Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Inceltown
Aug 6, 2019



OK so I just got not scammed by sometime calling me from Georgia the country. Turns out my mate got sent there for work and was calling to rub it in my face.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Initio
Oct 29, 2007
!

Pretty sure that anyone calling from the same state that my area code is from is clearly a scam these days.

toplitzin
Jun 13, 2003


Initio posted:

Pretty sure that anyone calling from the same state that my area code is from is clearly a scam these days.

"We would like to reward you as you have been making your payments on time for the past six months or more. We are excited to inform you that you may qualify for zero to 6% interest on your credit card debt off. If you still owe more than $3,000 in your combined credit card debt, press one now to Avail this offer, press one now. You are one step closer to your financial freedom and to decrease your interest rates low as 6% please press one to speak with our financial expert."

Absurd Alhazred
Mar 27, 2010

I'm the babyliberal, gotta love me!


Initio posted:

Pretty sure that anyone calling from the same state that my area code is from is clearly a scam these days.

Sometimes I'm grateful I got assigned a Maryland number when I got my phone, I've never lived there and know nobody from there, so it's 100% scammers or debt collectors calling the old owner of the number.

Rent-A-Cop
Oct 15, 2004

I posted my food for USPOL Thanksgiving!



I've had my area code blacklisted in my phone for years. It cuts down on scam calls considerably.

Family Values
Jun 26, 2007



Tubgoat posted:

The used video game store, Games and Go, is a loving scam. Motherfuckers offered me $2 for Duck Tales 2 (NES, original non-repro, no box, no manual). Said they'd probably resell it for $10, maybe less. I called a reputable game store and inquired about its approximate value.
"...we can't give you a quote over the phone, but the owner will be in the store tomorrow morning to afternoon."
"Is the reason you can't give me a quote because it's a much higher figure than $2 and you don't want me getting upset later if it turns out you can't offer quite as much as originally quoted?"
"That is correct."
loving gently caress Games and Go, motherfuckers looted what remaines of my mate's video game shop after his literally good-for-nothing brother embezzled it, and the motherfuckers are still at it.

If you live in the Twin Cities, Minnesota, do not EVER sell anything to Games and Go.

How is this a scam? They quoted you a value that you disagreed with and you took your business elsewhere. There's no deceit or deception here, based just on what you wrote.

Unless your point is that people should pay you whatever you decide is fair, in which case I would like to sell you one Brooklyn Bridge, original non-repro, no box, no manual.

Red Oktober
May 24, 2006

wiggly eyes!





I think it’s because they’re saying it’s worth less than $10, and the other place is saying it’s worth enough that they’re not comfortable giving a price without the owners say.

Mosch
Jul 30, 2013


Lying to someone to make a profit is not a scam?

EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006

COWABUNGA DUDES!



Loose cart price for that game is in the region of $150, so saying they'd put it out for $10 is pretty crappy. Like yeah, you know there's going to be markup (and paying you 1/5 of their lie price matches that) but that does sound pretty dishonest.

The Pirate Captain
Jun 6, 2006

Avast ye lubbers, lest ye be scuppered!

They guy probably had no idea what the cart was worth and just assumed it was some random game. Used game stores are mostly a scam though, if you go on ebay you can get way more for your stuff selling and often lower buying with only a little more effort.

ghost emoji
Mar 11, 2016

oooOooOOOooh


Tubgoat posted:

The used video game store, Games and Go, is a loving scam. Motherfuckers offered me $2 for Duck Tales 2 (NES, original non-repro, no box, no manual). Said they'd probably resell it for $10, maybe less. I called a reputable game store and inquired about its approximate value.
"...we can't give you a quote over the phone, but the owner will be in the store tomorrow morning to afternoon."
"Is the reason you can't give me a quote because it's a much higher figure than $2 and you don't want me getting upset later if it turns out you can't offer quite as much as originally quoted?"
"That is correct."

loving gently caress Games and Go, motherfuckers looted what remaines of my mate's video game shop after his literally good-for-nothing brother embezzled it, and the motherfuckers are still at it.

If you live in the Twin Cities, Minnesota, do not EVER sell anything to Games and Go.

I used to work at a used game store and the reason we couldn't give price estimates over the phone was because people would (a) either claim "some guy" promised them a different amount that was way higher than what our systems actually said, or (b) bring in stuff that was dirty or had missing labels or, in multiple occasions, urine-stained, and get mad when we couldn't buy it at all or had to buy it at a discount.

Also, sometimes people would wait like three months after they called in for an estimate to trade in their item, and then be shocked if we were offering less because we'd gotten more copies in since their last call.

Domus
May 7, 2007

Kidney Buddies


I gotta echo that it's probably just someone not into retro games. Seems weird to take anything like that to a physical store in the first place. What are they gonna do if someone shows them one on eBay for $150? They'd still be idiots to buy it that price because they have to resell it at a profit. Plus they they either have to get on EBay themselves, or get lucky with a local buyer. All that for a $50 profit?

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013

by sebmojo


Red Oktober posted:

I think it’s because they’re saying it’s worth less than $10, and the other place is saying it’s worth enough that they’re not comfortable giving a price without the owners say.
Ding ding ding!

Also, the shopkeep spent two solid minutes on a computer, typing and mousing around before giving me this figure.
And retro games is literally their business.

Tubgoat fucked around with this message at 18:56 on Oct 17, 2019

GreyjoyBastard
Mar 28, 2010


I've made a huge mistake.





Someone just signed up for a VPN service with a credit card that isn't mine, a name that definitely isn't mine, and... my rather distinctive, afaict uncompromised (although I changed the password and checked devices just in case) email address. Which means that now that I reset the password to get in and make sure it wasn't my credit card, they won't be able to access the service they just spent $60 on. :raise:

I reported it to the service so I don't get in trouble but I don't think I understand the master plan here.

The service is ExpressVPN which appears to be a pretty legitimate VPN company, and even if it's a complicated ploy by the VPN company to steal/launder money... why use a real person's email address instead of a throwaway?

GreyjoyBastard fucked around with this message at 19:09 on Oct 17, 2019

Jeb Bush 2012
Apr 4, 2007

A mathematician, like a painter or poet, is a maker of patterns. If his patterns are more permanent than theirs, it is because they are made with ideas.

GreyjoyBastard posted:

Someone just signed up for a VPN service with a credit card that isn't mine, a name that definitely isn't mine, and... my rather distinctive, afaict uncompromised (although I changed the password and checked devices just in case) email address. Which means that now that I reset the password to get in and make sure it wasn't my credit card, they won't be able to access the service they just spent $60 on. :raise:

I reported it to the service so I don't get in trouble but I don't think I understand the master plan here.

The service is ExpressVPN which appears to be a pretty legitimate VPN company, and even if it's a complicated ploy by the VPN company to steal/launder money... why use a real person's email address instead of a throwaway?

unless your address is so weird that you can't imagine anyone having that address plus a number or whatever, I'd say the most likely answer is that someone typo'd their own address as yours

GreyjoyBastard
Mar 28, 2010


I've made a huge mistake.





Jeb Bush 2012 posted:

unless your address is so weird that you can't imagine anyone having that address plus a number or whatever, I'd say the most likely answer is that someone typo'd their own address as yours

It IS pretty weird but all the other answers are less sensical, so.

doctorfrog
Mar 14, 2007

Great.



Here's a broad facebook scam I wasn't aware of, and a little examination of the life of the scammer himself. And either facebook is incapable of controlling such a thing, or they don't care as long as the bucks roll in and user engagement is up. We're in a great age of grift, folks.
https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/craigsilverman/facebook-subscription-trap-free-trial-scam-ads-inc

quote:

The Facebook account rental scheme run by Ads Inc. is by far the largest of its kind ever exposed, and, when compared to recent Federal Trade Commission cases, one of the largest-ever subscription trap operations in the United States. It’s also a reminder of how Facebook’s powerful ad tools have revolutionized scamming, putting average people in the crosshairs of sophisticated black hat marketers looking to rip them off.

“We’re the best in the world,” one Ads Inc. employee told BuzzFeed News. The employee said they believe it’s a risky and unlawful business, but said the money they’ve made has made them “numb” to the consequences.

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For That you Get the Head...

The Tail...

The Whole Damned Thing

doctorfrog posted:

Here's a broad facebook scam I wasn't aware of, and a little examination of the life of the scammer himself. And either facebook is incapable of controlling such a thing, or they don't care as long as the bucks roll in and user engagement is up. We're in a great age of grift, folks.

Hmmm....I wonder.

I watched a Frank Abignale lecture (the pioneer of identify theft and the subject of "Catch Me if You Can") and he says FB and social media will be the #1 driving force behind fraud, identity theft, etc. moving forward, which makes sense. People are willingly putting their place of birth, their children's names, their DOB, their pet's names, family histories, favorite movies, books and music and places of employment online for anyone to see. So basically about 3/4 of any security questions and password possibilities.

And to think, computer shopping and banking were sold in part as being incredibly secure.

Bloopsy
Jun 1, 2006

you have been visited by the Spooky Garlic Bread. you will be cursed by having bad Garlic Bread in your life time, but only if you comment "ty garlic bread" in the thread below

Tubgoat posted:

The used video game store, Games and Go, is a loving scam. Motherfuckers offered me $2 for Duck Tales 2 (NES, original non-repro, no box, no manual). Said they'd probably resell it for $10, maybe less. I called a reputable game store and inquired about its approximate value.
"...we can't give you a quote over the phone, but the owner will be in the store tomorrow morning to afternoon."
"Is the reason you can't give me a quote because it's a much higher figure than $2 and you don't want me getting upset later if it turns out you can't offer quite as much as originally quoted?"
"That is correct."
loving gently caress Games and Go, motherfuckers looted what remaines of my mate's video game shop after his literally good-for-nothing brother embezzled it, and the motherfuckers are still at it.

If you live in the Twin Cities, Minnesota, do not EVER sell anything to Games and Go.

I've been there before 4 or 5 years ago. They had a small bin full of lovely cartridge based games that you could rummage through. I found a Link's Awakening cartridge that was obviously mispriced at $2.99. When I went to pay for it the guy at the counter tried to tell me that it was actually more expensive than that and when I told him that no, it's clearly priced at $2.99, he begrudgingly sold it to me, saying something along the lines of "you should be grateful you got such a good deal". I still have it and I don't even have a Gameboy.

EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006

COWABUNGA DUDES!



He's actually right, and they don't have to sell you something that's been mispriced. Sounds like they suck so good on you for getting a win over them, though.

Inceltown
Aug 6, 2019



EL BROMANCE posted:

He's actually right, and they don't have to sell you something that's been mispriced. Sounds like they suck so good on you for getting a win over them, though.

You need better shoppers rights. If it's mispriced then it is on the business for being stupid. Take your bargain and sell it right back to them while laughing.

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013

by sebmojo


Inceltown posted:

You need better shoppers rights. If it's mispriced then it is on the business for being stupid. Take your bargain and sell it right back to them while laughing.

I'd sell it to someone who'd give me a better price, tbqh. "Price sticker = price" is also my understanding, as long as it wasn't you or a party member angling for a Gutenberg Discount.

hyperhazard
Dec 4, 2011

I am the one lascivious
With magic potion niveous

MightyJoe36 posted:

Got a call from Kingston, Jamaica yesterday telling me that I won the Publisher's Clearinghouse Sweepstakes, mon.
A couple years ago I got called by an unknown number on my work landline with an area code I didn't recognize. I googled the number and there were a bunch of people on forums complaining about a scam call from Jamaica. So I didn't pick up.

The guy called me for 10 straight minutes. I ended up having to unplug my phone. I thought it was an auto-dialer just looping the number again and again until it got a human voice, but when I plugged my phone back in, I had a voicemail. It was a very long and very drunken message by a guy with a Jamaican accent who alternated between mumbling into the phone and yelling at what sounded like his entire family in the background.

I still don't know what the gently caress.

Bloopsy
Jun 1, 2006

you have been visited by the Spooky Garlic Bread. you will be cursed by having bad Garlic Bread in your life time, but only if you comment "ty garlic bread" in the thread below

Tubgoat posted:

I'd sell it to someone who'd give me a better price, tbqh. "Price sticker = price" is also my understanding, as long as it wasn't you or a party member angling for a Gutenberg Discount.

It was a sticker on the back that said "$2.99".

MrNemo
Aug 26, 2010

"I just love beeting off"



Inceltown posted:

You need better shoppers rights. If it's mispriced then it is on the business for being stupid. Take your bargain and sell it right back to them while laughing.

I don't know, in the UK it's certainly the case that a listed price isn't a legally binding contract and isn't false advertising (in terms of a price by the item or price tag, which isn't advertising) so the business isn't required to honour that price. Same as if you saw something advertised much cheaper elsewhere. Now if you discuss a cheaper price when buying it and they charge you much more and you pay that, you have grounds for demanding they return the difference. Probably a much idea not to pay the increased price though.

Pharmaskittle
Dec 17, 2007

arf arf put the money in the fuckin bag



Yeah, I'm by no means on the side of businesses, but a $100 item accidentally getting piled in with cheap stuff or having an obviously wrong sticker on it doesn't make it that price. Back when I worked in retail, customers would look at me like I called them a slur when I wouldn't immediately bend over for dumb poo poo like that.

Inceltown
Aug 6, 2019



MrNemo posted:

I don't know, in the UK it's certainly the case that a listed price isn't a legally binding contract and isn't false advertising (in terms of a price by the item or price tag, which isn't advertising) so the business isn't required to honour that price. Same as if you saw something advertised much cheaper elsewhere. Now if you discuss a cheaper price when buying it and they charge you much more and you pay that, you have grounds for demanding they return the difference. Probably a much idea not to pay the increased price though.

I guess it sort of depends on where you're shopping here. If it's a locally owned place then you'd let it slide but a national chain then gently caress them it's cheap.

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013

by sebmojo


Bloopsy posted:

It was a sticker on the back that said "$2.99".

Right, and if you or a party member (and not the store) had placed it there, you'd've been guilty of theft.
That's why Goodwill made their stickers impossible to remove intact in a timely fashion.

HerStuddMuffin
Aug 10, 2014

YOSPOS


It might be legal to raise the price at the register, but it’s a dangerous idea to propagate, for the business. Once you’ve convinced your customers that the sticker isn’t the Law and written by God himself, be ready to spend your days haggling with customers who decided that the laundry detergent you marked $6.99 should really cost $3, and so on.

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013

by sebmojo


HerStuddMuffin posted:

It might be legal to raise the price at the register, but it’s a dangerous idea to propagate, for the business. Once you’ve convinced your customers that the sticker isn’t the Law and written by God himself, be ready to spend your days haggling with customers who decided that the laundry detergent you marked $6.99 should really cost $3, and so on.
I have yet to have a Goodwill attendant with pricing control turn down my requests for re-pricing. :yayclod:
I've got bad-to-poor charisma and a really low barter but I'm good at dealing in (useful) junk.

wizzardstaff
Apr 6, 2018

Zorch! Splat! Pow!


Jeb Bush 2012 posted:

unless your address is so weird that you can't imagine anyone having that address plus a number or whatever, I'd say the most likely answer is that someone typo'd their own address as yours

This just happened to me (well, to my wife) and I was convinced it was a scam. Someone paid an online fee for a parking ticket at a college campus several states away, and the receipt ended up in her email by mistake. I had to call up the college’s parking department before I felt reassured that it wasn’t some obscure phishing attempt.

Red Oktober
May 24, 2006

wiggly eyes!





BiggerBoat posted:

Hmmm....I wonder.

I watched a Frank Abignale lecture (the pioneer of identify theft and the subject of "Catch Me if You Can") and he says FB and social media will be the #1 driving force behind fraud, identity theft, etc. moving forward, which makes sense. People are willingly putting their place of birth, their children's names, their DOB, their pet's names, family histories, favorite movies, books and music and places of employment online for anyone to see. So basically about 3/4 of any security questions and password possibilities.

And to think, computer shopping and banking were sold in part as being incredibly secure.

Frank also co-hosts the podcast ‘the perfect scam’ which is really good, and talks about things like this.

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


Jeb Bush 2012 posted:

unless your address is so weird that you can't imagine anyone having that address plus a number or whatever, I'd say the most likely answer is that someone typo'd their own address as yours

Or they just don't understand you don't get to own an email address just because you want it. Pretty common with FirstnameLastname@gmail/hotmail/outlook I hear.

I've seen people track down the phone numbers of the folks signing up for stuff with the wrong address like that. It often ends with a verbal argument when the owner can't get it through the idiot's brain that this isn't your email address, and never will be, no matter how many times you try and claim it is.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




That's me but I live outside the US so I message the sender when possible, and "unsubscribe" when not.
Some idiot started listening to Christian radio, ew.

EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006

COWABUNGA DUDES!



MisterOblivious posted:

Or they just don't understand you don't get to own an email address just because you want it. Pretty common with FirstnameLastname@gmail/hotmail/outlook I hear.

I've seen people track down the phone numbers of the folks signing up for stuff with the wrong address like that. It often ends with a verbal argument when the owner can't get it through the idiot's brain that this isn't your email address, and never will be, no matter how many times you try and claim it is.

Yep I have a gmail account like that, I get email for at least 5 other people. School reports, job interview replies, NRA newsletters (blech). Not worth my time dealing with it.

hyperhazard
Dec 4, 2011

I am the one lascivious
With magic potion niveous

My husband has a super obscure full name that's shared by like 3 people in the world, and one of those 3 people is a dense fucker convinced that he owns the firstname.lastname gmail address. Husband ended up hunting the guy down and telling him, and it stopped for a few months until the guy forgot again.

Captain Monkey
Aug 23, 2007



My wife has a fairly common Scandinavian/Nordic first name and she has firstname@gmail.com. She gets pictures, concert tickets, medical records, and all sorts of things in her inbox weekly. She only really follows up when it seems important (receiving notice of a will reading, medical test results, concert tickets, etc.)

It’s a huge source of frustration for her.

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013

by sebmojo


Captain Monkey posted:

It’s a huge source of frustration for her.
With any modicum of power (combined with a conscience) comes unconscionable amounts of frustration.

hexa
Dec 10, 2004

And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom


MrNemo posted:

I don't know, in the UK it's certainly the case that a listed price isn't a legally binding contract and isn't false advertising (in terms of a price by the item or price tag, which isn't advertising) so the business isn't required to honour that price. Same as if you saw something advertised much cheaper elsewhere. Now if you discuss a cheaper price when buying it and they charge you much more and you pay that, you have grounds for demanding they return the difference. Probably a much idea not to pay the increased price though.

That wasn't the case when I was working retail at Homebase - they have to sell for the listed price, unless they then remove the product for sale for a minimum of 24 hours and correct the price. As staff we'd take full advantage of any mistakes like this - I once bought a stupidly expensive penknife for a fiver due to a misprint in a promo leaflet.

This was 15 years ago though, so it's quite likely it's changed.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

MrNemo
Aug 26, 2010

"I just love beeting off"



It's also quite likely company policy. As has been mentioned, people realising that the listed price isn't a legal requirement for the item to be sold at that price could start people trying to haggle. Likewise getting people angry at being 'tricked' frequently is probably not worth it for bad publicity and scenes being caused.

There isn't and I don't think ever has been a legal requirement for it.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply