Other than that, a very reasonable plan. I am made to understand by Google that OSX might be able to read (but not write to) an NTFS partition.

red19fire posted:

Would it be easier to export the NAS contents to a separate drive and reformat it for Mac? And possibly make a separate partition for time machine/crash plan backups?
It doesn't need to be "reformatted for Mac" as the Synology OS (DSM) handles the drive at the filesystem level, but it might make sense to do it anyway and split it up into separate volumes so you can dedicate one to Time Machine. It's not said though that this will solve the problem setting up Time Machine you're running into now. Don't know what that is. You could ask about that in the NAS thread, for example.

Col.Kiwi
Dec 28, 2004
And the grave digger puts on the forceps...

SlayVus posted:

Do you know or anyone with experience know if Lenovo will just ship a replacement drive? Don't want to send the entirety of the laptop for just a hard drive failure.
I'd say chances are they'll likely send you to an authorized service center, ie a repair shop they work with. Or maybe they'll make you send them the whole laptop. I'd be surprised if they just ship you a drive and let you install it yourself and keep your warranty coverage. It seems like with most laptop OEMs for any repairs at all, even really simple stuff like a drive replacement, it has to be done by a technician in an authorized service center for you to keep your warranty valid. I could be wrong though.

Flipperwaldt posted:

It's a PATA drive, which makes it a shame to spend money on an enclosure for it. Instead, find a combination USB to PATA/SATA cable, which at least has a chance to see some different use later on in life. Should be cheaper than an enclosure to.
Agree, good advice. Should cost a little less, be a little less effort to use, and will probably come in handy again at some point in the future.

SlayVus
Jul 10, 2009


Grimey Drawer

Col.Kiwi posted:

I'd say chances are they'll likely send you to an authorized service center, ie a repair shop they work with. Or maybe they'll make you send them the whole laptop. I'd be surprised if they just ship you a drive and let you install it yourself and keep your warranty coverage. It seems like with most laptop OEMs for any repairs at all, even really simple stuff like a drive replacement, it has to be done by a technician in an authorized service center for you to keep your warranty valid. I could be wrong though.


They're sending him a replacement drive. They wanted him to send the laptop, but he asked if they could send him the drive and they said yes. He just had to send the old drive back.

He is going to buy my 250 evo and use the replacement drive as an external.

lollybo
Dec 29, 2008


So my N200 came in and I was disappointed with the build quality- the case seems very light and flexes a lot when I press down. I don't feel confident in it and am afriad that it can be easily dented. Is the Silverstone TJ-08E a good replacement? I can pick up one of those at Fry's.

EDIT: Finished my trip to Fry's. I saw the TJ-08E but was not blown away by the build quality, sure it is better, but I'm not sure if it is good enough to justify getting rid of the N200. I saw a lot of cases and actually think the build quality of the N200 is about average. I guess you can't reach Mac levels of sturdiness unless you are willing to pay >140 for a case.

lollybo fucked around with this message at 13:59 on Dec 21, 2014

Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

lollybo posted:

So my N200 came in and I was disappointed with the build quality- the case seems very light and flexes a lot when I press down. I don't feel confident in it and am afriad that it can be easily dented. Is the Silverstone TJ-08E a good replacement? I can pick up one of those at Fry's.

EDIT: Finished my trip to Fry's. I saw the TJ-08E but was not blown away by the build quality, sure it is better, but I'm not sure if it is good enough to justify getting rid of the N200. I saw a lot of cases and actually think the build quality of the N200 is about average. I guess you can't reach Mac levels of sturdiness unless you are willing to pay >140 for a case.
Look for cases optimized for low-noise, the ones you're looking at are optimized for size and weight (and price for the N200) so are necessarily going to be made of thin metal and not particularly sturdy. Or, you know, don't care about how resistant your case is to fall damage because you won't drop it

Col.Kiwi
Dec 28, 2004
And the grave digger puts on the forceps...

lollybo posted:

I guess you can't reach Mac levels of sturdiness unless you are willing to pay >140 for a case.
Yeah thats probably about right. Mac level sturdy is pretty sturdy and there are plenty of cases that cost way over 140. N200 is definitely a budget case.


Alereon posted:

Or, you know, don't care about how resistant your case is to fall damage because you won't drop it
Perfectly valid imo.

Mackers
Jan 16, 2012


Hi folks, I was trying to do a quick upgrade to my girlfriend's dad's PC by adding new RAM.

In my ignorance I thought that upgrading RAM was a simple matter of buying new RAM and sticking it in the motherboard so I picked up 4GB of 800MHz DDR2, popped out the two old 1GB sticks and inserted the two new 2GB ones.

Welp, the PC wouldn't even power up fully. Fans would spin up a bit but then stop again and this would cycle over and over. Never got anything but a black screen on the monitor.

Now results on google are talking about things I've never heard of like RAM timing and voltage and I'm in over my head...

In short: Is there a way I can get the new RAM to work? In dumb person speak if possible

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Alereon
Feb 6, 2004

Dehumanize yourself and face to Trumpshed

College Slice

Mackers posted:

Hi folks, I was trying to do a quick upgrade to my girlfriend's dad's PC by adding new RAM.

In my ignorance I thought that upgrading RAM was a simple matter of buying new RAM and sticking it in the motherboard so I picked up 4GB of 800MHz DDR2, popped out the two old 1GB sticks and inserted the two new 2GB ones.

Welp, the PC wouldn't even power up fully. Fans would spin up a bit but then stop again and this would cycle over and over. Never got anything but a black screen on the monitor.

Now results on google are talking about things I've never heard of like RAM timing and voltage and I'm in over my head...

In short: Is there a way I can get the new RAM to work? In dumb person speak if possible
Post a thread in the Haus of Tech Support, we need to know what motherboard it currently has (or the computer brand and model) and what RAM you tried to put in.

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