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Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Best pic I have on hand while at work...from selling a previous car and doing the photo shoot. And a dated one from the county web site at least showing the truss direction. I think there's plenty of room to put it in, just hard to visualize it not looking terrible.



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Rhyno
Mar 22, 2003

Psst! It's me!
The Sinister with the mutant gene.


What's above the garage? Master bedroom?

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





What about extending the garage, even one bay, into your backyard? If that's not an option I think if you brick front the extension and then put in a sloped roof that asthetically matches the rest of the house you could have a decent look. Like have the roof just be a one way slope from the top of the second floor coming to a point at the new outside wall.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Bedroom above, and there's a den on the "back" of the garage so extending back isn't really an option.

The same roof slope with brick front is probably best aesthetically, I'd agree.

Rhyno
Mar 22, 2003

Psst! It's me!
The Sinister with the mutant gene.


Have you considered a walk out patio area?

Wrar
Sep 9, 2002



Soiled Meat

I'm looking at different wall mounting systems, either picking through a closing retail store for those wall mounts or doing my own French cleat setup. I'm not enthused with pegboard as the mounts seem to fall off fairly easily. Anyone have experience with the pros and cons of each?

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





Rhyno posted:

Have you considered a walk out patio area?

A roof top patio would be really cool there.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



There's a balcony off the master in the back that we never use, and a walk out patio under that.

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Wrar posted:

I'm looking at different wall mounting systems, either picking through a closing retail store for those wall mounts or doing my own French cleat setup. I'm not enthused with pegboard as the mounts seem to fall off fairly easily. Anyone have experience with the pros and cons of each?

Metal pegboard!

https://www.cheappegboard.com

It's"wall control" brand of pegboard but they sell the "defect" stuff for cheap. (superficial defects)

You can search this thread for some pics of my garage which has some

edit:

BraveUlysses fucked around with this message at 17:52 on May 24, 2019

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Super quick and dirty, but if you did a lower level at the same angle roof I think it'd look fine. Make it as tall or short as you need.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



LloydDobler posted:

Super quick and dirty, but if you did a lower level at the same angle roof I think it'd look fine. Make it as tall or short as you need.



Thanks for this. We're having somebody stop by next week to have a look and see what options are. I think that could work if it was raised a little higher. I think I'll future proof myself for a lift even though I sort of hate cars at the moment. Doesn't stop me from working on the dailies and such though.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



Suburban Dad posted:

Thanks for this. We're having somebody stop by next week to have a look and see what options are. I think that could work if it was raised a little higher. I think I'll future proof myself for a lift even though I sort of hate cars at the moment. Doesn't stop me from working on the dailies and such though.

So contractor has been selected, he's coming by today for deposit to start drawings and all that. Plan is to do a 12' wide bay that's the depth of the house (35'), assuming the city is ok with the massive depth/sq footage. Widening by another 3' was another $4500 or so so we'll probably keep it at 12' wide. Plan is to have another parking bay with storage in the back for tools and other crap that our tiny basement won't cover. It'll basically look like what Lloyd drew up, with the roof starting at the base of the 2nd story windows for maximum height. Here's the list of what he's quoting so far.

-Supply final design and blueprints for proposed garage
-Break out walkway next to existing garage and slab in front of new garage area and haul
-Dig and pour 12"x 42" footings for 12'x 35' attached garage
-Haul dirt
-Install (1) layer of block on footings
-Form new garage floor and approx.12'x 20' apron in front
-Install crushed gravel base and tamp
-Pour new 4" floor and apron with 6 bag mix
-Build 12'x 35' attached garage with shed roof
-Take down brick on east side of garage
-Match wall height of existing garage
-12" overhangs on eave and front gable
-Frame for 8'x 7' overhead door
-Cut in archway to existing garage
-Install 36" service door on rear wall of addition
-Install shingles to match house
-Install brick in front wall of garage up to eave using leftover brick
-Install vinyl soffit on overhangs; aluminum trim on rakes, eaves and doors
-Install Mastic Board & Batten vertical siding on walls and gables
-Install gutters and downspouts
-Upgrade electrical service to 30 circuit, 100 amp panel
-Run 60 amp panel to garage with basic wiring package
-Install 8'x 7' overhead door with opener to match existing as closely as possible

Anything else I should be thinking about or considering right now? Concrete 4" thick should be good for a lift in the future (?), but I'll check on ceiling height since I don't know what the trusses will look like with a "shed" style roof. Honestly a max jack is probably best case scenario at this point I'd guess.

I'm going to talk to him about insulating and drywall and expand on what the electrical "package" means. Obviously need to know what's planned there before drywall. Currently we have a big window on the exterior side of the existing garage that we're planning on turning into a big opening (no door planned) to the new garage, so makes sense to insulate it even though there's not going to be any HVAC to either garage. Also window on the room behind existing garage will be turned into a door most likely for another access point from inside the house.

Suburban Dad fucked around with this message at 14:39 on Jul 9, 2019

meatpimp
May 15, 2004

Psst -- Wanna buy

EVERYWHERE
some high-quality thread's DESTROYED!



Suburban Dad posted:

Anything else I should be thinking about or considering right now? Concrete 4" thick should be good for a lift in the future (?), but I'll check on ceiling height since I don't know what the trusses will look like with a "shed" style roof. Honestly a max jack is probably best case scenario at this point I'd guess.

I'm going to talk to him about insulating and drywall and expand on what the electrical "package" means. Obviously need to know what's planned there before drywall. Currently we have a big window on the exterior side of the existing garage that we're planning on turning into a big opening (no door planned) to the new garage, so makes sense to insulate it even though there's not going to be any HVAC to either garage. Also window on the room behind existing garage will be turned into a door most likely for another access point from inside the house.

Is he handling permits and inspections? Some areas are tight on that, others don't care. I walled up a loft to make a bedroom and I had to give plans, have a rough inspection and a final inspection to keep everything "on the books," all for 2 partition walls, a closet and a couple outlets.

Also, spray foam insulation on everything.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



meatpimp posted:

Is he handling permits and inspections? Some areas are tight on that, others don't care. I walled up a loft to make a bedroom and I had to give plans, have a rough inspection and a final inspection to keep everything "on the books," all for 2 partition walls, a closet and a couple outlets.

Also, spray foam insulation on everything.

Yes, they're doing permits and all that as well.

I've done a few pieces of fiberglass before and while it's itchy and kind of sucks, it's not too hard. I'm debating if I let them leave it bare and do the insulation and drywall myself eventually. That leaves electrical options open in case we don't want to spend as much up front since already this is a big expense. However, I am a terrible carpenter and it will look much shittier if I do this.

Is the R value better with spray? Sounds potentially easier but possibly messier to do but costs more from my 5 seconds of searching.

meatpimp
May 15, 2004

Psst -- Wanna buy

EVERYWHERE
some high-quality thread's DESTROYED!



Suburban Dad posted:

Yes, they're doing permits and all that as well.

I've done a few pieces of fiberglass before and while it's itchy and kind of sucks, it's not too hard. I'm debating if I let them leave it bare and do the insulation and drywall myself eventually. That leaves electrical options open in case we don't want to spend as much up front since already this is a big expense. However, I am a terrible carpenter and it will look much shittier if I do this.

Is the R value better with spray? Sounds potentially easier but possibly messier to do but costs more from my 5 seconds of searching.

Spray foam has comparable R value to fiberglass, in general, but it also performs better as an air barrier, since it's sealing all the nooks and cracks. It's the one thing I really wish I had in a 20 year old house, just for the energy savings and the air sealing. All the little holes and gaps add up, and the spray foam is a 1-stop fix for all the stuffs.

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



meatpimp posted:

Spray foam has comparable R value to fiberglass, in general, but it also performs better as an air barrier, since it's sealing all the nooks and cracks. It's the one thing I really wish I had in a 20 year old house, just for the energy savings and the air sealing. All the little holes and gaps add up, and the spray foam is a 1-stop fix for all the stuffs.

Fair enough. My house was built in the early 60s and has old windows, it's drafty as gently caress. I wonder how much insulation will really help on this addition that has no HVAC and is surrounded by exterior walls on 3 sides anyway. We're planning to maybe put another fridge out there (basement is probably the better idea once the electrical is dealt with) so it'll probably have a wide range of temps out there.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Suburban Dad posted:

So contractor has been selected, he's coming by today for deposit to start drawings and all that. Plan is to do a 12' wide bay that's the depth of the house (35'), assuming the city is ok with the massive depth/sq footage. Widening by another 3' was another $4500 or so so we'll probably keep it at 12' wide. Plan is to have another parking bay with storage in the back for tools and other crap that our tiny basement won't cover. It'll basically look like what Lloyd drew up, with the roof starting at the base of the 2nd story windows for maximum height. Here's the list of what he's quoting so far.

-Supply final design and blueprints for proposed garage
-Break out walkway next to existing garage and slab in front of new garage area and haul
-Dig and pour 12"x 42" footings for 12'x 35' attached garage
-Haul dirt
-Install (1) layer of block on footings
-Form new garage floor and approx.12'x 20' apron in front
-Install crushed gravel base and tamp
-Pour new 4" floor and apron with 6 bag mix
-Build 12'x 35' attached garage with shed roof
-Take down brick on east side of garage
-Match wall height of existing garage
-12" overhangs on eave and front gable
-Frame for 8'x 7' overhead door
-Cut in archway to existing garage
-Install 36" service door on rear wall of addition
-Install shingles to match house
-Install brick in front wall of garage up to eave using leftover brick
-Install vinyl soffit on overhangs; aluminum trim on rakes, eaves and doors
-Install Mastic Board & Batten vertical siding on walls and gables
-Install gutters and downspouts
-Upgrade electrical service to 30 circuit, 100 amp panel
-Run 60 amp panel to garage with basic wiring package
-Install 8'x 7' overhead door with opener to match existing as closely as possible

Anything else I should be thinking about or considering right now? Concrete 4" thick should be good for a lift in the future (?), but I'll check on ceiling height since I don't know what the trusses will look like with a "shed" style roof. Honestly a max jack is probably best case scenario at this point I'd guess.

I'm going to talk to him about insulating and drywall and expand on what the electrical "package" means. Obviously need to know what's planned there before drywall. Currently we have a big window on the exterior side of the existing garage that we're planning on turning into a big opening (no door planned) to the new garage, so makes sense to insulate it even though there's not going to be any HVAC to either garage. Also window on the room behind existing garage will be turned into a door most likely for another access point from inside the house.
4" @ 3000 PSI is pretty much the minimum for a lift. Not sure what "6 bag mix" is. If you are planing on a lift, an extra inch or so of thickness would not be a bad idea and get that ceiling as high as you reasonably can. RE: The electrical, if they wire it make sure you have outlets every 6-8' and lights. Lots of lights. Not sure where you live, but heat isn't important?

And yeah, spray foam is the bees knees. That sets apart the spec/mass builders in my area from the craftsman builders. They'll use batt insulation in the walls but spray in all the crawl spaces/inside the soffits/draft/tough areas.

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





I think you can just cut the slab later and pour deeper footings for a lift if needed (depending on the lift). May not be worth a thicker or higher PSI full slab pour. Not sure on the price TBH.

I debated going with a lift but ended up just doing a quickjack which I'm thankful for now since we're going to move and that will be easier to take with me.

Mr. Powers
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


The house I'm putting an offer on doesn't have a spectacular garage but it does have a 1200 sqft unfinished basement. It's also got a sink plumbed in, so a darkroom will most certainly be constructed.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Unifinished basements are severely underrated. Even a finished basement, the best thing a guy can do is leave a somewhat significant portion unfinished for ~stuff~

tangy yet delightful posted:

I think you can just cut the slab later and pour deeper footings for a lift if needed (depending on the lift). May not be worth a thicker or higher PSI full slab pour. Not sure on the price TBH.
I'm sure you could, but gently caress that. Capital "F"

Cutting/coring a slab, digging/coring, pouring a foot or even a screw pile, new pour on top. Ugh. Just doing an extra inch on the build is the time to do it.

Mr. Powers
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


slidebite posted:

Unifinished basements are severely underrated. Even a finished basement, the best thing a guy can do is leave a somewhat significant portion unfinished for ~stuff~


This house in particular has a basement in which there is no point I need to duck. Even under the ducts for HVAC they are probably at least 6.5' of height.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Noice. Good heights in basements make a huge difference. Our house has a raised basement as well (9.5' ceilings finished) and makes a huge difference in "feel"

Nothing worse than having to duck to go under a beam of a duct. Or, having a few adult bevs and forgetting that they are there!

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



slidebite posted:

4" @ 3000 PSI is pretty much the minimum for a lift. Not sure what "6 bag mix" is. If you are planing on a lift, an extra inch or so of thickness would not be a bad idea and get that ceiling as high as you reasonably can. RE: The electrical, if they wire it make sure you have outlets every 6-8' and lights. Lots of lights. Not sure where you live, but heat isn't important?

And yeah, spray foam is the bees knees. That sets apart the spec/mass builders in my area from the craftsman builders. They'll use batt insulation in the walls but spray in all the crawl spaces/inside the soffits/draft/tough areas.

Thanks, good questions I'll forward along.

E: As for heat, it's attached to the house and current garage is insulated. I can work out there in a long sleeve shirt in the winter comfortably. Doesn't get below around 50ish from what I've seen. Now the new one will add more unheated space and will probably drop that, but I could always add on a heater later. Honestly I've sort of moved on from car work/project cars too much anymore so the heat would only really be a concern for things that we're storing in there when the time comes.

Suburban Dad fucked around with this message at 12:43 on Jul 10, 2019

NitroSpazzz
Dec 8, 2006

You don't need style when you've got strength!




Mr. Powers posted:

The house I'm putting an offer on doesn't have a spectacular garage but it does have a 1200 sqft unfinished basement. It's also got a sink plumbed in, so a darkroom will most certainly be constructed.

This is what we ended up with after no luck finding big enough or detached garage. Works great other than I have to be mindful of fumes getting upstairs. We've got seven cars inside between the garage and unfinished basement...it's great.

Mr. Powers
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


NitroSpazzz posted:

This is what we ended up with after no luck finding big enough or detached garage. Works great other than I have to be mindful of fumes getting upstairs. We've got seven cars inside between the garage and unfinished basement...it's great.

Oh, yeah, there's no way to get a car in the basement except piece by piece. I don't need lots of cars, just room to work, and not having the garage be shared car/wood/metal/paint space means it's automatically giant compared to the 1 car that was all of those things.

E: did not win. got beat by 4 crazy people waiving inspection and appraisal contingencies.

Mr. Powers fucked around with this message at 15:09 on Jul 19, 2019

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007




So I talked to the architect about the roof and rafters, and it sounds like there won't really need to be a truss/beams going across the ceiling and I can have the roof be the ceiling if I want, or they can make it flat. I'm trying to think of future additional storage and also bonus roof height for lift, etc. so I may go this route and leave it open. Makes it more expensive to insulate (spray foam) if I decide to do that. So many decisions.

It's getting drawn up now and sounds like they should start on it within a few weeks, and estimate 3-4 weeks to complete it.

meatpimp
May 15, 2004

Psst -- Wanna buy

EVERYWHERE
some high-quality thread's DESTROYED!



Suburban Dad posted:

So I talked to the architect about the roof and rafters, and it sounds like there won't really need to be a truss/beams going across the ceiling and I can have the roof be the ceiling if I want, or they can make it flat. I'm trying to think of future additional storage and also bonus roof height for lift, etc. so I may go this route and leave it open. Makes it more expensive to insulate (spray foam) if I decide to do that. So many decisions.

It's getting drawn up now and sounds like they should start on it within a few weeks, and estimate 3-4 weeks to complete it.

Worth it.

angryrobots
Mar 31, 2005



Fuckit, cross posting why not.

Last Thursday I contacted a recommended contractor for quotes to build on some (completely self supported) lean-tos, to my shop. I heard from him this Wednesday and clarified what I wanted, sent drawings and site pictures.

Yesterday he called me mid-day and asked "how soon did you want to start this?"





30x24 is done except for trim, 40x12 is up next.

Mr. Powers
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


How little would you trust a garage with a wood floor that has a basement under it? My gut says I shouldn't trust it.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Mr. Powers posted:

How little would you trust a garage with a wood floor that has a basement under it? My gut says I shouldn't trust it.

Depends on the structure and flooring. There is a commercial garage in town that is in an old enough building to have wooden plank floors in their 3 bays at street level with another set of bays under them accessible from the back. It's all been working just fin since the mid 1900s.

Mr. Powers
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


Motronic posted:

Depends on the structure and flooring. There is a commercial garage in town that is in an old enough building to have wooden plank floors in their 3 bays at street level with another set of bays under them accessible from the back. It's all been working just fin since the mid 1900s.

The basement doesn't appear special at all with larger joists or beams. It is some sort of wood plank. It's build in '72.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

That doesn't sound promising.

Fermented Tinal
Aug 25, 2005
ASK ME ABOUT MY BIG DUMB LANDCRUISER



Mr. Powers posted:

The basement doesn't appear special at all with larger joists or beams. It is some sort of wood plank. It's build in '72.

A picture of the framing would help.

Mr. Powers
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


I haven't gone to look in person yet. Just going by the photos online.

This is a realtor.com link from the app. Not sure why they don't have a saner looking link.
https://b1iw.app.link/WK24h6LwdZ

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Dude....that is absolutely "special" under there. That's built right.

Nice house and nice property.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Don't see anything underside of that garage floor, pretty sure that is the house basement, but I agree that house looks structurally well built.

That kitchen is going to cost you $$ to modernize though, but that looks like a nice spread. I sort of like the old timey finishing in the living areas.

Mr. Powers
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


slidebite posted:

Don't see anything underside of that garage floor, pretty sure that is the house basement, but I agree that house looks structurally well built.

That kitchen is going to cost you $$ to modernize though, but that looks like a nice spread. I sort of like the old timey finishing in the living areas.

It's all one basement under the house and extending under the garage. I didn't think it looked flimsy or anything, but two cars are pretty heavy and it looks like what I would expect to see in a basement rather than something... more, I guess.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Mr. Powers posted:

It's all one basement under the house and extending under the garage. I didn't think it looked flimsy or anything, but two cars are pretty heavy and it looks like what I would expect to see in a basement rather than something... more, I guess.

That is not typical basement lally columns nor joists. I'm not saying this is a structural engineering analysis based on a real estate listing, but that is significantly more than what you would typically see. It's enough to pass a sniff test of "if I'm really interested in this house I'll have the inspector bring in a structural engineer for this particular purpose."

Also echoing $$ for kitchen modernization, but that looks completely serviceable as is.

Motronic fucked around with this message at 05:14 on Aug 17, 2019

Rhyno
Mar 22, 2003

Psst! It's me!
The Sinister with the mutant gene.


You could always shore it up with additional supports later.

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Crunchy Black
Oct 24, 2017

CASTOR: Uh, it was all fine and you don't remember?
VINDMAN: No, it was bad and I do remember.




Mr. Powers posted:

I haven't gone to look in person yet. Just going by the photos online.

This is a realtor.com link from the app. Not sure why they don't have a saner looking link.
https://b1iw.app.link/WK24h6LwdZ

A) they don't build them like they used to, holy poo poo that's gorgeous, especially for the price
B ) nthing "that's not enough to make me run away." I would probably get a PE to sign off on what it should be rated for and even then I might have them draw up plans to add additional supports if necessary, pending a solid inspection.

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