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chernobyl kinsman
Mar 18, 2007

a friend of the friendly atom



Soiled Meat

brian keene was in a fire and is in a burn ward; he's started a gofundme to cover medical bills because he doesn't have health insurance

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Section 9
Mar 24, 2003



Hair Elf

I'm pretty sure I found this in the Cosmic Horror thread, but I just re-read this and it's really amazing, so I think worthy of a reposting here. "Ever feel like you care too much?" This one wrecked me.

https://www.tor.com/2015/09/16/please-undo-this-hurt-seth-dickinson/

In "House of Leaves" chat, I agree that the Truant story is one of the weaker parts, but there's also some interesting bits hidden within all of it (such as one particular letter from his mother.) It's one of the few books that I re-read every so often because I find stuff I didn't realize was there before every time.

bloom
Feb 25, 2017

YOSPOS


chernobyl kinsman posted:

raw shark texts is unironically good and its a criminal offense that Hall hasn't put out more in the last like 10 years

I'm hoping one day he's gonna reveal that writing terrible video games was just paying the bills while he secretly worked on another cool rear end book.

this broken hill
Apr 10, 2018

by Lowtax


ravenkult posted:

Elaborate.
it was just all dreary sub-fictionpress-quality trash

i feel bad about saying that because it's new less-exposed authors, but drat

Robot Wendigo
Jul 8, 2013



Again from this thread I picked up Dark Entries yesterday, and read the first story, The School Friend. It was wonderfully creepy, and I spent the afternoon today running errands thinking about it. I'm 52 years old and I can't believe this is the first time I've heard of this writer.

chernobyl kinsman
Mar 18, 2007

a friend of the friendly atom



Soiled Meat

Robot Wendigo posted:

Again from this thread I picked up Dark Entries yesterday, and read the first story, The School Friend. It was wonderfully creepy, and I spent the afternoon today running errands thinking about it. I'm 52 years old and I can't believe this is the first time I've heard of this writer.

yessss

welcome, brother

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012





That collection felt to me like it just got better and better with each story. Not sure if Aickman laid it out in that order himself, but whoever did it did a good job of sort of setting up the reader for increasingly strange stories.

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012





chernobyl kinsman posted:

any worthwhile short fiction about ghosts come out in the last couple of years?

Did you find an answer to this question anywhere else? I'm pretty curious about it myself.

Also any recs for good mystery-ish novels with interesting horror elements? Or alternatively, any horror novels with a mystery bent? I've been reading Lauren Beukes's Broken Monsters and it's scratching that itch, but I'm almost done and want more of that.

Robot Wendigo
Jul 8, 2013



MockingQuantum posted:

Also any recs for good mystery-ish novels with interesting horror elements? Or alternatively, any horror novels with a mystery bent? I've been reading Lauren Beukes's Broken Monsters and it's scratching that itch, but I'm almost done and want more of that.

I haven't read them yet, but John Connolly's Charlie Parker series might work for you.The first book in the series is Every Dead Thing.

Ornamented Death
Jan 25, 2006

Pew pew!



Robot Wendigo posted:

I haven't read them yet, but John Connolly's Charlie Parker series might work for you.The first book in the series is Every Dead Thing.

This is a solid recommendation. That said, the horror elements are very light at first, but slowly ramp up as the series progresses.

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment
I wouldn't have any appointment



Grimey Drawer

NPR is asking for help in compiling the 100 best horror novels. Here's where you can contribute.

I've already put in my nominations.

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012





Franchescanado posted:

NPR is asking for help in compiling the 100 best horror novels. Here's where you can contribute.

I've already put in my nominations.

I really like to contribute to these sort of things, but ironically I always end up looking up some other "best of" list because I can never think of recommendations off the top of my head.

At the risk of the thread turning into its own nightmare brand of a best-of list, I'd be curious to hear what people nominate.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Pistol_Pete posted:

A much better and unjustly much-neglected novel is The Shaft, by David Schow, which I read recently. Written in the late 80's, The Shaft is set in Chicago in the depths of winter and it's a gritty crime thriller where the supernatural elements are only slowly and subtly introduced (most of the key characters don't realise that they're actually starring in a horror story until it's FAR too late...).

This is a beautifully well-written book: I've read plenty of godawful horror, so I know something good when I see it. The key characters are deftly drawn and you really start to care about them, even the shithead drug dealer Cruz, who flees to Chicago after successfully daring his bosses girlfriend to leap from a hotel roof into the pool while they're all shitfaced drunk (you can probably guess how that turns out). Also, look at this front cover. LOOK AT IT:



In short, this book owns and everyone should read it.

I picked this up and finished it last night, and drat is it just visceral and nasty. The writing really gets you down into the grotesque and fleshy squishiness of the horror in a way that's unusual, especially for that era of cheap horror paperbacks.

Also, the author loves him the gently caress out some cocaine. That drug, especially, makes the book just ooze late 80s, in a similar way that Koja's The Cipher (which you should also read if you haven't) just oozes early/mid 90s.

Two thumbs up - everybody read this book.

a foolish pianist fucked around with this message at 23:23 on Jun 12, 2018

A human heart
Oct 10, 2012



Pistol_Pete posted:

The worst part for ME is when Hell is properly described for the 1st time and some of the demons are riding about the City of the Damned on bicycles. loving bicycles. I'm hoping I hallucinated that particular detail so please let me know if I'm mistaken.

A much better and unjustly much-neglected novel is The Shaft, by David Schow, which I read recently. Written in the late 80's, The Shaft is set in Chicago in the depths of winter and it's a gritty crime thriller where the supernatural elements are only slowly and subtly introduced (most of the key characters don't realise that they're actually starring in a horror story until it's FAR too late...).

This is a beautifully well-written book: I've read plenty of godawful horror, so I know something good when I see it. The key characters are deftly drawn and you really start to care about them, even the shithead drug dealer Cruz, who flees to Chicago after successfully daring his bosses girlfriend to leap from a hotel roof into the pool while they're all shitfaced drunk (you can probably guess how that turns out). Also, look at this front cover. LOOK AT IT:



In short, this book owns and everyone should read it.

Pretty cool this dude wrote a book about his cock with a pic on the cover and everything

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

A human heart posted:

Pretty cool this dude wrote a book about his cock with a pic on the cover and everything

Yup, sounds like David J. Schow.

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012





So I know they're not strictly-speaking horror, but tell me of gothic fiction. I haven't read a ton of it beyond the big ones (Dracula, Frankenstein, Poe stuff) and I'm reading Jane Eyre right now, but what else is a must-read? And who is writing excellent gothic fiction in recent memory?

Also I remember picking up Castle of Otranto, Mysteries of Udolpho, and The Monk at various times in college, but never getting very far in any of them. Are they worth reading? I actually kind of liked The Monk, but the first two struck me as mostly being important because they were sort of the precursors to a lot of really great Gothic fiction. Melmoth the Wanderer is the other one I meant to try but never got around to.

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

18th-century stuff is pretty hard to get through, I don't blame you one bit

Daphne du Maurier is an early-to-mid-20th century Gothic author and you might find her works more accessible. Three of her novels - Rebecca, My Cousin Rachel, and Jamaica Inn - were adapted into films, as were her short stories "The Birds" and "Don't Look Now."

Back to the 18th century, Vathek by William Beckford is unusual among Gothics because it's set in Arabia and draws heavily on Orientalist tropes. It's about a Caliph who renounces Islam and commits a series of evil acts to gain supernatural knowledge, which works out about as well as you'd expect.

gey muckle mowser
Aug 5, 2003

Do you know anything about...
witches?





Buglord

I'd say Shirley Jackson's We Have Always Lived in the Castle counts as Gothic, and it's extremely good.

Le Fanu's Carmilla is a classic if you haven't read it yet.

I also enjoyed Elizabeth Gaskell's Gothic Tales a lot.

Flopstick
Jul 10, 2011



Top Cop

The Castle Of Otranto is great if you like heroines so feeble they faint because they are overcome by the beauty of a sunset. (Or is that Udolpho... it's been a long time tbh.)

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012





Flopstick posted:

The Castle Of Otranto is great if you like heroines so feeble they faint because they are overcome by the beauty of a sunset. (Or is that Udolpho... it's been a long time tbh.)

Oh yep, now that you say it that was a big reason I never finished one of them--- but I honestly can't remember which one it was, either.

But enough about problematic 18th century gothic lit....

I just finished I'm Thinking of Ending Things and it was very good, pretty creepy book, not at all what I expected. I don't want to say much more about it than that as it's a book that's probably best experienced blind. Thanks Franchescanado for suggesting it in whatever thread that was. It's definitely on my shortlist of good recent horror novels.

Up next, Kill Creek! At least as far as horror is concerned, I have like two other books I need to finish before I get to it.

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment
I wouldn't have any appointment



Grimey Drawer

MockingQuantum posted:

I just finished I'm Thinking of Ending Things and it was very good, pretty creepy book, not at all what I expected. I don't want to say much more about it than that as it's a book that's probably best experienced blind. Thanks Franchescanado for suggesting it in whatever thread that was. It's definitely on my shortlist of good recent horror novels.

Glad you enjoyed it!

Relevant Tangent
Nov 18, 2016

Tangentially Relevant



There was a short story about owl monsters or possibly bear monsters vs a gang of outlaws. One of the outlaws shot a baby monster, maybe. Does that ring a bell?

gey muckle mowser
Aug 5, 2003

Do you know anything about...
witches?





Buglord

Relevant Tangent posted:

There was a short story about owl monsters or possibly bear monsters vs a gang of outlaws. One of the outlaws shot a baby monster, maybe. Does that ring a bell?

Those Who Went Remain There Still by Cherie Priest

Len
Jan 21, 2008

Pouches, bandages, shoulderpad, cyber-eye...

Bitchin'!




I'm enjoying Hex and I'm curious if the original version has a translation? I'm curious what the differences between the English and not-English are. Apparently the ending is different for us?

chernobyl kinsman
Mar 18, 2007

a friend of the friendly atom



Soiled Meat

Len posted:

I'm enjoying Hex and I'm curious if the original version has a translation? I'm curious what the differences between the English and not-English are. Apparently the ending is different for us?

there's no translation of the original but various people have posted summaries of the ending online; if you google around a bit you can find it. it's not that good

Ornamented Death
Jan 25, 2006

Pew pew!



Len posted:

I'm enjoying Hex and I'm curious if the original version has a translation? I'm curious what the differences between the English and not-English are. Apparently the ending is different for us?

I posted this in the cosmic horror thread some time ago:

quote:

I found this posted in the comment section of a review from three months ago. I do not know how accurate it is.

Okay. So. The ending! MASSIVE SPOILERS ALL AROUND of course.
This is slightly complicated, since apparently he's changed the names, as well?

The ending is kind of long, I'd say it starts when the youngest son is admitted. But skipping to the end of the ending: it turns into into an orgy of torture like an Hieronymus Bosch painting of Hell. This is, of course, imagery we are all more or less familiar with over here, since the guy was Dutch and we all learned about him in
school. Nice echo of the 'just a village like all those you know so well'-horror trope.

The dad is led through all these horrors and recognizes each of them as a mirror image of things the villagers did
to the witch (I thought this was a bit far fetched at times, your mileage may vary). In the end, he realises that he must choose the thing he loves most. He runs between dozens of pot holes filled with people while it rains burning coals, carrying a single pot hole cover, finds wife + youngest son but jumps in the seemingly empty hole next to them, because we've know which son he would choose since chapter two or so.

He then wakes up in his own house to someone thumping the front door, and doesn't open it, because he knows that even if it is the person he wants it to be, it wouldn't end well.

And then the author apologizes for throwing us into a pit of despair.

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

Anybody play interactive fiction (like Zork and its descendants)? I'm working on Vespers by Jason Devlin again and it's spooooky. You can play it online or download it for free here: http://ifdb.tads.org/viewgame?id=6dj2vguyiagrhvc2

Don't trust Cecilia. Alternately, do trust Cecilia

GlassEye-Boy
Jul 12, 2001


Has anyone read 14 by Peter Clines? Starts off as a great haunted/mystery house book when the protagonist moves into a new apartment but then transforms into cosmic horror.

Len
Jan 21, 2008

Pouches, bandages, shoulderpad, cyber-eye...

Bitchin'!




GlassEye-Boy posted:

Has anyone read 14 by Peter Clines? Starts off as a great haunted/mystery house book when the protagonist moves into a new apartment but then transforms into cosmic horror.

I did the audiobook a few years back and enjoyed it. He wrote another book that's a semi-sequel The Fold that I also liked.

SniperWoreConverse
Mar 20, 2010







Gun Saliva

Section 9 posted:

I'm pretty sure I found this in the Cosmic Horror thread, but I just re-read this and it's really amazing, so I think worthy of a reposting here. "Ever feel like you care too much?" This one wrecked me.

https://www.tor.com/2015/09/16/please-undo-this-hurt-seth-dickinson/

In "House of Leaves" chat, I agree that the Truant story is one of the weaker parts, but there's also some interesting bits hidden within all of it (such as one particular letter from his mother.) It's one of the few books that I re-read every so often because I find stuff I didn't realize was there before every time.

I got to one of her letters and I was like "for fucks sake" and threw the book

Raw shark texts was good, but I let someone borrow it and never got it back. I keep thinking of some kind of situation where there's some kind of stuff in the environment that makes things weird and crazy, and they need to pump some sort of mist into the atmosphere for local protection, sort of reminiscent of the sick land if there was a defence from it.

I can't remember if those are the same book or if it's another one I read directly after RST, anyone know?

E: no I looked it up, it was "the gone away world." I think I associate them because the have slightly similar covers and I got them at the same time. Good but not real horror-y, although there's horror components.

SniperWoreConverse fucked around with this message at 20:56 on Jun 21, 2018

Robot Wendigo
Jul 8, 2013



I've started House of Leaves and Truant is already getting on my nerves. The footnotes haven't tripped into Infinite Jest levels of irritation yet. The Navidson material so far is good.

Robot Wendigo fucked around with this message at 00:45 on Jun 23, 2018

Solitair
Feb 18, 2014

This statement is a lie!


I started reading The Familiar recently, but that's not horror (as far as I know). No footnotes this time.

chernobyl kinsman
Mar 18, 2007

a friend of the friendly atom



Soiled Meat

i read four volumes of that stupid thing for some godforsaken reason and the memory of it fills me with blind rage

Solitair
Feb 18, 2014

This statement is a lie!


chernobyl kinsman posted:

i read four volumes of that stupid thing for some godforsaken reason and the memory of it fills me with blind rage

how many raindrops

Robot Wendigo
Jul 8, 2013



chernobyl kinsman posted:

i read four volumes of that stupid thing for some godforsaken reason and the memory of it fills me with blind rage

I was half looking at that series for when I finish HoL. Please give me details of the rage inducement.

Ornamented Death
Jan 25, 2006

Pew pew!



Robot Wendigo posted:

I was half looking at that series for when I finish HoL. Please give me details of the rage inducement.

I haven't read it, but at least one potential source of rage is that it likely won't ever be finished due to poor sales.

Solitair
Feb 18, 2014

This statement is a lie!


Ornamented Death posted:

I haven't read it, but at least one potential source of rage is that it likely won't ever be finished due to poor sales.

Aw, that sucks. Still understandable, because I'm checking them all out from the library instead of paying $75 for the whole first season.

chernobyl kinsman
Mar 18, 2007

a friend of the friendly atom



Soiled Meat

Robot Wendigo posted:

I was half looking at that series for when I finish HoL. Please give me details of the rage inducement.

It just sucks. It's stupid and it sucks. I'm angry that I wasted hours of my life and like $60 reading four volumes of it - four volumes of it - instead of doing anything else

Drunken Baker
Feb 3, 2015

VODKA STYLE DRINK


I remember lending my mum House of Leaves, just remembering that I loved it because I have a HUGE soft spot for spatial horror. I mean, I just loving adore it. It was only after she got about halfway through I remembered the cringe inducing porno shagging scenes. Hahaha.

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Robot Wendigo
Jul 8, 2013



chernobyl kinsman posted:

It just sucks. It's stupid and it sucks. I'm angry that I wasted hours of my life and like $60 reading four volumes of it - four volumes of it - instead of doing anything else

Thanks, Chernobyl. I will avoid it.

I'm finding it a chore to get through the Truant sections of House of Leaves. I just want to smack him.

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