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berth ell pup
Mar 20, 2017

I am a business magnet.


Yes, radiator should definitely be a priority repair. I know you're working on getting the funding, but if that tank outlet blows off and you dump all your coolant, you're going to be in deep poo poo.

I was getting slightly-high temperature readings with the factory, 28 year old, radiator in my 240, particularly driving in traffic after using the interstate. I replaced the radiator and they are back to normal- actually slightly low. Maybe there was some blockage or something in the radiator, I don't know, but it helped.

Replace the hoses too, obviously. Those type of hose clamps you have are the better kind than the ones with holes in the steel for the worm screw or whatever it's called, get some replacements of the same type as on the car now.

berth ell pup fucked around with this message at 19:29 on Jul 21, 2018

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LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

Also shop around or hit some of the fanatic message boards and see if any of the MB aftermarket suppliers have come up with an all-aluminum radiator for this thing. If so, it could be less expensive and even if not will last basically forever with proper cooling system maintenance.

Also whenever replacing hex drive fasteners I always splurge on the high grade stuff. 12.9 or higher in metric, the metal is a lot tougher and will be less likely to strip out.

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

New tubes and hoses are ordered, appointment is booked with radiator repair dudes, and another appointment is booked with screw destroying dudes (who'll also see to it that my timing chains are replaced). Next time I fire up the old V8, it's for a trip to a bunch of highly professional wrench wielders.

In the meantime, someone requested moar pics of the interior, so let me show you around my ride!



This is my truck. There aren't many like it, and this one is mine. In all, less than 500 of these bad boys were built by Mercedes-Benz between 1993 and 1994. Now this was way back before "SUV" had really cemented itself as a word in the public consciousness; back when a truck was a truck, a man was a man, and a man with a truck was a manly man with a forest or workshop or something. If he wasn't, he was some sort of British Lord who hadn't gone bankrupt maintaining his Vast Tracts of Land yet, and those rare specimens all opted for extremely patriotic Land Rover Defenders. Which I personally think is part of the reason there aren't any such lords left today.



However, as it turned out, someone high up in Stuttgart noticed that there was a segment of their very, very best customers who, for some inexplicable reason, kept buying Gelšndewagens. A small portion of the global elite, those who'd usually motor about in the back of a very long S-class, seemed partial to the idea of permanent four-wheel-drive. Could it be that these people mayhaps would be interested in all leather cow interior, and big brown baby seal eyes for headlights? Yeah?

A plan was hatched, 500 crates carrying the high-end M117 engine were shipped off to Graz, Austria, and Mercedes-Benz salespeople started making phone calls.



"Excuse me, Sir, but I couldn't help notice you've bought at least one G-wagon from me. Since you've also purchased at least one S-class from me, I was wondering, could I perhaps interest you in a very special blend of the two? Imagine, what if I could offer you a highly exclusive and monstrously powerful all-terrain automobile, but complete with the burled walnut interior you know and love from the luxury line of Mercedes-Benz vehicles?"



"Of course we'll throw in our very best Blaupunkt cassette player and radio, complete with the automatically extending antenna!"

And so the 500 GE was born. No advertising campaigns, no slogans; simply direct contact with a selected clientele which might be interested in a sports car with high utility scores. A... "sports/utility vehicle", if you will. The Germans never referred to it as such, of course, but there you have it. It was the last G-wagon not to be called a "G-class", and the first to carry a V8 engine straight from the Graz factory. When production ended, it would be another four years until we'd see the birth of the G500.



The car had a four-speed automatic transmission, power steering, power seats, power windows, power mirrors, power... pretty much everything. And it all works to this day. It was also, as you can see, lavishly decorated with that insanely costly burled walnut I've mentioned. The stuff is everywhere: Handbrake, shift stick, center console...



And yes, second shift stick. This one lets you choose between G, for "Gelšnde", or "terrain"; N, which I assume is for "Neutral" or "Normal" or whatever; and S, for "Strasse", meaning "street". I've never had to move it from the "S" position. Something has been mounted next to it, and I can't quite figure out what.



As an side, here's a picture of that $934 strip of wood on the driver side door, and the place where it's missing on the passenger side. $934. Did I mention I considered buying a grove of walnut trees to just make it myself? Seems cheaper.



Judging from the rest of the interior, I could be a millionaire just selling off strips of wood. Anyway, it's a pretty well equipped car, for a '93. As one of the largest moving items on four wheels, silly things like "airbags" wasn't deemed necessary, so that was left out. If there are any G-connoisseurs here, you might have noticed another missing detail, though. Notice the buttons for the differentials. Notice how there are two of them. But all G-wagons are supposed to have three, right?

All G-wagons do have three locking differentials. All, except this one. Odd.

See, I've heard a couple different explanations for this. One story goes that the Mercedes engineers figured the extremely limited customer base for this model would never take them outside city limits, and if they did, they'd certainly not go off the Autobahn. Additionally, even most offroad enthusiasts rarely had any need for the front differential, so these upper-class city folk would never miss it. A simple cost-saving measure. I'm not sure I buy it, though. No expense was spared building these things; one of the customers was the exiled king Constantine II of Greece. Also, switching away from the construction framework that they already used for every single other G-wagon made in order to save money on some gears... I'm not sure it'd end up saving any money at all, in the end.

That's why I'm more inclined to buy into the other explanation: They weren't sure the front differential would be able to handle all the power from the five-liter M117. In this story, I've been told that in order to prevent either catastrophic failures with the engine ripping the differential apart, or to prevent excessive maintenance costs, they engineered the front differential out. If this was the case, it was later proven very wrong by more modern models, kicking 5-6-700 horsepower around without sweating.

Either way, it's missing. I don't miss it much, though. I've got something better.



Embossed door sills! This became a regular thing for G-wagons later on, but as far as I know was a brand new thing back in the early 90's. Which is kind of a pain in the rear end, because the sill at the tail door on my car is slightly bent, and thus one more thing I need to replace for my restoration project. The cheapest one I've found is like $250. For a sill. Yeah.

So. That's my car, and I'm sticking with it. There's a lot left to do, but current condition isn't too bad, and I hope I'll be able to use it as my daily driver come winter. Looking good so far, unless I need to shell out $3000 for a goddamn radiator, anyway.

meltie
Nov 9, 2003

Not a sodding fridge.

Oh wow. That thing is bloody beautiful.

berth ell pup
Mar 20, 2017

I am a business magnet.


Now that's interesting, and also I'm now starting to understand it. G-wagens didn't come here for a long time after that, and they're always decked out with huge motors and all the fancy Benz stuff and the accompanying price tag. I always assumed they were just upmarket all along, didn't realize they started off more utilitarian originally.

Considering how obscure this car is, it's pretty remarkable that Mercedes will even offer to sell you that piece of very expensive walnut at all.

everdave
Nov 14, 2005

For The Record...

Mercedes-Benz will rebuild anything at anytime for any of their vehicles if you pay the asking price.

KozmoNaut
Apr 23, 2008

Happiness is a warm
Turbo Plasma Rifle


Grimey Drawer

Try pricing out the hydraulic power window control for a MB 600 "Grosser".

berth ell pup
Mar 20, 2017

I am a business magnet.


everdave posted:

Mercedes-Benz will rebuild anything at anytime for any of their vehicles if you pay the asking price.

I guess. Didnít some guy send a gullwing SL to be rebuilt by the factory a few years ago?

everdave
Nov 14, 2005

For The Record...

Yep that is what I was thinking of, but they really will supply anything.

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

Thanks, guys! Yeah, it's pretty special, but MB will truly sell you anything if you've got the money. That's good news for me, as some parts are pretty hard to find for just my car. G-wagons aren't really uncommon here per se, but a huge percentage are the old W460 models made up to 1989, or refurbished ex-military vehicles. Diesel reigns supreme, and the most common models are probably the 300, 240 and 350, in that order (all diesel).

By the way, my parts shop botched something in their system, but I've found AutohausAZ to stock at least some of what I need. Shipping costs are a bitch, but their prices for OE parts seem reasonable, so I was wondering if they're worth giving my money to?

Edit: As a bonus, here's some horrific noise from my engine compartment (no fade-in, it cuts straight into being noisy; you've been warned)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTsXYGg-sP0

First 10 seconds is the original sound from right before I started doing stuff to it; last 10 seconds is what it sounded like after replacing the first two injector valves. It idles better, if not yet good, but two weeks from now I'll hopefully have fixed those last six injectors. Also I'm just going to assume that awful hissing noise is a vacuum leak.

Pursesnatcher fucked around with this message at 20:53 on Jul 24, 2018

Kurten
May 28, 2001

100% less banned. 50% more sober. 0% less bitter. NOW WITH LOWER BLOOD PRESSURE!

Thank you for the interior pics!

Thats a lot of buttons and switches for a fussy old bastard like me. That said however...I find that interior beautiful. Not just the classy (!) wood grain, but the simple lines of it. I even like the slab style back seats. They are simple and clean. That interior is great all around! Except the blaupunkt tape deck. I have owned one once before...what a pile of dogshit. Worst $300+ dollar option ever.

But yeah, that interior, that "rolling cinder block" exterior, off road/big-fuckin-pile-of-snow capability...I like this vehicle a lot.

Cheers!

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





AutohausAZ is legit. I bought a few things from them for my Volvo years ago, back when they would do will call.

glyph
Apr 6, 2006



Pursesnatcher posted:

Edit: As a bonus, here's some horrific noise from my engine compartment (no fade-in, it cuts straight into being noisy; you've been warned)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTsXYGg-sP0

First 10 seconds is the original sound from right before I started doing stuff to it; last 10 seconds is what it sounded like after replacing the first two injector valves. It idles better, if not yet good, but two weeks from now I'll hopefully have fixed those last six injectors. Also I'm just going to assume that awful hissing noise is a vacuum leak.

Is that a valve adjustment noise? I don't know enough about these engines- Chain? Belt? Anything variable (timing)? Somehow I doubt anything is variable, doesn't this v8 architecture date back to the 30s or something?

Does the noise get better once the engine warms up? Alternately, is the clacking worst on a cold start (first thing in the morning)?

glyph fucked around with this message at 18:06 on Jul 25, 2018

cursedshitbox
May 20, 2012

Your rear-end wont survive my hammering.



Fun Shoe

glyph posted:

Is that a valve adjustment noise? I don't know enough about these engines- Chain? Belt? Anything variable (timing)? Somehow I doubt anything is variable, doesn't this v8 architecture date back to the 30s or something?


M117. 71-92. single chain, straight timing, mechanical lifters.

I can't really tell anything. Maybe lifter noise?

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

Hydraulic lifters, unless the previous owner got robbed twice. Or, at least, they call the lifters "hydro-elements" in Norwegian. I guess it... might be the chain? It does seem to rattle at high revs, as I mentioned, so that's why I'm getting it replaced. The high-pitched background noise in the video does sound a lot more like air escaping, though, at least in person.

E: Ok poo poo I just listened to the video myself with that in mind, and it sounds a godawful lot like a chain. I haven't for the life of me been able to pinpoint where the noise actually originates when down in the engine; it's like it's coming from the air flow sensor, but when I put my head close to it, it seems to be coming from someplace else. drat.

Noise is pretty much the same no matter the temperature, by the way.

Pursesnatcher fucked around with this message at 19:40 on Jul 25, 2018

meltie
Nov 9, 2003

Not a sodding fridge.

Some MB engines of the era needed chain guides replacing, and yeah, chains were known for stretching. In bad cases, stretched chains were known to wear grooves in the sides of the chain cover

Terrible Robot
Jul 2, 2010

FRIED CHICKEN


Slippery Tilde

I have always loved Gelandewagens, thanks for sharing your journey with yours.

Ferremit
Sep 14, 2007
if I haven't posted about MY LANDCRUISER yet, check my bullbars for kangaroo prints

Weíve got a pair of 2017 Gwagen Utes at work, and the drat things look practically IDENTICAL to that thing. Even down to the interior layout. Ours just donít have carpet or walnut accents

And cost AU$118K a piece

You Am I
May 20, 2001

I will decide who posts John Howard pictures in this thread and the circumstances in which they post.


meltie posted:

Some MB engines of the era needed chain guides replacing, and yeah, chains were known for stretching. In bad cases, stretched chains were known to wear grooves in the sides of the chain cover

I have heard of that as well, especially for the V8s.

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

meltie posted:

Some MB engines of the era needed chain guides replacing, and yeah, chains were known for stretching. In bad cases, stretched chains were known to wear grooves in the sides of the chain cover

Well that's more than a little unnerving :s

Even more glad I booked that appointment now. Looking up chain guides, they're made from plastic!? I'll never be able to understand the logic here. There are other parts like that as well, brittle little plastic things where metal would have made a lot more sense. Mine seems to have been swapped about nine years and 50k miles ago, but from the receipts I have, chain doesn't seem to have been replaced ever.

I also realize that what it sounds like in person is a hair dryer. That's why I've made the connection "must be rushing air".

ionn
Jan 23, 2004

Din morsa.

Grimey Drawer

meltie posted:

Some MB engines of the era needed chain guides replacing, and yeah, chains were known for stretching.

Not sure about MB, but many many engines where it's said that "the chain has stretched", it really hasn't but it's all down to worn out guides, malfunctioning tensioners, or just some wear on chain and sprockets, all of which will make the chain seem "too long" despite it not being a single millimeter longer than a new one. Some people then cheap out and only replace the chain and nothing else, which typically solves exactly fuckall.

tl;dr: don't cheap out. if you replace the chain, replace everything it touches.

Also gently caress plastic chain guides forever.

Ferremit
Sep 14, 2007
if I haven't posted about MY LANDCRUISER yet, check my bullbars for kangaroo prints

Some chains do legitimately stretch in length- the timing chain on my brothers CJ lancer stretched nearly 3/4Ē of an inch until the MIVEC system couldnít compensate any more and it ceased to run properly.

Apparently the tech at Mitsubishi could turn the cams the best part of 1/4 of a turn before the slack got taken up. Known issue too...

STR
May 12, 2006

I thought I was a nice jester


Pursesnatcher posted:

Even more glad I booked that appointment now. Looking up chain guides, they're made from plastic!? I'll never be able to understand the logic here. There are other parts like that as well, brittle little plastic things where metal would have made a lot more sense. Mine seems to have been swapped about nine years and 50k miles ago, but from the receipts I have, chain doesn't seem to have been replaced ever.

Yuuuuuuuup. This isn't just a MB thing. This is pretty much every engine with chain-driven overhead cams.

Some engines will go forever before the guides or tensioners fail. Some - see Toyota's 22R series of engines, and (not quite as bad, but close) Nissan's KA24E - have them as more of a regular maintenance item. Ignore the rattling too long, and they chew through the timing cover (which, helpfully, has coolant passages).

If you want to know of a real nightmare - one where the engineers truly should have been executed - look up Ford's 4.0 SOHC V6. See, the engine started life as a typical overhead valve (cam in block) V6, and it was a pretty reliable engine back then, and a decent performer for its day. When Ford decided to make an overhead cam version, they used essentially the same block, changed the camshaft out for a jackshaft... ran a timing chain from the crank to the cam-turned-jackshaft, then ran another chain to one of the cams. But no, that wasn't enough. You see, they cheaped out on the head design, and (mostly) flipped the other head around. Then they stuck a timing chain on the back of the engine, driven by the cam-turned-jackshaft, to run the cam on the other head.

You wanna guess which chain guides fail first? I'll give you a hint: getting to the most failure-prone guides requires removing the engine from the vehicle. And if you ignore it long enough, it WILL jump timing and run like poo poo (best case anyway... usually they self destruct - and I can name at least one AI regular who had hers jump timing).

This isn't as bad as the timing chain setup that VAG/Audi is so fond of on their V-engines, but there's a lot more Ford 4.0 SOHCs on the road (at least in the US) vs VAG stuff.

And of course, timing chain stretch is a real issue too (even on a traditional cam-in-block, overhead valve engine), but on most engines, it's more because of wear and tear than anything else (unless you're Ferremit's brother).

STR fucked around with this message at 06:27 on Jul 26, 2018

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

Well poo poo. I guess I better order up some new guides and stuff too. At least one camshaft has been replaced already (probably twice, I don't think they touched the right side one), they miiiight have changed the gear while they were at it. Oh well, the guy doing the job is apparently some kind of M117 magician who's done this procedure a bajillion times; hopefully he knows what to replace...

ionn
Jan 23, 2004

Din morsa.

Grimey Drawer

STR posted:

Nissan's KA24E - have them as more of a regular maintenance item. Ignore the rattling too long, and they chew through the timing cover (which, helpfully, has coolant passages).

Hello.



When I took this engine apart (junkyard mid-90's KA24E, allegedly about 170000km on it), I found most of the chain guide in pieces at the bottom of the oil pan, and the chain was just under halfway through in mining it's way into the water passage. The original chain guide was plastic, the replacement one was metal with a plastic surface molded onto it.
The source of the problem is the tensioner that pushes the guide rail against the chain. It's hydraulically driven by engine oil pressure and typically works fine, but it has a spring in it to provide tension at startup before there is oil pressure. That spring breaks, causing the chain to rattle and flop about for a second or two every time you start the engine, and that rattling will break the plastic chain guide. I have no idea how long this thing was driven with a broken chain guide or how long it would have had left before water and oil had met.

In all, a properly built timing chain system truly should be a part that never needs replacing for the life of the engine, but so many engines have some little engineering defect making them a replacement item with a lot of hassle involved compared to a regular old timing belt.

glyph
Apr 6, 2006



Pursesnatcher posted:

Well poo poo. I guess I better order up some new guides and stuff too. At least one camshaft has been replaced already (probably twice, I don't think they touched the right side one), they miiiight have changed the gear while they were at it. Oh well, the guy doing the job is apparently some kind of M117 magician who's done this procedure a bajillion times; hopefully he knows what to replace...

Before you go shotgunning parts at this, it looks like your valves, while hydraulically lifted, are also adjustable. Might be best to leave the m117 magician to it- donít ask any leading questions.

A valve adjustment, even one as fucky as this one looks to be, is going to be a shitload cheaper than changing a timing chain, guides and all of that.

E: 50k miles, even in metric countries with classic German hardware isnít THAT much. Donít throw good money at bad.
E2: your video before and after messing with 2/8 injectors also seemed to have quieted the... valve slapping noise I was hearing (like a diesel).
E3: slow down.
E4: you can use a long screwdriver like a stethoscope to isolate where the noise is coming from- hold one end to the valve cover, and the other to your temple or somewhere else bony on your head and probe around.

glyph fucked around with this message at 07:44 on Jul 26, 2018

STR
May 12, 2006

I thought I was a nice jester


ionn posted:

When I took this engine apart (junkyard mid-90's KA24E, allegedly about 170000km on it), I found most of the chain guide in pieces at the bottom of the oil pan, and the chain was just under halfway through in mining it's way into the water passage. The original chain guide was plastic, the replacement one was metal with a plastic surface molded onto it.
The source of the problem is the tensioner that pushes the guide rail against the chain. It's hydraulically driven by engine oil pressure and typically works fine, but it has a spring in it to provide tension at startup before there is oil pressure. That spring breaks, causing the chain to rattle and flop about for a second or two every time you start the engine, and that rattling will break the plastic chain guide. I have no idea how long this thing was driven with a broken chain guide or how long it would have had left before water and oil had met.

Yup, I've torn into a few KA24Es now.

GM's gen 1 Ecotec family has a similar issue with the tensioner. Spring breaks in the tensioner, no more tension on a cold start. Usually the guides are fine, and GM somehow figured out that hey, this thing might need occasional service. So they put the tensioner in the timing cover. It just screws in, though you do have to pull the valve cover, get a long piece of wood, and give the firewall side timing chain guide a solid THUMP (hammer meets wood) to get the spring to release after replacement.

Oh yeah, if that engine family loses oil pressure, however brief, they're almost guaranteed to jump timing.

Too bad they also decided "hey, let's run the water pump off of the timing chain... nobody should ever need to replace it" on an engine primarily used in FWD applications.

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

glyph posted:

Before you go shotgunning parts at this, it looks like your valves, while hydraulically lifted, are also adjustable. Might be best to leave the m117 magician to it- donít ask any leading questions.

A valve adjustment, even one as fucky as this one looks to be, is going to be a shitload cheaper than changing a timing chain, guides and all of that.

E: 50k miles, even in metric countries with classic German hardware isnít THAT much. Donít throw good money at bad.
E2: your video before and after messing with 2/8 injectors also seemed to have quieted the... valve slapping noise I was hearing (like a diesel).
E3: slow down.
E4: you can use a long screwdriver like a stethoscope to isolate where the noise is coming from- hold one end to the valve cover, and the other to your temple or somewhere else bony on your head and probe around.

Wow, thanks, this is really sound advice. I'll try taking it to heart. Valve adjustment is a good idea, I'll simply ask him to have a look at my valves and see if they seem in order. As for the chains, that's still going; I've got 75k miles/120k km of history on paper for this thing, and it's never been changed in that time. It's really weird, with all the other stuff that's been done, but it's the same story with the injectors. All valves were swapped out just six years and 30k miles ago, for instance, and the whole engine has been taken more or less apart at least twice.

Slowing down is likely the best bit of advice, though. It's surprisingly easy to get carried away!

glyph
Apr 6, 2006



Ferremit posted:

Some chains do legitimately stretch in length.

*sorry for the level of minutiae and overall length of this post*

gently caress yeah they do. I just went through this, my 2007 accord, inspire for the global types, was pulling a p0341 (cam and crank sensors out of phase) on first start in the morning. In its defense, it DOES have 285k on it. Yes, miles. As the day went on, it was fine, no codes. I had a good idea it was a stretched chain, and the spring in the [when running] hydraulic chain tensioner wasn't up to the task.

Like a dipshit, I lifted off the valve cover on a cold engine to check the timing, and when I cranked the engine over (plugs out, by hand), I heard the dreaded BZZZZZZZP of a chain skipping over cam teeth. I thought I was able to get it back in time, but, nope. When cranking the starter, I'm pretty sure I had some valves and pistols in the same place. Best I can figure, the tensioner wasn't up for it, and the valve springs calmed the, um, can over in a way that the constant torque of the starter or a running motor wouldn't.

A junkyard head and timing chain later- only thing I bought was coolant and the cheapest Amazon head gasket I could find. I did, however check the compression on junkyard motors, cranking by hand, and checked the head bolts, and head flatness (working in a machine shop has perks)- they were in spec. I'm about to close on a house with a garage and a nice, smooth slab, and a new engine is probably in the cards sooner than later, but I wasn't about to swap an engine on gravel, in 95f weather. Sorting [what seemed to be] bent valves for a day of wrenching and less than $100USD seemed like a pretty good move to me.

Check this out:



On the left is my chain, 285k of k24a8, the middle is an '03 accord with unknown mileage (digital dashes, and no jump packs allowed makes for some serious mystery). The right, and best came from an '04 acura tsx that must have had it's chain replaced- the crank bolt was the only one in the yard my weaker impact could budge, so I had a bunch it had been done, only once removed could I see the chain guides had a '13 date stamp. Felt pretty smart on that one.



Seriously, my chain was like a full link longer, check out how the pins fall court of phase as you work down from the bolt hanging the chains.


TL;DR: gently caress yeah timing chains stretch:

glyph fucked around with this message at 13:25 on Jul 26, 2018

KozmoNaut
Apr 23, 2008

Happiness is a warm
Turbo Plasma Rifle


Grimey Drawer

Well yeah, bicycle and motorcycle chains absolutely stretch (and it's the best indicator for wear), so I dunno why people think other chains don't stretch.

Terminus Est
Sep 30, 2005

Motorcycle Miliitia

I was under the impression that it wasn't the links stretching as much as the rollers wearing causing the chain to elongate. The whole being bathed in filtered oil in the engine vs covered in road grime on the motorcycle being the main difference in expected lifetimes.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

Yeah the term "chain stretch" is a colloquialism, it's not really stretching. Usually the pins wear down and the holes wear oval, which adds up if all the links are doing it, which they do. .001" of wear is not much for a single pin but multiply it by 100 links and now you're looking at .1" of "stretch".

JoshGuitar
Oct 25, 2005


Pursesnatcher posted:

The main job, however, remains those last six injectors Ė and the screws holding them in place.

First things first: You get out your power drill, put a 2,5 mm drill bit on the end, and make a hole.



Then, you stick your 2 mm screw extractor on a 3/8" ratchet, and break the extractor clean off inside said hole.



You then get in your daily driver, race over to the place where you bought the drat things, and get a new set. You then ruin one drill bit trying to make a hole through the old extractor, give up, mount your spare 2,5 mm drill bit, and move on to the next screw. You drill a hole in the next screw over...



...and then promptly break a second extractor clean off inside that screw as well.

I've successfully used an EZ-Out exactly one time in my life. Weird thing is it was on an exhaust stud that broke off flush in a big block Chevy cylinder head; just about the last place I expected that to work out.

Pursesnatcher posted:

That yellow gunk dripping off everything is lanolin; I had the whole darn thing coated extensively both underneath and in every conceivable opening.

I've actually never seen somebody undercoat a car with lanolin, but it seems so obvious now. Living in the steel buckle of the rust belt, I'll have to start doing that. Do they use pure lanolin, or something like Fluid Film?

berth ell pup
Mar 20, 2017

I am a business magnet.


BMW V8 chains from the early 00s "stretch" and eventually the plastic guides break and it all goes to hell rapidly, as far as i can tell with my 2002 BMW M62TUB or whatever it is. I paid so little for the car I don't feel like doing any PM on it and I don't really like it much so I'm just waiting for some extremely expensive failure to occur and then scrap it and buy another cheap car and rinse and repeat. But it is definitely A Thing on German V8s.

Of course this car will probably spite me for 30k more miles and I'll be stuck in a dated old BMW getting 17 mpg for what seems life forever.

berth ell pup fucked around with this message at 02:19 on Jul 27, 2018

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

glyph posted:



Seriously, my chain was like a full link longer, check out how the pins fall court of phase as you work down from the bolt hanging the chains.


TL;DR: gently caress yeah timing chains stretch:


All right, that does it. I'm going to ask them to let me bring my leftover chains home in a doggy bag. It's gonna be measuring tape time!

JoshGuitar posted:

I've actually never seen somebody undercoat a car with lanolin, but it seems so obvious now. Living in the steel buckle of the rust belt, I'll have to start doing that. Do they use pure lanolin, or something like Fluid Film?

I guess it's Fluid Film, applied by high pressure. You don't want it going on everything though, like the exhaust, since it's going to smell like wet sheep for a week if you do.

Ferremit
Sep 14, 2007
if I haven't posted about MY LANDCRUISER yet, check my bullbars for kangaroo prints

Fun Fact- The intersection of the South Australian, Northern Territory and Queensland borders here in Australia is Called Poeppels Corner, After Augustus Poeppel who surveyed it in the mid 1880's.



Back in the days before GPS, to measure out long distances, they used chains- 100 links, 66 feet long, that they would drag out over the terrain, mark the end, then drag it past, mark that end and rinse and repeat. In the middle of the Australian Desert. In Summer.

So i turns out after you drag a chain over the countryside from the intersection of the New South Wales, South Aus and Queensland border, all the way up to Haddon Corner and across to Poeppels Corner, you end up wearing your surveying chain out so badly that the point they originally measured as being correct wound up being close to 150m further west than it actually is!

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Seems legit, and also sounds like a hellish job. Four Corners (intersection of Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico) is just shy of 550m away from where it actually "should" be.

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

New month!

New money!

New monthly car fixing budget!



So yeah, my M117 guru gave me a call today, and his assessment, after a quick look-over without opening'er up, is that my chains are fine. The noise I had myself convinced was the rattling of a slack chain sounds to him like the furious, unhealthy ticking of the lifters for my rocker arms.

This is just a little absurd.

As mentioned, the P.O. spent on this car; a healthy chunk of which went into replacing a grand total of 32 (!) rocker arms, all 16 lifters, all intake and exhaust valves, and both camshafts, in just a few short years. On four different occasions he went in to get half of the rockers in the engine replaced, and did the same thing twice for the lifters. Unless all of this was just on one half of the engine, if they've gone to poo poo again, I'll start thinking this specific engine is cursed.

For now, I've decided to try a deep cleanse of the engine first; wasting tremendous amounts of oil getting the insides nice and shiny. After I told the guy about the scope of the P.O's repairs, he suggested this as a possible, maybe, perhaps-with-some-luck fix as an alternative to swapping them all out again Ė so you know, why not. I'm not very hopeful though.

On a happier note, professional people with professional tools are going to go to work on the accursed screws first thing tomorrow Ė so at least I've got a full set of clean, working injectors to look forward too. I also got a nice box of flexible new sneks and stuff all ready to go!



It's an adventure!

everdave
Nov 14, 2005

For The Record...

Yeah sounds about right for a used super premium luxo limited G Wagen. Good luck!

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Grakkus
Sep 4, 2011



This happened to a friend's m103 when the mechanic replacing the lifters didnt bother filling them with oil before putting them in, they all wore out in record time. So its possible the PO had a lovely, negligent mechanic rather than a cursed engine.

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