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Rolo
Nov 16, 2005

Hmm, what have we here?

Iím 80% through The Elementals and Iím going to want to know what of his to read next.

The supernatural bits of this book work so well with the geographical setting, I love it.

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Mel Mudkiper
Jan 19, 2012

It's not a sexual thing. Please don't think this is a sexual thing I just like mudkip and babies need diapers, that's how it works.

Blackwater is an investment but it is his peerless work imho

No. 1 Juicy Boi
Jun 1, 2003

#1 JUICY BOY



Buglord

Mel Mudkiper posted:

Blackwater is an investment but it is his peerless work imho

Yeah I'm about halfway through it and it's insanely good. I mean, it's 90% southern gothic family politics, and 10% terror, but it's still a really good read.

Mel Mudkiper
Jan 19, 2012

It's not a sexual thing. Please don't think this is a sexual thing I just like mudkip and babies need diapers, that's how it works.

COOL CORN posted:

Yeah I'm about halfway through it and it's insanely good. I mean, it's 90% southern gothic family politics, and 10% terror, but it's still a really good read.

Its also the closest in content to The Elementals in that it is set around the legacy of families and three neighboring houses and ghosts the traumatic legacy left behind by controlling mothers

They are so close in both when they were written and in the content that I suspect Elementals opened up a whole bunch of buried skeletons in his psyche he had to write Blackwater to get rid of

No. 1 Juicy Boi
Jun 1, 2003

#1 JUICY BOY



Buglord

Mel Mudkiper posted:

Its also the closest in content to The Elementals in that it is set around the legacy of families and three neighboring houses and ghosts the traumatic legacy left behind by controlling mothers

They are so close in both when they were written and in the content that I suspect Elementals opened up a whole bunch of buried skeletons in his psyche he had to write Blackwater to get rid of

I haven't read The Elementals yet, so hell yeah now I can't wait

Rolo
Nov 16, 2005

Hmm, what have we here?

COOL CORN posted:

I haven't read The Elementals yet, so hell yeah now I can't wait

Iím liking it more than I liked hill house.

COOL CORN posted:

Yeah I'm about halfway through it and it's insanely good. I mean, it's 90% southern gothic family politics, and 10% terror, but it's still a really good read.

Awesome. I love when an author clicks and itís just like ďnext book!Ē

Ariza
Feb 7, 2006


Did anyone finish the Peter Clines Threshold series? The fourth is audiobook only and I have a hard time with audiobooks if I'm not currently taking a long trip.

I really liked the first two books, enjoyed the third but it seemed to have nothing at all to do with the overarching narrative, especially after slowly trying to get through the fourth. They go back to older characters and stories and it's bizarre to me that a middle story is hundreds of years in the future on the loving moon. I really like the monsters though, so I keep going.

It's just a bizarre series.

No. 1 Juicy Boi
Jun 1, 2003

#1 JUICY BOY



Buglord

Man the greatest crime ever committed was the cover they chose for the Blackwater collected edition. The originals were so iconic.

Compare these gorgeous covers




To this cartoon nonsense

Black Griffon
Mar 12, 2005


COOL CORN posted:

Man the greatest crime ever committed was the cover they chose for the Blackwater collected edition. The originals were so iconic.

Compare these gorgeous covers




To this cartoon nonsense



that's a loving newgrounds narrative anime game rear end cover right there

Rolo
Nov 16, 2005

Hmm, what have we here?

drat Blackwater is 6 books?

And you all say Iíll like it if Elementals was an A+?

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012





Rolo posted:

drat Blackwater is 6 books?

And you all say Iíll like it if Elementals was an A+?

It's technically 6 books but they're all on the shorter side (by modern genre publishing standards), maybe like 100-200 pgs per book in paperback form if I had to guess.

And yeah if you dug Elementals it's pretty much a must read. Like others have said it's more kind of supernatural southern gothic family drama than out-and-out horror, but there are still some pretty chilling moments throughout.

Ornamented Death
Jan 25, 2006

Pew pew!



Rolo posted:

drat Blackwater is 6 books?

And you all say I’ll like it if Elementals was an A+?

Each one is pretty short.

Mel Mudkiper
Jan 19, 2012

It's not a sexual thing. Please don't think this is a sexual thing I just like mudkip and babies need diapers, that's how it works.

Aesthetically I preferred the original covers but I do think the Valancourt anthologized version is more "honest" to the story tbh

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



COOL CORN posted:

Two interesting Ballingrud news tidbits:

- Monsterland season 1 (the Hulu adaptation of NALM) wrapped filming on 2/10, so hopefully there's some sort of official announcement soon?
- He's nearing completion on his next book, "The Strange", and it's a "dark Martian fantasy" novel.

Ah, the Ghosts of Mars novelization is a good get

Rolo
Nov 16, 2005

Hmm, what have we here?

Ok I just finished Elementals. That was a great recommendation, it had me gripped and was exactly what I was asking for.

Kudos for the pick, chernobyl kinsman!

chernobyl kinsman
Mar 18, 2007

a friend of the friendly atom



Soiled Meat

i just keep recommending it bc i didnt really understand what was going on with the photo/drawing of the woman and the deformed baby and im hoping eventually someone explains it to me

Mel Mudkiper
Jan 19, 2012

It's not a sexual thing. Please don't think this is a sexual thing I just like mudkip and babies need diapers, that's how it works.

chernobyl kinsman posted:

i just keep recommending it bc i didnt really understand what was going on with the photo/drawing of the woman and the deformed baby and im hoping eventually someone explains it to me

I have a theory

There are actually two supernatural forces at play in the story one is that the family is cursed by the dead wife who ate her own baby. That is why the ending line of "these babies are Savages" is meant to suggest that they have inherited a sort of darkness from the family legacy that will pass down the generations.

The elementals, on the other hand, are simply a supernatural force of nature that are empowered by being near the curse. If the Savages were not near those houses, the Elementals would never show up or care. Its also why the oil company never had a problem with the area after the Savages sold the land. Its not enough for the elementals to be present, they have to be present around a darkness to empower them, which the Savages have


Alternatively, who cares spooky don't need answers

StrixNebulosa
Feb 14, 2012

You cheated not only the game, but yourself.
But most of all, you cheated BABA


A brief review of La Belle Fleur Sauvage: Plague of the Womb by Caitlin R Kiernan: fancily named novella with a cool cover from Dark Regions Press; of course I had to have it. It's very similar to Kiernan's other works for better or for worse -

- as a novella, similar to her other novellas you can tell it is desperate to be a novel. These are scenes that have been cut from a larger work and presented and they would work better if they had more space but they do not. While I forgive this in Agents of Dreamland and Black Helicopters (and not so much in Dry Salvages), I don't here because there's this sense of too much being left out, too many unaddressed plot threads. She built a living breathing dying world and made it feel like it has a lot of stories to tell, and then it's over.

- the trend of writing about writing returns. realistic perhaps as her characters start a journal with "i'm writing this because" and then meander, but I would appreciate if these bits were edited out.

- best scenes: the parade, the glimpses of the apocalypse in motion, the museum

- the chapter about how prostitution works in the dying world where people with wombs have to be "cut" and have to be scarred to prove it was hosed up. believable but hosed up.

- surprisingly gore filled for kiernan's works (not to say there isn't gore in the rest of her stuff) but also - interestingly - very little of the gore was due to the supernatural horror thing. it's mostly from humans being awful to themselves and each other.

Ultimately I enjoyed it but it's very much a novella for Kiernan fans only, as it has a lot of the hallmarks of her writing style.

Rolo
Nov 16, 2005

Hmm, what have we here?

Mel Mudkiper posted:

I have a theory

There are actually two supernatural forces at play in the story one is that the family is cursed by the dead wife who ate her own baby. That is why the ending line of "these babies are Savages" is meant to suggest that they have inherited a sort of darkness from the family legacy that will pass down the generations.

The elementals, on the other hand, are simply a supernatural force of nature that are empowered by being near the curse. If the Savages were not near those houses, the Elementals would never show up or care. Its also why the oil company never had a problem with the area after the Savages sold the land. Its not enough for the elementals to be present, they have to be present around a darkness to empower them, which the Savages have


Alternatively, who cares spooky don't need answers

I took it as a mini-twist that the babies had something off about them. Sorta opens the door to what youíre saying, that the family brings their own supernatural factors to the table. It would explain things like the mortar around the motherís casket being cracked in the mausoleum and the bird who doesnít talk saying one single ominous thing.

The girl eating that womanís eyes to gain her sight was pretty metal.

No. 1 Juicy Boi
Jun 1, 2003

#1 JUICY BOY



Buglord

Now that I'm done with Wounds, I would give anything for a Butcher's Table movie

escape artist
Sep 24, 2005

Slow train coming


COOL CORN posted:

Now that I'm done with Wounds, I would give anything for a Butcher's Table movie

I've been saving that story. Last thing he's published that I haven't read. I'm gonna be sad when I am done with it.

I think I'll get to it tonight.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


COOL CORN posted:

Now that I'm done with Wounds, I would give anything for a Butcher's Table movie


My exact same thought. I would love just to be in the room for the pitch.

No. 1 Juicy Boi
Jun 1, 2003

#1 JUICY BOY



Buglord

Spoilering my thoughts about Butcher's Table here

My favorite thing about Butcher's Table is how it sort of culminates ideas from all the other stories but also stands as entirely its own thing. You have the iron box monks from the first story, the lotus head which hearkens back to the flower headed girl from Skullpocket, the angels from The Visible Filth, and more ideas I'm sure. Yet at the same time all of those ideas seem original and fresh when they show up in Butcher's Table.

Ballingrud is really an amazing author. And as for it being his last thing, he has a short story in a collection coming out called Final Cuts edited by Ellen Datlow.

Conrad_Birdie
Jul 10, 2009


Iíve been salivating over the idea of a Butcherís Table movie since I finished Wounds. Done right, with the correct budget, it would be the coolest movie ever.

No. 1 Juicy Boi
Jun 1, 2003

#1 JUICY BOY



Buglord

Just finished up Blackwater. Overall I'd give books 1-4 a 5/5 and books 5-6 a 3/5. You get so invested in these core members of the Caskey family over the first few books but like, it's a story that takes place over 60 years, so naturally there's some turnover in the characters later on and I just... I didn't find myself as emotionally invested in the descendants of the family.

Overall though, the whole story was fantastic and it's really an incredible work of fiction for what it is, and despite it taking place over nearly 1000 pages of novellas and 60 years of in-story time, McDowell manages to stick the ending in a very poetic and poignant way that made me appreciate the journey all the more. It's an investment, but highly recommended.

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



I just got around to watching Wounds and it seems to be a fairly straightforward adaptation of The Visible Filth. I recall seeing a lot of complaints that the movie was misleadingly marketed or not what they expected... how so?

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




Fallom posted:

I just got around to watching Wounds and it seems to be a fairly straightforward adaptation of The Visible Filth. I recall seeing a lot of complaints that the movie was misleadingly marketed or not what they expected... how so?

some of the published reviews of it read that armie hammer plays his character like nothing more than a hollow shell - and that it was mostly a pretty meandering character drama. i loved it myself, because it is a faithful adaptation and his character is meant to be an absolute nothing. but i dunno how it was marketed really

Lil Mama Im Sorry
Oct 14, 2012

I'M BACK AND I'M SCARIN' WHITE FOLKS

Mel Mudkiper posted:

Ok, putting together a list


Night Film by Marisha Pessl
The Drowning Girl by Caitlin R. Kiernan
Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin
White is for Witching by Helen Oyeyemi
The Fisherman by John Langan
Song for the Unraveling of the World by Brian Evenson
The Toll by Cherie Priest
A Lush and Seething Hell by John Hornor Jacobs
Songs of a Dead Dreamer and Grimscribe by Thomas Ligotti
North American Lake Monsters by Nathan Ballingrud

Youíre the Aquarium guy so Iím pretty sure youíll really dig North American Lake Monsters

hallelujah
Jan 26, 2020

by LITERALLY AN ADMIN


i'm desperate to read aquarium too but again, capitalism

Untrustable
Mar 16, 2009







a foolish pianist posted:

Has anyone mentioned Bartlett's The Stay-Awake Men? It's a fantastic collection, up there with Evenson's short story collections.

EDIT: Or Jeremy Robert Johnson's Entropy in Bloom?

I picked up The Stay-Awake Men and so far it's very good.

SniperWoreConverse
Mar 20, 2010







Gun Saliva

So I always thought that Ligotti lived in Alaska for some reason. I guess Nethiscurial? Something about the vibe of the islands or whatever makes me think of that kind of climate. But I guess he lives in Florida, that's some black sloth country.

PsychedelicWarlord
Sep 8, 2016




Ligotti living in Florida makes perfect sense

chernobyl kinsman
Mar 18, 2007

a friend of the friendly atom



Soiled Meat

ligotti is clearly from the suburbs. you only get that kind of existential despair there

Catfishenfuego
Oct 21, 2008

Moist With Indignation


I'm reading Apple and Knife by Intan Paramaditha. It's more of a dark fairy tale Angela Carter vibe than full horror but the stories are engaging, punchy and it's cool to read stuff in this genre from the perspective of an Indonesian feminist author.

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012





What "classic" horror/gothic works are worth reading? I'm talking like 18th-19th century stuff. I've read Dracula, Frankenstein, Poe, Jekyll & Hyde, etc. basically all the ones that you'd run into normally if you were looking for "classic" horror literature.

But how are works like The Mysteries of Udolpho, The Castle of Otranto, The Monk, Melmoth the Wanderer, Sheridan Le Fanu, etc? I feel like someone said somewhere on SA that the first two, at least, were pretty rough to go back to, but I don't remember why exactly. Also, are there any other must-read early horror or gothic literature that maybe flies a bit under the modern radar?

chernobyl kinsman
Mar 18, 2007

a friend of the friendly atom



Soiled Meat

have you read wuthering heights

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012





chernobyl kinsman posted:

have you read wuthering heights

No, but I was just about to! I know shockingly little about Wuthering Heights so I kind of forgot it was a gothic novel.

Skyscraper
Oct 1, 2004

Hurry Up, We're Dreaming





SniperWoreConverse posted:

So I always thought that Ligotti lived in Alaska for some reason. I guess Nethiscurial? Something about the vibe of the islands or whatever makes me think of that kind of climate. But I guess he lives in Florida, that's some black sloth country.

you could say alaska is a northern border state, if not a northern border town

SniperWoreConverse
Mar 20, 2010







Gun Saliva

Uldolpho was not a one I was able to get into. Turn of the screw imo was not worth it either, I just can't really deal with the mindset of those people I guess.

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No. 1 Juicy Boi
Jun 1, 2003

#1 JUICY BOY



Buglord

Tommy Ligotti's "Special Plan for This World" is suicide right

I listened to Current 93's version of it this morning and now my mood for the day is ruined lol

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