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Asimov
Feb 15, 2016



PhazonLink posted:

Is selling epipens a gray black market too?

Asking for a friend.


No idea, but I heard that each parent has to provide their own EpiPens to their child's school. It must vary by district/state but imagine 100 parents purchasing 1+ EpiPens for their child to take to school, and then 95% of them expiring after 18 months going unused. I suppose it would be unconscionable to have some sort of communal store of EpiPens. Skylar needs to have several of them on-deck at all times even if a poorer kid is going into anaphylactic shock right this moment.

"If your child has been diagnosed with an allergy/health condition that requires the use of an EpiPen, it is still your responsibility to provide your childís EpiPen to the school nurse on or before the first day of class along with medical orders."

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Lutha Mahtin
Oct 10, 2010

Your brokebrain sin is absolved...go and shitpost no more!


epinephrine pens are probably a prescription drug/device. in the US it's illegal to use a prescription product on someone different from the name on the prescription label, so no you can't use Alice's epi pen on Bob even if both have a prescription. part of this has to do with licensing: a doctor or RN in an emergency room might be able to use a pen on somebody who doesn't even have a prescription for it (don't quote me here), but you aren't going to have someone with that level of certification in every school

another thing about the "i buy houses" signs is aome are straight up scams. i collected one of these snipe signs recently (i have very mundane hobbies ok) and the web site listed on it was a domain registered by proxy less than a month before I grabbed the sign. no legit information on the site besides trying to funnel people into phone/email contact. no real contact information on the DNS records that i could find. searched online for the supposed LLC nams of the company, found no news hits, no social media, no LinkedIn, no phone book records, nothing. i didn't contact fhem but i am guessing it's less than legit

my favorite twist on the real estate scam sign is "hiring real estate apprentice, make up to 20k per month part time". i don't know how it works but my guess is it's a commission thing where your "mentor" takes most of the money, or they toss you the crumbs they don't want and still take a cut, or they try and get you to buy in to their business by putting in your own money. something classic like that

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




10/90 split of agent's fees, all you gotta do is sell a few 5 million dollar houses!

Konstantin
Jun 20, 2005
And the Lord said, "Look, they are one people, and they have all one language; and this is only the beginning of what they will do; nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them.

Plus I bet you have to pay for overpriced classes before you take the realtor exam, with your "mentor" getting a kickback.

MightyJoe36
Dec 29, 2013

:minnie: Cat Army :minnie:


Konstantin posted:

Plus I bet you have to pay for overpriced classes before you take the realtor exam, with your "mentor" getting a kickback.

Reminds me of the old "Medical billing Work From Home" scam.

Doctor_Acula
May 24, 2011


Maybe you folks can help.

On my way to my office, I stopped into a Shell station in question to purchase a chicken sandwich and a soda for a coworker around 09:56.  The total was 3.88 (or 3.98, I forget precisely).


I attempt to insert my card into the pin-pad, and am told it is not working.  The attendant says he can swipe it for me at the register.  

He swiped my card, then flips it over and is looking at it, commenting that the magnet strip is worn and it may not work.  I found this peculiar since he had already swiped my card.  
He then said "everything went through, have a good one" and I left.

On my way to my office, I started feeling very unsettled by him staring at the back of my card where the CV2 number is located.  As soon as I arrived at my office I checked my statement and sure enough the charge was for 11.21.

I attempted to call the station using the number listed as their contact, but it rang to voicemail. 

I contacted my bank, and they stated they could reverse the charge when it poated, but they also recommended me cancelling my card based on how he may have copied the CV2.  Which I did.

On my lunch, I left my office and went to my bank to get a new card.  On the way back, I decided to see if it was possible that this was a system error by checking exactly what I was billed for. 
(Note: I don't believe this is possible, since the difference between the amount I was told and the amount charged is not a flat amount or a multiplication thereof.)

I asked the clerk for a copy of my purchase receipt.  He said sure, and fiddled with the register for a bit.  Then he asked me if there was a problem.  I said I just wanted the receipt.  This went back and forth a few times before he told me it was impossible to reproduce a receipt (even after I cited that the Shell site says specifically the opposite).

He continued to ask me what the problem was, and I told him he knew he overcharged me and I wanted to see what he had billed me for.  I asked to speak with his manager, and he told me he was the manager.  I then asked to speak with his boss.  He provided me a phone number for a "Bobby" and said that was his manager.

I called Bobby and it went straight to voicemail.  He did not call me back.

I called him again later in the evening, and he said he wanted to speak to the gas station and call me back.  He left me a voicemail, simply stating he was returning my call.  I have not yet made another attempt to contact him, since I have no idea who "Bobby" actually is.

Reviews online all point to this being a frequent situation, which concerns me greatly.  Shell customer service says it's independently operated so there isn't anything they can do, and it sounds like "Bobby" is hip to what is going on. Is there anything I can do to stop them from getting away with this?

Wicked Them Beats
Apr 1, 2007

Moralists don't really *have* beliefs. Sometimes they stumble on one, like on a child's toy left on the carpet. The toy must be put away immediately. And the child reprimanded.



Doctor_Acula posted:

Maybe you folks can help.

On my way to my office, I stopped into a Shell station in question to purchase a chicken sandwich and a soda for a coworker around 09:56.  The total was 3.88 (or 3.98, I forget precisely).


I attempt to insert my card into the pin-pad, and am told it is not working.  The attendant says he can swipe it for me at the register.  

He swiped my card, then flips it over and is looking at it, commenting that the magnet strip is worn and it may not work.  I found this peculiar since he had already swiped my card.  
He then said "everything went through, have a good one" and I left.

On my way to my office, I started feeling very unsettled by him staring at the back of my card where the CV2 number is located.  As soon as I arrived at my office I checked my statement and sure enough the charge was for 11.21.

I attempted to call the station using the number listed as their contact, but it rang to voicemail. 

I contacted my bank, and they stated they could reverse the charge when it poated, but they also recommended me cancelling my card based on how he may have copied the CV2.  Which I did.

On my lunch, I left my office and went to my bank to get a new card.  On the way back, I decided to see if it was possible that this was a system error by checking exactly what I was billed for. 
(Note: I don't believe this is possible, since the difference between the amount I was told and the amount charged is not a flat amount or a multiplication thereof.)

I asked the clerk for a copy of my purchase receipt.  He said sure, and fiddled with the register for a bit.  Then he asked me if there was a problem.  I said I just wanted the receipt.  This went back and forth a few times before he told me it was impossible to reproduce a receipt (even after I cited that the Shell site says specifically the opposite).

He continued to ask me what the problem was, and I told him he knew he overcharged me and I wanted to see what he had billed me for.  I asked to speak with his manager, and he told me he was the manager.  I then asked to speak with his boss.  He provided me a phone number for a "Bobby" and said that was his manager.

I called Bobby and it went straight to voicemail.  He did not call me back.

I called him again later in the evening, and he said he wanted to speak to the gas station and call me back.  He left me a voicemail, simply stating he was returning my call.  I have not yet made another attempt to contact him, since I have no idea who "Bobby" actually is.

Reviews online all point to this being a frequent situation, which concerns me greatly.  Shell customer service says it's independently operated so there isn't anything they can do, and it sounds like "Bobby" is hip to what is going on. Is there anything I can do to stop them from getting away with this?

If they actually stole your credit card info and made fraudulent charges it's what is known as a crime and you can report them.

Check your local district attorney office's website and see if they have a fraud hotline you can call.

shame on an IGA
Apr 8, 2005

Get into shit, let it out like diarrhea
Got burnt once, that was only gonorrhea




1121 is a reasonable amount for a gas station transaction that won't look suspicious AND really easy to remember and punch into a keypad quickly and with minimal hand motion. Dollars to donuts they're using that exact amount for every fraudulent transaction and if their CC processor looks at the records it'll be super obvious.

why not 1111? Because it looks weird on a statement and it's too easy to miscount and punch up 111.11 and give away the game

shame on an IGA fucked around with this message at 20:30 on Jun 28, 2018

Zereth
Jul 8, 2003




What evidence do you have that "Bobby" is the actual boss? Because it sounds like you don't have any.

Collateral Damage
Jun 13, 2009



Call your bank, tell them you suspect your card's been skimmed.

Midjack
Dec 24, 2007





Collateral Damage posted:

Call your bank, tell them you suspect your card's been skimmed.

Call the bank and tell them exactly what you told us. They don't gently caress around with stuff like this.

Proteus Jones
Feb 28, 2013





Collateral Damage posted:

Call your bank, tell them you suspect your card's been skimmed.

LOL. You didnít even read his post did you?

Doctor_Acula posted:

I contacted my bank, and they stated they could reverse the charge when it poated, but they also recommended me cancelling my card based on how he may have copied the CV2.† Which I did.

On my lunch, I left my office and went to my bank to get a new card.†

Doctor_Acula
May 24, 2011


Zereth posted:

What evidence do you have that "Bobby" is the actual boss? Because it sounds like you don't have any.

I don't. I simply stated that was my feeling. If he is, he didn't seem very interested in helping me.

Doctor_Acula
May 24, 2011


My bank got kind of indignant with me today when I filed the dispute. Like 11.21 was so trivial. The amount isn't the point.

They didn't seem to care very much.

Hoshi
Jan 20, 2013

:wrongcity:


Doctor_Acula posted:

My bank got kind of indignant with me today when I filed the dispute. Like 11.21 was so trivial. The amount isn't the point.

They didn't seem to care very much.

A lot of finance people have this perspective but they're wrong and it does matter

Lutha Mahtin
Oct 10, 2010

Your brokebrain sin is absolved...go and shitpost no more!


Doctor_Acula posted:

My bank got kind of indignant with me today when I filed the dispute. Like 11.21 was so trivial. The amount isn't the point.

They didn't seem to care very much.

it would be very worrying to me if my bank reacted this way. i would be sure to find out if it was just the rep i spoke to being dismissive, or if it's actual bank policy that they don't care about fraud if it is below a certain dollar amount. it's super illegal for banks not to care about that stuff in most developed countries, to the point where they can get shut down and prosecuted if they don't monitor for and report fraud

you should also consider reporting this to your relevant government agencies. in the US, a good place to start would be the office of your state Attorney General

Shroud
May 11, 2009


Might be a long shot, and it might be too much bother, but:

Call the FBI. That transaction probably crossed a state line. If nothing else, you can commiserate with the person answering their phones.

Space Gopher
Jul 31, 2006

BLITHERING IDIOT AND HARDCORE DURIAN APOLOGIST. LET ME TELL YOU WHY THIS SHIT DON'T STINK EVEN THOUGH WE ALL KNOW IT DOES BECAUSE I'M SUPER CULTURED.


Doctor_Acula posted:

My bank got kind of indignant with me today when I filed the dispute. Like 11.21 was so trivial. The amount isn't the point.

They didn't seem to care very much.

Did you talk to the people who handle disputed transactions, or the people who handle fraud and stolen cards?

There's a big difference between "I think that I was accidentally overcharged for a sandwich" and "I think somebody at the convenience store is running fraudulent charges and took down my CVV2 number."

Eric the Mauve
May 8, 2012

Making you happy for a buck since 199X


Sorry to be the guy that pisses in the Cheerios but the amorphous entity known as The Bank is comprised of a whole bunch of individual persons, every single one of whom will regard eleven dollars and twenty-one cents as not worth their time.

Likewise, it's unlikely any law enforcement agency is going to get interested unless you can hand them proof that systematic fraud is going on. But--seriously--hell yeah, if I were in your position I'd be on a crusade about this too. gently caress those guys.

Spazzle
Jul 5, 2003




Call the Foundation for Law And Government. They will use advanced AI to solve your problems.

Wicked Them Beats
Apr 1, 2007

Moralists don't really *have* beliefs. Sometimes they stumble on one, like on a child's toy left on the carpet. The toy must be put away immediately. And the child reprimanded.



Like I already said, contact your local DA or whichever body in your area handles consumer fraud and file a report. They won't take action over :10bux: but if they get multiple tips about the same vendor they'll investigate. They have full-time enforcement officers who look into this sort of thing for a living.

They're generally more interested in multi-million dollar stuff but busting a small time credit theft ring makes for good headlines in the local papers.

SEKCobra
Feb 28, 2011


First make sure you actually got their scam right, because to overcharge your card they don't need the CVV2

stringball
Mar 17, 2009



Doctor_Acula posted:

Maybe you folks can help.

On my way to my office, I stopped into a Shell station

Hi I work for 76 under the andeavor umbrella (formerly western refining). I don't know where you live but our shells and others are sister stations that we are interchangeable easily at. Ours aren't independently owned, they should have a district manager or operations manager?

Go to any relatively close location that's listed here and see if you explain what happened and if you can talk to the district/operations manager.

I know it may not be the same case and it is independently owned, a a number here might be able to help.

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Anyone heard of the fuel delivery scam? You sign up with a low monthly fee, talk to real people in "customer service," and book a delivery time during which they will fuel your car if you leave it in the driveway, and they will charge you less than current local fuel prices. You don't even have to be home! Just leave your fuel door open and they will show up. Only no one ever does. You attempt to call, they answer and rebook, no one shows up. When you get fed up and call to cancel, they apologize and say they will cancel the service and your card will no longer be charged but they keep charging it anyway--my guess is they just want to wear you down, and they eventually stop picking up the phone so your only avenue is to cancel your card with the bank. If they get enough people, $3.99USD/month isn't much but it adds up for them. Presumably someone just shows up to actually SIPHON gas out of your car if you leave the fuel door open.

The FB page and website seem legit enough on the surface, but there are no real numbers to call, no info on the company, no owner's name. Just photos of generic fuel tanker trucks fueling a Honda or some poo poo.

I've heard there ARE legit fuel delivery companies, but at least a few of them are bullshit companies. Anyone seen this?

Wicked Them Beats
Apr 1, 2007

Moralists don't really *have* beliefs. Sometimes they stumble on one, like on a child's toy left on the carpet. The toy must be put away immediately. And the child reprimanded.



life is killing me posted:

Anyone heard of the fuel delivery scam? You sign up with a low monthly fee, talk to real people in "customer service," and book a delivery time during which they will fuel your car if you leave it in the driveway, and they will charge you less than current local fuel prices. You don't even have to be home! Just leave your fuel door open and they will show up. Only no one ever does. You attempt to call, they answer and rebook, no one shows up. When you get fed up and call to cancel, they apologize and say they will cancel the service and your card will no longer be charged but they keep charging it anyway--my guess is they just want to wear you down, and they eventually stop picking up the phone so your only avenue is to cancel your card with the bank. If they get enough people, $3.99USD/month isn't much but it adds up for them. Presumably someone just shows up to actually SIPHON gas out of your car if you leave the fuel door open.

The FB page and website seem legit enough on the surface, but there are no real numbers to call, no info on the company, no owner's name. Just photos of generic fuel tanker trucks fueling a Honda or some poo poo.

I've heard there ARE legit fuel delivery companies, but at least a few of them are bullshit companies. Anyone seen this?

I looked into this a bit recently and one thing I know is that it's illegal in a lot of places due to fire regulations. And the ones I saw were app-based and offered multiple services including tire pressure checks and window cleaning.

Found an article where at least one company was only servicing corporate clients on privately owned company property for insurance reasons. If you're calling some number you found in a craigslist ad to set up the service I probably wouldn't trust it.

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Wicked Them Beats posted:

I looked into this a bit recently and one thing I know is that it's illegal in a lot of places due to fire regulations. And the ones I saw were app-based and offered multiple services including tire pressure checks and window cleaning.

Found an article where at least one company was only servicing corporate clients on privately owned company property for insurance reasons. If you're calling some number you found in a craigslist ad to set up the service I probably wouldn't trust it.

The one I'm referencing was claiming to be based in Atlanta which should be a red flag for anyone not living in Atlanta--though they claimed to be a national company. Very few obvious ways to contact them and people interested in fuel delivery should check for BBB membership maybe. Interestingly enough I can't find their FB page anymore but whatever. Not on CL.

Lutha Mahtin
Oct 10, 2010

Your brokebrain sin is absolved...go and shitpost no more!


it's probably a great scam because you're only going to get people signing up who are dumb enough to think it's possible to do home delivery of an unprofitable commodity at a cheaper price than going to the station. i worked at a rural gas station that did fuel delivery where it was a 100 or 200 gallon minimum per delivery, and iirc the price was more than what you paid at the pumps out front

shame on an IGA
Apr 8, 2005

Get into shit, let it out like diarrhea
Got burnt once, that was only gonorrhea




The BBB is a shakedown racket that belongs in this thread as content.

ametris
Dec 14, 2011


Lutha Mahtin posted:

epinephrine pens are probably a prescription drug/device. in the US it's illegal to use a prescription product on someone different from the name on the prescription label, so no you can't use Alice's epi pen on Bob even if both have a prescription. part of this has to do with licensing: a doctor or RN in an emergency room might be able to use a pen on somebody who doesn't even have a prescription for it (don't quote me here), but you aren't going to have someone with that level of certification in every school

another thing about the "i buy houses" signs is aome are straight up scams. i collected one of these snipe signs recently (i have very mundane hobbies ok) and the web site listed on it was a domain registered by proxy less than a month before I grabbed the sign. no legit information on the site besides trying to funnel people into phone/email contact. no real contact information on the DNS records that i could find. searched online for the supposed LLC nams of the company, found no news hits, no social media, no LinkedIn, no phone book records, nothing. i didn't contact fhem but i am guessing it's less than legit

my favorite twist on the real estate scam sign is "hiring real estate apprentice, make up to 20k per month part time". i don't know how it works but my guess is it's a commission thing where your "mentor" takes most of the money, or they toss you the crumbs they don't want and still take a cut, or they try and get you to buy in to their business by putting in your own money. something classic like that

Most places any scheduled drug provided in an ER is prescribed before being administered (though the process is usually quite fast), otherwise it's still illegal

Teriyaki Hairpiece
Dec 29, 2006

Ask me about my dream Frasier episode where Frasier and Bulldog oil their heads and then rub them together. It's definitely not a fetish of mine, I swear!

shame on an IGA posted:

The BBB is a shakedown racket that belongs in this thread as content.

Yeah they are the worst and their persistence in the American public consciousness is incomprehensible.

Pharmaskittle
Dec 17, 2007

arf arf put the money in the fuckin bag


Teriyaki Hairpiece posted:

Yeah they are the worst and their persistence in the American public consciousness is incomprehensible.

Being a tattletale is extremely American

life is killing me
Oct 28, 2007



Didn't know the BBB had such a stigma. What is the deal with that?

ne: They did try calling me about 20 times in two weeks assumedly trying to get me to become a member which I also assume involved fees. It was a legit phone number on their website. It was extremely annoying. But that's the worst experience I've had with them.

Wicked Them Beats
Apr 1, 2007

Moralists don't really *have* beliefs. Sometimes they stumble on one, like on a child's toy left on the carpet. The toy must be put away immediately. And the child reprimanded.



It's not uncommon for a bad rating to become a better rating as soon as your membership check clears, and calling yourself a "Bureau" implies some sort of official government status when they're actually a private org that has no actual power or authority.

Eric the Mauve
May 8, 2012

Making you happy for a buck since 199X


I consider it more of a feature than a bug to keep everyone who takes the BBB seriously out of my customer pool, but that's just me

Vinny the Shark
Oct 11, 2005


Speaking of shady Craigslist ads, this brings to mind an experience I had with a job offer from the old school classifieds in the local newspaper-

Back in early 2006 I think, I answered an ad I saw in the paper. The ad stated it was looking for "light maintenance/landscaping work" for a nearby apartment complex. I called the listed number and the guy who answered told me the work was exactly what it sounded like- shoveling snow, sprinkling salt on walkways and staircases, cleaning/vacuuming newly vacated apartment units, cutting grass in summer time, etc. It was a short distance away and I was unemployed at the time, so it sounded perfect. Then the guy told me the big catch- due to the way the payroll was set up, he wouldn't be able to pay me for 3 months, possibly longer. I asked him why, and he said "it's something with my bank, they're being jerks." Sounds real legit. I told him that wasn't acceptable and hung up.

I've always wondered about this. Is it even legal to do that? Even if it is legal, what was to stop him from cooking the books and shortchanging me, or from not paying me at all? It just seemed like there are so many ways a deadbeat apartment manager could take advantage of an employee he doesn't officially have on the payroll.

Teriyaki Hairpiece
Dec 29, 2006

Ask me about my dream Frasier episode where Frasier and Bulldog oil their heads and then rub them together. It's definitely not a fetish of mine, I swear!

Eric the Mauve posted:

I consider it more of a feature than a bug to keep everyone who takes the BBB seriously out of my customer pool, but that's just me

You are insanely naive if you actually think there's a government agency with teeth that enforces best practices and protects consumers. Probably a good mark.

iajanus
Aug 17, 2004

#GOAT


Teriyaki Hairpiece posted:

You are insanely naive if you actually think there's a government agency with teeth that enforces best practices and protects consumers. Probably a good mark.

Come to a first world country and you might be pleasantly surprised

EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006

COWABUNGA DUDES!



iajanus posted:

Come to a first world country and you might be pleasantly surprised

Iím almost certain that once Brexit happens, the European consumer protection laws will absolutely disappear in the UK. I saved thousands on things from computer repair to flights due to those, in just a few occurrences too.

Raldikuk
Apr 7, 2006

I'm bad with money and I want that meatball!

Vinny the Shark posted:

Speaking of shady Craigslist ads, this brings to mind an experience I had with a job offer from the old school classifieds in the local newspaper-

Back in early 2006 I think, I answered an ad I saw in the paper. The ad stated it was looking for "light maintenance/landscaping work" for a nearby apartment complex. I called the listed number and the guy who answered told me the work was exactly what it sounded like- shoveling snow, sprinkling salt on walkways and staircases, cleaning/vacuuming newly vacated apartment units, cutting grass in summer time, etc. It was a short distance away and I was unemployed at the time, so it sounded perfect. Then the guy told me the big catch- due to the way the payroll was set up, he wouldn't be able to pay me for 3 months, possibly longer. I asked him why, and he said "it's something with my bank, they're being jerks." Sounds real legit. I told him that wasn't acceptable and hung up.

I've always wondered about this. Is it even legal to do that? Even if it is legal, what was to stop him from cooking the books and shortchanging me, or from not paying me at all? It just seemed like there are so many ways a deadbeat apartment manager could take advantage of an employee he doesn't officially have on the payroll.

Depends on state. In MN employers have to pay within 30 days of hours worked

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tinytort
Jun 10, 2013

Super healthy, super cheap

Got a call at 6 am the other day, and answered to get a robocall that claimed it was calling on behalf of the Canada Revenue Agency to inform me that I'm being sued for tax evasion.

The robot called me back several times, because I hung up on it as soon as it started claiming it was calling for the CRA. (They don't call people and they sure as hell wouldn't use a phone call to inform me about litigation or issues with my taxes.) It even kept going when I hung up on it and it left a voice mail message with a contact number.

Unfortunately, the assholes called my mother-in-law too, and she thought it was legit for long enough to have actually given them her real address. So that's going to be interesting.

I also keep getting calls in Chinese (the only bit I understand or recognize is "ni hao"), and I have no idea why. I think it's also a robocall, since there isn't any reaction when I try and go "you have the wrong number" or "I can't understand you".

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