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Ostentatious
Sep 29, 2010



A Neurotic Jew posted:

I'm the people who respond to Jared with "oh wow hallelujah a list you guys still have it on a list woah and a pipeline too? woah the wizards at CIG do it again gently caress EA"

If EA were running the show Chris Roberts would be the first against the wall.

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Mc Do Well
Aug 1, 2008

by FactsAreUseless


I'm going to spend my entire life in one star system.

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004


Exciting Lemon

Congratulations to Chris for not only failing to deliver 2.2 in January like he said he would, but also missing February as well.

CHICKEN SHOES
Oct 4, 2002


Slippery Tilde

Beer4TheBeerGod posted:

Congratulations to Chris for not only failing to deliver 2.2 in January like he said he would, but also missing February as well.

he even had an extra day to do it this year :smith:

Justin Tyme
Feb 22, 2011




Everyone knows fidelity(F) is a unit just like mass, length, and time. Star Citizen currently has well over 2,000 F compared to, say, Battlefront's 1,750 F. Every patch adds about 200 F. Last patch added a lot more fidelity!

WhiskeyWhiskers
Oct 14, 2013

CHOO! CHOO!
TANKIE COMIN THRU!




Pretty sure you can figure out what this ship needs as a second flight mode. :flaccid:

CubicalSucrose
Jan 1, 2013




Beer4TheBeerGod posted:

Congratulations to Chris for not only failing to deliver 2.2 in January like he said he would, but also missing February as well.

"Our goal is to release a new update every month (so January’s would be SC Alpha 2.2)."

It's okay, it was just a goal. Not even a promise or a commitment or a deadline. No need to worry. You just don't understand Gregorian development.

G0RF
Mar 19, 2015

Some galactic defender you are, Space Cadet.


"THE STORY MUST BE TOLD, BUT THE STORY CAN'T BE TOLD"

A mind-numbingly long examination of why the Gaming Press ignores one of the biggest stories in gaming history.

D1E posted:

Serious question: have you thought about writing up a massive expose based on known facts or things which can be conclusively researched and submitting it to a news organization for review and publication?
The truth is, D1E, some of the big players in Gaming Media know enough of what we do to run hard-hitting exposes already. So rather than us serving up something for them to promptly ignore, let's consideration explanations for why they would ignore it.

Admittedly, they may not know about eyeball rolls in video streams from fed-up female employees... about upcoming weekly shows will be dedicated to Space Plants due to the boss' recent fixation with farm simulators... about "the games aren't separate, they're a-la-carte!" sound bites.. fallout from an email exchange between the VP of Marketing and a former backer turned heretic... or have a ledger keeping track of all the high dollar furniture purchases for CIG LA...

But they know Star Citizen, the biggest crowdfunding success in history, is a project in trouble.

Some even have heard stories we haven't, submitted by employees and ex-employees of CIG. Kotaku said as much themselves when clutching their pearls and crying foul about The Escapist's story. Apparently silence about it was the moral high ground. Kotaku surely isn't alone in sitting on actionable info. Nor are they deluded about the current state of the game. It's just easier for them and their ilk to keep giving CIG the benefit of the doubt in spite of what they know.

When it comes to drawing blood, they're as timid as manatees. Yet if there's blood in the water, they frenzy like sharks. The exceptions tend to be when they've a recurring axe to grind (social justice issues, objectification of women in games, etc.) That they'd didn't frenzy over the The Escapist story was because the story was too drat toxic, their poisoned blade tainted the meat. It was a truly shocking read, compiled of allegations as furious as they were anonymous.

So-- how do you get them to write an expose when the following things are known to or suspected by many of the big players already?

-- Repeated Delays and Missed Deadlines...
-- Absolutely No Oversight...
-- Fractional Progress Against the Promised Deliverable...
-- The Troubled Freelancer Saga...
-- Clear Signs of Financial Waste...
-- Fraudulent Marketing Practices...
-- Stonewall Policies Enacted on Refunds...
-- Perpetually Buggy Updates of the Most Alarming Kind...
-- Nepotistic Leadership...
-- Alleged Workplace Toxicity....


These aren't secret, arcane truths known only to the enlightened goons of an ancient humor site for alpha dorks... The Gaming Press knows it because it's obvious to anybody paying attention by now, especially those paid to pay attention.

They probably gab about it in the break room, joke about it in story sessions. Snarky asides might get tossed into an unrelated article. But mostly, the big guys will sit on it, content to crank out five new stories an hour on fluff about Fallout dlc, a secret drivable couch in Hardline, and when they want to strike a blow for justice, they'll excoriated the restoration of a sexualized female animation in Street Fighter V. It's pain-free, brain-free eyeball fodder.

---

The Story Must Be Told-- yet paradoxically, The Story Can't Be Told.

This strange Nether period -- where it must be told but can't be told -- happens more often than we realize.

Here are some of the reasons:

1) Fears of being too early, losing subscribers, finding out later they were wrong about something-- bind their hands.

2) Personal loyalties to or affections for at risk parties can be a factor. We're sympathetic to that ourselves, right? Could Imperium employs a lot of seemingly decent, talented and hardworking people, all of whom might be collateral damage if funding implodes due to a total loss of confidence in the project by funders. Why should everyone at CIG have to suffer that, when most of the misdeeds and missteps have only a handful of authors at the very top? I know I wasn't the only CIG cynic here who felt a real pang when Sean Tracy earnestly thanked the viewers on Meet the Devs for providing him the means to support his family. What rings hollow off Sandi's, Ben's, and Chris's lips rings true from one of the many little people tasked with Mission Impossible-- and there's 200+ people there who could say it without sounding robotic, patronizing or entitled.

3) Fears of lost access or advertising -- fears of lawsuits, all these factors and more turn watchdogs to lap dogs. Rewarded as they are for lazy, low effort clickbait, why choose anything riskier?

4) Beyond that, there's the uncomfortable fact that the infamous Derek Smart! Derek Smart! DEREK SMART!, one of gaming history's greatest mustache-twirling comic villains, beat them all to the punch. He game them a roadmap. Told them where the bodies were buried. Demanded they start digging. The map checked out. The prospects looked intriguing. And editors throughout the industry promptly declared moratorium's on any follow-up pieces because "like hell are we giving that troll Derek Smart the satisfaction of following his marching orders!"

I think all of the above help explain why we've had this long period of relative calm after the Escapist Story. It's why we so rarely get "What the hell is up with this game?!" type articles from major players, and there are precedents for this all over.

---

The Past as Prologue at Ion Storm

This same weird Nether period occurred during Ion Storm's hype-fueled ascent, as some here remember.

While the national Gaming Media was hyping 'game changing title from a boy genius behind Doom and Quake!' to hell and back, and that narrative was echoed in punch-drunk biz rags, a quietly fomenting counter narrative of wasteful extravagance, troubling nepotism, defections / intrigues, and outlandish behavior was served up weekly by self-appointed gawkdogs like us-- in Quake chat rooms and message boards-- devoted to tracking Romero and whatever they could glean about the company and its mysterious new game. Battle lines were sometimes drawn there too, with pro-Romero vs. pro-Carmack camps engaged in endless wars of words about game development. Today feels eerily similar to 1998.

Romero made it all easy-- he too engaged in rockstar posturing non-stop for the sake of boosting the hype for his game, garnering free publicity and stoking the confidence of investors. Today, Roberts plays the Boy Wonder with appealing humility; Romero preferred playing the Gaming God.

His girlfriend Killcreek was an object of fascination, admiration, contempt and a lot of skeevy talk, too. That Romero made her an employee was much derided-- yet Stevie Case at least had serious gamer cred for her Quake skillz. (One presumes Sandi's 5 day a week, 10 hour a day Doom sessions were already in her rearview mirror by then.)

At the time, I wasn't that interested in Daikatana. I loved Doom and Quake (who didn't, right?) but considered Carmack the playmaker at iD and preferred his low-key, human computer demeanor. (Their split was described back then by Romero as his "vision of gaming perfection" vs. Carmack's "vision of coding perfection", and I'd be lying if I didn't admit seeing echoes of that in Roberts vs. Braben today...) Truth be told, though, by November of 1998, Romero and Carmack both seemed like yesterday's legends-- Half-Life was out.

Still, the stories from guys monitoring the ongoing Ion Storm scuttlebutt made for riveting reading (and members of the Gaming Media surely read it, too.) It came in smaller, less frequent parcels than CIG's does (unsurprisingly)-- but the stream was steady. Some of it was too outlandish to believe, though at the time, we believed it all anyway. It was only after it all fell apart that reflective sorts could go back and run evaporation techniques to boil off the bullcrap and salvage the facts. (Old Man River aside: Chris Roberts cocaine tales -- often repeated here with few corroborations beyond an angry ex-employee's Facebook comment -- remind me of that. Barring further evidence, I feel the same about the worst claims about Sandi. I'm no fan of her, and she no fan of us, but the burden of proof is high when incendiary claims are made with anonymous rumors by angry ex-subordinates. Fair play and all that.)

---

The Indeterminable Waiting Period Between Can't and Must

Then as now, there was this indeterminable wait, a surreal Nether period. It lasted most of 1998 as I remember.

You'd read things on some Quake underground gossip swap, or occasionally hear them from your hardcore gamer friend over rotgut shots-- then you'd read the exact opposite in the gaming press. The press accounts were lazy and glib, lean on hard facts and replete with PR soundbites and hype!, hype!, hype! just inflating the expectations bubble all the more. Yet the chinwag from the gawkdog grapevine was dismal, specific, and very sharp.

You knew, you just knew the latter would pop the former any day now. That the bubble that inflated for years would deflate in a flash, with only the dismal truth remaining before the game even got close to release.

But that's not really the way it played out, was it?

Sure, a few big ominous prophecies of doom made it to print or online before launch. The company took a hit mid-98 for the overhyped, over budget "Dominion: Storm Over Gift 3 (it sucked). The big developer walkout was high-drama that broke out on places like blues news, then IGN, and eventually even got some mainstream attention.

Ironically though, the biggest pre-launch expose on Ion Storm didn't come from the Gaming Media. It came from the alt paper down in Dallas, in the form of an especially colorful local dumpster fire story in early 99. Their "Stormy Weather" article surely got more traffic than anything they wrote that year-- gamers all over the world, particularly skeptics, were electrified. These days, a Star Citizen backer would call it 'click bait', but it was honest to God shoe leather reporting and remains, 17 years after the fact, a great early prophecy of the eventual outcome. Ion Storm was blindsided by the blow. (In researching this effort post, I learned they even went on mole hunts and targeted the reporter.)

After it broke, PC Mag and Gaming Media outlets dutifully got react quotes from Romero-- none apparently embarrassed that they'd been scooped by guys who, like alt rags in conservative cities all over the world, mostly covered right-wing foibles at the municipal level and the like. (I suspect that gaming mag editors throughout the industry, even those who didn't spill ink in coverage, realized the time for breathlessly hyping Daikatana was over. But no real frenzy followed, and I believe that was largely due to the fact that they still thought more about circulation than clicks. Nowadays, they'd have no choice...)

The center held.

Beyond that, though, the full on Gaming Media hellstorm we all kept assuming was right around the corner because "OMG I can't believe this crazy crap is happening guys it's gonna 'splode any minute!!!" did not precede the release of the game. There was still some cautious optimism from the Big Guys for far longer than informed skeptics could believe.

The Ion Storm skeptics saw their "it's all gonna burn!" narrative boosted with the early release of the Daikatana demo. 'Lowtax' took a shot at it a small eternity ago, and was but of many... But the big guys stayed polite, and in the months prior to commercial release, started reframing their stories in accommodating "Can our hero save the day for his troubled game?"

I couldn't find the full scans of the magazine, but did find the text of Next Generation magazine's May 1999 story, printed only weeks before release.

Next Generation, May 1999 posted:

Dogged by software delays, and scarred by staff losses and accusations of mismanagement, highflying developer Ion Storm has come down to earth with a bump. Is the company that spends millions when thousands will suffice all flash and no dash? Can "John Romero's Daikatana" save the day? In Dallas, it's make or break time...
A sidebar in the story notes those gleeful doomsayers, yesteryear's version of us...

Next Generation, May 1999 posted:

Recent troubles have had Ion Storm's most cynical detractors rubbernecking with the kind of glee usually reserved for the owner of a broken-down Ferrari stranded at the side of the road..."
The alt rag story apparently at least made it safe for the gaming press to talk about the possibility of abject failure. How strange that seems, even still. But it remained no forgone conclusion. Romero got a pass right up until the official release, and then, at belated last, the feeding frenzy truly began. The merciless, gleeful scorn. Mockery, savagery, damnation. Articles about Carmack as the genius, Romero the pretender. "Feet of clay", "suck what down, Romero?", "Can ya believe it? Who saw THIS coming?", blah blah blah...

And Slashdot- remember them? In researching this story, a found a choice gem that simply had to be included here. In their metacritic-like rundown of excoriating reviews, "Daikatana Sucks: It's Official", even the supervillian of gaming himself, our beloved OP, got a shoutout:

Jonathan (5011) posted:

"I know what John Romero can do next... (Score: 3)

Start a company with Derek Smart of "Battlecruiser 3000" fame!"
At long last that which couldn't be told for over a year finally had to be told. A deluge of merciless reviews from the mostly incurious, toothless gaming press. The Gaming Press After-Action reports about the waste, dysfunction, nepotism, insanity quickly followed and were all now safely codified for posterity by the very parties who feared giving voice to it when it might've actually helped change things for the better.

---

Back in the Nether Zone

So-- here we are again, waiting in the Nether Zone. CIG's narrative is triumphalist, our narrative apocalyptic, and the gaming media narrative conspicuously deferential with occasional gentle sniping. At least two of those narratives are wrong-- and at some point in the future, one will emerge and become settled history. For my part, I don't expect THESIS and ANTITHESIS to beget SYNTHESIS.

It certainly didn't happen in Ion Storm's case. In the end, ANTITHESIS prevailed, and ex-employees negotiated for gentler epitaphs for Ion Storm for posterity's sake. Defenders of Romero / Daikatana could still be found, but they were given no quarter by yesterday's equivalent of triumphant goons.

Andy posted:


"A sad story? Are you insane? They caused all the crap they went through! That feature just made me want to strangle him and his band of idiots even more. How could he live with himself, wasting tens of millions of dollars working in an office on the top floor of a Dallas skyscraper on a game without a plan. What little design they did have is like something out of the imagination of a ten year old. Even if Daikatana had been completed exactly as he envisioned, on schedule, it wouldn't have been a great game.

Did he think Eidos' money was a gift? A reward for his brilliant work on Doom? How could he have put so little effort into making a good game? He said he couldn't concentrate on level design because he had to manage a team, but he didn't want to manage a team. He/they did absolutely everything wrong. It's incredible. But they get to learn from their mistakes, and LGS is out of business because of their stupidity (yes, indirectly, but $10 million is $10 million)."
Sound familiar?

"Nedan' posted:


"First off, I like to see a show of hands right now... which one of you has experience in running a Game Development Company?!?! Well... anybody?!?! Just like I thought . Alot of you guys are sure ones to talk & dis a company when you know jack about running one yourselves.

You can read all the friggin' info you want on running a company. But when it comes to actually doing it... it's a whole different friggin' story entirely.

Yes... John Romero made some mistakes. Why? He was new to running a business. He never ran one himself before. He also didn't like the idea of stealing talent. He tried his best not to steal talent. So he had problem of finding new talent instead... which is not easy to begin with.

His only mistake wasn't being an egomaniac, it wasn't over spending & it certainly wasn't advertising the game too early. It was just inexperience. He had none when it came to running a company. I can certainly have sympathy & show forgiveness for that."
Behold, the last holdout of the chump who believed too long in a Dream!. Their final intellectual sanctuary is the same as it ever was: "At Least They Tried."

---

In Closing

I honestly think if a hard-hitting, narrative smashing expose comes, it will probably come from outside the gaming press.

In the short term, though smaller sites will write blistering pieces, the big guys will continue to opt for safe ways to nibble at this without tearing it wide open. We've seen a bit of that already.

Examples have oblique titles like:

-- "Ranking The Space Sims You Can Play Right Now"
-- "Is 'Mass Effect: Andromeda' a threat to Squadron 42?"
-- "No Man's Sky: A VR-friendly Star Citizen You Can Play Today"

Articles like the above will dribble out constantly. The comments sections will exploded with Believers vs. Skeptics each calling each other idiots and worse, "It's Pre-Alpha!" and "You know nothing about game development" will be repeated millions of times. The Status Quo will be maintained and the untenable center will somehow hold because the story must be told, but it can't be told for longer than you'd think.

(drat this is a long post. I apologize if it bored anybody. The question of 'when will the story break open?' comes up a lot and I figured it was worth examining in detail. I had to do a good amount of research on the Ion Storm stuff and learned a lot that I'd not seen the first time around because I wasn't paying THAT close attention. I hope others learned some things they didn't know, too...)

G0RF fucked around with this message at 04:35 on Mar 1, 2016

Rodney-CK
Jun 19, 2004


Beer4TheBeerGod posted:

The problem with Star Citizen's art direction is the lack of imagination. The artists are obviously clearly talented but whoever is telling them what to make has no vision of the future whatsoever. I will freely admit to not have having any game development experience, but it seems like it would be a good idea to establish the fundamentals of the game universe before having your art crews spend hours making assets. The image Sandi put on her facebook of "Randall Graves" (the character John Rhys-Davies plays) is a perfect example. There is nothing about that character who suggests they are 900 years in the future. Hell I wouldn't be surprised if he's wearing jeans. Think about what the average person was wearing 900 years ago in Europe, let alone the rest of the world. Or even what the average person was wearing a hundred years ago. Yet we're supposed to believe that a major, iconic character for a AAA sci-fi game wouldn't look out of place in a trucker bar?

Other universes have done a much better job. Serenity intentionally evokes a "Wild West" vibe by creating a universe where technology outside of the core worlds is rare and the emphasis is on a frontier approach. Star Trek has a universe where scarcity is largely eliminated and as a result clothing is much more uniform. Star Wars emphasized diversity with millions of planets and species, and clothing to reflect that. Star Citizen had some really promising concept art in the beginning, but the actual implementation seems to have completely eliminated all of that. Just look at the civilian attire in the MMHC. Where's the creativity in that? It's ridiculously well done but also utterly uninspired.

I was thinking about clothing, especially utilitarian frontier clothing, would look like in the future. I made some assumptions:

1. Technological development continued to go at an advanced pace, seeing new developments in terms of materials and fabrication techniques as well as medical device technology.
2. The propagation of starship technology allows for the rapid transfer of goods between worlds, encouraging the propagation of trend-setting articles of clothing comparable to the spread of jeans today.
3. Humans as a whole would become healthier thanks to better foods and medicine, eliminating obesity and excessive fat.
4. The needs of space-born living would demand particular requirements for functionality, such as limited vacuum protection in the event of an emergency.

Historically we've seen clothing become more and more form fitting, so I would assume that trend would continue. Presumably with high levels of trade we would likely see a "default" outfit that would gain in popularity, particularly among people with the same physical needs (like space travelers), and stylistic choices would be largely limited to colors and minor details over a common form or extraneous levels of clothing over a functional core. Space-born living would necessitate an outfit that was protective against the elements and vacuum yet comfortable to wear nearly constantly due to the ever-present risk of decompression. Likely such an outfit would stay very close to the body so as to eliminate excess air and maximize efficiency for heating/cooling. There would also be the ability to rapidly seal the suit, so a helmet would probably be seen more often than not.

The more I thought about it, the more I realized there was already such an outfit prevalently being used in a science fiction game universe...



And it turns out they already had plans for how to allow characters to have style while staying alive...



Amazing what happens when you have vision.

Very well said.

There is also some irony to the history behind the games and the legacy. The later games, where things were able to surpass 320x200 and 256 colors, is when artistic direction could more freely be expressed, especially in the gaming industry.

Just to focus, Wing Commander, even the very old ones, featured guys in "normal clothes" basically. Somebody here even has an avatar of the talking head of the briefing room guy from #1. He basically wore a blue baseball cap and a blue jumpsuit.

Now for the ironic part. Not all of the games in this series are completely devoid of artistic license. In fact, Privateer 2: The Darkening, was very stylish. It may not have featured a lot of skin tight space suits, but it was very clearly different. It was also directed by Erin Roberts.

I wonder if it stings Chris ever that Erin took his legacy and actually made something completely unique with it. Without even being a self proclaimed visionary. It also featured named actors.

P2 was very rough around the edges in gameplay though, and came out during the Video Card wars when Voodoo was still a thing, so it didn't get the reception it could have. But as far as settings go, it was a very Blade Runner feeling sort of world, in space, with very eccentric locales and characters.

If they modernized that style even, it'd be an enormous improvement to what we're seeing now. I'm afraid I doubt Star Citizen will ever come to life, but I'm pretty sure we'll get at least some of SQ42. I'd be more excited for it if their character design was even slightly inspired. Truckers and farmers in today's world doesn't exactly fill me with excitement about the Star Citizen science fiction universe.

The way John Rhyes Davies character looks like a tired old farmer fills me with dread, and I almost know he will be the retired, all knowing veteran who has an old cargo ship secretly outfitted for special operations behind enemy lines. Because we really didn't get enough of that 20+ years ago in Wing Commander, where it was already tongue in cheek at best.

I know people say that the more realistic games get, the more boring they become. SQ42 is shaping up to be that in spades, and part of me is disappointed because I didn't go into this disliking so much about it. The only real thing CIG has going for it is strong artistic capability. If they kill that off, there's literally nothing left. At this point, even if they started to crib Mass Effect wholesale it would be a big improvement to the artistic direction.

Plural Abysss
Feb 25, 2016


Beet Wagon posted:

That's true, I forgot about that. Oh, you also have a module you can fit to your ship that enables an auto-docking procedure, if you're a baby back bitch that doesn't like docking at maximum throttle.

I just really like Blue Danube :chord:

e. That G0rf post wowow

Plural Abysss fucked around with this message at 04:40 on Mar 1, 2016

Samizdata
May 14, 2007


trucutru posted:

900 years into the future, fashion has grown enamored of the ancient clothes worn by ninjas in proto-neoliberal Yapan. So everybody buys only the best bright orange jumpsuits and head protectors credits can buy. Of course, they are actual bright orange space onesies and helmets with a forehead metal plate but the future is full of space weaboos. Shades are also popular because they are cool as gently caress.



Nice try, but you failed on the shades. Unibody mirror shades. THAT'S what the properly dressed Derivative Star Citizen wears/

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




these days i actually look forward to GORF effort posts more than any shambolic news drop from CIG

Tortolia
Dec 29, 2005

Hindustan Electronics Employee of the Month, July 2008


Grimey Drawer

Nice post G0RF.

Beer4TheBeerGod
Aug 23, 2004


Exciting Lemon

G0RF, that was amazing.

Samizdata
May 14, 2007


Toops posted:

Hey y'all, trying out different weekly update formats for Solar Plebeian. Let me know how this one works for you.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOKq_4RaVVY

Immersion good.
Fidelity good.
Soundtrack good.
Open development log good.
Savagely taunting desperately obese idiots with unhealthy junk food bad. As in non-existant.

Do you actually know anything about open game development?

Mirificus
Oct 29, 2004

Kings need not raise their voices to be heard


G0RF posted:

"THE STORY MUST BE TOLD, BUT THE STORY CAN'T BE TOLD"

Great write-up G0RF.

Wise Learned Man
Apr 22, 2008

by Jeffrey of YOSPOS


Lipstick Apathy

It is a good post, but I still think that Star Citizen's implosion is gonna be an even bigger story because of the sheer amount of money involved, the fact that the money is from a lot of individuals instead of a few faceless investors, and because of its implications for the crowdfunding model in general.

E: To be clear, I'm responding to lines like:

quote:

You knew, you just knew the latter would pop the former any day now. That the bubble that inflated for years would deflate in a flash, with only the dismal truth remaining before the game even got close to release.

But that's not really the way it played out, was it?

[snip]

But no real frenzy followed...

and

quote:

In the short term, though smaller sites will write blistering pieces, the big guys will continue to opt for safe ways to nibble at this without tearing it wide open. We've seen a bit of that already.

Examples have oblique titles like:

-- "Ranking The Space Sims You Can Play Right Now"
-- "Is 'Mass Effect: Andromeda' a threat to Squadron 42?"
-- "No Man's Sky: A VR-friendly Star Citizen You Can Play Today"

Articles like the above will dribble out constantly. The comments sections will exploded with Believers vs. Skeptics each calling each other idiots and worse, "It's Pre-Alpha!" and "You know nothing about game development" will be repeated millions of times. The Status Quo will be maintained and the untenable center will somehow hold because the story must be told, but it can't be told for longer than you'd think.

Of course, I'm basing this on nothing more than my opinion that this story is too big to not explode. Crappy clickbait sites can get days of articles out of mild player rabblerousing over inconsequential crap like a character's costume being changed, and while there's definitely a risk of devisiveness in taking a position on a meatier issue, I still expect to see a furor over SC. Daikatana was just a crap game, but with Star Citizen we have tons of concrete promises that haven't been fulfilled. Once some real news outlet finally goes for it, it should snowball. Maybe.

Wise Learned Man fucked around with this message at 05:28 on Mar 1, 2016

Facebook Aunt
Oct 4, 2008

i like cats



McDowell posted:

I'm going to spend my entire life in one star system.

While that statement is completely true, I'm not sure what it has to do with video games?

Samizdata
May 14, 2007


Google Butt posted:

maine coon cat



(rip)

My little buddy is part Maine Coon.

If you have catte allergies, Maine Coons are known for underproducing one of the most common allergens in their saliva, so there's that too.

Also, you have a pretty good chance at having the spawn (some generations down the line, mind you) of having a cross between a bobcat and a domestic cat, so mental comedy option too.

Plus they tend to be BIG furry bundles of loving awesomeness, so that too.

CAPTAIN CAPSLOCK
Sep 11, 2001





Beer4TheBeerGod posted:

Congratulations to Chris for not only failing to deliver 2.2 in January like he said he would, but also missing February as well.

thats the price you pay for fidelitous content

Jst0rm
Sep 16, 2012


Grimey Drawer

Wise Learned Man posted:

It is a good post, but I still think that Star Citizen's implosion is gonna be an even bigger story because of the sheer amount of money involved, the fact that the money is from a lot of individuals instead of a few faceless investors, and because of its implications for the crowdfunding model in general.

New laws will be made because of this retardation.

Fargin Icehole
Feb 18, 2011

Pet me.


G0RF posted:

"THE STORY MUST BE TOLD, BUT THE STORY CAN'T BE TOLD"

Very insightful post, G0RF. Thanks for taking the time on making similarities I forgot a long time ago.

Goobs
Jan 30, 2016

Doxcat is watching you PU.

I really hope this poo poo crumbles soon, I've had blue balls since I woke up and realized this was a Nigerian prince scam.

kordansk
Sep 12, 2011



##vote g0rf
Handwavey post, bad case on the industry - reads scum to me.



fe: playing mafia in another thread - it's weird how playing mafia frames how you read posts in general.

Samizdata
May 14, 2007


Saint Isaias Boner posted:

is the bird in your av procedural? it's pretty fidelitous

Wow!! First thread multicrew spotted! SO IMMERSION!

Paramemetic
Sep 29, 2003







Fallen Rib

remember us in 2200

kordansk
Sep 12, 2011


new century of posting?

trucutru
Jul 9, 2003

Invoking fairy dust is not a crime.


Toops posted:

Does anyone have a good idea for a ship with multiple flight modes? I wanna see if I can implement multiple flight modes that are manually switchable this week.

Have a ship with a huge target on its rear end by default. At the press of a button it becomes slow and vulnerable as gently caress but extends a spike from its rear end in "oh no, my butt" defensive mode. Call it the B'Tak X'form

Samizdata
May 14, 2007


Ostentatious posted:

I'll have you know that Star Citizen has the highest fidelity per square mile out of all the video games never made

FTFY. Now with bonus B'takism!

Ash1138
Sep 29, 2001

Get up, chief. We're just gettin' started.



G0RF posted:

Yet the chinwag from the gawkdog grapevine was dismal, specific, and very sharp.
That whole effortpost was gold and I'm going to frame this sentence and put it up on a wall.

Rodney-CK posted:

Now for the ironic part. Not all of the games in this series are completely devoid of artistic license. In fact, Privateer 2: The Darkening, was very stylish. It may not have featured a lot of skin tight space suits, but it was very clearly different. It was also directed by Erin Roberts.

I wonder if it stings Chris ever that Erin took his legacy and actually made something completely unique with it. Without even being a self proclaimed visionary. It also featured named actors.

P2 was very rough around the edges in gameplay though, and came out during the Video Card wars when Voodoo was still a thing, so it didn't get the reception it could have. But as far as settings go, it was a very Blade Runner feeling sort of world, in space, with very eccentric locales and characters.
I remember being bummed that P2 wasn't more Privateer, but it was cool and weird and I enjoyed it nonetheless.

kordansk
Sep 12, 2011


the game probably still wont be out in ITYOOL 2200 anyway

Samizdata
May 14, 2007


Tippis posted:

It is. Trying to do kinetic damage with a laser means pumping so much energy into the target that it vaporises or at least gets a big chunking hold through it, at which point energy transfer no longer happens.

But the whole point of laser weaponry, other than the lack of a need for physical ammo (assuming you have an appropriate energy tech), is THERMAL transfer, not kinetic. (Also, another point of lasers are basically real life hitscan, but we've already covered that.)

Apparently, I don't know anything about open energy weapon development. I know that now.

trucutru
Jul 9, 2003

Invoking fairy dust is not a crime.


Beer4TheBeerGod posted:

Congratulations to Chris for not only failing to deliver 2.2 in January like he said he would, but also missing February as well.

You loving troll trolling the trollosphere. 2.2 is already out in the PTU so that means that Chris delivered.

A Neurotic Jew
Feb 17, 2012

by exmarx


both 2.2.0f and g launched today. Here's the patch notes for the latter:

https://www.reddit.com/r/starcitizen/comments/48em8v/star_citizen_alpha_220g_is_up/

quote:

Contents:

Star Systems:
Fixed an issue where the Audio in Crusader was missing certain bass elements. Fixed an issue where players would experience desync after EVA’ing. Fixed an issue where the oldest ship on Crusader would despawn even if in use, if a 17th ship was called for on Port Olisar.

Ships:
Fixed an issue where the Freelancer had incorrect mass values. Fixed an issue where the Retaliator and Constellation turret fire would be offset from the aimed direction. Fixed an issue where the Mustang ladder does not appear or deploy when the player climbs into the ship. Fixed an issue where the Cutlass Black turret would not fire.

First Person:
Fixed an issue where the LH-86 Combustion Pistol wouldn’t respawn after being picked up and relogging. Fixed an issue where the Crusader marine loadout was missing suit thrusters. Fixed an issue where the Marine loadout was missing hair.

User Interface:
Fixed an issue where repairs made to a ship would not update the ship HUD hologram.

G0RF
Mar 19, 2015

Some galactic defender you are, Space Cadet.


Wise Learned Man posted:

It is a good post, but I still think that Star Citizen's implosion is gonna be an even bigger story because of the sheer amount of money involved, the fact that the money is from a lot of individuals instead of a few faceless investors, and because of its implications for the crowdfunding model in general.
Of course it will be a bigger story when it finally breaks. That's why it deserves an effort post.

As I said it the open, it's one of the biggest stories in gaming history, and as I noted in an older post, when it does break, Romero will get some overdue relief, too. Finally, a story that makes Ion Storm's look like a model of restraint.

It's not just big, it's the biggest. We are talking about the 4th biggest gaming budget in history-- and the biggest indie game budget that may ever be. It's the biggest crowdfunding success in history. For these reasons, it's likely that the best reporting we one day see won't come from the gaming press at all-- it'll come from some hungry reporter at one of the top dogs. Maybe a guy at the New York Times business desk or. (His editor might dangle a shot at inclusion in their weekly mag.) Or maybe it'll come from the FT, or the rapier sharp wordsmiths at The Economist (I'm chortling picturing that read.)

I'm effort posted out or I'd go into greater detail about all this-- lucky you!

Goobs
Jan 30, 2016

Doxcat is watching you PU.

A Neurotic Jew posted:

both 2.2.0f and g launched today. Here's the patch notes for the latter:

https://www.reddit.com/r/starcitizen/comments/48em8v/star_citizen_alpha_220g_is_up/




Fixed things that were broken. Clearly means you should give them more money. Seen.

Tippis
Mar 21, 2008

It's yet another day in the wasteland.



Samizdata posted:

But the whole point of laser weaponry, other than the lack of a need for physical ammo (assuming you have an appropriate energy tech), is THERMAL transfer, not kinetic. (Also, another point of lasers are basically real life hitscan, but we've already covered that.)

Exactly, which is why no-one wastes that much energy on such a minute and coincidental effect. Well, unless you count all the bits flying off the target as it explodes as some kind of (very) indirect kinetic damage to nearby targets. :D

quote:

Apparently, I don't know anything about open energy weapon development. I know that now.
Sure you do. It's just a discussion of how marginal, to the point of irrelevant, the whole recoil and momentum transfer is, and you might mistake it for saying that it's a viable design strategy.

kordansk
Sep 12, 2011


A Neurotic Jew posted:

both 2.2.0f and g launched today. Here's the patch notes for the latter:

https://www.reddit.com/r/starcitizen/comments/48em8v/star_citizen_alpha_220g_is_up/




thats 2 patches in 1 day. therefore they met their quota for january AND february.

Samizdata
May 14, 2007


G0RF posted:

"THE STORY MUST BE TOLD, BUT THE STORY CAN'T BE TOLD"


(drat this is a long post. I apologize if it bored anybody. The question of 'when will the story break open?' comes up a lot and I figured it was worth examining in detail. I had to do a good amount of research on the Ion Storm stuff and learned a lot that I'd not seen the first time around because I wasn't paying THAT close attention. I hope others learned some things they didn't know, too...)

How could that possibly bore me? That was AWESOME!

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kordansk
Sep 12, 2011


The amount of :smug: that is going to be in the comments of that article when there's a tell-all expose is going to be the highlight.

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