Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
feedmyleg
Dec 25, 2004

EVERY FAIRY TALE NEEDS ITS HERO.



Yeah, I started doing real, proper, "go back to primary sources" research for the first time in my life during quarantine and I really fell for it. I'm excited to get back into libraries post-pandemic and dive into sources not available online.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Cobalt-60
Oct 11, 2016

Over time, random factors add up. What is chaos in the moment becomes systemic over time and space. As data accumulates, a pattern emerges.



Libraries are about the only public buildings left that aren't designed to extract money from people.

I still prefer physical books to PDFs. And there is nothing like just browsing through the stacks, able to pick up and read/take home anything.

Speaking of old references, Dewey Decimal system. I learned it in elementary school, then in middle school the local library installed computers and quit updating their card catalog, so I forgot most of what I knew.

Do people still use Rolodexes/rotary card files? I still see 3x5 cards for sale (for what? no idea; haven't used one since high school), so I assume there's still storage inertia.

Blue Moonlight
Apr 28, 2005
Bitter and Sarcastic

We made flash cards out of 3x5 notecards for our kids, and my wife still uses them as an outline/organization tool sometimes.

I suspect they’re largely relegated to school speeches and exam “cheat sheets” otherwise.

Jack B Nimble
Dec 25, 2007




Soiled Meat

gently caress, that's a reference that *I* didn't get until now; of *course* index cards were orginally primarily designed for Dewey decimal style indexing in wooden drawers, I've just never even seen them used that way by regular people.

RCarr
Dec 24, 2007



Yea flash cards are still needed for a lot of things. I use them to study for my job regularly.

doctorfrog
Mar 14, 2007

Great.



Anyone know about "that's my motto?" Seems like an old guy thing to say. Like maybe people would learn Latin as part of their expected high class education and part of that whole thing is coming up with a personal motto. Then it became a generic thing you would say, and now no one says it.

Shrecknet
Jan 2, 2005

Nosferatu Enthusiast
@shrecknet



The literal #1 song in the country less than ten years ago was called "The Motto" and featured a motto in it. I doubt that idiom is lost on these kids today

FreudianSlippers
Apr 12, 2010

Shooting and Fucking
are the same thing!



Kids these days consider Drake to be oldies

doctorfrog
Mar 14, 2007

Great.



Shrecknet posted:

The literal #1 song in the country less than ten years ago was called "The Motto" and featured a motto in it. I doubt that idiom is lost on these kids today

yeah i'm not up on stuff that new

Shrecknet
Jan 2, 2005

Nosferatu Enthusiast
@shrecknet



doctorfrog posted:

yeah i'm not up on stuff that new

SA->Ask/Tell->Tell me about references in newer media lost on goons

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



Cobalt-60 posted:

Speaking of old references, Dewey Decimal system. I learned it in elementary school, then in middle school the local library installed computers and quit updating their card catalog, so I forgot most of what I knew.

DD is dogshit.

All the cool libraries use LoC.

Shine
Feb 26, 2007

No Muscles For The Majority


Shrecknet posted:

SA->Ask/Tell->Tell me about references in newer media lost on goons

The WWE thread when Bad Bunny appeared on Raw.

Powered Descent
Jul 13, 2008

We haven't had that spirit here since 1969.



From the newspaper comic strip thread, a Far Side cartoon from 1987 that a bunch of goons were too young to get the reference:

The Lone Badger
Sep 24, 2007



I was taught to use the filing cabinets to look up periodicals in high school.

Lemniscate Blue
Apr 21, 2006

Here we go again.

Powered Descent posted:

From the newspaper comic strip thread, a Far Side cartoon from 1987 that a bunch of goons were too young to get the reference:

I can see that - I'd almost expect more goons to know Threepenny Opera than Bobby Darin at this point just through having weird interests and hobbies.

Teriyaki Hairpiece
Dec 29, 2006

Ask me about my dream Frasier episode where Frasier and Bulldog oil their heads and then rub them together. It's definitely not a fetish of mine, I swear!

I've heard the Bobby Darin version of Mack the Knife in a store or two as part of their general music. I'm always like what the gently caress this is a really messed up song about murders.

Can't wait to hear uncensored Break Stuff by Limp Bizkit while I'm waiting on my meds at CVS in the 2050's.

Cobalt-60
Oct 11, 2016

Over time, random factors add up. What is chaos in the moment becomes systemic over time and space. As data accumulates, a pattern emerges.



I used to work at a "family" restaurant with an oldies music theme; listening to Elvis, The Doors and Rolling Stones play in the background and remembering back when those used to be dangerous and subversive; now it's PG-rated ambient music.

Or back when I learned about jazz in middle school music class; learning that it used to be wild and dangerous and a moral threat was a surprise to us, who associated jazz with NPR; staid white people music. (The lesson left out the biggest reason why jazz got so many moral guardians outraged; it wasn't that it was "new and different," it was that it "encouraged race mixing.")

Jeza
Feb 13, 2011

The cries of the dead are terrible indeed; you should try not to hear them.


Jack B Nimble posted:

gently caress, that's a reference that *I* didn't get until now; of *course* index cards were orginally primarily designed for Dewey decimal style indexing in wooden drawers, I've just never even seen them used that way by regular people.

Giving me flashbacks to my subject library at university. There was no 'active' librarian, just a big set of wooden drawers full of index cards. To take a book out you had to fill out a carbon copy paper (itself something talked about in here before lol) and file half of it away in the draw.

The index cards themselves were all of different vintages. Some of the the older ones were on yellowed card stock with ye olde typewriter face, straight out of the 30s/40s.

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



I visited a bonsai show in 2018 that had the cards with the species, cultivar, age, owner, &c. on it, done with a typewriter on a card it had been for eighty years.

Cemetry Gator
Apr 3, 2007

Do you find something comical about my appearance when I'm driving my automobile?


Cobalt-60 posted:

I used to work at a "family" restaurant with an oldies music theme; listening to Elvis, The Doors and Rolling Stones play in the background and remembering back when those used to be dangerous and subversive; now it's PG-rated ambient music.

Or back when I learned about jazz in middle school music class; learning that it used to be wild and dangerous and a moral threat was a surprise to us, who associated jazz with NPR; staid white people music. (The lesson left out the biggest reason why jazz got so many moral guardians outraged; it wasn't that it was "new and different," it was that it "encouraged race mixing.")

I remember hearing Femme Fatal by the Velvet Underground at a Friendly's while driving back from college, which seems very weird.

I used to work retail, and here were some of the songs they had in rotation:
Brown Sugar by the Rolling Stones
Stagger Lee by Lloyd Price
Enola Gay by OMD (when I'm shopping, I really want to hear a song about a horrible war crime)
Luka by Suzanne Vega
Someone Saved My Life Tonight by Elton John

I'm sure there were a few others, but yeah, some of those were just songs I can't imagine why you would put them into rotation.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

It's weird when Oldies stations change formats. We had one or two 50's radio stations growing up and then one day they were 70's classics. Every 10 or 15 years the number of people still around who remember that music declines enough that they move on to the next decade. Or did. The on-demand nature of media now kind of killed that broadcast format. Now you can just listen to an Apple Music podcast with Huey Lewis talking over all your childhood favorites.

Cobalt-60 posted:

Do people still use Rolodexes/rotary card files? I still see 3x5 cards for sale (for what? no idea; haven't used one since high school), so I assume there's still storage inertia.

Rolodex is still a thing and I have no idea why.

https://www.rolodex.com

Some old technology still has a certain charm or utility to it, but there is nothing that a Rolodex can do that's easier, cheaper, or more efficient than a digital daily planner. Even if you wanted a paper backup, you wouldn't want it to constantly take up desk space in an expensive spinning card holder. They look cool though. I suspect that's most of their appeal. If I had an office desk and people to impress I'd own a mostly empty Rolodex.

Scudworth
Jan 1, 2005

When life gives you lemons, you clone those lemons, and make super lemons.



Dinosaur Gum

I see Rolodexs in construction/contractor offices all the time. Someone would have to go through and put it all into a computer and they don't have time or inclination so it's still there from the 70s or 80s, just gets added on to. Old established businesses that aren't computer-based don't care to do the data entry involved in changing that.

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.





How many Kids These Days know what "Nickelodeon" is a reference to?

Gaius Marius
Oct 9, 2012



I cant tell you with certainty that they didn't know what a nickelodeon was when the network premiered.

JnnyThndrs
May 29, 2001

HERE ARE THE FUCKING TOWELS

Cemetry Gator posted:

I used to work retail, and here were some of the songs they had in rotation:

Stagger Lee by Lloyd Price


At least it wasn’t Stagger Lee by Nick Cave

FreudianSlippers
Apr 12, 2010

Shooting and Fucking
are the same thing!



Fun fact:
Stagger Lee is the only song off Murder Ballads that's about a real murder.

Though one that had been mythologised for decades beforehand so it's pretty removed from the reality of pimp "Stack/Stag" Lee Shelton shooting his colleague Billy Lyons for stealing his hat during a drunken argument during the Christmas of 1895.

RC and Moon Pie
May 5, 2011



Cobalt-60 posted:

Or back when I learned about jazz in middle school music class; learning that it used to be wild and dangerous and a moral threat was a surprise to us, who associated jazz with NPR; staid white people music. (The lesson left out the biggest reason why jazz got so many moral guardians outraged; it wasn't that it was "new and different," it was that it "encouraged race mixing.")

Pat Boone was A Thing because he was white and thus, acceptable to Boomers' parents. His version of Tutti Frutti outcharted Little Richard's, despite being this unforgivably soulless.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F68Z0sVVa7s

Boone reached #1 by covering Fats Domino's Ain't That a Shame, which he did a pretty decent job on. Neither Domino nor Little Richard claimed to have minded Boone that much. Domino was co-writer of his song and earned a ton of royalties. Little Richard claimed that kids bought both his records and Boone's, putting Boone's on display while secretly listening to his.

Boone himself hits a double reference for older media references lost, first for his leeching off Black artists. Secondly, because in a brief moment of clarity, he parodied the hell out of himself with a metal album.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qjQV3omTRtk

Boone's lil' wild streak scared the GOP, who quickly shamed him back into purity.

Jazerus
May 24, 2011



Gaius Marius posted:

I cant tell you with certainty that they didn't know what a nickelodeon was when the network premiered.

i think they had a short that they played once in a while that explained the origin of the name. i'm pretty sure i learned it through nick at some point as a kid, anyway

My Lovely Horse
Aug 21, 2010




JnnyThndrs posted:

At least it wasn’t Stagger Lee by Nick Cave
Where The Wild Roses Grow definitely, and amusingly, made it onto one of those "romantic music for couples" compilations back in the day. The opener no less, if I recall.

Also from Red Hand Files:

quote:

Is the screeching at the end of ‘Stagger Lee’ due to the fact that when Stag filled Billy Dilly full of lead, he blew his own dick off in the process? After all, Billy Dilly was presumably still slobbering on his head when Stag opened fire. Thanks for taking the time to consider this question.

quote:

Dear Slim Lee,

During my more gloomy moments I sometimes wonder if anyone actually listens to my lyrics, and whether the enormous amount of work I put into them may in fact go unheeded. So it was with very real gratitude that I read this question, as you had clearly reflected long and hard on the matter. I am very moved, to be honest. On my knees, I thank you (but not in that way).

I didn’t even have to look at the address of this question to know that you were from Melbourne. We Melburnians are warped but meticulous thinkers and, I would tentatively suggest, a step ahead of everyone else. Our minds simply jump the leash and run, unchecked and slavering, where others fear to tread.

It did occur to me one night, as I performed Stagger Lee in full priapic flight, that Stagger Lee does not shoot Billy Dilly with an actual gun at all, but that his being “filled full of lead. Bang! Bang! Bang!” was simply a metaphor for the force of Stag’s ejaculation, and Blixa’s terrifying and inhuman screeching at the end orgasmic in nature. This made me wonder, chillingly at the time, what sleeping with Blixa must be like – something I am sadly unable to elaborate on.

Beyond that, my friend, I have nothing more to add, but if any more theories about my songs work their way into your beautiful mind, perhaps on one of those warm and eerie Melbourne nights, where the fruit bats fly from tree to tree, please do not hesitate to write in and tell me. I would love that.

Love, Nick

JnnyThndrs
May 29, 2001

HERE ARE THE FUCKING TOWELS

Nick Cave’s a wordy SOB, but I love him for things like that.

King Hong Kong
Nov 6, 2009

For we'll fight with a vim
that is dead sure to win.



Arsenic Lupin posted:

How many Kids These Days know what "Nickelodeon" is a reference to?

I saw someone on Reddit, who only knew the TV network, confused by why a movie theater would have that name.

AmbassadorofSodomy
Dec 30, 2016

SUCK A MALE CAMEL'S DICK WITH MIRACLE WHIP!!


Home sick from work today, and watching Married With Children season 1 on DVD.

Collect Calls. Who the gently caress uses them anymore?

tinytort
Jun 10, 2013

Super healthy, super cheap

AmbassadorofSodomy posted:

Home sick from work today, and watching Married With Children season 1 on DVD.

Collect Calls. Who the gently caress uses them anymore?

I used them a couple times in high school, but 1) we had a payphone so that students could call home without needing to go to the office, and 2) it was on the handful of times I didn't have a quarter to use to make the call.

I'd be surprised if they didn't still exist, though.

ulmont
Sep 15, 2010

IF I EVER MISS VOTING IN AN ELECTION (EVEN AMERICAN IDOL) ,OR HAVE UNPAID PARKING TICKETS, PLEASE TAKE AWAY MY FRANCHISE


AmbassadorofSodomy posted:

Collect Calls. Who the gently caress uses them anymore?

People in prison.

AKA Pseudonym
May 16, 2004

A dashing and sophisticated young man

Doctor Rope

Arsenic Lupin posted:

How many Kids These Days know what "Nickelodeon" is a reference to?

When Nickelodeon was still pretty new I was telling my 2nd grade friend that there was an entire channel for kids he didn't believe me because "Nickelodeon was an old type of theater." I got mad because that's just really poor reasoning and we stopped being friends for a while. But I learned what a Nickelodeon was.

Slimy Hog
Apr 22, 2008



AKA Pseudonym posted:

I got mad because that's just really poor reasoning and we stopped being friends for a while.

You ended up a goon so it sounds like he got the better end of that deal.

carry on then
Jul 10, 2010


tinytort posted:

I used them a couple times in high school, but 1) we had a payphone so that students could call home without needing to go to the office, and 2) it was on the handful of times I didn't have a quarter to use to make the call.

I'd be surprised if they didn't still exist, though.

You have a collect call from "bandpracticeisoverpickmeup"

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

"That's right. We've evolved."

"I can see that. Cool mutations."



Imagined posted:

I recently tried listening to some of the 50s and 60s British radio comedies that are supposed to have inspired the likes of Monty Python (e.g. The Goon Show) and found that, despite generally not being the sort of person bewildered by accents, I literally couldn't even understand what they were saying between the speed they were talking, the low quality of the original recording, the low bitrate of the files of that, only having the audio to go off of, and then not recognizing what they were parodying or satirizing.

You can read the scripts online!

http://www.thegoonshow.net/scripts.asp

The Goon Show is a curious mix of period-specific (often British-specific) references with timelessly absurd stupid-but-clever wit.


quote:

GRAMS:
Various timepieces ticking, chiming and cuckooing. A chicken clucking. Finally a hooter.

Bluebottle:
What time is it Eccles?

Eccles:
Err, just a minute. I've got it written down on a piece of paper. A nice man wrote the time down for me this morning.

Bluebottle:
Ooooh, then why do you carry it around with you Eccles?

Eccles:
Welll, um, if a anybody asks me the time, I can show it to dem.

Bluebottle:
Wait a minute Eccles, my good man.

Eccles:
What is it fellow?

Bluebottle:
It's writted on this bit of paper, what is eight o'clock, is writted.

Eccles:
I know that my good fellow. That's right, um, when I asked the fella to write it down, it was eight o'clock.

Bluebottle:
Well then. Supposing when somebody asks you the time, it isn't eight o'clock?

Eccles:
Well den, I don't show it to 'em.

Bluebottle:
Ooohhh.

Eccles:
[smacks lips] yeah.

Bluebottle:
Well how do you know when it's eight o'clock?

Eccles:
I've got it written down on a piece of paper.

The_Franz
Aug 8, 2003



long distance charges in north america are still a thing that exists, even though phone numbers have no connection to your physical location and haven't since 2004 when number porting was allowed. i can only surmise that they exist primarily to rip off old people who don't know any better

1-900 numbers (and their predecessor the 976 number) are another one of those things that just kind of disappeared around the turn of the century that nobody under 30 likely has any experience with. the idea of paying per-minute for phone calls as a whole is probably something that's totally foreign to kids. even communicating internationally is free as long as you use one of the 9000 voip apps out there

The_Franz fucked around with this message at 00:05 on Apr 30, 2021

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

RC and Moon Pie
May 5, 2011



For years, I had a prepaid long distance keytag. Never used it. I guess I got it in high school because my family didn't have a bag/car phone until a year or two later.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply