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Long Francesco
Jun 3, 2005


It's always been a slip the dude 10 bucks kind of repair afaik. 50% seems insane.

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Fabulousity
Dec 29, 2008

= (Displacement through a hetero medium) / Time


Nap Ghost

MrOnBicycle posted:

Of course got a flat tire on my rear left. Brand new Goodyears as well. Seems to be a slow leak.
Tire places and mechanics that do tires here do something they call (directly translated) "umbrella repairs" that are supposed to be permanent. Might be hard to answer, but can tire repairs generally be trusted? It's about 40-50% of the cost of a new tire.
Also, my car has one of those lovely repair kits so I am praying for it to for once work and get me to a tire shop...

I don't understand the cost part of this post, but as the other posters noted if the "umbrella" method involves a combined patch/plug it is a very reliable and safe patching method if done correctly. Around here such a tire repair should only run around $20-25, so unless you're running some sort of weird tires made out of cardboard a patch/plug costing 40-50% of a new tire sounds like a harsh ripoff.

Modus Man
Jun 8, 2004



Soiled Meat

Long Francesco posted:

It's always been a slip the dude 10 bucks kind of repair afaik. 50% seems insane.

Nobody's taking the wheel off the vehicle, dismounting the tire from the wheel, repairing it (inspect, clean, drill, buff, glue, patch, seal) then mounting the tire back on the wheel and possibly servicing the tpms and back on the vehicle for $10.

I commonly see $25-$30 for a repair and maybe another $10-$20 to re-balance it. I suppose you could get a new tire for double that, depending on the size and quality of the tire.

Preoptopus
Aug 25, 2008



Modus Man posted:

Nobody's taking the wheel off the vehicle, dismounting the tire from the wheel, repairing it (inspect, clean, drill, buff, glue, patch, seal) then mounting the tire back on the wheel and possibly servicing the tpms and back on the vehicle for $10.

I commonly see $25-$30 for a repair and maybe another $10-$20 to re-balance it. I suppose you could get a new tire for double that, depending on the size and quality of the tire.

We do all that for 21.50 and people scoff all day at me even at that price.

MrOnBicycle
Jan 18, 2008
Wait wat?

Labour costs in Sweden. I'm actually surprised it's that cheap. The repair is $47 (including mounting and balancing it), the tire ~$100 then there is mounting cost and balancing cost, so probably ~£130 in the end. Goodyear Efficientgrip Performance. Goodyear might have some warranty, but I probably missed some step in the fine print.
Good to hear the repair is reliable. I'm going to try that first. Thanks guys.

MrOnBicycle fucked around with this message at 10:56 on May 3, 2019

Fabulousity
Dec 29, 2008

= (Displacement through a hetero medium) / Time


Nap Ghost

A few words on tires:

Tread wear warranties are riddled with clauses and tbh for pretty good reason: The tire companies can't make you align your suspension, stop you from driving on lovely roads, prevent you from driving like a maniac, make you repair damaged suspension components, and they sure as poo poo
didn't put that screw in the path of your daily commute. In that sense the tread life warranties they offer act more like vague suggestions for how long the tire should last under nearly perfect conditions across a general homogeneous collection of vehicles. As a result getting a warranty adjustment on tread life is pretty difficult and buying based on tread life is kinda silly. That said if you scream loud enough you can probably get a prorated adjustment just to get you out of the shop because you're an rear end in a top hat and you're pissing everyone off.

Modern tires are really loving tough. When they get punctured it's usually some piece of metal or weirdly shaped rock that gets hit just right. Also in an otherwise perfect tire/rim setup a slow leak can develop at the valve stem or along the bead seal where the tire meets the rim. In general a healthy tire and rim can loose one pound of air pressure per month. Also remember that temperature directly fucks with pressure readings (tp=nr(Volkswagen ruined it everyone)x or some poo poo, go look up gas laws) so when the first big freeze of the season hits and all your pressure sensors go off it's probably because you're low on pressure to start with and the cold snap put you below the alert threshold. A tire at rest overnight is "cold", a tire that has been driven at least a mile is "hot". This will change the pressure readings so plan accordingly.

Also your recommended tire pressure is not on the tire itself, it's defined by the car. The tire will usually have a "maximum load at PSI x" molded into the sidewall. This is NOT the pressure to use, instead you need to the use the pressure indicated by the placard in your vehicle's door flange, or A/B pillar.

TPMS - Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems - Are now mandated by NHTSA and come in two general flavors: Active sensors mounted in each wheel at the valve stem. This has the advantage of telling the driver which specific wheel is low (if the manufacturer chooses to make that level of detail available), but it also makes the valve stem assemblies more expensive and if a sensor goes bad it's just loving annoying. The other method is leveraging Automatic Braking System sensors to detect a deflated tire when rotational velocities start to differentiate over a threshold on an axle. This method has fewer points of failure but also doesn't know which specific tire has a problem.

Why is TPMS a thing? - I'm glad you asked! For this we wind the clock back to 1998-ish where our two asswipe players prepare to do minor stupid things that compound into majorly lovely stupid things: Ford Motor Company and Firestone Inc. Back then Ford was looking to sell as many SUVs as they could, and don't be fooled the the SUVs they were peddling then were total trash: Second generation Ford Explorers. Not like the police package Explorers of 2017+ these things were truly piles of loving poo poo. There's a reason you don't see them around much in TYOOL 2019: They either broke or got eaten by cash for clunkers. So Ford is designing these poo poo buckets, and getting so high on their own farts they start co-branding with Eddie Bauer editions and what not, some engineer asks while in a cocaine induced haze, "HEY HOW CAN WE MAKE THESE THINGS RIDE SMOOTHER?!" Another engineer responds, "We could soften the suspension?" to which previous engineer, now doing rails of coke off of various interior pieces, "NO THAT TAKES MONEY. LET'S JUST DEFLATE THE TIRES A BUNCH!" So engineer two goes to Firestone whom, at the time, was selected as the OEM tire provider.

They ask Firestone, "Yo, dudes, we need to smooth out the ride on our total poo poo bucket SUV and want to do it the laziest way possible by dropping tire pressure. Let's say 235/75R15 at 26psi. Whatchoo think about that?"

The Firestone engineers put down the dice from the D&D game and pondered the question. They ultimately came back to say, "Operating at 26 PSI is the bare minimum for safe operation. We do not recommend that you make this the required inflation pressure for this particular application."

Ford did it anyways. A whole bunch of people died. Everyone hates Firestone. And now we have TPMS.

Fabulousity fucked around with this message at 07:23 on May 3, 2019

Charles
May 9, 2004

zoom-zoom


Toilet Rascal

MrOnBicycle posted:

Labour costs in Sweden. I'm actually surprised it's that cheap. The repair is $47 (including mounting and balancing it), the tires ~$100 then there is mounting cost and balancing cost, so probably ~£130 in the end. Goodyear Efficientgrip Performance. Goodyear might have some warranty, but I probably missed some step in the fine print.
Good to hear the repair is reliable. I'm going to try that first. Thanks guys.

That's an inexpensive tire. What size is it?

MrOnBicycle
Jan 18, 2008
Wait wat?

Charles posted:

That's an inexpensive tire. What size is it?

225/45R17 91V. Yeah they are a good deal for a premium tire. The "model" is a couple years old but got high marks and finished top 3 in many of the Swedish tire tests, and I have them on my other car. Was considering Pilot Sports but was unsure of how loud they are.

Was just outside and used the good and pump kit. Worked very well and the tire had no problem going up to the factory 2.1 bar. Booked it in for repair in 40 minutes. The fact that air doesn't rush out and that it was easy to get pumped up must be a good sign. At least in my mind.

Update: They couldn't find anything wrong with the tire. Only charged me about $3 in the end (for taking off the tire from the rim). Good.. I guess?

MrOnBicycle fucked around with this message at 11:52 on May 3, 2019

Mr-Spain
Aug 27, 2003

Bullshit... you can be mine.

Tire rack's hazard policy will cover the cost of the tire when you bought it. They paid me out, just be aware that if you buy a tire on sale and need to get it replaced you're out what ya paid. Other than that had them put on at NTB, liked everything about it.

Preoptopus
Aug 25, 2008




Sensors have gone down in price tho. Used to be like 120 now they are about half that at 69. And I dont charge extra to put em in the tire you already have. And thank gently caress Ford did away with band sensors.

JQADDINGMACHINE
Jan 5, 2014



Fabulousity posted:

Also your recommended tire pressure is not on the tire itself, it's defined by the car. The tire will usually have a "maximum load at PSI x" molded into the sidewall. This is NOT the pressure to use, instead you need to the use the pressure indicated by the placard in your vehicle's door flange, or A/B pillar.

this is one of my biggest pet peeves. I always see idiots on facebook complaining about how the dealership can't even set their tire pressure to the correct 50psi they see on their sidewalls.

BlackMK4
Aug 23, 2006

wat.

Megamarm

The door jamb tire pressure is for the OE tires, not that I am saying that they are right about the sidewall pressure

Preoptopus
Aug 25, 2008



I love people comming in for a TPMS light and all four tires are at 50 psi

JQADDINGMACHINE
Jan 5, 2014



BlackMK4 posted:

The door jamb tire pressure is for the OE tires, not that I am saying that they are right about the sidewall pressure

Yes i might have worded it poorly, I meant they think the sidewall is the correct pressure when it isn't and complain about the dealerships setting pressure "low" at only 36psi or whatever.

BlackMK4
Aug 23, 2006

wat.

Megamarm

JQADDINGMACHINE posted:

Yes i might have worded it poorly, I meant they think the sidewall is the correct pressure when it isn't and complain about the dealerships setting pressure "low" at only 36psi or whatever.

Totally, sorry, I wasn't trying to call you out, I was just throwing a thought out

Sneaks McDevious
Jul 29, 2010

by LITERALLY AN ADMIN


I just got some new Pirellis and they are much quieter than the old Pirellis. A bit silly to spend so much when we do only 6000km/year but in an electric car you hear and feel the difference immediately. It's magic carpet level now

Kreez
Oct 18, 2003



Every year when swapping from winters back to all seasons I do some internet reading and always get pretty close to convincing myself to get put summer tires on instead of all season. And then once every couple years this happens on the road I take once every two weeks for work, and I make a note that summer tires are definitely not for me.

Not really related to the tires, but this is always scary as gently caress when it happens to me. No matter how much your brain knows you're driving in the mountains and be prepared for anything, when you get in the car at 25C and it's 30C at your destination, you've been driving past "high mountain pass, watch for changing weather" signs for the past 3 hours seeing people in shorts and t-shirts stopped at the viewpoints snapping photos, it's hard to stay alert for loving snow and it comes out of nowhere while you're doing 140km/hr because for some dumb reason this is the road with the highest speed limit in the whole country.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Kreez fucked around with this message at 19:09 on Jun 19, 2019

Preoptopus
Aug 25, 2008



julian assflange posted:

I just got some new Pirellis and they are much quieter than the old Pirellis. A bit silly to spend so much when we do only 6000km/year but in an electric car you hear and feel the difference immediately. It's magic carpet level now

You shoulda sprang for the Tesla Michelins that have foam on the inside for extra less loudness.

Disgruntled Bovine
Jul 5, 2010



BlackMK4 posted:

The door jamb tire pressure is for the OE tires, not that I am saying that they are right about the sidewall pressure

This is a point I'm rather curious about. I never run OE tires and despite being religious about alignments and maintaining correct tire pressures I still see some situations where I get heavier middle or outside wear as if pressures are incorrect. Should pressures in a non-OE tire be different than the OE tires, and if so, how do you determine what they should be?

Kivi
Aug 1, 2006
I care

Preoptopus posted:

You shoulda sprang for the Tesla Michelins that have foam on the inside for extra less loudness.
I think those are Continentals, see here. Sadly not available in smaller (read: cheaper) sizes.

moosemanmoo
Jan 5, 2007
R the Reply that his life was in danger

I decided to upgrade the stock Pirelli Cinturato P7s on my B8.5 allroad for a set of Vredestein Quatrac 5s: they are a bit quieter at low speed and have a ludicrous amount of grip compared to the old, 60,000 mile worn set. I considered the P7 Plus but these seemed to perform as good or better for less money, and donít regret my choice at all.

Terrible Robot
Jul 2, 2010

FRIED CHICKEN


Slippery Tilde

I usually buy General Altimax RT43s for my dailies but went with some Vredestein Quatrac 5s on my Camry last year because they were only 20$ more per tire and seemed interesting, and because where I live gets actual snow sometimes. I've got about 15k on them and they're great tires, super quiet and comfortable with tons of grip in wet and dry, even better than the RT43s which are drat good for the price. In the snow/ice they blow the RT43s out of the water.

Also tossing in another vote for Altimax Arctics, great winter tires.

Terrible Robot fucked around with this message at 07:46 on Jun 26, 2019

CornHolio
May 20, 2001



Toilet Rascal

How do treadwear warranties work?

I bought four Sumitomos in October of 2017. I have a little over 21k on them and the tread is down to 4/32". Treadwear warranty is 4 years/45k miles.

I have a nail in the sidewall of one of them and should probably get them all replaced.

My Dodge dealership ordered the tires through Tire Rack and price-matched them (free rotations, woo), which shouldn't make a difference.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...



Fallen Rib

CornHolio posted:

How do treadwear warranties work?

I bought four Sumitomos in October of 2017. I have a little over 21k on them and the tread is down to 4/32". Treadwear warranty is 4 years/45k miles.

I have a nail in the sidewall of one of them and should probably get them all replaced.

My Dodge dealership ordered the tires through Tire Rack and price-matched them (free rotations, woo), which shouldn't make a difference.

In my experience, not well. I had a set of Michelin Pilot Exaltos AS wear our prematurely (30k to 3/32"), and tried for about 3 months to get Town Faire Tire here in MA to honor the warranty (45k miles). They wanted original receipts for rotations every 15k (I rotate them myself when I change the oil every 7-8k), and for me to take the car to the same location for proof of god-knows-what. I finally completed all the steps, and they offered me a pro-rated discount of 30% off the MSRP, which ended up making the replacements more expensive than what I originally paid. Maybe Sumitomo is better, but I've never heard of anyone getting much back unless the tire was bad at very low miles. The nail in the sidewall will probably disqualify the warranty on that tire, but the others might be fine. Expect to get at most a 50% off of MSRP discount applied to the same tires, purchased at MSRP. If you've got staggered tire sizes, then there's no warranty.

CornHolio
May 20, 2001



Toilet Rascal

So they say they may not warranty the tires because I have a "performance car." I am at 4/32 and they can't do anything until I get down to 3/32 anyway, so whatever. I can air up my tire a couple times a week.



In the meantime, I'm tire shopping. Kinda got my eye on either Goodyear Eagle Sports or Goodyear Eagle F1s.

I want an all-season with decent performance, decent treadwear and a decent price.

I've thought about going with a dedicated summer tire because I have a winter car, but I also have a dedicated sports car and with how unpredictable the weather in the fall and spring gets here, I'm more comfortable staying with all seasons.

RIP Paul Walker
Feb 26, 2004



gently caress Goodyear, every experience Iíve had with their tires has sucked. If you throw out your need for reasonable prices, the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3 is the best all-season tire ever.

CornHolio
May 20, 2001



Toilet Rascal

RIP Paul Walker posted:

gently caress Goodyear, every experience Iíve had with their tires has sucked. If you throw out your need for reasonable prices, the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3 is the best all-season tire ever.

What was bad about them? The reviews on Tire Rack are pretty positive, though the Pilot Sports are a little better.

Bajaha
Apr 1, 2011

BajaHAHAHA.



For what it's worth I've got the Goodyear Eagle Sport A/S on my cayenne and they seem fine. Relatively quiet, decent comfort, good dry and wet grip. They're still relatively new so I can't say how they'll wear down but so far so good on a big heavy boat like the cayenne.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




I have Goodyear Eagle F1s on the Focus ST and Michelin Pilot Sport 4S on the M5, and the Pilot Sports are vastly better tires in every circumstance I can find except maybe tire wear, but I will chalk up at least part of that to the fact that the M5 is a two ton fatty. The F1s firm up more in cold weather (~40) than the PS4s.

Aren't you in Indiana? I wouldn't bother with an all-season if you have a separate winter car. Just don't drive like a moron on the off chance it gets a little cold.

CornHolio
May 20, 2001



Toilet Rascal

KYOON GRIFFEY JR posted:

Aren't you in Indiana? I wouldn't bother with an all-season if you have a separate winter car. Just don't drive like a moron on the off chance it gets a little cold.

I might drive like a moron, though.

RIP Paul Walker
Feb 26, 2004



CornHolio posted:

What was bad about them? The reviews on Tire Rack are pretty positive, though the Pilot Sports are a little better.

Itís hard to quantify, but every set of Goodyearís Iíve come across over the years have just *sucked*. lovely grip, lovely feel, expensive... maybe theyíre better nowadays but still. Ugh.

This is coming from someone that bought the cheapest tires Walmart sells and liked them... just sayiní.

Buy the Michelins. They A/S 3ís feel way better to me than the last set of summer Goodyearís I drove on...

BlackMK4
Aug 23, 2006

wat.

Megamarm

Tires are incredibly difficult to compare when they are close unless you are literally hot swapping between brand new sets on the same car on the same day and have data to base a conclusion off of. It is easy to call a set of tires poo poo when you're replacing an unevenly and heat cycled set out for a brand new set of a different brand.

RIP Paul Walker
Feb 26, 2004



BlackMK4 posted:

Tires are incredibly difficult to compare when they are close unless you are literally hot swapping between brand new sets on the same car on the same day and have data to base a conclusion off of. It is easy to call a set of tires poo poo when you're replacing an unevenly and heat cycled set out for a brand new set of a different brand.

Itís also easy to call a set of new tires great when theyíre replacing old worn tires. Iím pretty sure thatís how Goodyearís have good reviews

Charles
May 9, 2004

zoom-zoom


Toilet Rascal

You really should specify model
I bet you can still buy Bridgestone Re92s.
Should I say Bridgestone are all terrible?

22 Eargesplitten
Oct 10, 2010

Also sexism, religious bias, jingoism, and so on. Don't do it, people!

Dogs, don't do it either, even if the police man really tries to train you to do it.



Disgruntled Bovine posted:

This is a point I'm rather curious about. I never run OE tires and despite being religious about alignments and maintaining correct tire pressures I still see some situations where I get heavier middle or outside wear as if pressures are incorrect. Should pressures in a non-OE tire be different than the OE tires, and if so, how do you determine what they should be?

I was wondering something similar. My Subaru Impreza came with 205/60/R15s, and I put 205/55/R16s on there with wheels off of a Legacy GT because the OEM size is expensive for the quality you get. Should I be looking at the numbers for an Impreza if the same year with 16Ē wheels? Or stick with the 32/29 on the B pillar?

RIP Paul Walker
Feb 26, 2004



Charles posted:

You really should specify model
I bet you can still buy Bridgestone Re92s.
Should I say Bridgestone are all terrible?

Bias alert!

Iíve spent plenty of time driving on RE92ís (Oh Scion tC, what a piece of poo poo you were), Iím convinced they were made by Goodyear 🥳

/bias

I have actually heard very good things about the newest Goodyear summer tire, generally couched by ďnever thought Iíd say this but...Ē, ... take what I say with a big dose of salt.

CornHolio
May 20, 2001



Toilet Rascal

So Goodyears are garbage, is there anything other than the Michelins in a 245/45R20 all season that are a little, uh, cheaper?

I'm assuming I'm only going to get 20k out of these tires, and I'm not so much of an enthusiast that I'll notice a difference between a really good tire and a good tire.

Charles
May 9, 2004

zoom-zoom


Toilet Rascal

RIP Paul Walker posted:

Bias alert!

I’ve spent plenty of time driving on RE92’s (Oh Scion tC, what a piece of poo poo you were), I’m convinced they were made by Goodyear 🥳

/bias

I have actually heard very good things about the newest Goodyear summer tire, generally couched by “never thought I’d say this but...”, ... take what I say with a big dose of salt.

I actually didn't have any trouble with Re92s on my WRX, just you could get a lot better and for cheaper.

Charles
May 9, 2004

zoom-zoom


Toilet Rascal

CornHolio posted:

So Goodyears are garbage, is there anything other than the Michelins in a 245/45R20 all season that are a little, uh, cheaper?

I'm assuming I'm only going to get 20k out of these tires, and I'm not so much of an enthusiast that I'll notice a difference between a really good tire and a good tire.

https://m.tirerack.com/tires/TireSe...ter=20#allTitle

Sort by customer rating, price, etc here
Looks like Vredestein Quadtrac 5s are a good value?

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CornHolio
May 20, 2001



Toilet Rascal

Charles posted:

https://m.tirerack.com/tires/TireSe...ter=20#allTitle

Sort by customer rating, price, etc here
Looks like Vredestein Quadtrac 5s are a good value?

I've been using Tire Rack's website (and will be buying from them most likely) and I'm tempted to go with another set of Sumitomos because I like them enough, but yeah they only lasted about 20k miles. Those Vredesteins look like they'd last even less.

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