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Hoshi
Jan 20, 2013



Lutha Mahtin posted:

i think the only people left in america who don't use voicemail to screen unknown numbers are the parents of young children

Job searchers too

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Lutha Mahtin
Oct 10, 2010

Your brokebrain sin is absolved...go and shitpost no more!


yeah it's like, just the couple of demographics where PHONE CALL RIGHT NOW might actually be a big deal. everyone else just rolls their eyes and declines the call

MightyJoe36
Dec 29, 2013

Cat Army


Lutha Mahtin posted:

yeah it's like, just the couple of demographics where PHONE CALL RIGHT NOW might actually be a big deal. everyone else just rolls their eyes and declines the call

I'm one of those demographics. I grew up before cell phones, voicemail, or answering machines and I still have to force myself to resist the Pavlovian response I get to answer immediately every time my phone rings.

Pekinduck
May 10, 2008


This happened a while ago but its always puzzled me. When I was in college I went online to sell a gift card for cash. I found some sketchy website that agreed to give me 100% of the gift card's value! I did it and immediately afterwards thought I must have been scammed; what did they have to gain? To my surprise I got a good check in the mail for the exact amount on the card. How were they making money here? Some kind of money laundering thing?

Proteus Jones
Feb 28, 2013





Pekinduck posted:

This happened a while ago but its always puzzled me. When I was in college I went online to sell a gift card for cash. I found some sketchy website that agreed to give me 100% of the gift card's value! I did it and immediately afterwards thought I must have been scammed; what did they have to gain? To my surprise I got a good check in the mail for the exact amount on the card. How were they making money here? Some kind of money laundering thing?

Money laundering is by far the most likely answer. But it’s a weird one since they would presumably want to convert at least the amount they paid for the card. I would think that generally getting full face value on a gift card would be difficult, but you apparently got it. Maybe there is an ouroboros of money launderers endlessly cycling gift cards.

Bad Titty Puker
Nov 3, 2007

!!

Soiled Meat

Once I put up a gift card for auction on eBay and someone bought it for more than it was worth!

ToxicSlurpee
Nov 5, 2003

-=SEND HELP=-




Pillbug

Family Values posted:

The only Newman's Own product I've ever tried was the salad dressing, and it was… about the same as any other bottled dressing.

Actually I don't understand why anyone buys bottled dressing when it's so easy to make yourself. It's just two ingredients, a fat plus an acid, plus some seasonings. And if you're lazy you can get pre-blended herb packets for less than a buck. That's actually my main complaint about a lot of packaged foods, you pay 600% markup for incredibly simple and common ingredients that aren't even all that convenient. A bottle of olive oil can be used for an infinite number of purposes in the kitchen and can be stored in a cupboard, but bottled salad dressing is single purpose and takes up space in the fridge.

So the actual scam is packaged/prepared foods.

It's really easy to make good food yourself in general. A lot of it is really just learned helplessness. So many people were never taught how to cook and are terrified of loving it up. That or they tried one time, burned the hell out of something, and Never Again. I've been making my own limeade and lemonade for years and can bake my own bread. Pretty much everything I actually want to eat I know how to make. There are a lot of things that are also delicious that are balls easy to make. Granted one of the other snags is that heavily processed food is specifically formulated to be as addicting and tasty as possible; hence all of the sugar and corn-based stuff shoveled into it. That makes it not very nutritious other than calories which then leads to people getting fat as their body is like "no, gently caress, I'm out of this micronutrient go eat more." While not everybody will be able to do the things a skilled chef who cooks for a living can do everybody can learn to make good, daily stuff. Even so it's just easier to live on frozen dinner.

Cost is also a factor; I can make a big rear end pot of haluski for like $5 that'll be an entire week of dinners.

The only thing I haven't been able to replicate is Chinese takeout fried rice. I don't know what they do to it that's so different from every recipe I've tried but it's just so drat good.

Don Gato
Apr 28, 2013

Actually a bipedal cat.

Grimey Drawer

ToxicSlurpee posted:


The only thing I haven't been able to replicate is Chinese takeout fried rice. I don't know what they do to it that's so different from every recipe I've tried but it's just so drat good.

My grandpa put in copious amounts of msg and it tasted amazing.

Proteus Jones
Feb 28, 2013





ToxicSlurpee posted:

It's really easy to make good food yourself in general. A lot of it is really just learned helplessness. So many people were never taught how to cook and are terrified of loving it up. That or they tried one time, burned the hell out of something, and Never Again. I've been making my own limeade and lemonade for years and can bake my own bread. Pretty much everything I actually want to eat I know how to make. There are a lot of things that are also delicious that are balls easy to make. Granted one of the other snags is that heavily processed food is specifically formulated to be as addicting and tasty as possible; hence all of the sugar and corn-based stuff shoveled into it. That makes it not very nutritious other than calories which then leads to people getting fat as their body is like "no, gently caress, I'm out of this micronutrient go eat more." While not everybody will be able to do the things a skilled chef who cooks for a living can do everybody can learn to make good, daily stuff. Even so it's just easier to live on frozen dinner.

Cost is also a factor; I can make a big rear end pot of haluski for like $5 that'll be an entire week of dinners.

The only thing I haven't been able to replicate is Chinese takeout fried rice. I don't know what they do to it that's so different from every recipe I've tried but it's just so drat good.

For anyone that feels like “I can’t cook”, an Instant Pot is a game changer. Making a complete, healthy meal is is almost effort free using one of these.

Between that and a few other appliances like an air fryer, rice cooker, and bread machine there’s almost no end of foods I can make myself these days.

Achmed Jones
Oct 16, 2004





Proteus Jones posted:

Money laundering is by far the most likely answer.

Not like you’re thinking. It’s not “turn dirty money clean” laundering, it’s “turn compromised accounts, checkbooks, etc into something worth actual money.” It’s not their money, so they don’t care if they turn a “profit”

TheKennedys
Sep 23, 2006

By my hand, I will take you from this godforsaken internet


Don Gato posted:

My grandpa put in copious amounts of msg and it tasted amazing.

Just worked at a Chinese restaurant for a year and a half, can confirm. Everything has "corn sauce" or "wok seasoning" which is very specifically not labeled MSG

AngryRobotsInc
Aug 2, 2011




TheKennedys posted:

Just worked at a Chinese restaurant for a year and a half, can confirm. Everything has "corn sauce" or "wok seasoning" which is very specifically not labeled MSG

If they use said "wok seasoning" would they be able to call their restaurant MSG free technically? I only ask because the closest take out Chinese place to my house now plasters MSG free all over their stuff, and I can only think "That must be the most disappointing take out...."

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013



I fry really good rice myself, though it's usually much simpler, but I like to add onion and jalapeño and garlic if I'm thinking about it first. Start with bacon grease, fry up moist (fresh or reconstituted with water in microwave) brown rice in that until the grease is pretty much absorbed, pour in two scrambled eggs into the rice and stir that slurry until it's cooked. Rice should be approximately evenly coated by the egg.
Fry up the herbs in the grease first, a good couple minutes head start, then add rice and continue on.

The Lone Badger
Sep 24, 2007



AngryRobotsInc posted:

If they use said "wok seasoning" would they be able to call their restaurant MSG free technically? I only ask because the closest take out Chinese place to my house now plasters MSG free all over their stuff, and I can only think "That must be the most disappointing take out...."

You can get glutamic acid in forms other than specifically MSG. The stuff I use is hydrolysed vegetable protein extract. You can use autolysed yeast extract instead if you want to be 'all natural'.

ghost emoji
Mar 11, 2016

oooOooOOOooh


The idea that "MSG is bad for you" is a bit of a con in itself.

https://www.thecut.com/2014/08/msg-isnt-harmful.html posted:

MSG’s bad rap began in the late 1960s, when the author of a letter to the editor of The New England Journal of Medicine complained of what he dubbed “Chinese restaurant syndrome” — numbness, weakness, and headaches, all of which he attributed to the MSG in Chinese food. But decades of research have found no link between MSG and weakness, numbness, or headaches in most people, though a small amount of people will experience very mild symptoms after consuming huge quantities of MSG. (They’d need to consume three grams at once; for reference, most of us consume 0.55 grams every day.)

Absurd Alhazred
Mar 27, 2010

I'm the babyliberal, gotta love me!


ghost emoji posted:

The idea that "MSG is bad for you" is a bit of a con in itself.

One teaspoon is 4.92892cm3, the density of MSG is 1.62 g/cm3, so a total of about 7.98 of grams of MSG. That's more than twice the amount which your own source claims causes symptoms in some people, and doesn't sound unreasonable if MSG is used directly as seasoning.

The Lone Badger
Sep 24, 2007



One teaspoon of pure msg fed to a person is very excessive. Use extremely small amounts or bulk it with dextrin or salt so you can sprinkle it freely.

bamhand
Apr 15, 2010


MSG has a ton of sodium which, which is bad for you but that's about it.

Also one thing restaurants can do that you generally can't do at home is get a really hot wok for that wok hei.

The Lone Badger
Sep 24, 2007



^ just hook up your gas stovetop with an oxygen hose as well.

nishi koichi
Feb 16, 2007

everyone feels that way and gives up.
that's how they get away with it.


https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/02/the-food-lab-how-to-make-best-fried-rice-chinese-thai-wok-technique-right-type-of-rice.html

you don't quite get the wok hei (especially on an electric range) and i do things a little differently (mainly i forgo salt and just use soy sauce), but this has never steered me wrong. it's also important to not crowd the pan. if you do you'll steam the rice rather than frying it. wok hei is caused by oil burning up and if you get good at tossing it, you can get some.

Pekinduck
May 10, 2008


Thread moved on a while ago, but this is all you need to know about the Better Business Bureau:

https://www.bbb.org/us/mi/ada/profile/multilevel-sales/amway-0372-17004933

Tunicate
May 15, 2012





bamhand posted:

MSG has a ton of sodium which, which is bad for you but that's about it.

Also one thing restaurants can do that you generally can't do at home is get a really hot wok for that wok hei.

Sodium isn't even bad for people in general, it only causes problems for people with specific heart conditions.

Captain Monkey
Aug 23, 2007



Its not like amazing for your kidneys in overabundance, but yeah the risks are somewhat overblown.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005


Plaster Town Cop

Pekinduck posted:

Thread moved on a while ago, but this is all you need to know about the Better Business Bureau:

https://www.bbb.org/us/mi/ada/profile/multilevel-sales/amway-0372-17004933

yikes

Sanford
Jun 30, 2007

...and rarely post!



Over the last six months a friend, a family member and I have all cards cloned. Every time the scammers try and buy loads of sex toys from online vendors like lovehoney.com or pandora.com:



What's with all the sex toy buying?

TheKennedys
Sep 23, 2006

By my hand, I will take you from this godforsaken internet


The Lone Badger posted:

One teaspoon of pure msg fed to a person is very excessive. Use extremely small amounts or bulk it with dextrin or salt so you can sprinkle it freely.

This is relevant as well, idk what other places do but ours was bulked with salt and/or dashi (I think) most of the time. Might be thinking of the wrong word. It's in goddamn near everything though, including "salting" the water we steamed veg in

Domus
May 7, 2007

Kidney Buddies


I'm just disappointed that a place called "big toys" does not, in fact, sell toys that are giant sized. I wanna send my nephew a giant t-Rex or something when he turns two.

On topic, I was at my parents' place when my Dad got a scam call from folks claiming to be from Bank of America. Fortunately my Mom stopped him from doing anything stupid, but I imagine that just by actually remaining on the line instead of hanging up, he's put himself up as a good target. He's 80+ years old with worsening frontal lobe dementia. He's still functional enough to be angry when I suggest he stops driving so I very much doubt he'd let me take away his cellphone. What the heck do you do to protect the elderly from scam calls?

Sydin
Oct 29, 2011

Another rainy day commute





Domus posted:

What the heck do you do to protect the elderly from scam calls?

There are apps that allow you to block all incoming calls that aren't from people on your contacts list, so if you have access to his phone you could always set that up and hope he doesn't notice.

Domus
May 7, 2007

Kidney Buddies


That's an idea I never thought of. That just might work. He's more likely to notice than most, given that he was in IT for much of his life, but maybe there's one that's innocuous looking....

PhazonLink
Jul 17, 2010


The Lone Badger posted:

One teaspoon of pure msg fed to a person is very excessive. Use extremely small amounts or bulk it with dextrin or salt so you can sprinkle it freely.

the guidelines I seen with a quick search engine try is about 1/4 tsp for a whole dish.


also maybe placeboing myself, but I think adding a tiny bit of MSG to stuff makes it taste better.

KozmoNaut
Apr 23, 2008

Happiness is a warm
Turbo Plasma Rifle


PhazonLink posted:

also maybe placeboing myself, but I think adding a tiny bit of MSG to stuff makes it taste better.

That's... The entire point of adding MSG, though?

I love the stuff, it makes vegetarian stews and stuff taste full and meaty, which is a great way to cheat my primitive meat-craving brain into loving vegge food.

Generally I use it in a 1:4-ish proportion to salt.

KozmoNaut fucked around with this message at 20:33 on Jul 16, 2019

synthetik
Feb 28, 2007

I forgive you, Will. Will you forgive me?


There was a show (Food Lab maybe?) that did a “blind” taste test with a bunch of random people and Chinese food. After everyone had finished eating, they announced that half of the room had MSG in their food and the other half didn’t. A good portion of the people in the MSG side reported having head and body aches as well as other assorted symptoms, and none of the people in the other side reported anything.

Then they revealed that there was no MSG in any of the dishes on either side of the room.

edit: Food Detectives with Ted Allen

synthetik fucked around with this message at 20:43 on Jul 16, 2019

DizzyBum
Apr 16, 2007




MSG is literally a "savory salt". Honestly, it's about as bad for you as regular table salt.

Happy Thread
Jul 9, 2005


Plaster Town Cop

Agh, just got scammed again with the old "it's just basically salt" scam! Classic

Eric the Mauve
May 8, 2012

Making you happy for a buck since 199X


Sydin posted:

There are apps that allow you to block all incoming calls that aren't from people on your contacts list, so if you have access to his phone you could always set that up and hope he doesn't notice.

You don't need an app for that on most smartphones, you can just set Do Not Disturb mode and there's usually an option to allow calls/texts from your contacts.

Absurd Alhazred
Mar 27, 2010

I'm the babyliberal, gotta love me!


Domus posted:

I'm just disappointed that a place called "big toys" does not, in fact, sell toys that are giant sized. I wanna send my nephew a giant t-Rex or something when he turns two.

On topic, I was at my parents' place when my Dad got a scam call from folks claiming to be from Bank of America. Fortunately my Mom stopped him from doing anything stupid, but I imagine that just by actually remaining on the line instead of hanging up, he's put himself up as a good target. He's 80+ years old with worsening frontal lobe dementia. He's still functional enough to be angry when I suggest he stops driving so I very much doubt he'd let me take away his cellphone. What the heck do you do to protect the elderly from scam calls?

Sounds to me like you have to talk about getting your Mom to become his partial legal guardian or whatever it's called when you can no longer make financial decisions.

goatsestretchgoals
Jun 4, 2011

in soviet russia, you shove robot

Domus posted:

I'm just disappointed that a place called "big toys" does not, in fact, sell toys that are giant sized. I wanna send my nephew a giant t-Rex or something when he turns two.

Non-zero chance that they sell something called a T-Rex.

PostNouveau
Sep 3, 2011



Grimey Drawer

Sanford posted:

Over the last six months a friend, a family member and I have all cards cloned. Every time the scammers try and buy loads of sex toys from online vendors like lovehoney.com or pandora.com:



What's with all the sex toy buying?

There was an episode of the Reply All podcast about Domino's pizza locations all getting pickup orders from the same weirdly-named person for 1 bottle of soda. No one ever shows up to pick up the soda.

The conclusion was that there's something about the Domino's online ordering system that is advantageous for scammers to use it to check lots of stolen credit card numbers to see if they still work. The sex toy place likely has the same issue.

Midjack
Dec 24, 2007





PostNouveau posted:

There was an episode of the Reply All podcast about Domino's pizza locations all getting pickup orders from the same weirdly-named person for 1 bottle of soda. No one ever shows up to pick up the soda.

The conclusion was that there's something about the Domino's online ordering system that is advantageous for scammers to use it to check lots of stolen credit card numbers to see if they still work. The sex toy place likely has the same issue.

Probably no rate limit on the purchase API so you can spam a zillion transactions per second with some scripting. Modern day analogue to how you’d set up your wardialer to check credit card numbers by attempting long distance calls in the 1980s and check for the success tone to know you had a good one. Run it overnight and you’d wake up to a few dozen valid card numbers.

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m0therfux0r
Oct 11, 2007

me.

bamhand posted:

MSG has a ton of sodium which, which is bad for you but that's about it.

It does have sodium, but it actually has less than table salt.

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