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Snow Cone Capone
Jul 31, 2003


Good ol' 1/1/11, never fails.

That's right, I'm 105 years old and using the internet. Prove I'm not!

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PT6A
Jan 5, 2006

Public school teachers are callous dictators who won't lift a finger to stop children from peeing in my plane

Lutha Mahtin posted:

Another thing like this is when there's a website that has an article I need for something, but they hide it behind a free account login. So I fill out all the account information with fake stuff; like, I'm sure there are quite a few Lutha Mahtin accounts here and there around the web that were logged into exactly once, and then were logged out a few minutes later. The problem is when you have another instance where that site has some page you want to see, and you try and sign up again only to see "that email address is already in use". Then I go to the password recovery system and it asks me "what's your birthdate"? Oh, looks like I must have just picked a random birthdate when I signed up the first time. Looks like the person who got scammed this time....is me :shepface:

That's why you pick a consistent fake birthday, obviously!

Griefor
Jun 11, 2009

Captain Bravo posted:

That's when you start a throwaway hotmail account with more fake information, to register with the site again! :pseudo:

Gmail has a neat trick for this. Messages to account+1@gmail.com, account+spam@gmail.com, account+somethingawful@gmail.com and account+blabla@gmail.com will all end up in the inbox of account@gmail.com.

Jasper Tin Neck
Nov 14, 2008


"Scientifically proven, rich and creamy."

I recently got called up by a telemarketer who pushed a magazine that supports a hotline for bullied kids.

The scammy part is that the hotline is only barely open and run by completely untrained people. The company printing the magazine pockets the vast majority of the profit from their overpriced mag but presents their operation as charity. Since you do receive a poorly edited quarterly magazine, it's technically not fraud though.

I told the guy to go gently caress himself. Of all kinds of frauds, charity frauds are the worst.

kaschei
Oct 25, 2005

Jasper Tin Neck posted:

I recently got called up by a telemarketer who pushed a magazine that supports a hotline for bullied kids.

The scammy part is that the hotline is only barely open and run by completely untrained people. The company printing the magazine pockets the vast majority of the profit from their overpriced mag but presents their operation as charity. Since you do receive a poorly edited quarterly magazine, it's technically not fraud though.

I told the guy to go gently caress himself. Of all kinds of frauds, charity frauds are the worst.
A guy was soliciting donations for a domestic violence center a block or two away from my college campus, but when I asked to see the pamphlet he was waving he told me to "stop wasting his time" and clammed up. I saw he only had one pamphlet, walked away without giving anything, but somehow it wasn't until I got home I realized there was basically no way he was legit. And then I kicked myself because I'd missed my opportunity to tell him to go gently caress himself.

Boris Galerkin
Dec 17, 2011

Yeah, never thought I'd be on a boat (let's go)
It's a big blue watery road (yeah)
Poseidon look at me, oh!
I'm in Italy right now and I keep getting people pushing these stupid string bracelets on me. Like the dudes literally put a bracelet on my shoulder as I'm walking by and then grab my arm when I ignore them and keep telling me "it's free it's free." Whatever I just keep ignoring them and walking away. Sometimes I see them approaching me with a hand full of bracelets and I stick out my hand and start saying no and they've generally gotten the idea.

Like I get the general idea of this scam but how exactly does it work out? According to Google they should tie it on my wrist and then demand money for the bracelet. How does it go from them telling me repeatedly that it's free to "give me money now?"

JiimyPopAli
Oct 5, 2009

Boris Galerkin posted:

I'm in Italy right now and I keep getting people pushing these stupid string bracelets on me. Like the dudes literally put a bracelet on my shoulder as I'm walking by and then grab my arm when I ignore them and keep telling me "it's free it's free." Whatever I just keep ignoring them and walking away. Sometimes I see them approaching me with a hand full of bracelets and I stick out my hand and start saying no and they've generally gotten the idea.

Like I get the general idea of this scam but how exactly does it work out? According to Google they should tie it on my wrist and then demand money for the bracelet. How does it go from them telling me repeatedly that it's free to "give me money now?"

I'd check here for a great list of European tourist scams:

https://www.ricksteves.com/travel-tips/theft-scams/tourist-scams

Boris Galerkin
Dec 17, 2011

Yeah, never thought I'd be on a boat (let's go)
It's a big blue watery road (yeah)
Poseidon look at me, oh!
I read that already.

I can understand if the dudes just chatted me up and started putting the bracelet on and then tell me it's 20.

But my experience all day has been more like "here's a free bracelet." Now I've never let it go any further than that so I just don't know how it goes from "here's a free bracelet" to "lol changed my mind it's 20."

Lutha Mahtin
Oct 10, 2010

Your brokebrain sin is absolved...go and shitpost no more!

Boris Galerkin posted:

But my experience all day has been more like "here's a free bracelet." Now I've never let it go any further than that so I just don't know how it goes from "here's a free bracelet" to "lol changed my mind it's 20€."

It's the standard strategy to make the mark feel uncomfortable enough that they'd rather part with some money, rather than risk this stranger getting angry with them or feeling like they are causing a "scene". The bracelet trick has the bonus that the scammer can tie it on to someone's wrist in such a way that it is difficult for the mark to remove it themselves. And targeting tourists is always good, because scammers can imply that this is a normal thing in this culture and that the mark is committing a faux pas.

Arctic Bunny
Aug 3, 2012

A PERFECT LOOKING NOSE
Can Easily Be Yours

Jasper Tin Neck posted:

I recently got called up by a telemarketer who pushed a magazine that supports a hotline for bullied kids.

The scammy part is that the hotline is only barely open and run by completely untrained people. The company printing the magazine pockets the vast majority of the profit from their overpriced mag but presents their operation as charity. Since you do receive a poorly edited quarterly magazine, it's technically not fraud though.

I told the guy to go gently caress himself. Of all kinds of frauds, charity frauds are the worst.
I got a similar call some months ago. The seller was really aggressive and unprofessional which made me say I need to think about it, asked for their website ("yeah yeah I can totally join via the website right") and promptly Googled the thing to find a bunch of discussion about the company. Apparently they did have a legit magazine but I'm willing to bet all monet not going on the mag would be taken and hidden by the company boss.

Hoshi
Jan 20, 2013

:wrongcity:

Boris Galerkin posted:

I read that already.

I can understand if the dudes just chatted me up and started putting the bracelet on and then tell me it's 20.

But my experience all day has been more like "here's a free bracelet." Now I've never let it go any further than that so I just don't know how it goes from "here's a free bracelet" to "lol changed my mind it's 20."

When I was in Milan they would talk about how they're trying to visit their family at home and just need some money for transportation to the airport, they already have a ticket, something like that. They usually have a decent back story. Then when you don't give them money they yell at you that you need to pay x for the bracelet you just bought and they tell that you're stealing and hope it embarrasses you into just giving them money to stop the scene.

Outside the duomo was the worst, they would just grab your wrist and start putting tying it on. I'm pretty sure the best move is to get some sunglasses and ignore them.

EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006

COWABUNGA DUDES!
🥷🐢😬



Read this yesterday... still seems a bit odd regardless of what the author says. Either way it's interesting to read 'I'm aware of the scams and I went along with it anyway' and I'm sure plenty of people will now read this and fall for scams themselves.

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20160601-the-moroccan-scam-that-wasnt

Teriyaki Hairpiece
Dec 29, 2006

I'm nae the voice o' the darkened thistle, but th' darkened thistle cannae bear the sight o' our Bonnie Prince Bernie nae mair.
Like I said upthread, it's a mugging with props.

Snow Cone Capone
Jul 31, 2003


cheerfullydrab posted:

Like I said upthread, it's a mugging with props.

did you actually read the link or are you just patting yourself on the back for some weird reason

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006

Public school teachers are callous dictators who won't lift a finger to stop children from peeing in my plane

EL BROMANCE posted:

Read this yesterday... still seems a bit odd regardless of what the author says. Either way it's interesting to read 'I'm aware of the scams and I went along with it anyway' and I'm sure plenty of people will now read this and fall for scams themselves.

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20160601-the-moroccan-scam-that-wasnt

I've been through similar things in a few different countries (although never invited to a wedding, usually just for dinner or drinks or something) and I've never been scammed*. In fact, sometimes I've felt bad because people have bought me drinks or dinner and I haven't had the chance to reciprocate properly.

Most people really aren't out to get you, no matter where you are in the world.

* EDIT: Not true, I did get scammed one time based of a "come have a drink in this bar" and you get the tourist menu with insane prices. That was the worst of it.

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For That you Get the Head...

The Tail...

The Whole Damned Thing

Boris Galerkin posted:

I read that already.

I can understand if the dudes just chatted me up and started putting the bracelet on and then tell me it's 20.

But my experience all day has been more like "here's a free bracelet." Now I've never let it go any further than that so I just don't know how it goes from "here's a free bracelet" to "lol changed my mind it's 20."

So is your whole arm just covered in bracelets right now?

Teriyaki Hairpiece
Dec 29, 2006

I'm nae the voice o' the darkened thistle, but th' darkened thistle cannae bear the sight o' our Bonnie Prince Bernie nae mair.

drunk asian neighbor posted:

did you actually read the link or are you just patting yourself on the back for some weird reason

It can be both!

many johnnys
May 17, 2015

If you go to a scam bar, is it possible to go out for a smoke and then just never come back in?

I don't know how bars work across the pond.

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006

Public school teachers are callous dictators who won't lift a finger to stop children from peeing in my plane

many johnnys posted:

If you go to a scam bar, is it possible to go out for a smoke and then just never come back in?

I don't know how bars work across the pond.

This was in Cuba, so I didn't want to gently caress around too much (and it cost me $6 extra or so, which is not an amount I'm prepared to get pissed off over, when you get right down to it, even though it was about four times what I should've paid). Arguably it wasn't a "scam" so much as a hustle. I got the drink I ordered (after being convinced to order that specific drink), and I paid the price that was on the menu.

many johnnys
May 17, 2015

PT6A posted:

This was in Cuba, so I didn't want to gently caress around too much (and it cost me $6 extra or so, which is not an amount I'm prepared to get pissed off over, when you get right down to it, even though it was about four times what I should've paid). Arguably it wasn't a "scam" so much as a hustle. I got the drink I ordered (after being convinced to order that specific drink), and I paid the price that was on the menu.

Fair enough, if it's six bucks it's not worth the trouble. But I figure, what are they gonna do if you grab a smoke and then just disappear? Yeah yeah, I'm suuure the cops are really interested in someone walking out of a scambar, and will care a whole lot about finding some tourist who may not even be in the city the next day.

photomikey
Dec 30, 2012

many johnnys posted:

Fair enough, if it's six bucks it's not worth the trouble. But I figure, what are they gonna do if you grab a smoke and then just disappear? Yeah yeah, I'm suuure the cops are really interested in someone walking out of a scambar, and will care a whole lot about finding some tourist who may not even be in the city the next day.
That part is probably true, but the ante is also higher for you, who is not at home, is unfamiliar with the currency, the laws, even simple stuff like how to make a call from jail should you land there. That's why the con thing works so well. Because at home, you know how everyone will react.

EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006

COWABUNGA DUDES!
🥷🐢😬



London still had a bunch of 'clip joint' bars running pulling the exact same scam even up to a few years ago, possibly even now. Authorities say they wanted them closed in the early 2000s but didn't really do a good job of it as you can still find stories of them operating a bunch of years later. So even in the English speaking world you can't always escape this poo poo it seems.

Safety Biscuits
Oct 21, 2010

If you're in your home country and go to a clip joint, you could always say you need to go to the ATM, then enter the wrong number and have it eat your card. It would be inconvenient but it might be enough to make them let you go. I'd rather not go into one in the first place, though.

many johnnys posted:

Fair enough, if it's six bucks it's not worth the trouble. But I figure, what are they gonna do if you grab a smoke and then just disappear?

If I were running a scam, I'd either come out for some fresh air/a smoke with you, or nod to the bouncer outside to make sure this doesn't happen.

WampaLord
Jan 14, 2010

House Louse posted:

If you're in your home country and go to a clip joint, you could always say you need to go to the ATM, then enter the wrong number and have it eat your card. It would be inconvenient but it might be enough to make them let you go. I'd rather not go into one in the first place, though.

:wtc:

This is not how ATMs work. If you put in the wrong PIN it says "Hey, wrong PIN" and gives you back your card and tells you to try again.

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006

Public school teachers are callous dictators who won't lift a finger to stop children from peeing in my plane

WampaLord posted:

:wtc:

This is not how ATMs work. If you put in the wrong PIN it says "Hey, wrong PIN" and gives you back your card and tells you to try again.

After enough wrong PINs it will make you reset your pin with the bank, at least in Canada.

Non Serviam
Feb 25, 2006

wAstIng 10 bUcks ON an aVaTar iS StUpid

WampaLord posted:

:wtc:

This is not how ATMs work. If you put in the wrong PIN it says "Hey, wrong PIN" and gives you back your card and tells you to try again.

I've seen machines that swallow the card after three errors or that will block it.

Phantasium
Dec 27, 2012
I know of some that will eat the card if the person is too dumb to take it out after they're done so that the next person that comes up doesn't steal it, but none that eat it for wrong PINs.

goatsestretchgoals
Jun 4, 2011

Bank ATMs will eat the card sometimes but not the crappy little freestanding ones you usually see in (USA) bars.

Absurd Alhazred
Mar 27, 2010

:rip:
ATM's in cash-only bars are a scam in and of themselves.

Safety Biscuits
Oct 21, 2010

WampaLord posted:

:wtc:

This is not how ATMs work. If you put in the wrong PIN it says "Hey, wrong PIN" and gives you back your card and tells you to try again.

Yes, but if you get it wrong three times it'll eat the card. In the UK anyway; maybe it's different where you are.

Non Serviam
Feb 25, 2006

wAstIng 10 bUcks ON an aVaTar iS StUpid
Many pages ago someone asked why scammers still say that they're from Nigeria.
Sadly, I can't find the source right now, but a theory is that stating that they're Nigerian immediately allows them to decrease false positives. Since scammers want to avoid investing a lot of time on people who will not fall for the con, it's better to just appeal to idiots from the very beginning. If they start talking to you, they're probably going to fall.

Lutha Mahtin
Oct 10, 2010

Your brokebrain sin is absolved...go and shitpost no more!

Why do Nigerian Scammers Say They are from Nigeria?

e:

it's actually a pretty interesting paper that has implications for many diverse fields

Captain Bravo
Feb 16, 2011

An Emergency Shitpost
has been deployed...

...but experts warn it is
just a drop in the ocean.

EL BROMANCE posted:

Read this yesterday... still seems a bit odd regardless of what the author says. Either way it's interesting to read 'I'm aware of the scams and I went along with it anyway' and I'm sure plenty of people will now read this and fall for scams themselves.

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20160601-the-moroccan-scam-that-wasnt

While that does sound like he had a fun night, it also suspiciously sounds like the foreign equivalent of a pig party. Especially the "Old man warns him to be careful" and "Everyone laughs as he enters the room." I bet tricking stupid foreigners to wear a funny robe and make a fool of themselves is a pretty hilarious, and harmless, good time. :v:

feedmegin
Jul 30, 2008

House Louse posted:

Yes, but if you get it wrong three times it'll eat the card. In the UK anyway; maybe it's different where you are.

Except you'll have a heavily muscled guy escort you to the ATM and the second time you 'forget' your PIN he applies some rubber hose cryptanalysis until you 'remember' it properly...

Josef K. Sourdust
Jul 16, 2014

"To be quite frank, Platinum sucks at making games. Vanquish was terrible and Metal Gear Rising: Revengance was so boring it put me to sleep."

The bracelet scam, like all the other push-something-in-your-hand scams, is essentially "hey I gave you something for free because I am welcoming :) but :( I am poor, hungry and homeless and won't you help?" The pressure of reciprocation, embarrassment and ignorance of local culture (plus a fear/aversion to getting involved with local local enforcement who couldn't give a drat) all combines. Plus if there is a gang of scammers there is always the fear of getting outright robbed. Paying E10 seems like an easy/quick way out of an embarrassing and intimidating situation.

Personally, if they are polite I just wave them away with a smile. If they are pushy I get in their face and tell them to get lost. Never touch anything that is offered in that way and just walk away.

Pryor on Fire
May 14, 2013

they don't know all alien abduction experiences can be explained by people thinking saving private ryan was a documentary

You people who let random strangers engage with you on the street are quite confusing to me. Are you just super polite all the time or something?

Imaduck
Apr 16, 2007

the magnetorotational instability turns me on
If you don't live in a big city, you might not be that used to encountering strangers on a street, and probably don't know how to deflect them. Doubly so if you're in a country and don't know how common/uncommon it might be for strangers to talk to you.

Absurd Alhazred
Mar 27, 2010

:rip:

Pryor on Fire posted:

You people who let random strangers engage with you on the street are quite confusing to me. Are you just super polite all the time or something?

I talk to strangers on the street all the time. You know the "don't talk to strangers" things only apply when you're a kid, right?

Snow Cone Capone
Jul 31, 2003


I mean on the one hand you may get scammed if you engage with strangers, on the other hand you could completely ignore when people are talking to you, and you look like a douche, plus you may get punched in the back of the head for it.

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Captain Bravo
Feb 16, 2011

An Emergency Shitpost
has been deployed...

...but experts warn it is
just a drop in the ocean.
I just walk down the street with both hands up, middle fingers blazing, and turn towards every person I see to give them the full salute. Is that not what everyone does?

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