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Untrustable
Mar 16, 2009







Finished The Deep by Nick Cutter. Pretty decent deep ocean horror. Anything involving deep ocean horror is cool though. Anyone have any recs? I think the only thing I have left in my "to read" pile is Night Of The Mannequins.

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StrixNebulosa
Feb 14, 2012

You cheated not only the game, but yourself.
But most of all, you cheated BABA


Untrustable posted:

Finished The Deep by Nick Cutter. Pretty decent deep ocean horror. Anything involving deep ocean horror is cool though. Anyone have any recs? I think the only thing I have left in my "to read" pile is Night Of The Mannequins.

My favorite deep ocean horror is Starfish by Peter Watts. I have not read the sequels and hear they're bad.

anilEhilated
Feb 17, 2014

But I say fuck the rain.



Grimey Drawer

StrixNebulosa posted:

My favorite deep ocean horror is Starfish by Peter Watts. I have not read the sequels and hear they're bad.
I have read them and confirm they are bad. Definitely check out Starfish, though.

You could also try Dead Sea by Tim Curran for a considerably campier but still enjoyable sea horror book (carnivorous seaweed! giant squids! aliens!).

anilEhilated fucked around with this message at 16:24 on Oct 23, 2020

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



anilEhilated posted:

I have read them and confirm they are bad. Definitely check out Starfish, though.

You could also try Dead Sea by Tim Curran for a considerably campier but still enjoyable sea horror book (carnivorous seaweed! giant squids! aliens!).

Dead Sea is awesome at first, but it really drags out and ends poorly. I felt like it could have been a great novella at half its length.

Clipperton
Dec 20, 2011


Grimey Drawer

a foolish pianist posted:

Dead Sea is awesome at first, but it really drags out and ends poorly. I felt like it could have been a great novella at half its length.

This also describes Curran's Hive quite well

Ornamented Death
Jan 25, 2006

Pew pew!



That describes pretty much everything Curran has written.

High Warlord Zog
Dec 12, 2012


Untrustable posted:

Finished The Deep by Nick Cutter. Pretty decent deep ocean horror. Anything involving deep ocean horror is cool though. Anyone have any recs? I think the only thing I have left in my "to read" pile is Night Of The Mannequins.

Caitlin Kiernan's Houses Under The Sea (and a lot of the other stories in the collection this story lends it's name to)

High Warlord Zog fucked around with this message at 11:29 on Oct 24, 2020

Xiahou Dun
Jul 16, 2009
BUTTS





Untrustable posted:

Finished The Deep by Nick Cutter. Pretty decent deep ocean horror. Anything involving deep ocean horror is cool though. Anyone have any recs? I think the only thing I have left in my "to read" pile is Night Of The Mannequins.

Is that the one with the "fig men"? (Not a spoiler cause it's both obscure and like 20 pages in.)

I loved some of the stuff. Like the diary bit with the bees was amazing. Then there was a lot that made me go kind of "enh" but was still good enough to read. But the ending was just awful. If it had been a physical book rather than on a tablet I would have thrown it, that's how bad it was.

I don't know too much deep-sea ah we're in the Mariana Trench horror, but I stan The Fisherman and it's at least evocative of the horrors of the depths. Plus you can learn so much about Upstate New York! :)

Untrustable
Mar 16, 2009







Xiahou Dun posted:

Is that the one with the "fig men"? (Not a spoiler cause it's both obscure and like 20 pages in.)

I loved some of the stuff. Like the diary bit with the bees was amazing. Then there was a lot that made me go kind of "enh" but was still good enough to read. But the ending was just awful. If it had been a physical book rather than on a tablet I would have thrown it, that's how bad it was.

I don't know too much deep-sea ah we're in the Mariana Trench horror, but I stan The Fisherman and it's at least evocative of the horrors of the depths. Plus you can learn so much about Upstate New York! :)

Yeah it's got the fig men. I'm honestly sitting here and cannot remember the ending. I finished the book like a week or less ago. What the hell. I remember everything leading up to it. The dog dying, the soldier lady dying, his brother becoming part of the ambrosia, and then...ummm...it must have been a poo poo ending for my brain to just say "it was bad after that stuff, don't worry about it."

Edit: I went back and read the last chapter. Yeah that ending was poo poo.

Untrustable fucked around with this message at 21:55 on Oct 26, 2020

unpacked robinhood
Feb 18, 2013

by Fluffdaddy


I remember the ending being suitably hosed up for the story, I wouldn't say it was poo poo imo.

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



It's basically just The Tommyknockers and man that is not a good pull

muscles like this!
Jan 17, 2005




Chuck Hogan and Guillermo del Toro put out a new book a couple of months ago, The Hollow Ones. I picked it up the other day because it was on sale and having recently finished it I would say that it was just okay. The main problem the book has is that there's not a lot of tension as the main characters and the monster they're chasing barely interact. There's a scene at the beginning of the book and then a fight at the end but between they're just kind of doing their own thing. In the end the book feels like it is just the backstory for how the two main characters meet and start working together and that the real story will be in the sequels.

Bilirubin
Feb 16, 2014

The sanctioned action is to CHUG!!!




Bleak Gremlin

Just want to say that I've read few horror novels as well written as T. E. Grau's I Am The River. I can't recall whether its been discussed here or not but search is hosed right now it seems. Its well worth the read.

Ornamented Death
Jan 25, 2006

Pew pew!



I've loved everything I've read by Ted and I wish he was more prolific.

Bilirubin
Feb 16, 2014

The sanctioned action is to CHUG!!!




Bleak Gremlin

Ornamented Death posted:

I've loved everything I've read by Ted and I wish he was more prolific.

the weird thing was that he liked my "review" of the book at the 30% read point, and when I finally posted it he liked two additional updates.

I mean the book was great and my review reflected that but I've never been stalked by an author like that.

Sounds like a good idea for a novel in fact...

Yarrington
Jun 13, 2002

While I will admit to a certain cynicism, I am a nay-sayer and hatchet man in the fight against violence. I pride myself in taking a punch and I'll gladly take another.

Does anyone have links/articles/discussions of Matthew Bartlett's Creeping Waves/Gateway to Abomination anywhere? I had drifted off from the whole northeastern cult/lovecraftian genre a long time ago since it had basically become kitsch but I picked up Gateways on a whim and it was like getting slapped in the face. Really exciting stuff, I can't believe he managed to make that milieu scary and also pack in some surprisingly funny dark jokes. Creeping Waves wasn't quite as stunning, the longer stories and greater coherence were a bit of a double edged sword, but still very good. Can't believe I hadn't read more about it, it just felt very fresh.

MockingQuantum
Jan 20, 2012





Yarrington posted:

Does anyone have links/articles/discussions of Matthew Bartlett's Creeping Waves/Gateway to Abomination anywhere? I had drifted off from the whole northeastern cult/lovecraftian genre a long time ago since it had basically become kitsch but I picked up Gateways on a whim and it was like getting slapped in the face. Really exciting stuff, I can't believe he managed to make that milieu scary and also pack in some surprisingly funny dark jokes. Creeping Waves wasn't quite as stunning, the longer stories and greater coherence were a bit of a double edged sword, but still very good. Can't believe I hadn't read more about it, it just felt very fresh.

Honestly I've never seen them so much as mentioned anywhere but here. I haven't read either but I have Gateway to Abomination (and another one, but not Creeping Waves).

Ben Nevis
Jan 20, 2011


Bilirubin posted:

the weird thing was that he liked my "review" of the book at the 30% read point, and when I finally posted it he liked two additional updates.

I mean the book was great and my review reflected that but I've never been stalked by an author like that.

Sounds like a good idea for a novel in fact...

I've run into that. Stephen Graham Jones has a tendency to like reviews of his books. Thuy Da Lam liked my updates, reviews, and commented on each, though her book only has 8 reviews total. I've had a few other low-review authors like reviews of their books.

a foolish pianist
May 6, 2007

(bi)cyclic mutation



Yarrington posted:

Does anyone have links/articles/discussions of Matthew Bartlett's Creeping Waves/Gateway to Abomination anywhere? I had drifted off from the whole northeastern cult/lovecraftian genre a long time ago since it had basically become kitsch but I picked up Gateways on a whim and it was like getting slapped in the face. Really exciting stuff, I can't believe he managed to make that milieu scary and also pack in some surprisingly funny dark jokes. Creeping Waves wasn't quite as stunning, the longer stories and greater coherence were a bit of a double edged sword, but still very good. Can't believe I hadn't read more about it, it just felt very fresh.

I've read both of them (and Stay-Awake Men), and I'd love to talk about them here. Gateway to Abomination just oozes menace in a really extraordinary way.

Bilirubin
Feb 16, 2014

The sanctioned action is to CHUG!!!




Bleak Gremlin

Gateways was good. I also liked If it Bleeds

Untrustable
Mar 16, 2009







I finished A Head Full Of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay last night and that book will gently caress you up.

Bilirubin
Feb 16, 2014

The sanctioned action is to CHUG!!!




Bleak Gremlin

Ben Nevis posted:

I've run into that. Stephen Graham Jones has a tendency to like reviews of his books. Thuy Da Lam liked my updates, reviews, and commented on each, though her book only has 8 reviews total. I've had a few other low-review authors like reviews of their books.

Yeah I had Padgett like my review of Shiloh, but liking it after it gets posted is normal. What was odd was liking it before I had written anything. I could have sent it down in flames!

Fate Accomplice
Nov 30, 2006




muscles like this! posted:

Chuck Hogan and Guillermo del Toro put out a new book a couple of months ago, The Hollow Ones. I picked it up the other day because it was on sale and having recently finished it I would say that it was just okay. The main problem the book has is that there's not a lot of tension as the main characters and the monster they're chasing barely interact. There's a scene at the beginning of the book and then a fight at the end but between they're just kind of doing their own thing. In the end the book feels like it is just the backstory for how the two main characters meet and start working together and that the real story will be in the sequels.

I dunno if I could read another thing by them after The Strain series. it was so much better on TV than in print.

High Warlord Zog
Dec 12, 2012


Come on, are we really going to act like del Toro had anything to do with the text on the pages of his co-authored books? Those things are clearly TOM CLANCY (who wrote nothing) with GUY WHO ACTUALLY WROTE THE BOOK type deals

JOSEPH SAMOAN
Jun 13, 2010



Untrustable posted:

I finished A Head Full Of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay last night and that book will gently caress you up.

The last 20 pages of that book felt like experiencing a car crash in slow motion, it was honestly amazing

Untrustable
Mar 16, 2009







Reaverbot posted:

The last 20 pages of that book felt like experiencing a car crash in slow motion, it was honestly amazing

Yeah I felt genuinely frightened and then like I just got my rear end kicked badly.

Oxxidation
Jul 22, 2007


reading T.E. Grau's The Nameless Dark after he was namedropped earlier and this is extremely good so far, probably the best collection i've read since NALM

Artelier
Jan 23, 2015




So I bought a Kindle recently and thought I'd try to read a horror ebook. I looked in the latest page for suggestions and

Untrustable posted:

I finished A Head Full Of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay last night and that book will gently caress you up.


Reaverbot posted:

The last 20 pages of that book felt like experiencing a car crash in slow motion, it was honestly amazing

I binged this in one day and NOOOOOOOOO

Untrustable posted:

Yeah I felt genuinely frightened and then like I just got my rear end kicked badly.

Same. Same.

leftist heap
Feb 28, 2013



Fun Shoe

Untrustable posted:

I finished A Head Full Of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay last night and that book will gently caress you up.

Yeah this is one of my favorites. I thought Home Before Dark by Riley Sager was pretty close and kinda similar, although quite as good.

remigious
May 13, 2009

Destruction comes inevitably :rip:


Hell Gem

Ok I clearly need to read A Headful of Ghosts again because I remember thinking the ending was corny and overall not enjoying it very much.
Also reviews are so incredibly helpful for authors and will most likely make their day :3:

N-N-N-NINE BREAKER
Jul 12, 2014



Oxxidation posted:

reading T.E. Grau's The Nameless Dark after he was namedropped earlier and this is extremely good so far, probably the best collection i've read since NALM

I didn't realize it til looking him up that I'd already read "transmission" in lost signals. I thought it was okay, maybe leaned a little hard on the Great Old Ones stuff. But holy moly The Nameless Dark starts strong. Can't wait for the rest of it, although it'll be hard to top tubby

Oxxidation
Jul 22, 2007


N-N-N-NINE BREAKER posted:

I didn't realize it til looking him up that I'd already read "transmission" in lost signals. I thought it was okay, maybe leaned a little hard on the Great Old Ones stuff. But holy moly The Nameless Dark starts strong. Can't wait for the rest of it, although it'll be hard to top tubby

after finishing it i'm sorry to report that the latter half of the collection is also much too fixated on lovecraft. a few of the cthulu-mythos stories approach it from novel angels ("White Feather" is a standout) but nothing in the collection came close to "The Screamer" and there's at least one of them ("Mr Lupus") that's downright terrible

still, not a bad hit/miss ratio for a horror collection

FPyat
Jan 17, 2020


Is there any good apocalyptic/disaster/all-of-society-is-hosed-up horror? I find a horror story's predicament to be more unsettling if it endangers a larger number of people, the fear not being isolated to a cabin or location but ever-present - specifically, I have in mind the way an entire town is doomed in Junji Ito's Uzumaki. One thing that seems like it'll appeal to me is the podcast I Am In Eskew.

FPyat fucked around with this message at 13:03 on Nov 11, 2020

Oxxidation
Jul 22, 2007


FPyat posted:

Is there any good apocalyptic/disaster/all-of-society-is-hosed-up horror? I find a horror story's predicament to be more unsettling if it endangers a larger number of people, the fear not being isolated to a cabin or location but ever-present - specifically, I have in mind the way an entire town is doomed in Junji Ito's Uzumaki. One thing that seems like it'll appeal to me is the podcast I Am In Eskew.

Scorch Atlas is an entire collection of this

Muninn
Dec 29, 2008


Oxxidation posted:

after finishing it i'm sorry to report that the latter half of the collection is also much too fixated on lovecraft. a few of the cthulu-mythos stories approach it from novel angels ("White Feather" is a standout) but nothing in the collection came close to "The Screamer" and there's at least one of them ("Mr Lupus") that's downright terrible

still, not a bad hit/miss ratio for a horror collection

I agree, Grau is at his best when he is writing cosmic horror without invoking the Cthulhu mythos: "The Screamer", "Return of the Prodigy", even "Twinkle, Twinkle". "The Mission" is a very good story that could have been a great story if it went in a different direction. Incidentally, "The Nameless Dark" is the only book I've reviewed on Amazon since Grau reached to me on Goodreads asking if I would.

I am almost finished with Michael Wehunt's "Greener Pastures" and it is mostly excellent. "Onanon" and "Deducted From Your Share in Paradise" are unsettling stories that affected me in a similar way to Ballingrud's NALM. "October Film Haunt: Under the House" made me feel actual dread in a way that written fiction rarely does. Maybe because I've been binging found footage horror movies this last month--which I find especially frightening--and the approach is similar.

Relax Or DIE
May 8, 2006

"My brain is amazing! It's full of wrinkles, and... Uh... Wait... What am I trying to say?"


Oxxidation posted:

Scorch Atlas is an entire collection of this

I'll second Scorch Atlas.

The Vosgian Beast
Aug 13, 2011

Business is slow

Muninn posted:

I agree, Grau is at his best when he is writing cosmic horror without invoking the Cthulhu mythos: "The Screamer", "Return of the Prodigy", even "Twinkle, Twinkle". "The Mission" is a very good story that could have been a great story if it went in a different direction. Incidentally, "The Nameless Dark" is the only book I've reviewed on Amazon since Grau reached to me on Goodreads asking if I would.

I am almost finished with Michael Wehunt's "Greener Pastures" and it is mostly excellent. "Onanon" and "Deducted From Your Share in Paradise" are unsettling stories that affected me in a similar way to Ballingrud's NALM. "October Film Haunt: Under the House" made me feel actual dread in a way that written fiction rarely does. Maybe because I've been binging found footage horror movies this last month--which I find especially frightening--and the approach is similar.

The titular story for Greener Pastures is the scariest story I've ever read. I don't know why it creeps me out on the level it does, but it really works on me.

Len
Jan 21, 2008

Pouches, bandages, shoulderpad, cyber-eye...

Bitchin'!




FPyat posted:

Is there any good apocalyptic/disaster/all-of-society-is-hosed-up horror? I find a horror story's predicament to be more unsettling if it endangers a larger number of people, the fear not being isolated to a cabin or location but ever-present - specifically, I have in mind the way an entire town is doomed in Junji Ito's Uzumaki. One thing that seems like it'll appeal to me is the podcast I Am In Eskew.

The Magnus Archives maybe? The fifth season is definitely that but you very much need to listen to the previous ones to get it.

filmcynic
Oct 30, 2012


FPyat posted:

Is there any good apocalyptic/disaster/all-of-society-is-hosed-up horror? I find a horror story's predicament to be more unsettling if it endangers a larger number of people, the fear not being isolated to a cabin or location but ever-present - specifically, I have in mind the way an entire town is doomed in Junji Ito's Uzumaki. One thing that seems like it'll appeal to me is the podcast I Am In Eskew.

If you're in the mood for splatterpunk, Skipp & Spector's The Bridge should work nicely.

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Bilirubin
Feb 16, 2014

The sanctioned action is to CHUG!!!




Bleak Gremlin

I just started The Road, not sure whether it would qualify as "horror" yet or not

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