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kaworu
Jul 23, 2004

I actually really enjoyed playing in this game, and was pleasantly surprised. I haven't really played many Telltale games in a very long time, so it was interesting to see what sort of stuff they're pointing out. To be honest, this game had me from the very start - you're chilling in a camp of Robb Stark's army, the men are drinking and telling tall tales, too many generic characters are being introduced too quickly - just like GRMM! And just as you're getting comfortable it pans back and reveals that you're actually at the Twins, and this is the outer party for the Red Wedding, and you're all completely hosed and only have seconds to process this. Naturally, chaos ensues and it all goes immediately to poo poo, but the pacing and the sense of dread and the knowledge that the informed player already has about the series was really used to great effect to create what was (for me) a good enough opening hook to make me stick with the game for a while.

I just felt like it was honestly a good representation of the show in game form, for the most part, and while I didn't feel like the rest of the game always lived up to the opening scene, it was quite fun. I have no problem with the way the story is set up - it got the tone of the world the TV show created just about right, and I dig the idea of a parallel story that has nothing to do with the mainstream story, in a sense. Westeros is actually big and diverse enough that it's plausible and makes decent sense, to be frank. There'd be plenty of houses like Forrester/Whitehill in various regions, with rivalries going back centuries between petty lords warring over this piece of land and that piece of land.

kaworu fucked around with this message at 21:40 on Dec 9, 2014

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Dvlos
Aug 26, 2003

"I came here to argue with you about a freaking television show!"

etalian posted:

It also loses points for not having any natalie dorner duckface scenes.

They are trying to be more original. Hence the rat faces instead.

Ghetto Prince
Sep 11, 2010

got to be mellow, y'all
Yeah, when the soldiers walked in I just assumed that someone in the castle was a traitor, or deserted, because I was wondering why the guy that got caught was taking enough weapons for a small group.

Anyway, I thought it was a solid episode, there's plenty to build on and they didn't gently caress anything up too badly.

Henrik Zetterberg
Dec 7, 2007

What happens in the beginning if I don't kill the dude who murdered my family? After I did that, I thought I hosed up hard, but reading this thread, it seems as if it probably didn't matter and that Ramsay would come and stab me anyway.

dmboogie
Oct 4, 2013

Henrik Zetterberg posted:

What happens in the beginning if I don't kill the dude who murdered my family? After I did that, I thought I hosed up hard, but reading this thread, it seems as if it probably didn't matter and that Ramsay would come and stab me anyway.

You always end up killing one of the dudes during the QTE, so the choice doesn't affect anything in the grand scheme of things. One dead soldier or two, either way, Whitehill and Ramsay are pissed.

Dolash
Oct 23, 2008

aNYWAY,
tHAT'S REALLY ALL THERE IS,
tO REPORT ON THE SUBJECT,
oF ME GETTING HURT,


I'm willing to bet it'll come up again in a later episode in some way, either that soldier will be one of the ones garrisoned at Ironrath, or someone at the wall will hear about Gared's taste for revenge/mercy, something like that. It might not matter much outside of a throwaway line but it could still come up.

CountingWizard
Jul 6, 2004
I guess I wouldn't mind the whole episodic thing if there was content. I feel pretty ripped off having paid full price for my first Telltale game. Altogether I spent about 2 hours to finish the episode. There is no gameplay, and choices don't have consequences, which only leaves the story; however I can get just as much entertainment just by watching a youtube of the game.

And for a company that does nothing but make interactive movies, they really suck at animating; i felt like I was watching an art school project.

emanresu tnuocca
Sep 2, 2011

by Athanatos

CountingWizard posted:

I guess I wouldn't mind the whole episodic thing if there was content. I feel pretty ripped off having paid full price for my first Telltale game. There is no gameplay, and choices don't have consequences, which only leaves the story; however I can get just as much entertainment just by watching a youtube of the game.

And for a company that does nothing but make interactive movies, they really suck at animating; i felt like I was watching an art school project.

Gameplay is sparse but at least some of their games, particularly the walking dead season 1, offer a rather unique interactive experience which you really won't get by just watching someone else play it. TWD Season 1 offers tons of dialogue and characterization variance based on your choices.

It's really too early to say whether GOT will have these merits, so I can definitely see where you're coming from.

whalestory
Feb 9, 2004

hey ya'll!

Pillbug
If you get the same out of it as you would if you had watched a youtube video of someone playing it, then just don't play any other telltale games it ain't for you!

precision
May 7, 2006

by VideoGames

CountingWizard posted:

I guess I wouldn't mind the whole episodic thing if there was content. I feel pretty ripped off having paid full price for my first Telltale game.

You feel ripped off over 5 dollars or are you saying you bought the season pass? I would never recommend peopl buy the season pass unless the whole season is available and opinions are in on it. Saving 5 bucks in case you like it vs. saving 25 bucks in case you don't.

BOAT SHOWBOAT
Oct 11, 2007

who do you carry the torch for, my young man?

CountingWizard posted:

I guess I wouldn't mind the whole episodic thing if there was content. I feel pretty ripped off having paid full price for my first Telltale game. Altogether I spent about 2 hours to finish the episode. There is no gameplay, and choices don't have consequences, which only leaves the story; however I can get just as much entertainment just by watching a youtube of the game.

And for a company that does nothing but make interactive movies, they really suck at animating; i felt like I was watching an art school project.

I think the "choices don't have consequences" thing is stretching it a bit too far. In none of the Telltale games have you been able to hugely alter the outcome of the story, but it absolutely affects character relationships and interactions, and I (and a lot of people) get a lot of investment and enjoyment from the choices made in these games.

If you didn't that sucks for you man, but I don't find these games to be a rip off at all.

CountingWizard
Jul 6, 2004

precision posted:

You feel ripped off over 5 dollars or are you saying you bought the season pass? I would never recommend peopl buy the season pass unless the whole season is available and opinions are in on it. Saving 5 bucks in case you like it vs. saving 25 bucks in case you don't.

Where was the 5$ version? I only saw the $30 version of the game. It doesn't say anything about a pass either. As far as I can tell it was $30 for just the first episode.

precision
May 7, 2006

by VideoGames

CountingWizard posted:

Where was the 5$ version? I only saw the $30 version of the game. It doesn't say anything about a pass either. As far as I can tell it was $30 for just the first episode.

If you paid more than $5 you got the Season Pass and therefore all episodes. I don't know what platform you're on so I can't tell you specifically where the option should have been.

I too would feel ripped off if I had paid $30 for a 2-hour Telltale episode. :stare:

1st AD
Dec 3, 2004

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu: sometimes passing just isn't an option.
$30 is for the season pass.

I think you can only buy individual episodes on mobile, and those are like $5.

precision
May 7, 2006

by VideoGames
You can buy individual episodes on console, is this the first time you can't on Steam? I know you could buy individual eps of Wolf Among Us on Steam. Weird.

timp
Sep 18, 2007

Everything is in my control
Lipstick Apathy

1st AD posted:

$30 is for the season pass.

I think you can only buy individual episodes on mobile, and those are like $5.

I paid $5 for the first episode only on XBox 360.

CountingWizard
Jul 6, 2004
I bought it through steam, but I had never played through a telltale game before and I didn't see any individual episodes for sale.

So now that I've bought this gimp horse, how long is the usual wait between episodes?

timp
Sep 18, 2007

Everything is in my control
Lipstick Apathy

CountingWizard posted:

I bought it through steam, but I had never played through a telltale game before and I didn't see any individual episodes for sale.

So now that I've bought this gimp horse, how long is the usual wait between episodes?

I saw something that said 6 weeks between the release of ep 1 and ep 2. Not sure if it'll be 6 weeks every time or not though

ActusRhesus
Sep 18, 2007

"Perhaps the fact the defendant had to be dragged out of the courtroom while declaring 'Death to you all, a Jihad on the court' may have had something to do with the revocation of his bond. That or calling the judge a bald-headed cock-sucker. Either way."
downloading now...hope I don't regret it.

RightClickSaveAs
Mar 1, 2001

Tiny animals under glass... Smaller than sand...


I didn't know people ever bought the episodes individually. They seem to be most commonly sold as a season, and the season pass is what they push, but it's well worth it if you like their games.

If you don't know if you're into the type of game then it's probably a good way to check it out first though.

Rusty
Sep 28, 2001
Dinosaur Gum

CountingWizard posted:

I guess I wouldn't mind the whole episodic thing if there was content. I feel pretty ripped off having paid full price for my first Telltale game. Altogether I spent about 2 hours to finish the episode. There is no gameplay, and choices don't have consequences, which only leaves the story; however I can get just as much entertainment just by watching a youtube of the game.

And for a company that does nothing but make interactive movies, they really suck at animating; i felt like I was watching an art school project.
This is pretty much what I think about the game. I had never played a Telltale game either and was really disappointed in the animation to the point I almost didn't bother finishing it. Also, the first thing you see when it starts up is the game telling you your choices have consequences, so it seems kind of weird that it isn't the case. I mean, without that, like you said, there is a story which i think suffers from the interactive part of the "game".

Dolash
Oct 23, 2008

aNYWAY,
tHAT'S REALLY ALL THERE IS,
tO REPORT ON THE SUBJECT,
oF ME GETTING HURT,


Telltale has the issue that choice in games is an incredibly complicated and loaded concept, and can be implemented in countless different ways. If the version people have in their mind doesn't synch up with what you actually implement, it's going to be hard to please. I think they specifically reworded the opening slide to something more nuanced like "tailored" to emphasize that they're still telling a story and taking you somewhere, you just get to decide what kind of person you want to be and how you get there.

Personally, I wouldn't get the same value out of watching a Telltale game on youtube as I would playing it - they're good at making their games feel immersive, and a lot of that comes from the constant barrage of little dialogue choices that let you characterize yourself. Watching someone else do it robs you of that, so that the game really is just a movie. Getting to decide just how Ethan handles his new responsibility, whether as an irresponsible and power-mad child or making an attempt to rise to the occasion, gives more investment in his situation even if you can't change the outcome.

1st AD
Dec 3, 2004

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu: sometimes passing just isn't an option.
Yeah the immersion is important, like if this was just an episode of the show I probably wouldn't give a poo poo about when the girl is staring down a mad Cersei in the throne room, but the tension is really palpable when you're playing that section in the game after experiencing the stakes of it all.

Trash Trick
Apr 17, 2014

If you want a game where choices matter play Alpha Protocol. It's where telltale cribbed their conversation system from.

Dvlos
Aug 26, 2003

"I came here to argue with you about a freaking television show!"

timp posted:

I saw something that said 6 weeks between the release of ep 1 and ep 2. Not sure if it'll be 6 weeks every time or not though

What I read out of TellTale was they were aiming for 5-8 weeks between each episode. Episode 2 was rumored to have an early February release.

Steam only offers the whole game for $30 it is also my first time buying on Steam as previous telltale games I played on my iPad. Didn't care though I know I'll play the whole thing through to the end.

I also enjoy the character options that develop and are remembered through the games. It's true that it would be great to have a major fork in the road so to speak, in storytelling. Not many games can honestly do that. Even big budget games like Mass Effect only offered changes in dialog perhaps different mission options based on choices but essentially key plot points remain constant. That could change with TWD Season 3 and this game however.

CountingWizard
Jul 6, 2004
You guys say, "but it would be difficult to have major branches in plot," and, "it's hard to have meaningful choices," as if it is impossible. Even the 2012 cyanide game of thrones game was able to do this, and that game had tons of (albeit unfun) gameplay to tack the story to.

veni veni veni
Jun 5, 2005


Dvlos posted:

What I read out of TellTale was they were aiming for 5-8 weeks between each episode. Episode 2 was rumored to have an early February release.

They really need to stop it with this poo poo. Their release schedules are a joke. They just need to finish their games and release them all at once or on a weekly schedule or something. From now on I'm just waiting until their games are finished to play them because they take so long in between episodes I forget what's even going on.

monster on a stick
Apr 29, 2013

NESguerilla posted:

They really need to stop it with this poo poo. Their release schedules are a joke. They just need to finish their games and release them all at once or on a weekly schedule or something. From now on I'm just waiting until their games are finished to play them because they take so long in between episodes I forget what's even going on.

This is why you wait until the game is finished - it will also be cheaper and you will know if it ends up having a poor ending (hi, TWAU!)

Arbite
Nov 4, 2009





An easy way to have choices matter is if they impact the action scenes. Saving someone in an earlier scene means they take out a guard you would have had to mash Q at otherwise. You wouldn't even need to record extra dialogue, just use grunts.

precision
May 7, 2006

by VideoGames

Arbite posted:

An easy way to have choices matter is if they impact the action scenes. Saving someone in an earlier scene means they take out a guard you would have had to mash Q at otherwise. You wouldn't even need to record extra dialogue, just use grunts.

Previous games have had things like this. Wolf Among Us especially. People are being hyperbolic about how there are "no choices" when in some of their games you literally choose whether characters live or die or whether they are seriously wounded etc.

BOAT SHOWBOAT
Oct 11, 2007

who do you carry the torch for, my young man?

NESguerilla posted:

They really need to stop it with this poo poo. Their release schedules are a joke. They just need to finish their games and release them all at once or on a weekly schedule or something. From now on I'm just waiting until their games are finished to play them because they take so long in between episodes I forget what's even going on.

Playing this game and the Borderlands one with an alternating release schedule, I'm getting a bit of content at least each month consistently. I'd much prefer that to waiting for a two year development cycle (even if it results in a more polished game) and I genuinely think you gain more attachment to the characters due to the time gap between episodes (like a TV series).

And , life is busy. This way, when the game comes out it isn't too hard to find the time to play for two hours. Whereas buying a twelve hour full game seems like a much bigger time commitment, even if adds up to the same anyway.

Antifa Spacemarine
Jan 11, 2011

Tzeentch can suck it.
So does one have to buy each episode or does the 30 dollar purchase entitle me to the full set like a season pass?

Oh wait nevermind, I see its a complete set.

Antifa Spacemarine fucked around with this message at 23:50 on Dec 13, 2014

Hakkesshu
Nov 3, 2009


precision posted:

Previous games have had things like this. Wolf Among Us especially. People are being hyperbolic about how there are "no choices" when in some of their games you literally choose whether characters live or die or whether they are seriously wounded etc.

Also those characters might die later anyway, but that doesn't mean your choices don't matter since you still made them for a reason. I'm not sure what people actually want out of these games when it comes to branching narratives. Walking Dead season 2 had a number of drastically different endings.

Dolash
Oct 23, 2008

aNYWAY,
tHAT'S REALLY ALL THERE IS,
tO REPORT ON THE SUBJECT,
oF ME GETTING HURT,


NESguerilla posted:

They really need to stop it with this poo poo. Their release schedules are a joke. They just need to finish their games and release them all at once or on a weekly schedule or something. From now on I'm just waiting until their games are finished to play them because they take so long in between episodes I forget what's even going on.

I'd prefer they don't stop, since waiting for a whole season to be done would mean waiting for an extra 6+ months before playing any episodes at all. I find the wait between episodes actually helps build hype, since playing a game a bit at a time over most of a year makes it more memorable than a game you play all at once on a weekend and then never again. Plus, the episodic format helps them accommodate feedback.

There's nothing stopping you from just buying the game once they're completely done, like you say, but I prefer having the option.

SatansBestBuddy
Sep 26, 2010

by FactsAreUseless

Hakkesshu posted:

I'm not sure what people actually want out of these games when it comes to branching narratives. Walking Dead season 2 had a number of drastically different endings.

But those endings all spun off of two choices twenty minutes before the end, and nothing you did before that point matters.

TellTale games are all all about the choice you make "in the moment" and the consequences of those choices are typically prewritten into the story, ie regardless of the choice you make the results are the same. Take the whole ending of this episode, the difference between meeting Ramsey at the gates with all of your men suited up ready to fight and welcoming him into the hall with bowed knee right off the bat is nil, you're still getting shanked.

For most people it's fine, good even, when you're "in the moment" and have to make a split second decision with a ticking clock counting down, even the smallest choices feel big that way. It's an interesting way to make narrative into gameplay and it works really well, people naturally panic under time limits and not knowing the consequences of any choice you make just adds to the tension. For a purely story driven game, this is a system that works way better than any other attempt I've seen.

But the second someone replays the episode to see what those consequences are, and the curtain is pulled back and the answer is "dick all", for almost everyone their response is "well then what was the loving point?!" Because every decision feels important, having the lie revealed and the illusion of choice shattered makes the gameplay feel worse, turns the ticking clock into an annoyance rather than than a tension builder, and makes the choices less rewarding.

It's exactly the same as figuring out how a magicians card trick works, the magic's gone when you know the mechanics behind how it works, and since the gameplay itself is reliant on you not knowing how it works, that makes the game less fun to play through.

Trash Trick
Apr 17, 2014

I just wish they explained how all the guards made it in. It's kinda something that would at least cause a commotion outside if someone were to raise the gate or sneak an entire battalion in.

Narcissus1916
Apr 29, 2013

Some people theorized that your maester or someone else in Ironrath let them in - though we may be looking for a plot point instead of a plot hole.

CountingWizard
Jul 6, 2004

a cop posted:

I just wish they explained how all the guards made it in. It's kinda something that would at least cause a commotion outside if someone were to raise the gate or sneak an entire battalion in.

Yeah, that was bs. I wasn't about to let Ramsay Snow within 10ft of my character without armed guards ready to cut him down. Hell, I wanted the option to pre-emptively kill him or take him hostage if he pulled anything unreasonable.

Baron von der Loon
Feb 12, 2009

Awesome!
What I personally found odd is that I met Ramsey at the gates, and just had a bit of a joking dialogue with him, something about asking him if it's cold outside. And then the gates opened by themselves, without me giving the orders. Given the surprised look by the characters, I thought that this was some sort of a hint that -someone- was sabotaging the effort... and Royland was noticeably absent.

There's a reason why I didn't pick him to be the Sentinel... while I do think he'd make the better choice for this time, I just don't trust the man.

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wooger
Apr 16, 2005

YOU RESENT?

Baron von der Loon posted:

What I personally found odd is that I met Ramsey at the gates, and just had a bit of a joking dialogue with him, something about asking him if it's cold outside. And then the gates opened by themselves, without me giving the orders. Given the surprised look by the characters, I thought that this was some sort of a hint that -someone- was sabotaging the effort... and Royland was noticeably absent.

There's a reason why I didn't pick him to be the Sentinel... while I do think he'd make the better choice for this time, I just don't trust the man.


I replayed the scene that ends in Ethan's murder a bunch of times to check for every possible way out.

No difference, it just makes all the choices I've made during the game moot.

Seriously, planning a single bank job in GTAV offers more useful options that actually make a difference then the whole of episode 1 of this game.

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