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Pedestrian Xing
Jul 18, 2007



How fast do feline resorptive lesions happen? My cat needed to be sedated to biopsy a nasal mass and my vet suggested doing a dental at the same time since it would only cost a little more. She found two severely decayed teeth and removed them and he's bounced back wonderfully. What's odd is that he had a normal exam in November with nothing unusual noted. It it possible everything looked normal then?

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A LOVELY LAD
Feb 8, 2006

Hey man, wanna hear a secret?





College Slice

1up posted:

So I have an almost 14 year old cat with raging dermatitis and you should definitely commit now to a feeding schedule and feed them completely separately. If the itching still happens, you might need an immunosupressant as well. My cat takes atopica/cyclosporine daily and eats isolated from our other cats, but all it takes is 1 little bit of kibble overlooked after a meal to trigger a new episode of scratching a hole into herself.

Thanks for that - yeah we had another mild bad stomach day so switching back to soy again, I was kinda hoping for a magic bullet where both cats could eat it and we wouldn't have to worry about food stealing etc and we'd have no more itching or red poos. The steroids handle the itching in the main problem catte (and hopefully we can try ween her off if it is indeed a food allergy causing the itching) , and keeping the other away from the soy kibble should stop her itching as well.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


Pedestrian Xing posted:

How fast do feline resorptive lesions happen? My cat needed to be sedated to biopsy a nasal mass and my vet suggested doing a dental at the same time since it would only cost a little more. She found two severely decayed teeth and removed them and he's bounced back wonderfully. What's odd is that he had a normal exam in November with nothing unusual noted. It it possible everything looked normal then?

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Most feline dental disease is hidden under the gums which is why dental radiographs are so important. Most will just tolerate the discomfort.

Pedestrian Xing
Jul 18, 2007



YourCreation posted:

Most feline dental disease is hidden under the gums which is why dental radiographs are so important. Most will just tolerate the discomfort.

Good to know. She said he flinched (under anaesthesia) when she probed one of them so it must have really hurt.

Reik
Mar 8, 2004

Yuo think you can take me? ill eat ur dumb werewolf ass alive, loser.

Our cat continues to be medically baffling. She got a presumptive diagnosis of Transitional Cell Carcinoma 6 weeks ago when we did an ultrasound to look for the cause of her high calcium levels. We were going to start her on palladia but her appetite was still not great and we found out it was because her pancreatitis was flaring up again so we had been working on getting that under control and she's back to eating well again and putting on weight. Yesterday we noticed she was being weird at the litter box, only peeing a small amount before getting out, going to another litter box, and peeing a small amount again. Assuming this was progression of the cancer we took her in for an ultrasound today before finally starting her on palladia, and apparently her tumor has shrunk slightly and was visibly less dense in the ultrasound despite her getting no cancer treatment since her diagnosis.

Geno
Apr 26, 2004
STUPID
DICK


On Wednesday, my cat started showing lethargy and didn't eat all day. Took him in Thursday morning (yesterday) to the emergency vet, they diagnosed him as having a fever but were unsure of the cause. He was briefly (like 10 seconds) exposed to an outdoor cat 10 days ago but that was the only thing I can think of.

After coming back from the vet, he ate some but slept most of the day, probably since one of the meds causes sedation. He hasn't used the litter box at all.

Now this morning, I put out some food but he still hasn't eaten. He vomited some of the food he ate yesterday though. He also started having eye pus this morning. He did start purring when I petted him; that purring wasn't happening at all on Wednesday.

Kinda stressed since I'm supposed to be out of town tomorrow but will be back Sunday morning.

YourCreation
Jan 4, 2004

A little creative surgery helps turn a few sick pets into a new and improved friend!


You need to get your kitty back to the vets. A cat who is not eating is a ticking time bomb for getting worst (hepatic lipidosis). It may be a viral flare up, but could be things like pancreatitis, pneumonia, UTI, etc. Cats can also purr to self soothe so it doesn't necessarily mean he's feeling good.

J-Spot
May 6, 2002



Anyone here have experience with diabetic cats? Mine was recently diagnosed and it's proving to be a bit stressful. We started him on two units of insulin but that didn't seem to be doing much so he was upped to three a few weeks ago. Late Friday night he had some sort of episode where he seemed very out of it and blind from what I could tell. I took him to the emergency vet but the cause was inconclusive. The most obvious answer was hypoglycemia though his blood sugar reading wasn't quite low enough for the vet to feel that was the cause. On the vets advice I skipped his next insulin dose and now have him back on two units until I can talk to his regular vet.

One thing I'm struggling with is his diet. He's always been a free feeder but you're recommended to limit them to two meals a day. I tried that but it seems he has bilious vomiting syndrome and will throw up bile if he goes too long on an empty stomach. Naturally, the solution to that is free feeding. Plus he had gained weight in between vet visits so I somehow need to balance him getting enough to eat when he gets his insulin while also avoiding the vomiting and preventing weight gain.

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


J-Spot posted:

Anyone here have experience with diabetic cats? Mine was recently diagnosed and it's proving to be a bit stressful. We started him on two units of insulin but that didn't seem to be doing much so he was upped to three a few weeks ago. Late Friday night he had some sort of episode where he seemed very out of it and blind from what I could tell. I took him to the emergency vet but the cause was inconclusive. The most obvious answer was hypoglycemia though his blood sugar reading wasn't quite low enough for the vet to feel that was the cause. On the vets advice I skipped his next insulin dose and now have him back on two units until I can talk to his regular vet.

One thing I'm struggling with is his diet. He's always been a free feeder but you're recommended to limit them to two meals a day. I tried that but it seems he has bilious vomiting syndrome and will throw up bile if he goes too long on an empty stomach. Naturally, the solution to that is free feeding. Plus he had gained weight in between vet visits so I somehow need to balance him getting enough to eat when he gets his insulin while also avoiding the vomiting and preventing weight gain.
Have you tried meal feeding with canned, and leaving a bit of dry out all day? If he'll adapt to that, perhaps snacking on dry throughout the day would keep the vomiting at bay without affecting his meal feeding too much. Otherwise, you could ask your vet about glargine, which depending on the cat might work better with a free feeding schedule. It's a more expensive insulin though.

nunsexmonkrock
Apr 13, 2008




J-Spot posted:


One thing I'm struggling with is his diet. He's always been a free feeder but you're recommended to limit them to two meals a day. I tried that but it seems he has bilious vomiting syndrome and will throw up bile if he goes too long on an empty stomach. Naturally, the solution to that is free feeding. Plus he had gained weight in between vet visits so I somehow need to balance him getting enough to eat when he gets his insulin while also avoiding the vomiting and preventing weight gain.

I free feed my cats, however if I forget to fill up the bowls and they are empty for half a day or so the cats will gorge themselves and then vomit. For this they make special bowls specifically for slowing down eating. For the life of me though I can't remember the one that I personally had.

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J-Spot
May 6, 2002



Slugworth posted:

Have you tried meal feeding with canned, and leaving a bit of dry out all day? If he'll adapt to that, perhaps snacking on dry throughout the day would keep the vomiting at bay without affecting his meal feeding too much. Otherwise, you could ask your vet about glargine, which depending on the cat might work better with a free feeding schedule. It's a more expensive insulin though.

Yeah, that's kind of what I've been trying to do although he's not really wild about wet food. I'll put some out and he'll take a few bites before walking away but if there's dry food available to him he'll prioritize that. I do have him on glargine and the vet advised to at least make sure he's getting at least a few bites in at the time he gets the insulin.

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