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Mr. Powers
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


I am considering getting someone out to estimate embedding a 2 car foundation into an area that currently just has a retaining wall. That would be pretty sweet. I'd put a roof over it at my leisure, but at minimum, it would let me get third+ car off the side of the driveway.

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tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





I currently have 3 of these bins on my wall. They were gifted to me so they've seen years of heavy use and just a few days ago one of mine had the top right corner of the plastic box come unglued or whatever. Luckily it didn't spill everything onto the floor but in the interest of averting disaster I want to replace all 3. I don't really need the exact same number of bins but I'd like a decent # of bins in whatever I end up getting.

Any suggestions on what to buy?

The current boxes are 14" wide * 18" tall* 6.5" deep. I would like replacements roughly the same size. Or maybe a double wide one and buy less?



edit: figured out the search term I needed to get some options "parts bin"

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-2...22169/205053254

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Akro-Mi...10124/203538887

Thinking I might get 2x husky and 1x akro.

tangy yet delightful fucked around with this message at 03:30 on Mar 8, 2020

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



I think I've just realized that the reason I have a shitload of miscellaneous screws and fasteners is that I never use screws and fasteners. I probably should just get in the habit of recycling what I don't use at the end of each project, because I only do about one project a year anyway. It's not expensive to buy a box of screws if I need them.

poo poo, I'm sitting on a box of square drive subfloor screws from remodeling my bathroom 13 years ago. I really don't need those taking up space in my brain or my garage. Definitely time for a garage purge.

bolind
Jun 19, 2005



Pillbug

LloydDobler posted:

I think I've just realized that the reason I have a shitload of miscellaneous screws and fasteners is that I never use screws and fasteners. I probably should just get in the habit of recycling what I don't use at the end of each project, because I only do about one project a year anyway. It's not expensive to buy a box of screws if I need them.

poo poo, I'm sitting on a box of square drive subfloor screws from remodeling my bathroom 13 years ago. I really don't need those taking up space in my brain or my garage. Definitely time for a garage purge.

That's a very common phenomenon. Then, the week after you chuck them, you'll need them, on a Sunday night.

But yeah, watching the builders that did our house. They unceremoniously chucked leftover stuff at the end. A waste, but storing, cataloguing and retrieving is way more expensive than just getting new stuff next time.

A compromise, that I've found, is that if you have a geographically close group of buddies who all do DIY, keep a small spreadsheet on Google Docs or something with what you have left over, and just treat it as a communal pot. Same with specialty tools, actually.

Mustache Ride
Sep 11, 2001






Barn chat?







Not pictured: Tractor and Ranger currently in use.

Rubber Ducky
Nov 5, 2009


It's so clean and bright?! How! How is that done?

Mustache Ride
Sep 11, 2001






A very strong wind blows through the doors when they're open, so any trash or dirt goes flying if left on the ground. Also keeps it pretty cool in the summer.

MomJeans420
Mar 19, 2007

Most of the gear, most of the time


I bought some of the cheapest, on-sale LED garage lights from Ace Hardware and just put one up in my garage (which before only had a single fluorescent fixture with 2 bulbs) and the improvement is amazing. You can really tell the difference having them on side by side, and I'll definitely be taking the fluorescent one down to be replaced by my extra LED light. Highly recommend them to anyone who needs more light in their garage. They also turn on instantly in the cold.

Rhyno
Mar 22, 2003

Psst! It's me!
The Sinister with the mutant gene.


So what do you guys think about steel construction for a free standing garage? Seems to be a much cheaper option and it mostly bolts together.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Rhyno posted:

So what do you guys think about steel construction for a free standing garage? Seems to be a much cheaper option and it mostly bolts together.

Steel is good, but if you're in an area where it's common pole construction can be even cheaper. I've got a buddy out my way shopping comparisons on this right now.

Rhyno
Mar 22, 2003

Psst! It's me!
The Sinister with the mutant gene.


Motronic posted:

Steel is good, but if you're in an area where it's common pole construction can be even cheaper. I've got a buddy out my way shopping comparisons on this right now.

Pole buildings are not allowed under association rules for some reason. Which is dumb but thus far my only real issue with the HOA so far. But a few people do have steel out buildings so I'm assuming that would be okay.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

The foundation is the biggest cost, regardless of construction method. There's a reason there's a ton of mobile steel building erection companies. Cheap labor, everything fits on a truck, and the expensive part has to be done before they arrive.

Bulk Vanderhuge
May 2, 2009

womp womp womp womp


sharkytm posted:

The foundation is the biggest cost, regardless of construction method. There's a reason there's a ton of mobile steel building erection companies. Cheap labor, everything fits on a truck, and the expensive part has to be done before they arrive.

True, it's also the one thing you can't change afterwards. When the time comes I plan to insulate the slab and run PEX even though I won't be running in floor heating anytime soon.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

Bulk Vanderhuge posted:

True, it's also the one thing you can't change afterwards. When the time comes I plan to insulate the slab and run PEX even though I won't be running in floor heating anytime soon.

Don't forget about conduit to a bunch of different spots, too. It's really handy to be able to pull data, power, or water to a different corner in the future.

Mustache Ride
Sep 11, 2001






Our barn is a pole barn. They poured the concrete (it's not a slab) after the frame was up and clad it and we did all the electrical and water afterwards. Given that the barn is much larger than any garage, its probably a lot easier than what we did.

One thing I will suggest if you do pole and a concrete floor is make sure the concrete is thick enough to mount a lift on. Some lifts require a minimum thickness to secure and it's a big pain in the rear end if you need to add concrete later.

Also the bluebonnets are in:

Elmnt80
Dec 30, 2012

OH NOOOO!





I miss the Bluebonnet fields. A severely underrated part of living in Texas.

BlackMK4
Aug 23, 2006

wat.

Megamarm

Long story short, I bought a condo back in January and I am starting to figure out how the thing is built. I'm getting around to throwing LEDs in my garage, so I removed one of the fluorescent fixtures since I need to put in an outlet where it is to plug in one or two of the LEDs.

I found that the fixture was hardwired with a round ceiling box that has a 2.75" screw spacing, and that ceiling box is held by one of the braces that connects between two joists. The garage ceiling is double 5/8" drywall so I really want to avoid loving with it more than I already have.

Question becomes - can I replace the round ceiling box with a metal single or double gang with a GFCI receptacle in there, or do I need to cut two more holes so I can replace it with an entire brace assembly with box? Looks like the single gang has the same mounting holes as the old round box. I really don't want to cut a bunch of holes to run wire and mount boxes to joists, but if I have to... well.


FatCow
Apr 22, 2002
I MAP THE FUCK OUT OF PEOPLE


Not sure I exactly follow. But the only reason you'd need to brace the box to the joists is if you want to hang a fixture from it. Otherwise just get a plastic old work box and put it in the hole. Might want to get a double gang so you can just enlarge the hole that the circular box was in. Metal boxes are a pain in the rear end because you have to ground them.

BlackMK4
Aug 23, 2006

wat.

Megamarm

The rework boxes like that donít accommodate the extra layer of drywall, I have some here that I tried. I could hack up the upper layer of drywall, but that seems ghetto.

I just donít know if changing the hanger with round box to have a different box somehow violates code since Iím not using the assembly as designed.

meatpimp
May 15, 2004

Psst -- Wanna buy

EVERYWHERE
some high-quality thread's DESTROYED!



BlackMK4 posted:

Long story short, I bought a condo back in January and I am starting to figure out how the thing is built. I'm getting around to throwing LEDs in my garage, so I removed one of the fluorescent fixtures since I need to put in an outlet where it is to plug in one or two of the LEDs.

I found that the fixture was hardwired with a round ceiling box that has a 2.75" screw spacing, and that ceiling box is held by one of the braces that connects between two joists. The garage ceiling is double 5/8" drywall so I really want to avoid loving with it more than I already have.

Question becomes - can I replace the round ceiling box with a metal single or double gang with a GFCI receptacle in there, or do I need to cut two more holes so I can replace it with an entire brace assembly with box? Looks like the single gang has the same mounting holes as the old round box. I really don't want to cut a bunch of holes to run wire and mount boxes to joists, but if I have to... well.




Gfci is typically for damp locations, is something driving that need? Or would this work? https://www.gordonelectricsupply.co...WhoCrC0QAvD_BwE

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



meatpimp posted:

Gfci is typically for damp locations, is something driving that need? Or would this work? https://www.gordonelectricsupply.co...WhoCrC0QAvD_BwE

That's exactly what I was going to suggest.

angryrobots
Mar 31, 2005



He's in the electrical thread now with this question, but yes GFCI is required for anything in a garage.. Though having one on the ceiling runs afoul of the requirement that it's accessible. So you protect it via an upstream receptacle, or GFCI breaker.

BlackMK4 posted:

The rework boxes like that don’t accommodate the extra layer of drywall, I have some here that I tried. I could hack up the upper layer of drywall, but that seems ghetto.

You can use a longer screw on the mounting tab, to accommodate the extra later of wallboard.

angryrobots fucked around with this message at 14:46 on Apr 5, 2020

meatpimp
May 15, 2004

Psst -- Wanna buy

EVERYWHERE
some high-quality thread's DESTROYED!



angryrobots posted:

He's in the electrical thread now with this question, but yes GFCI is required for anything in a garage.. Though having one on the ceiling runs afoul of the requirement that it's accessible. So you protect it via an upstream receptacle, or GFCI breaker.

Interesting, I didn't know that was a code update. Looks like GFCI in the garage was required in 2008. My 1999 house is lacking that. I'll have to look into that next round of updates. Thanks!

BlackMK4
Aug 23, 2006

wat.

Megamarm

LloydDobler posted:

That's exactly what I was going to suggest.

meatpimp posted:

Gfci is typically for damp locations, is something driving that need? Or would this work? https://www.gordonelectricsupply.co...WhoCrC0QAvD_BwE

I couldn't find them in stock locally and I also wasn't sure if it would work with my box since the screw spacing on it is 2.75" (which seems weird to me).
I'll order two and see if it fits once it arrives, worst case I can use it somewhere else down the line.

BlackMK4 fucked around with this message at 15:34 on Apr 5, 2020

stevobob
Nov 16, 2008

Alchemy - the study of how to turn LS1's into a 20B.


I don't think I've posted it before, so here's my workbench/workspace in the basement of the house I rent.



Bench is made entirely from wood given to me when my neighbor moved away. The articulated lamp I got from Salvation Army for $6. Most of the crap in the boxes below the bench is old auto wiring bits and bobs, the toolbox I used to use at my old job, most everything parts- and components-wise I picked up over the years and I've kinda just hoarded most of it and not touched it since I got it but I totally will some day you guys just trust me

devmd01
Mar 7, 2006

Elektronik
Supersonik


Adding another GFCI circuit in the garage. The main reason for the circuit is the outlet outside...which is exactly where Iíll start Christmas lights. Iíll also have a perfect spot to plug in my dadís 22gal air compressor, whenever it is my mom can take a trip up next.







That all branches off of the GFCI load terminals. I need to order more 12/2 and the circuit breakers next to run from the gfci into the load center. Most of this is leftovers from other projects, so itís been pretty cheap so far! Wiring it with 12/2 so I can easily upgrade it to 20A if needed in the future.

devmd01 fucked around with this message at 06:53 on Apr 6, 2020

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

You need a different cover for the soffit box if you want to keep stuff plugged in. Look for an "in use" cover like this: https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-Gang-...WIU-1/206469236

Otherwise, nice work.

Dielectric
May 3, 2010


I've got a broken torsion spring on my garage door. The new ones arrive tomorrow, I figure it's like doing car springs where you should do them in pairs. I've always been told they're spooky and will definitely kill you but the YouTube hive mind makes it look relatively straightforward if you don't gently caress up. RIP me?

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



I would highly recommend hiring a pro to come put them in. It's not that expensive, like $100 or less, and they'll do a full tune-up/adjustment on all of it. They absolutely can kill you.

The luckiest guy I knew on that subject was the building maintenance guy at my first job. One of those Jack of all trades, Master of none types. He was doing the springs on one of our truck bay doors, a 12 footer, up on a ladder. The bar popped out of the hole and smacked him in the head. He fell all the way down on to concrete, somehow came to work the next day with nothing more than a limp and a bad shiner. And advice to not gently caress with garage door springs.

I also don't have the balls to impact gun struts apart without compressors, even though I've seen it on youtube a dozen times.

LloydDobler fucked around with this message at 20:33 on Apr 7, 2020

BlackMK4
Aug 23, 2006

wat.

Megamarm

LloydDobler posted:

I also don't have the balls to impact gun struts apart without compressors, even though I've seen it on youtube a dozen times.
Only way to fly, just aim in a safe direction

o7

boxen
Feb 20, 2011


Dielectric posted:

I've got a broken torsion spring on my garage door. The new ones arrive tomorrow, I figure it's like doing car springs where you should do them in pairs. I've always been told they're spooky and will definitely kill you but the YouTube hive mind makes it look relatively straightforward if you don't gently caress up. RIP me?

Yeah, I would. It's not super complicated, it's more that if you gently caress it up it can no poo poo kill you with little warning if you gently caress it up. There's a loooot of torque wrapped up in those things when they're installed.

LloydDobler posted:

He fell all the way down on to concrete, somehow came to work the next day with nothing more than a limp and a bad shiner. And advice to not gently caress with garage door springs.

Yeah, it's possible to get your skull caved in and be dead before you hit the ground, he's lucky.

I worked for a summer installing garage doors with a relative. I could do any given part of it but was specifically and repeatedly told to not touch installing those springs. Of the two guys I worked with, the older one had been doing it for 20+ years and had the biggest Popeye forearms I have ever seen, and the other guy had been doing it like 2 and it still scared him to do it.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



I'm thinking maybe it's time to invent a tool that does it without the danger. Or just a new collar. I mean, the concept of a releasable ratchet has been around forever, why do they have these lovely setscrew locked collars that can kill you in the 21st century? Meh, given the number of installs, a tool is probably the right way to go. Something that locks in to the standard collar and allows you to safely release and wind it under power.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









I'm going to go with: it's cheaper

Seat Safety Switch
May 27, 2008

MY RELIGION IS THE SMALL BLOCK V8 AND COMMANDMENTS ONE THROUGH TEN ARE NEVER LIFT.



Pillbug

LloydDobler posted:

I'm thinking maybe it's time to invent a tool that does it without the danger. Or just a new collar. I mean, the concept of a releasable ratchet has been around forever, why do they have these lovely setscrew locked collars that can kill you in the 21st century? Meh, given the number of installs, a tool is probably the right way to go. Something that locks in to the standard collar and allows you to safely release and wind it under power.

The wall-mounted spring compressors are supposedly the safest way to do it.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Heh. This is exactly what I was inventing as I typed my previous post:

https://www.northshorecommercialdoo...ing-system.html

And it's discontinued, people prefer the suicide bars apparently.

I was also imagining this, better idea: http://winderer.com/ Priced around where I'd expect to find it too, $695.00

LloydDobler fucked around with this message at 20:41 on Apr 8, 2020

Beach Bum
Jan 13, 2010


I adjusted my torsion spring with a pair of 6" 3/8" extensions. I'm a loving mad man, don't be like me. If you're careful it won't be a problem, but if you're not you'll likely be very injured or dead.

Gorson
Aug 29, 2014



Anyone have a brand of mechanics overalls (full length full sleeves) they like? Comfort would be the priority, no scratchy/itchy materials.

RIP Paul Walker
Feb 26, 2004



Iíll happily impact struts apart (poo poo Iíve done it with hand tools) but garage springs scare me senseless. Probably one of the more dangerous things in a home, now that I think about it.

Powershift
Nov 23, 2009




Gorson posted:

Anyone have a brand of mechanics overalls (full length full sleeves) they like? Comfort would be the priority, no scratchy/itchy materials.

Nomex can get hot in the summer, but it's a very soft fabric. very comfortable. In the summer i used to just wear them without pants underneath. I of course had to get them custom made, but i still have a 15 year old pair that sees regular use

Find a good coverall place and try some on. Most places go buy chest circumference as the primary measure of size, then have regular and tall sizes, but not everybody's 44 tall is the same size, for example.

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frrtbkr
Apr 25, 2004


Iím excited! I made an offer that the seller accepted for this beauty:


ohhh nice, it has garages too.


six!


My home inspection is Saturday, Iíll take some more photos then. The garage looks like a grow house - the walls and ceilings are covered with foil faced insulation. Iím hoping itís structurally sound underneath. The roof is rubber and has some sagging areas that collect ponding water. Good news is the wiring is new, it has itís own electrical service from the street, the (electric!) garage doors are new and hot & cold PEX run along the back wall for 3 future sink hookups. I forgot which ones are double bays and which ones are singles but every demising wall has pass doors between them with hasps for padlocks. Iíll probably keep a double and rent the rest for storage until I can complete my water cooled VW collection, haha!

I also saw some old Verizon networking equipment in bay #1. Looked it up after the showing and they offer gigabit FIOS!

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