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Chris James 2
Aug 9, 2012



The remake has some appeal, Naomi Watts is good and it's kinda a trip seeing Tim Roth in such a vulnerable role. But I also prefer the original over it

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Kvlt!
May 19, 2012

DIG THROUGH THE DITCHES
AND BURN THROUGH THE WITCHES



I have no problem with subtitles but also love Naomi Watts so im torn ;-;

Timeless Appeal
May 28, 2006


I think eventually watch both, but start with the original.

The original is a little sloppier, but I think the fact that you're not likely to really recognize the actors really helps the movie. They just feel like a real family being tormented. I think they is some low budget-ness that also works better in the original. Like the living room scenes in the remake where most of the games happen are well shot with dynamic lighting. But the flatter lighting of the original just makes it feel like you're in this normal living room with the overhead light on.

It's definitely a movie I got more out of the second time and since they're so similar, watch the original and then go to the remake.

Kvlt!
May 19, 2012

DIG THROUGH THE DITCHES
AND BURN THROUGH THE WITCHES



sounds good to me im going with that plan

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

"Real life is messy, inconsistent, and it's seldom when anything ever really gets resolved."



Funny Games is good but I'm not a huge fan of it simply because it is kind of a indictment against horror movies in general. Just kind of makes me pissed off which is kind of the point of the film. Its very effective.

Hollismason fucked around with this message at 02:17 on May 20, 2021

pospysyl
Nov 10, 2012

SO EMBARRASSING



Just saw In the Earth, loved it. It's definitely not as grounded as I assumed based on the marketing and the reviews I skimmed. The antagonists of the movie have very colorful personalities and there's tons of fun horror movie mistakes, like characters wandering off alone in dangerous situations or trusting strangers they shouldn't. The way it's filmed mostly in handheld close-up gives it more of an adventurous tone than an intimate or psychological one. The trip imagery is used very sparingly, but to great effect.

Timeless Appeal posted:

I think eventually watch both, but start with the original.

The original is a little sloppier, but I think the fact that you're not likely to really recognize the actors really helps the movie. They just feel like a real family being tormented. I think they is some low budget-ness that also works better in the original. Like the living room scenes in the remake where most of the games happen are well shot with dynamic lighting. But the flatter lighting of the original just makes it feel like you're in this normal living room with the overhead light on.

It's definitely a movie I got more out of the second time and since they're so similar, watch the original and then go to the remake.

It's funny you mention that because nearly all the actors in the movie previously appeared in other movies in the Haneke-verse. It adds to the intertextuality of it.

veni veni veni
Jun 5, 2005

Clunk! Clunk Clunk!



Saying 28 Days Later isn't a zombie movie is not only the gooniest thing I have read all day, but does a disservice to 28DL as the movie that pretty much single handedly reinvented zombies into what they are today and reignited public interest (probably way too much) in a genre that was quarantined into Joe Bob Briggs midnight shows. Like, barely a single piece of media that involves zombies in the last 20 years doesn't owe at least a little to 28 Days later. Most of it owes a lot.

dorium
Nov 5, 2009

If it gets in your eyes
Just look into mine
Just look into dreams
and you'll be alright
I'll be alright






Hollismason posted:

Funny Games is good but I'm not a huge fan of it simply because it is kind of a indictment against horror movies in general. Just kind of makes me pissed off which is kind of the point of the film. Its very effective.

Itís very effective at getting you to question your tastes and your role as the viewer in films. Itís that good kind of questioning because you gotta be introspective every once in awhile to grow. Your tastes, personality, beliefs should be things you question a fair amount in life and Funny Games can get those kinda discussions going. Especially at the point I was at in life when I first saw it (way more of a gore-hound and into shocking material), but the movie while shocking and really a punch in the face more times than not itís fairly tame in regards to showing the actions that lead to bloodshed. Just a terrific film.

Lurdiak
Feb 25, 2006

I believe in a universe that doesn't care, and people that do.




veni veni veni posted:

Saying 28 Days Later isn't a zombie movie is not only the gooniest thing I have read all day, but does a disservice to 28DL as the movie that pretty much single handedly reinvented zombies into what they are today and reignited public interest (probably way too much) in a genre that was quarantined into Joe Bob Briggs midnight shows. Like, barely a single piece of media that involves zombies in the last 20 years doesn't owe at least a little to 28 Days later. Most of it owes a lot.

To be fair the director started it.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

"Real life is messy, inconsistent, and it's seldom when anything ever really gets resolved."



dorium posted:

Itís very effective at getting you to question your tastes and your role as the viewer in films. Itís that good kind of questioning because you gotta be introspective every once in awhile to grow. Your tastes, personality, beliefs should be things you question a fair amount in life and Funny Games can get those kinda discussions going. Especially at the point I was at in life when I first saw it (way more of a gore-hound and into shocking material), but the movie while shocking and really a punch in the face more times than not itís fairly tame in regards to showing the actions that lead to bloodshed. Just a terrific film.

I actually practice something called mindful consumption. Its basically the idea that you have to curate what kind of media you consume. Its kind of weird when I'm a huge horror fan but I do things like not watch intense films at night , not watch depressing poo poo, mostly stick to the classics of the 80s and other films. Anyway its a interesting movie because it does cause you to evaluate your consumption of media and how that impacts you.

As I've gotten an older horror fan and just older in general my taste in horror has changed drastically. I've seen all the video nasties etc.. but I wouldn't watch any of that stuff now.

pospysyl
Nov 10, 2012

SO EMBARRASSING



dorium posted:

Itís very effective at getting you to question your tastes and your role as the viewer in films. Itís that good kind of questioning because you gotta be introspective every once in awhile to grow. Your tastes, personality, beliefs should be things you question a fair amount in life and Funny Games can get those kinda discussions going. Especially at the point I was at in life when I first saw it (way more of a gore-hound and into shocking material), but the movie while shocking and really a punch in the face more times than not itís fairly tame in regards to showing the actions that lead to bloodshed. Just a terrific film.

I think "question" is really the right term for it, not just because the characters literally ask the audience questions. Liking horror is something worth being curious about. It's not clear that Haneke gives a strong judgment about whether making horror films or enjoying them is good or bad. After all, Funny Games is itself a horror movie, and Haneke's taken a lot of care to make it one of the best shot and most intense horror movies out there. If he really hated horror movies, he'd have made a bad one.

Timeless Appeal
May 28, 2006


pospysyl posted:

It's funny you mention that because nearly all the actors in the movie previously appeared in other movies in the Haneke-verse. It adds to the intertextuality of it.
True. But I think even if you're familiar with them as actors, they read as more common and mundane.

Hollismason posted:

Funny Games is good but I'm not a huge fan of it simply because it is kind of a indictment against horror movies in general. Just kind of makes me pissed off which is kind of the point of the film. Its very effective.
Honestly, I think Funny Games is a bit broader in its critique and what it's exploring.

Gonna spoil because hopefully Kvlt! is going in blind-ish. (And even if you know the broad strokes, really don't read this spoiler because you're denying yourself one of the best moments in horror) The big defining scene is when the mother kills the bad guys and they reverse the film. All fiction is based on having to watch people suffer and struggle so you can take part in their victories. Bruce Wayne's parents die so that you can see him become Batman. Rob has to go through his break ups in High Fidelity so you can see him find love in the end. Jason has to kill people so you can see the final girl win. Funny Games suggests a paradox of narrative when we claim to be on the good guys' side, but we essentially create their suffering. They wouldn't really even exist if we weren't watching after all. The movie calls us out on this paradox by making us complicit with the villains. After all, we know at some level bad stuff is going to happen. And since as far as we're concerned none of this happens if we don't participate in the fiction, why are we imagining ourselves aligned with the good guys. The rewind thusly calls us out for having our cake and eating it too. It takes away the moment of triumph that we could imagine as having been on the woman's side all along.

Sad thing is my son was recently born and WELP on ever watching that again.

Timeless Appeal fucked around with this message at 02:52 on May 20, 2021

Halloween Jack
Sep 11, 2003

Let your word be "Yes, Yes" or "No, No"; anything more than this comes from the evil one.




Every single costume in Clive Barker's Underworld is physically painful to look at.

veni veni veni
Jun 5, 2005

Clunk! Clunk Clunk!



Lurdiak posted:

To be fair the director started it.

Heh. I don't think I have seen that but it wouldn't surprise me either.

I guess a better way to approach the question would be to ask. is the year 2002? If the answer is yes, then someone could probably make a compelling argument that it's not a zombie film. But after two decades of zombies that are basically 28 days later infected, and zombie films using a similar tone and style to 28DL, hell yeah it's a zombie film.

Drunkboxer
Jun 30, 2007


Timeless Appeal posted:

I think eventually watch both, but start with the original.

The original is a little sloppier, but I think the fact that you're not likely to really recognize the actors really helps the movie. They just feel like a real family being tormented. I think they is some low budget-ness that also works better in the original. Like the living room scenes in the remake where most of the games happen are well shot with dynamic lighting. But the flatter lighting of the original just makes it feel like you're in this normal living room with the overhead light on.

It's definitely a movie I got more out of the second time and since they're so similar, watch the original and then go to the remake.

This is basically how I feel, the original just landed a little harder. I also find german to be an inherently smugger language than english and that really adds to how much I hate those smug murderous teens.

Jedit
Dec 10, 2011

Proudly supporting vanilla legends 1994-2014




Not a zombie movie. Dolores O'Riordan with her mouth open was a horrifying nightmare when she was still alive.

david_a
Apr 24, 2010





Megamarm

Halloween Jack posted:

Every single costume in Clive Barker's Underworld is physically painful to look at.

Never heard of this movie, but apparently:

quote:

The film's music was produced by synthpop group Freur, which later evolved into the band Underworld, their name taken from the film's title.
neat

Dragonshirt
Oct 28, 2010



WHY BONER NOW posted:

Hell yeah! It's a great movie.

Great miniatures, too

The miniature and stop motion work are fantastic. So are the set designs. It's an expensive looking movie!

The_Doctor
Mar 29, 2007

"The entire history of this incarnation is one of temporal orbits, retcons, paradoxes, parallel time lines, reiterations, and divergences. How anyone can make head or tail of all this chaos, I don't know."


pospysyl posted:

Just saw In the Earth, loved it.

Oh good, that's on the watching pile over the next few days.

bitterandtwisted
Sep 4, 2006






Who are some prominent horror people who have passed since October? Looking for ideas for the challenge thread

Basebf555
Feb 29, 2008

The greatest sensual pleasure there is is to know the desires of another!



Fun Shoe

bitterandtwisted posted:

Who are some prominent horror people who have passed since October? Looking for ideas for the challenge thread

I can't believe I forgot about Daria Nicolodi when I chose what to watch for that challenge. Shame on me.

bitterandtwisted
Sep 4, 2006






Basebf555 posted:

I can't believe I forgot about Daria Nicolodi when I chose what to watch for that challenge. Shame on me.

oh that's a good one. I've not seen Deep Red or Opera.
Shudder has a movie called "Deep Red" with the Argento poster on the thumbnail, but it's actually some 90s sci-fi starring Michael Biehn

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment
I wouldn't have any appointment



Grimey Drawer

bitterandtwisted posted:

oh that's a good one. I've not seen Deep Red or Opera.
Shudder has a movie called "Deep Red" with the Argento poster on the thumbnail, but it's actually some 90s sci-fi starring Michael Biehn

Make sure you watch the Director's Cut of Deep Red. It makes more sense and you get more Daria.

weekly font
Dec 1, 2004


Everytime I try to fly I fall
Without my wings
I feel so small
Guess I need you baby...





I had no idea A Quiet Place 2 was happening. What could possibly be added to that story other than unnecessary monster lore?

Halloween Jack
Sep 11, 2003

Let your word be "Yes, Yes" or "No, No"; anything more than this comes from the evil one.




david_a posted:

Never heard of this movie, but apparently:

neat
The movie is sort of a prototype of Nightbreed, but instead of being cool monsters, they just take drugs that give you syphilis.

There's an amazing scene where the hero confronts the evil doctor, going "Did you make designer drugs? Like the ones in this vial here?" And he's like "No I swear" and they walk out of the room together. The second the hero's back is turned, the evil doctor walks into the room next door, where a few dozen of those vials of drugs are just lying around. He doesn't even wait for him to leave the building. Or close the door behind him.

Halloween Jack fucked around with this message at 15:21 on May 20, 2021

Basebf555
Feb 29, 2008

The greatest sensual pleasure there is is to know the desires of another!



Fun Shoe

weekly font posted:

I had no idea A Quiet Place 2 was happening. What could possibly be added to that story other than unnecessary monster lore?

It seems like it's probably going to be more about actually turning the tide against the monsters and taking back the world rather than just day to day survival.

feedmyleg
Dec 25, 2004

EVERY FAIRY TALE NEEDS ITS HERO.



Basebf555 posted:

It seems like it's probably going to be more about actually turning the tide against the monsters and taking back the world rather than just day to day survival.

Yuck.

Kvlt!
May 19, 2012

DIG THROUGH THE DITCHES
AND BURN THROUGH THE WITCHES



Good news: Fred Vogel got back to me and sold me a copy of I Am No One!

dorium
Nov 5, 2009

If it gets in your eyes
Just look into mine
Just look into dreams
and you'll be alright
I'll be alright






Kvlt! posted:

Good news: Fred Vogel got back to me and sold me a copy of I Am No One!

the national crisis is over.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

"Real life is messy, inconsistent, and it's seldom when anything ever really gets resolved."



I still need movie suggestions for the Dead and Buried requirement of the Fran Challenge for May. Horror movies where someone involved passed away in the last year. I'm already aware of Daria Nicolodi from Dario Argento films.

Basebf555
Feb 29, 2008

The greatest sensual pleasure there is is to know the desires of another!



Fun Shoe

Hollismason posted:

I still need movie suggestions for the Dead and Buried requirement of the Fran Challenge for May. Horror movies where someone involved passed away in the last year. I'm already aware of Daria Nicolodi from Dario Argento films.

Barbara Shelley, who was in some Hammer films that you've probably already seen(Quatermass and the Pit, Dracula: Prince of Darkness, a few others) and also Village of the Damned.

BonerDetective
Jun 4, 2013


Doesn't a zombie always represent more or less the same thing? The zombie is an abject figure, more often than not standing in for a group that is necessary for class society to function, but who the comfortable would rather not acknowledge.
Depending on the film they might be compared to poor people, or immigrants, (usually those two though) but it's pretty much always a variation on the theme, right?. No-one really wants to be a zombie the same way they might want to become a vampire, cause it's downward social mobility. So something like Assault on Precinct 13 could fit the bill, but The Purge not so much.
So a movie about a reanimated 1000 year old aristocrat who feeds on the living would be a vampire film, even if they ate brains. I realise that this might come across as contrarian.

Drunkboxer
Jun 30, 2007


BonerDetective posted:

Doesn't a zombie always represent more or less the same thing? The zombie is an abject figure, more often than not standing in for a group that is necessary for class society to function, but who the comfortable would rather not acknowledge.
Depending on the film they might be compared to poor people, or immigrants, (usually those two though) but it's pretty much always a variation on the theme, right?. No-one really wants to be a zombie the same way they might want to become a vampire, cause it's downward social mobility. So something like Assault on Precinct 13 could fit the bill, but The Purge not so much.
So a movie about a reanimated 1000 year old aristocrat who feeds on the living would be a vampire film, even if they ate brains. I realise that this might come across as contrarian.

Not always. Sometimes theyíre more about body horror and fear of decay/disease. Or sometimes theyíre about existential fear of being nothing but a death-doll animated by physiochemical processes that give the illusion of free will. You know, real Thomas Ligotti poo poo.

FreudianSlippers
Apr 12, 2010

Shooting and Fucking
are the same thing!



The OG Carribbean zombies represented the fears of slavery being inescapable. I can't imagine many things would be as horrific to slaves as the idea that not even death could free you from slavery. The zombie itself wasn't to be feared as they were essentially just living dead farm hands but the horror was the idea of becoming one.

It's worth noting that the zombie myth spread to the US because from 1915 to 1934 the country was occupied by the US army to protect American business interests in the area.

Jedit
Dec 10, 2011

Proudly supporting vanilla legends 1994-2014



Drunkboxer posted:

Not always. Sometimes theyíre more about body horror and fear of decay/disease. Or sometimes theyíre about existential fear of being nothing but a death-doll animated by physiochemical processes that give the illusion of free will. You know, real Thomas Ligotti poo poo.

If you want a very different take on zombies, check out Handling the Undead by John Ajvide Lindqvist (of Let The Right One In fame). It's not a zombie apocalypse at all; the premise is that everyone in a small region of Sweden who had died in the previous year rises and the living have to figure out how to deal with their returned loved ones. The book follows a number of characters as they do this, from families regaining lost parents (and in one case, a lost child) to a woman who died only minutes before the revivification.

Lumbermouth
Mar 6, 2008

GREG IS BIG NOW




Hollismason posted:

I still need movie suggestions for the Dead and Buried requirement of the Fran Challenge for May. Horror movies where someone involved passed away in the last year. I'm already aware of Daria Nicolodi from Dario Argento films.

David Prowse was in a handful of Hammer movies, most notably The Horror of Frankenstein.

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

If it wasn't for disappointment
I wouldn't have any appointment



Grimey Drawer

FreudianSlippers posted:

The OG Carribbean zombies represented the fears of slavery being inescapable. I can't imagine many things would be as horrific to slaves as the idea that not even death could free you from slavery. The zombie itself wasn't to be feared as they were essentially just living dead farm hands but the horror was the idea of becoming one.

It's worth noting that the zombie myth spread to the US because from 1915 to 1934 the country was occupied by the US army to protect American business interests in the area.

And the fear the colonizer's (ie, white people in general) had that they'd get what's coming to them from the masses of people they'd oppressed.

pospysyl
Nov 10, 2012

SO EMBARRASSING



Hollismason posted:

I still need movie suggestions for the Dead and Buried requirement of the Fran Challenge for May. Horror movies where someone involved passed away in the last year. I'm already aware of Daria Nicolodi from Dario Argento films.

Charles Grodin was in Rosemary's Baby.

Drunkboxer
Jun 30, 2007


Itís interesting how the default zombie movie became either siege or survival scenarios to the point where people donít even consider other ideas when it comes up. Even Romero deviated from that by Day of the Dead. And even in siege/survival movies you get scenes that touch on other themes outside of mowing down soulless mobs of ďothers.Ē I blame video games.

Jedit posted:

If you want a very different take on zombies, check out Handling the Undead by John Ajvide Lindqvist (of Let The Right One In fame). It's not a zombie apocalypse at all; the premise is that everyone in a small region of Sweden who had died in the previous year rises and the living have to figure out how to deal with their returned loved ones. The book follows a number of characters as they do this, from families regaining lost parents (and in one case, a lost child) to a woman who died only minutes before the revivification.

Thanks Iíll probably check that out. I finally shook off the quarantine malaise that was keeping me from reading and Iíve been easing myself back into it with horror novels.

e:

pospysyl posted:

Charles Grodin was in Rosemary's Baby.

gently caress, I didnít know he died.

Drunkboxer fucked around with this message at 17:49 on May 20, 2021

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Basebf555
Feb 29, 2008

The greatest sensual pleasure there is is to know the desires of another!



Fun Shoe

Psycho Goreman is how available on Shudder.

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