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Skyscraper
Oct 1, 2004

Hurry Up, We're Dreaming





Flaggy posted:

I have an old one I can send you bub. I got it for free and so can you! I use the Kindle App on an Ipad because its easier than carrying the multiple books around that I am currently reading.

Is there a secret to getting free paperwhites?

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Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Kindles donít wrinkle when reading in a hot bath.

I only really buy physical books now if theyíre particularly awesome editions or include some gimmick that works better on paper. Books are great, but they take up a lot of space and I just love having tons of stuff to read without taking up half of my luggage when going somewhere. Itís the same as iPod vs carting around a pile of CDs back in the day.

unpacked robinhood
Feb 18, 2013

by Fluffdaddy


My kobo slides nicely in most of my jackets and I get to load it with news articles to read while commuting which is great. It's supposedly splash tolerant too

No. 1 Juicy Boi
Jun 1, 2003

I CAN FEEL MYSELF ROT.


Buglord

Skyscraper posted:

Is there a secret to getting free paperwhites?

Flaggy and I are friends outside the forums, it's not just random benevolence :)

Skyscraper
Oct 1, 2004

Hurry Up, We're Dreaming





COOL CORN posted:

Flaggy and I are friends outside the forums, it's not just random benevolence :)

I meant how flaggy got it for free :p

Flaggy
Jul 6, 2007

Grandpa Cthulu needs his napping chair





Grimey Drawer

Skyscraper posted:

I meant how flaggy got it for free :p

My wife's aunt passed away and had 7-8 of them due to her illness and always buying the latest thing.

Skyscraper
Oct 1, 2004

Hurry Up, We're Dreaming





Flaggy posted:

My wife's aunt passed away and had 7-8 of them due to her illness and always buying the latest thing.

Aw, sorry.

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012





I want to read more Clark Ashton Smith, but it looks like there's about a billion different collections of his work. Anybody have a good definitive one they'd recommend? Or individual stories that are worth hunting down (since it looks like a lot of his stuff is online in some fashion)?

I see there's a Penguin Classics collection, which I'm usually pretty happy with, but it looks like a lot of it is his poetry, which if I'm honest, I don't care about reading at all.

gey muckle mowser
Aug 5, 2003

Do you know anything about...
witches?





Buglord

MockingQuantum posted:

I want to read more Clark Ashton Smith, but it looks like there's about a billion different collections of his work. Anybody have a good definitive one they'd recommend? Or individual stories that are worth hunting down (since it looks like a lot of his stuff is online in some fashion)?

I see there's a Penguin Classics collection, which I'm usually pretty happy with, but it looks like a lot of it is his poetry, which if I'm honest, I don't care about reading at all.

I have the Penguin Classics edition (The Dark Eidolon and Other Fantasies) and only maybe ~20% is poetry. I definitely enjoyed the book.

Ornamented Death
Jan 25, 2006

Pew pew!



MockingQuantum posted:

I want to read more Clark Ashton Smith, but it looks like there's about a billion different collections of his work. Anybody have a good definitive one they'd recommend? Or individual stories that are worth hunting down (since it looks like a lot of his stuff is online in some fashion)?

I see there's a Penguin Classics collection, which I'm usually pretty happy with, but it looks like a lot of it is his poetry, which if I'm honest, I don't care about reading at all.

Start here.

Anomalous Blowout
Feb 13, 2006

rock
ice
storm
abyss



It makes no attempt to sound human. It is atoms and stars.

*


MockingQuantum posted:

I want to read more Clark Ashton Smith, but it looks like thereís about a billion different collections of his work. Anybody have a good definitive one theyíd recommend? Or individual stories that are worth hunting down (since it looks like a lot of his stuff is online in some fashion)?

I see thereís a Penguin Classics collection, which Iím usually pretty happy with, but it looks like a lot of it is his poetry, which if Iím honest, I donít care about reading at all.

gey muckle mowser posted:

I have the Penguin Classics edition (The Dark Eidolon and Other Fantasies) and only maybe ~20% is poetry. I definitely enjoyed the book.

MQ, I think I know your tastes pretty well from our goon/discord interactions over the years. I think youíll like the Classics collection even with the poetry. And by god, I actually like the poetry. You might just find yourself enjoying it too.

Also re reading in the bathtub chat, I have an LG G6 waterproof phone and I get a lot of bathtub reading done that way. I never got bit by the kindle bug due to living in a country which Amazon basically doesnít service, so I donít know what Iím missing. Phone works fine for me.

Black Griffon
Mar 12, 2005


I think there's one subsection of the population that never needed an e-reader, one that tried one and found that they needed it and one that never tried one but still knew they needed one, and I'm part of the latter. I've never been happy reading books off screen, it's always been a strain, and when I got my kindle it was just like "ah, yeah this just works".

But gently caress Amazon, can't say that enough, this is not an advertisement. Steal a kindle.

nankeen
Mar 20, 2019

by Cyrano4747


i hoard physical books like a dragon, but also give them generously to friends and family, neither of which is quite as ceremonial with e-books

Antivehicular
Dec 30, 2011

I wanna sing one for the cars
That are right now headed silent down the highway
And it's dark and there is nobody driving
And something has got to give



nankeen posted:

i hoard physical books like a dragon, but also give them generously to friends and family, neither of which is quite as ceremonial with e-books

I believe this is technically classified as hobbit behavior

Anomalous Blowout
Feb 13, 2006

rock
ice
storm
abyss



It makes no attempt to sound human. It is atoms and stars.

*


I was surprised to see that Iain Reidís short novel Iím Thinking of Ending Things is getting a Netflix adaptation. It generated a decent amount of buzz back when it was released, but I was very whelmed by it at the time. It felt like most of the praise I saw for it describing it as so unique and mind-bending were reviews written by people who have apparently never read the gothic horror genre before. They were so excited by the concept of (twist ending spoilers ahoy) the real villain being MADNESS and the weird evil boyfriend and the worried girlfriend actually being two facets of the same mentally ill personís personality!

I donít know, maybe my standards for gothic horror are just much higher than ďmentally ill person trapped in an inescapable scary building / being haunted by weird localsĒ but it really didnít feel like anything groundbreaking to me. I still enjoyed it and itís well written enough, just a well-written retread of a story thatís been done better before. Instead of a creepy manor itís a deserted high school. Instead of a strange caretaker and maid itís Jakeís creepy parents. I had already figured out the twist by the time the narrative voice switched over and the reader was meant to realise that Jake had made the girlfriend up and their entire road trip was invented in his mind. It was telegraphed pretty well.

The more I think about it though, the more I think the story might actually work better as a film than as a book. Thereís some neat visuals they could play with. Anyway, to anyone considering reading it because itís been picked up by Netflix: itís a decent short horror read but I donít think anyone whoís a seasoned reader of the genre will find it as mindblowing as the general public.

pospysyl
Nov 10, 2012

SO EMBARRASSING



Anomalous Blowout posted:

I was surprised to see that Iain Reidís short novel Iím Thinking of Ending Things is getting a Netflix adaptation. It generated a decent amount of buzz back when it was released, but I was very whelmed by it at the time. It felt like most of the praise I saw for it describing it as so unique and mind-bending were reviews written by people who have apparently never read the gothic horror genre before. They were so excited by the concept of (twist ending spoilers ahoy) the real villain being MADNESS and the weird evil boyfriend and the worried girlfriend actually being two facets of the same mentally ill personís personality!

I donít know, maybe my standards for gothic horror are just much higher than ďmentally ill person trapped in an inescapable scary building / being haunted by weird localsĒ but it really didnít feel like anything groundbreaking to me. I still enjoyed it and itís well written enough, just a well-written retread of a story thatís been done better before. Instead of a creepy manor itís a deserted high school. Instead of a strange caretaker and maid itís Jakeís creepy parents. I had already figured out the twist by the time the narrative voice switched over and the reader was meant to realise that Jake had made the girlfriend up and their entire road trip was invented in his mind. It was telegraphed pretty well.

The more I think about it though, the more I think the story might actually work better as a film than as a book. Thereís some neat visuals they could play with. Anyway, to anyone considering reading it because itís been picked up by Netflix: itís a decent short horror read but I donít think anyone whoís a seasoned reader of the genre will find it as mindblowing as the general public.

I pretty much agree with this. My only quibble would be that I wouldn't call it gothic horror, exactly, but then I don't know that I have a specific genre in mind that it would fit. I would definitely recommend that people wait for the movie before reading the book. I also think that Plemons is very well cast as the lead.

Anomalous Blowout
Feb 13, 2006

rock
ice
storm
abyss



It makes no attempt to sound human. It is atoms and stars.

*


pospysyl posted:

I pretty much agree with this. My only quibble would be that I wouldn't call it gothic horror, exactly, but then I don't know that I have a specific genre in mind that it would fit. I would definitely recommend that people wait for the movie before reading the book. I also think that Plemons is very well cast as the lead.

I think Plemons is well cast in anything but yeah, he'll knock this particular role out of the park.

And yeah maybe calling it gothic horror was simplifying things a little but I felt it was structured very much like a traditional gothic horror tale and hit a lot of the same plot points.

No. 1 Juicy Boi
Jun 1, 2003

I CAN FEEL MYSELF ROT.


Buglord

I just found out Nathan Ballingrud will sign your books for free if you buy them from the local book store near where he lives :kiddo:

Ornamented Death
Jan 25, 2006

Pew pew!



COOL CORN posted:

I just found out Nathan Ballingrud will sign your books for free if you buy them from the local book store near where he lives :kiddo:

This is true of a lot of authors. If you're interested in signed copies, it pays to check their websites.

j. alfred moonrock
Nov 15, 2014


I actually just got back from a mini vacation in Asheville NC, and stopped by Malaprop's... sure enough, left with a signed copy of Wounds.

I loved NALM but I didn't think I'd enjoy Wounds since 'magical realism but with HELL STUFF' didn't seem quite up my alley. But I'm through the first two stories, and I'm loving it. The imagery of the babbling/rumbling skull in "The Atlas of Hell" is amazing, and "The Diabolist" was so sad and wonderfully imaginative.

Bilirubin
Feb 16, 2014

The sanctioned action is to CHUG!!!




Bleak Gremlin

j. alfred moonrock posted:

I actually just got back from a mini vacation in Asheville NC, and stopped by Malaprop's... sure enough, left with a signed copy of Wounds.

I loved NALM but I didn't think I'd enjoy Wounds since 'magical realism but with HELL STUFF' didn't seem quite up my alley. But I'm through the first two stories, and I'm loving it. The imagery of the babbling/rumbling skull in "The Atlas of Hell" is amazing, and "The Diabolist" was so sad and wonderfully imaginative.

Hang on to your butt then for the last story

Black Griffon
Mar 12, 2005


Yo what's good space horror?

gey muckle mowser
Aug 5, 2003

Do you know anything about...
witches?





Buglord

Black Griffon posted:

Yo what's good space horror?

Event Horizon, Alien, Jason X... there aren't a ton of really great ones. I like Sunshine, Europa Report, Last Days on Mars, and Apollo 18 but ymmv on those. Life was OK.

e: Lifeforce!

e2: this is not the thread I thought it was!

gey muckle mowser fucked around with this message at 16:44 on Jan 13, 2020

Black Griffon
Mar 12, 2005


I was thinking books though, but thanks anyway!

Edit: for reference, I've read Blindsight twice and I love it.

Black Griffon fucked around with this message at 16:38 on Jan 13, 2020

gey muckle mowser
Aug 5, 2003

Do you know anything about...
witches?





Buglord

Black Griffon posted:

I was thinking books though, but thanks anyway!

Edit: for reference, I've read Blindsight twice and I love it.

lol sorry I thought I was in the horror movie thread.

Yeah Blindsight is great. "The Voyage of the Space Beagle" by A. E. van Vogt is mostly sci-fi but it does have some good monsters and dangerous space stuff.

e: I liked Crescent by Phil Rossi too

gey muckle mowser fucked around with this message at 16:46 on Jan 13, 2020

StrixNebulosa
Feb 14, 2012

You cheated not only the game, but yourself.
But most of all, you cheated BABA


Black Griffon posted:

Yo what's good space horror?

More sci-fi horror with lovecraftian themes: Dry Salvages, Black Helicopters, Agents in Dreamland by Kiernan. All three novellas are real good.

Peter Watts' Starfish is incredible, but it uses the deep ocean instead of space.

Finally, borderline recs: Queen of Angels by Greg Bear has some horror elements and is set in the future. Luminous Dead is about caving horror in a sci-fi setting.

Sorry I don't have anything exact for you. :(

e: I haven't read it yet but Greg Bear's Hull Zero Three.
e2: Again, haven't read it yet: Salvation Day by Kali Wallace. If it's good post about it so I pick it up sooner.

StrixNebulosa fucked around with this message at 16:53 on Jan 13, 2020

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012





Hull Zero Three is good, not amazing. A neat concept with an okay ending and a couple of iffy hand-wavey plot details, but not enough to ruin the experience IMO

Ship of Fools/Unto Leviathan is another sci-fi horror favorite... that I'm iffy on. It has some really great moments and I love the setting and atmosphere, but the ending is weird. I'm not sure I'd call it terrible, I think others would, but it absolutely squanders a lot of the mystery and horror that was built up to that point.

I've seen Luminous Dead recommended in a couple places as horror, first and foremost, which I actually don't think does the book any favors. It's got some spooky moments (and probably does qualify as horror, period, if you're claustrophobic) but in the end some of the "horror" elements were kind of a let-down and I don't know I'd recommend it on its horror merits or lack thereof alone. I did enjoy the book, though. Not really directly related to the request for sci-fi horror, just thought I'd mention it.

Long story short, I wish there was more good sci-fi horror out there!


edit: so I did a search for sci-fi horror and just found out that Brian Evenson actually wrote two Dead Space books, Martyr and Catalyst (under BK Evenson) which is bizarre. On the one hand, yech licensed tie-ins, but on the other, Brian Evenson! Anybody read them? He's done a couple of pretty good, very weird sci-fi stories that I liked (The Warren, and... some other one, can't remember the name, but it was short)

MockingQuantum fucked around with this message at 17:09 on Jan 13, 2020

anilEhilated
Feb 17, 2014

But I say fuck the rain.



Grimey Drawer

MockingQuantum posted:

Ship of Fools/Unto Leviathan is another sci-fi horror favorite... that I'm iffy on. It has some really great moments and I love the setting and atmosphere, but the ending is weird. I'm not sure I'd call it terrible, I think others would, but it absolutely squanders a lot of the mystery and horror that was built up to that point.
This, although I'd say it is definitely worth reading.

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012





anilEhilated posted:

This, although I'd say it is definitely worth reading.

That's kind of my feeling, now that I've thought about it a bit. At the time, the ending really disappointed me (and still does, I should be clear) but with some time away from it, it's the cool, atmospheric moments that stand out to me, rather than the ending. That first facility they open up, on the first planet they land on, with all the bodies on hooks in the huge room... oof, still a chilling image.

szary
Mar 12, 2014


Black Griffon posted:

Yo what's good space horror?

'Obscura' by Joe Hart

Black Griffon
Mar 12, 2005


Thanks for all the recommendations! With both sci-fi and horror being occasionally tricky genres, I guess it's a given that good sci-fi horror might be hard to pin down, but I have a lot to go on here. Keep 'em coming if you've got 'em!

fez_machine
Nov 27, 2004



Black Griffon posted:

Yo what's good space horror?

"Voyager in Night" by C J Cherryh

Brian Evenson has done a lot under the name B. K. Evenson

fez_machine fucked around with this message at 20:27 on Jan 13, 2020

Black Griffon
Mar 12, 2005


Well, I finally finished NALM. I'd kept putting off the last story, perhaps out of no small degree of trepidation, perhaps because it's hard to end things sometimes. I think the wait made it even better though. In some ways, I feel that all the other stories built up to The Good Husband, and with all the varied strengths of the rest of the tales, this one felt the most like pure horror. Utterly magnificent.

North American Lake Monsters is loving good. Read it if you haven't (though who in this thread haven't?).

chernobyl kinsman
Mar 18, 2007

a friend of the friendly atom



Soiled Meat

ive been listening to the Magnus Archives and itís good

Bilirubin
Feb 16, 2014

The sanctioned action is to CHUG!!!




Bleak Gremlin

Black Griffon posted:

Well, I finally finished NALM. I'd kept putting off the last story, perhaps out of no small degree of trepidation, perhaps because it's hard to end things sometimes. I think the wait made it even better though. In some ways, I feel that all the other stories built up to The Good Husband, and with all the varied strengths of the rest of the tales, this one felt the most like pure horror. Utterly magnificent.

North American Lake Monsters is loving good. Read it if you haven't (though who in this thread haven't?).

The Good Husband is so magnificently :wtc: it is the perfect capstone to a thoroughly strong series of stories

nankeen
Mar 20, 2019

by Cyrano4747


Bilirubin posted:

The Good Husband is so magnificently :wtc: it is the perfect capstone to a thoroughly strong series of stories
yeah it had been a long time since i'd read a short story that left me feeling shellshocked

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



chernobyl kinsman posted:

ive been listening to the Magnus Archives and itís good

This podcast really is a ton of fun, and the actors are pretty impressive given the genre. The mix of anthology-style stories and long-running plot bits is good as well.

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012





a foolish pianist posted:

This podcast really is a ton of fun, and the actors are pretty impressive given the genre. The mix of anthology-style stories and long-running plot bits is good as well.

I liked it a lot, but then I think I hit a streak of so-so episodes and never really picked it up again. I can't remember which episodes, though. I guess it might be worth another try.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



In the later seasons, they got the guy who hosts the Pseudopod podcast to act, and he's very much not good at it. He's got a great host voice, but an actor he is not. Those bits get a bit grating.

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Black Griffon
Mar 12, 2005


On the other hand, the host/writer/main actor's parents act in the show and it's so wholesome and great and also good.

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