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cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



The problem with the enormous amount of progress I managed in 2 weeks off from work is that the tiny bits I've managed in the evenings feel like no progress at all, but there's the weekends.

My wife has now allowed herself to get excited and we've discussed what furniture is getting moved in here (to make space in the house, it's cupboards and drawers units full of craft materials and tools), the layout, lighting and finish. Interior cladding she's asked for timber and lining paper do she can paint it light easily, 2 separate switched lights, 3 double sockets, 2 along the window wall, 1 at the far end. That's nice and simple and within my abilities, waiting to hear back from the electrician when he can come to discuss the job. Floor will be lino to be easily cleaned.

I need to sort a step out as the distance from the grass to the threshold is nearly 300mm, another thing to figure out along with nice stepping stones. She'd like ones shaped like maple leaves, not quite sure how that will work but I like a challenge.

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cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



And the weekend is here. I stripped the tarp off to see how bad the leaks had been.


1st one, I managed to raise this section and drain it better so it's already dry.


This isn't so great but it's not soaked in so it'll dry today. I need to trim all the "not square" bits of ply. Debating getting the router on some of this



Bugs are making it a home already

I also need to attach another timber to each end so the roof extends over the cladding, but due to metric/Imperial size mismatch and my lack of foresight the soffit and decking add 27mm to the 150mm timber height. I'll make it as tidy as I can.

I just wish I didn't feel so thoroughly fatigued for no good reason.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




cakesmith handyman posted:

I just wish I didn't feel so thoroughly fatigued for no good reason.

:unsmith::hf::unsmith:

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Well fatigue got me, I fell asleep midday and woke up to rain so had to run out sand screw the tarp back down. This morning was better so off it came again and it was bone dry in a few hours.


Chamfered the edges of the roof boards that were a little thicker than their neighbours


Fitted the extra end timbers and filled the gaps where the roof ended up honestly not perfectly square


Used the 2x6 I cut too short a while ago


Eased the corners so the rubber didn't tear on it


Laid out the rubber to let it relax and unwrinkle


Marked out 100mm from the edges, rolled the rubber back to uncover half the roof, rolled out the water based adhesive up to the 100mm mark


My suspicions that this was just PVA were dashed when my wife pointed out you could smell it at the front of the house, I think my sense of smell pretty much just shut down immediately


Rolled the edges back to see the unglued 100mm


Used the other adhesive for this, on both the roof and the rubber. This one has more interesting hazard signs.


Roll it on, let it flash off then carefully fold it back and brush it smooth.

That's how it sits at the moment, going to go out after tea and trim the excess and for the upstands.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Didn't trim the excess and whatever last night, made pizza and drank beer instead.

This morning:

Not the end of the world.


gently caress.

Not as bad as it looks, this area is a side with an upstand trim. There's 90+% of this strip adhered so if I tried to pull this back to have another go I'd likely ruin the whole roof. Basically not pretty but for my first go it's acceptable.

How did this happen? Almost certainly glue that hasn't finished gassing off, either I didn't leave it long enough or there was excess glue in crevices. This was the scrappiest edge where the slight out of square condition manifested so not 100% surprised.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




This project is a wonderful guide to what things I'm best off not doing myself. Thank you for your sacrifice.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



If I were a perfectionist (and I'm obviously not) this step would definitely be "pay a professional" everything under this apart from fitting the door I'd be comfortable saying do it yourself.

The end result in the roof is perfectly fine in terms of weather tightness but I'll always be able to see the mistakes and fixes. I'm okay with that, I've always had a problem not starting a project because I know it'll be imperfect, I'd rather finish it imperfect than never get around to starting it.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Another week, it rained a lot so I got to see that the gutters I put in are fine. They could be better, the second half had a steeper fall than the first half but they both go the same direction at least. I'll tweak it when it's dry.


About the gutter, the drip trim is in two parts, the rectangular profile you screw to the joist header and the y-shaped piece. Instructions are to push the roof rubber into the groove at the top with the top of the y, then clip the y into the groove at the bottom. This is pretty much impossible, I had to go along the roof with a blunted 1/2"brick chisel pushing the rubber into the groove then come along afterwards and clip the y into place. Gutter just sits beneath that.


We tackled the door as all the new hardware turned up, sanding took a couple of hours then my wife gave it a couple of coats of 10 year protective woodstain. It's come up lovely and she's going to give it another couple of coats while I'm at work.


I had to rig up a temporary porch and it ended up naturally curved and we agreed we need something long term so I'll see about making a proper permanent version.

Target this week is find a 2450mm sill and install sill and window.

Tomarse
Mar 7, 2001

Grr





I forgot to check this thread for a few weeks... This looks awesome! nice work!

You shouldn't worry about any small imperfections like your roof bubbles. You cant see them in the aerial shot!

I'm pretty sure 99% of the projects I have ever completed also have imperfections in them somewhere as do pretty much all of the bits of work I have actually paid professionals to do on/in my house or vehicle

You should make your porch roof full width so as to give a space beside the door for you to lean stuff up or hang stuff or leave shoes outside without having to trip over them

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Cabin isn't dead, I'm just, struggling.

Latest task was to get a window sill for a reasonable price. Nothing used at that size, new everyone wanted £60ish but I found a local building plastics company that would sell me a 6m length for £30. Picked that up in the wife's car, cut it in half in the car park. Trimmed to the right length once home, I need to list the other half for sale and with luck I'll make a bit back if someone wants to collect.

That prepared I started to cut a hole in the cabin, starting with the wrap:


Started with the Jigsaw but quickly switched to the router. Battery trim router might not be very ergonomic but it's unbeatable for portability with a flush trim bit.




Stapled and trimmed back


Cut one end of the sill to shape, offer up, mark and cut other end. Generous bead of silicon in the grooves on the underside of the window then screw the sill down to the upside down frame. Place the frame in the opening, clamps just to stop the top moving.


Big rear end screws down into the wooden frame.

Then it's break out the packing shims and square it up and screw it in the sides and top


The light inside is incredible, no regrets.


Packed all the left over 50mm insulation into the roof so it's 150mm now.


Found these low profile dimmable/4000 lumen panels at Costco, after shopping around I'm going back to get two of these next week.


£10 for a sandstone top for the step


Decision still to be made on round Vs square but 3 or 4 of these should make a path.



Spray foamed any gap over 10mm (nozzle width) and caulked anything smaller.


Did the same to the door and window



Went browsing cushion floor/lino. My suggestions were not appreciated.



For real though probably going to get the grey herringbone one at the bottom because that's what my wife would like.


I've been trying to get an electrician in to quote putting in an extra circuit, (house distribution box is full so that's either a small parallel box or a whole new bigger one) running the line to the cabin, installing a 20A distribution unit and 3 double sockets and a double dimmer. I can do a lot of that myself and will if I can save money but it'll all need inspecting and some people don't like inspecting and signing off another person's work. I'll definitely dig the trench though.

Unfortunately the guy I used to use a few years ago isn't answering his phone and I've resorted to contacting anyone in the village Facebook group who recently asked about electricians and seeing who they used and if they recommend them. We'll see, don't want to do much else in there until I've had quotes incase I have to pull something down again.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




cakesmith handyman posted:

Went browsing cushion floor/lino. My suggestions were not appreciated.


I especially love that the OSB finish would be worse than what's there now. I'm a little baffled why anyone would want that tbh.

cakesmith handyman posted:

Unfortunately the guy I used to use a few years ago isn't answering his phone and I've resorted to contacting anyone in the village Facebook group who recently asked about electricians and seeing who they used and if they recommend them. We'll see, don't want to do much else in there until I've had quotes incase I have to pull something down again.

I've had reasonable luck with checkatrade.com if that's useful in your area.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Jaded Burnout posted:

I especially love that the OSB finish would be worse than what's there now. I'm a little baffled why anyone would want that tbh.

That's the dumbest linoleum I've ever seen, lol.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Cabin still isn't dead, still struggling.

Gave up on any local or local-ish plasterers, some are booked up to 3 years out now. So I'm going to learn how to plaster (I'm under no illusions it's hard as poo poo I know)

Caulked the last of the gaps, boarded out with 1/2". I hate drywall screws, I always seem to end up digging bits of swarf out of my fingertips.



In slightly better news it turns out I do have a spare circuit in the consumer unit and I can get the cable from that installed around the outside of the house at a low level where it'll be pretty much unnoticeable, so I'll only need to dig a trench and have the cabin connected/checked/inspected. My next job is actually figuring out the best way/place to put a hole in for the cable, after I spent so much time and effort filling holes :argh:

While I was installing this lot I had a little 300w oil filled heater running at about 25% and it kept it lovely and warm.

Tomarse
Mar 7, 2001

Grr





Yay! Progress! :)

Having attempted plastering in my house I would advise just putting filler over the screw heads and then painting everything...

A Small Car
Aug 24, 2016




Looking good! I would be seriously tempted to just throw up some wallpaper and call it a day, but I don't have a wife to keep happy. I would hate myself forever if I actually did that. The wallpaper, not the wife

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





Cool thread!

Have you checked wifi signal strength in the building yet? I figure you're mostly at final strength, I suppose a touch more could get blocked by the cladding when you put that up.

Perhaps it'll be worth it to run some appropriately shielded cable in the electrical trench when you pull/dig that?

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



A Small Car posted:

Looking good! I would be seriously tempted to just throw up some wallpaper and call it a day, but I don't have a wife to keep happy. I would hate myself forever if I actually did that. The wallpaper, not the wife

This may actually happen as my wife wants to put lining paper up and paint that, so screw holes and caulk the joints might happen instead.

WiFi is "ok" but after steel cladding I guess it'll step to "dogshit" so I'll be running some donated Cat5 in the trench with whatever shielding is deemed appropriate. (Thanks Tomarse)

I'm questions about corner beading strips for plastering, I've seen no mention of using them between the walls and ceiling, only between different walls. Do they just plaster that joint and forget about it?

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




You don't bead inside corners, you tape them. You bead outside corners, basically anywhere where you want the plaster to stop at a sharp line in mid air, you need the bead to plaster up to.

You don't often get outside corners between walls and ceilings, presumably why you're not seeing anything about it.

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cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Oh that makes sense thank you.

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