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The Hello Machine

I'm not a real machine, but I am a real Hello-sayer.
I just got Mathematics for Human Flourishing. I've been hearing such lovely things about this book! Right now I'm teaching math to future elementary and middle school teachers and im thinking of assigning a chapter from it as a reading assignment. I would like them to not see math as a painful chore but as something beautiful that can bring creativity and community.

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xcheopis


SpaghettiArmstrong posted:

I just got Mathematics for Human Flourishing. I've been hearing such lovely things about this book! Right now I'm teaching math to future elementary and middle school teachers and im thinking of assigning a chapter from it as a reading assignment. I would like them to not see math as a painful chore but as something beautiful that can bring creativity and community.

That looks very interesting!

I was finally able to afford a copy of A Broken Flute: The Native Experience in Books for Children and it just arrived today and I'm very excited about it! It's one of those books that the library wouldn't let you check out to take home - you had to get it from the reference desk and read it right there.

The concrete floor is cold; the walls are bare

How Wonderful!


I only have excellent ideas
I am finishing a book I started awhile ago about sex and love between men in the 19th c. US before the invention of the "homosexual" or the "gay man" as socially understood categories. It's really interesting especially as people on both sides of the Atlantic begin to go "hm perhaps I am a certain specific kind of guy and can organize myself and my coterie along the lines of constituting a new sort of subject position." Right now I'm just in the middle of a long section on Walt Whitman so I took a break and reread the first version of Leaves of Grass.





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biosterous




this is the season at work in which i do a lot of zombie-brain tasks (think stuffing envelopes), so i can read by propping up my phone and occasionally booping the screen to turn the page :yayclod:

i've been making my way through eric flint's 1632/ring of fire series. basic premise is a small west virginian mining town got transported back to 1632 in the middle of germany and there's War and Politicking happening around them. but unlike a lot of these type of books ("what if some modern navy seals were with the brits in WWI?") it's not just a huge lovefest on guns and america and freedoms. there's a lot of focus on using their current stockpiles of coal and future tech (that they know will break down) to jumpstart an industrial base that's maybe a hundred years ahead of current tech, but still maintainable with current resources.

they also quickly come to the conclusion that they can't just wall themselves off from the rest of europe, so they need to participate and while they don't have the power to make grand sweeping changes to improve everything, they can start off by making small changes where they can and try to build from there. as a small mining town they're very pro-union and mostly see dealing with the nobility & rulers as a necessary means to achieve their ends.

also there's no weird underlying concept that the future folks are inherently smarter or better than any of the europe folks - the americans just have access to information that hasn't been discovered yet, and once that starts spreading they will lose their edge. there are several times where european powers will end up doing something like making a better gun than the americans, because they got some intel on gun manufacture and branched off in a different direction and the americans are caught on the back foot.

i just really like that, throughout the series, it is a fundamental part of the fiction that any advantage the americans have is temporary, and the world will catch up with them quickly, so they need to focus on social change and achieve enough goodwill and/or political strength in all levels of society in order to make things be better for everyone.

also it's really funny that a lot of the characters would probably have called themselves conservative in america but the actions they are taking are pretty dang socialist



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he/him

3D Megadoodoo

That sounds very interesting.

ToxicFrog


I've never bothered checking out 1632 because I know a lot of it was co-written with David Weber, and while Weber is sometimes a trash snack for me I really don't want to experience his takes on 17th-century European politics

Based on that description it sounds like maybe Flint has more control over the plot, though, maybe I should check it out
This also reminds me that I picked up Flint's Belisarius series back when it was a free download on the Baen website and never got around to reading it, maybe I should do that

Meanwhile for what I've actually been reading, I went away to a cabin on a lake with my family for thanksgiving and did a bunch of reading there, except the first two books I picked (Unconquerable Sun and Master of One) had been recommended to me as standalones but are actually the first books in their respective series and the rest of the books haven't been written yet! That makes me extremely grumpy

So then I read two Dave Barry collections from my childhood (Talks Back and Greatest Hits) and found that they're just as funny as I remember them being 20 years ago, but in different ways; as a kid I was more "lol exploding cows" and as an adult that still gets a chuckle but the jokes about parenting, idiotic pets, etc land a lot better for me now. The political stuff makes a lot more sense, too -- as a kid that mostly just washed over me.

After that I read Urban Enemies, a collection of short stories by established urban fantasy authors focusing on the antagonists of their respective series; I picked it up mainly for the Seanan McGuire short in the InCryptid setting ("Balance"), but there are a few others that landed well for me -- "Kiss" by Lilith Saintcrow (Jill Kismet), "The Resurrectionist" by Caitlin Kittredge (Hellhound Chronicles), and "Altar Boy" by Jonathan Maberry (Joe Ledger) all make me think that the series they write might be worth a look.

Not sure what to read next; I was recently gifted Gödel, Escher, Bach and that's going to be my next nonfiction read, but it's also in hardcopy so I can't just carry it around and read it whenever, it's strictly a "when I have time to sit down and read for a while" book. Derelict by L.J. Cohen caught my attention but that's another book-one-of-a-series and I'm not sure it's one I want to read right now (also, I only have the first book; I think I got it in a bundle a while ago).

Maybe I'll give those Belisarius books a look after all?

biosterous




i recently reread the belisarius books (last time i read them was in my teens, wanted to see how they held up). and the parts that are good are good, but there's a fair amount of yikes and oh jeez shut up (and a much lesser sin of ugh stop leaning on this catchphrase it sucks). every race/ethnicity has a few defining traits and are total exemplars of those traits at all times (good or bad). fortunately for the majority of them it's neutral-to-positive portrayals at least.

1632 itself is definitely the most boomer-dad fiction* of the ones i've read so far, and might be skippable if you find a decent summary of the actual plot events. the rest of the series (so far) is a lot more about the logistics and politics of trying to revolutionize 17th century europe

and if you end up hating the novels but still enjoying the premise, there's tons of endorsed fan works (generally short stories or serials) published as the Grantville Gazette (Grantville is the name of the town that gets sent into the past)

of the two series i definitely prefer 1632, it has a much better interesting stuff:boomer dad stuff ratio imo

*(we have future guns!!! we shoot the bad guys, who are very bad, here is a scene where they do very bad things before we shoot them, let's linger on them being very bad so that the readers get real mad before we shoot them with our future guns)



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Buttchocks

No, I like my hat, thanks.
Halfway through the audiobook of Master & Commander. I'm very proud that I only giggled a little every time they said "seaman". Not much has actually happened yet, but there has been a surprising amount of discussion of buggery.

How Wonderful!


I only have excellent ideas
One of my favorite poets, Jack Spicer, went pretty much forgotten after his death in the 60s with just a few die-hard fans and advocates keeping his stuff circulating, but lately he's had a big boom (maybe the last 10-15 years). I wrote part of my dissertation about him and was in pretty close contact with his major biographer, Kevin Killian, a great poet and novelist himself who was extremely generous in sharing materials and keeping me in the loop about a new collection of Spicer's plays and unpublished poems that was in the works.

Unfortunately Kevin died a few years ago, and was unable to see that book through to the end. But a different Spicer scholar took up the reins and now the book is out. I'm only reading it a little bit at a time because it's really bittersweet. On one hand it's just like-- after this that's all there is. On the other hand it makes me think of all the ways my diss would have been different if I'd had access to everything in here. But mostly I'm just remembering Kevin and how much passion and labor he put into this and wishing he'd been able to hold the actual thing itself in his hands.





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Viginti Septem

Oculus Noctuae
I just read Roald Dahl's The Sound Machine. It's a short, but I encourage every orb to read it.

take the moon

by sebmojo
i was reading some of this beat collection put together with a preface by ginsberg (ew) but i read the burroughs parts which were funny and the amiri baraka and joanne kyger parts which were cool. anyone an expert on beat stuff lol? if there are any names recced i will check out what they have to say, in this book

i liked how nakedly honest joannes stuff was, it was harder to relate to barakas stuff since reasons i dont rly need to say. burroughs was funny when he was liek drat with these techniques.... infinite rimbaud lmao

----------------
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How Wonderful!


I only have excellent ideas
I don't know who's in your specific anthology but I'm flipping through one I have in my office and here are some people from it I like. I am not a beat expert because for the normal petty poet reasons a lot of the people I like from that period really hated the beats and wanted them to gently caress off (ie. Spicer, Duncan, Blaser) so I didn't have to read them very much. But there are a bunch that I like reading:

Kenneth Rexroth
Philip Lamantia
Joseph Ceravolo (I don't think of him as a beat AT ALL though)
Bob Kaufman, who was known as the "black Rimbaud"
Diane DiPrima DEFINITELY
you already mentioned Joanne Kyger-- I like her a lot


Here are some people in my anthology I DEFINITELY do not consider beats, I have NO idea why they're in it but I think very much worth reading
Anne Waldman
Frank O'Hara
John Wieners





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take the moon

by sebmojo
lol john wieners is def in this one. i would never not notice that

& diane diprima is in it :yaycloud:

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beer pal

im reading the brothers karamazov (pronounced 'karamazov')

before that i read the atrocity exhibition by jg ballard which i thought was interesting and compelling but i didnt enjoy reading it
before that i read the savage detectives by roberto bolano which didnt really work for me. there were plenty of discrete scenes that i enjoyed but the book felt very long, like thinking back on it i find myself thinking 'oh that was a good bit' about almost all of it and yet i also think 'im glad im done with that one'

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ToxicFrog


Wow, it's been a whole month since I posted here

Let's see, I read the Tales of Inthya series which are cute gay wish-fulfillment fantasy; they don't have a lot of substance to them but they were really relaxing, and while they all follow the same basic structure ("someone with a lovely home life is transplanted into a loving and supportive environment and falls in love with someone there") they mix up the specifics a lot. Also one of the books has a trans lesbian werewolf as one of the major characters, and it looks like there's a gradually-building metaplot involving the hosed up relationship between the goddess of love and the goddess of war.

After that I read the first nine Cradle books, which are wuxia fantasy where a guy attempts to become The Best At Kung Fu in order to save his hometown from a giant monster prophecied to destroy it in a few decades. The series is not actually finished yet, which I didn't realize when I started reading, but I'm pretty sure at this point it's going to end with him killing and/or becoming a god. These books badly need a copyeditor, especially the first few, but they're a fun diversion if you're looking for the book equivalent of one of those kung fu movies where someone floats across the room biting bullets out of the air and spitting them back at people at supersonic speed, but turned up to 11.

Then I read Master and Commander, which I did not really like; it felt like he was trying so hard to feel like something written in the early 1800s that it ends up being considerably more tedious and impenetrable than stuff actually written two centuries ago.

Next, I poked at the Belisarius books, but punted them a book and a half in; biosterous sums it up well here:

biosterous posted:

i recently reread the belisarius books (last time i read them was in my teens, wanted to see how they held up). and the parts that are good are good, but there's a fair amount of yikes and oh jeez shut up (and a much lesser sin of ugh stop leaning on this catchphrase it sucks). every race/ethnicity has a few defining traits and are total exemplars of those traits at all times (good or bad). fortunately for the majority of them it's neutral-to-positive portrayals at least.
And the ratio of "good" to "yikes/shut up" was just not doing it for me.

Now I'm reading Patricia C. Wrede's Enchanted Forest Chronicles at the request of my daughter, who has read them three times now; I just finished the first book and it was pretty good. A bit disappointed that the second book is going to star a different character, because Cimorene is great.

One I'm done those, a friend recommended Nor Crystal Tears as a fun, short first-contact novel, something that's generally in my wheelhouse, and after that, who knows? Maybe I'll check out the Commonweal series the SFF thread is always burbling about, or read the next three Foreigner books.

bad guy

take the moon posted:

i was reading some of this beat collection put together with a preface by ginsberg (ew) but i read the burroughs parts which were funny and the amiri baraka and joanne kyger parts which were cool. anyone an expert on beat stuff lol? if there are any names recced i will check out what they have to say, in this book

i liked how nakedly honest joannes stuff was, it was harder to relate to barakas stuff since reasons i dont rly need to say. burroughs was funny when he was liek drat with these techniques.... infinite rimbaud lmao

i know a fair amount about the beats but what's your objection to ginsberg?

bad guy

i guess i don't need to know the ginsberg thing to make recs because the poets i would rec aren't like ginsberg anyway. people usually sleep on the west coast beats which is a real shame. i like them better. imo the east coast writers were useful for getting you to the new york school which owns but they were mostly loving around not fully formed while the west coasters were solid, having had robinson jeffers as a precursor so

gary snyder (the most important imo)
philip whalen
lew welch
(rexroth already been mentioned)
lawrence ferlinghetti
kenneth patchen was maybe more beat-adjacent than strictly beat and bicoastal but he has some real good poems, and i have a soft spot for anti-war poets

take the moon

by sebmojo
its the nambla thing lol. his texts are fine that just feels really sketch

ill check those guys out been really aiming to move past burroughs* and kerouac so i can stop being a basic baby

*i know hes problematic too

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I only have excellent ideas

bad guy posted:

i guess i don't need to know the ginsberg thing to make recs because the poets i would rec aren't like ginsberg anyway. people usually sleep on the west coast beats which is a real shame. i like them better. imo the east coast writers were useful for getting you to the new york school which owns but they were mostly loving around not fully formed while the west coasters were solid, having had robinson jeffers as a precursor so

gary snyder (the most important imo)
philip whalen
lew welch
(rexroth already been mentioned)
lawrence ferlinghetti
kenneth patchen was maybe more beat-adjacent than strictly beat and bicoastal but he has some real good poems, and i have a soft spot for anti-war poets

oh yeah I really do like Gary Snyder. I haven't read him in years because I gifted all of my Snyder books to a younger relative but he was mega important to me in college. bad guy, do you have any thoughts on the Berkeley Renaissance crew? I feel like I've become slightly less well-disposed towards the beats because I spent so much time over the past few years really immersing myself in people who considered themselves like... diametrically opposed to the beats, although I guess I really don't see that much air between them once you get outside of the immediate orbit of Spicer and Duncan.





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xcheopis


ToxicFrog posted:

One I'm done those, a friend recommended Nor Crystal Tears as a fun, short first-contact novel, something that's generally in my wheelhouse, a

Foster writes fairly good schlock. Interesting ideas but not so great with characters. He's also one of those who has to demonstrate how evil the bad guys are by descriptions of women being tortured/murdered. Also, the reasons behind humanity's wavering in the first-contact book make no sense and he has a (presumably unconscious) Western-centric historical bias. BUT. Leaving aside those things, his books are entertaining and I have enjoyed them.

and a misuse of 'nadir' in one of his books which still irritates me

The concrete floor is cold; the walls are bare

take the moon

by sebmojo

xcheopis posted:

and a misuse of 'nadir' in one of his books which still irritates me

thats inexcusable

----------------
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xcheopis


take the moon posted:

thats inexcusable

I actually threw the book on the floor and yelled at it. I did finish it, fuming all the way. The man was teaching writing classes, for pete's squeak!

The concrete floor is cold; the walls are bare

bad guy

take the moon posted:

its the nambla thing lol. his texts are fine that just feels really sketch

ill check those guys out been really aiming to move past burroughs* and kerouac so i can stop being a basic baby

*i know hes problematic too

yeah the reason i was asking was because i was thinking "i guess i should tell him not to read any biographies of burroughs..." lol

bad guy

How Wonderful! posted:

oh yeah I really do like Gary Snyder. I haven't read him in years because I gifted all of my Snyder books to a younger relative but he was mega important to me in college. bad guy, do you have any thoughts on the Berkeley Renaissance crew? I feel like I've become slightly less well-disposed towards the beats because I spent so much time over the past few years really immersing myself in people who considered themselves like... diametrically opposed to the beats, although I guess I really don't see that much air between them once you get outside of the immediate orbit of Spicer and Duncan.

i think they were very Serious about poetry, which is both an indictment and praise -- even when the tone is light they can't escape the awareness that they're doing something important with language, which makes it a heavy kind of lightness vs. say the kind of (seems to me) genuine light touch of o'hara for instance who was able to bring a lightness even to heavy things. there's a kind of antic disposition they can adopt which is incredibly grim -- stevens had that quality too. a lot of the high modernists did, and the berkeley guys are i think more directly in that lineage of the high modernists than the beats were even if pound and williams provided somewhat of a bridge to the beats. they were aiming for something self consciously within the established ambit of poetry, something which provided definition and strength to the core 20th c. poetry rather than extended its scope. this all sounds rather negative but i don't feel negatively about them; there's a tendency to deprecate people who are maintaining and reimagining the parts of the house that have already been built but without them the whole thing falls apart and you have nowhere to sit when it rains. to be clear i am not suggesting that they made no technical innovations -- i'd actually class them along with the black mountain school in terms of their formal flexibility and inventiveness, but all this stuff i'm saying about them i'd say about the black mountain school too. because they were formally experimental and technically innovative it's not normally acknowledged how conservative they were in that they were attempting to carry forward an idea of who a poet is and what a poem does which could be traced in an unbroken line all the way back to the romantics. whereas what the beats were doing was kind of manifesting an occasional spirit which skips along history like a flat stone on a pond, so it maybe stretches way farther back but it's got all kinds of holes in it, no density and only superficial continuity. the forms may be the same but the contexts are entirely different. you can see why the berkeley guys did not like what the beats were doing. but i think you're right that in retrospect there's less distance there than there might have seemed since the difference was less in the language than it was in a certain conception of the poet's role in public life. now that they're all dead and times are different, what we really have left is the language and language trends towards a rapprochement over time. the farther away you get from two objects, the closer they appear to each other.

idk i've never met a style of poetry i didn't like although there are individual poets i hate. the one thing i really don't like is when poets get bitchy with each other. this is of course something they do all the time and something other people take genuine and meaningful pleasure from so i realize it's my problem

How Wonderful!


I only have excellent ideas

bad guy posted:

i think they were very Serious about poetry, which is both an indictment and praise -- even when the tone is light they can't escape the awareness that they're doing something important with language, which makes it a heavy kind of lightness vs. say the kind of (seems to me) genuine light touch of o'hara for instance who was able to bring a lightness even to heavy things. there's a kind of antic disposition they can adopt which is incredibly grim -- stevens had that quality too. a lot of the high modernists did, and the berkeley guys are i think more directly in that lineage of the high modernists than the beats were even if pound and williams provided somewhat of a bridge to the beats. they were aiming for something self consciously within the established ambit of poetry, something which provided definition and strength to the core 20th c. poetry rather than extended its scope. this all sounds rather negative but i don't feel negatively about them; there's a tendency to deprecate people who are maintaining and reimagining the parts of the house that have already been built but without them the whole thing falls apart and you have nowhere to sit when it rains. to be clear i am not suggesting that they made no technical innovations -- i'd actually class them along with the black mountain school in terms of their formal flexibility and inventiveness, but all this stuff i'm saying about them i'd say about the black mountain school too. because they were formally experimental and technically innovative it's not normally acknowledged how conservative they were in that they were attempting to carry forward an idea of who a poet is and what a poem does which could be traced in an unbroken line all the way back to the romantics. whereas what the beats were doing was kind of manifesting an occasional spirit which skips along history like a flat stone on a pond, so it maybe stretches way farther back but it's got all kinds of holes in it, no density and only superficial continuity. the forms may be the same but the contexts are entirely different. you can see why the berkeley guys did not like what the beats were doing. but i think you're right that in retrospect there's less distance there than there might have seemed since the difference was less in the language than it was in a certain conception of the poet's role in public life. now that they're all dead and times are different, what we really have left is the language and language trends towards a rapprochement over time. the farther away you get from two objects, the closer they appear to each other.

idk i've never met a style of poetry i didn't like although there are individual poets i hate. the one thing i really don't like is when poets get bitchy with each other. this is of course something they do all the time and something other people take genuine and meaningful pleasure from so i realize it's my problem

I at least respect that a lot of Spicer's direct beef with the beats had to do with them making the bars too crowded. And I think that you're definitely right that the Berkeley guys saw the beat as doing something facile and shallow, formally-- I don't think that's necessarily fair and I especially think that they all, to a person, were very quick to ascribe naivety or crudity to poets that weren't in their immediate circle and weren't in particular self-consciously cultivating that Kantorwicz/Georg-esque relationship with History.

Which again like-- that parallax effect you're talking about at the end there is very true. From the vantage point of 60 years later it's kind of difficult to see the supposedly huge aesthetic and philosophical gulf between like, Spicer's coterie and Ferlenghetti's coterie except that they were petty and catty people just like anybody else and didn't like each other for very relatably petty and catty reasons.

On a side note I was looking at the NYRB sale today and noticed that they put out a little pocket sized edition of Jack Spicer's After Lorca which is one of my favorite single poetry books ever, so I think I'm going to assign it to a writing class in the spring.





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Bilirubin

The sanctioned action is to CHUG


Thanks for this discussion, its really timely for me and I'd love to hear more. I've been reading through the Ginsberg collection Planet News off and on since Ferlinghetti passed (its the only City Lights Pocket Poets volume I still have, my copy of Howl having long been lent/stolen into oblivion). I really like some of his stuff, but am meh to :yikes: with quite a few others. Its also quite dated and removed from a post boomer immediacy of experience. Ultimately I think it really needs to be read aloud for the full impact to be felt. There is a Youtube video of Allen reading one of his poems on Buckley's show back in the day that is really powerful in particular--even old Bill was left speechless.

I'm old enough that I would see him around Ann Arbor from time to time but never interacted with him. He was friend and mentor to some friends, reportedly hit on another friend of mine with a truly classy "who wants to sleep with a famous poet" line, and that concludes my Allen Ginsberg Ted talk.


OMGVBFLOL posted:

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Thank you deep dish peat moss!
bad guy

i agree with everything you wrote. even ginsberg knew the great majority of his poems were pretty bad...iirc somewhere he said he was just "whittling" a lot of the time. it's also true that he was a good performer, much much better than most modern poets, and a lot of his worse poems were probably still pretty good to actually hear. and there's mountains of evidence that he was a pretty skeevy dude especially in his later years.

How Wonderful!


I only have excellent ideas
I saw John Ashbery drop a shrimp on the floor at a thing and he didn't think anybody was watching and he just swooped down and picked it up and ate it.





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bad guy

How Wonderful! posted:

I saw John Ashbery drop a shrimp on the floor at a thing and he didn't think anybody was watching and he just swooped down and picked it up and ate it.

loo ol

bad guy

this thread brought me back to robert duncan and he's good, poets are good

How Wonderful!


I only have excellent ideas
Did you ever read The H.D. Book? I feel like I never really understood Duncan very well until I read it.





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Dr. Yinz Ljubljana

The Final Girl Support Group is a solid thriller, a love letter to slasher movies. Ripping prose. Loved it. Picked up Utopia Avenue by the guy who wrote Cloud Atlas and it's a 70s rock band version of Faust, at least from what I've read so far. Very very British with the slang and all, so reader beware

baka of lathspell

yall read this guyotat guy pretty wild

Dr. Yinz Ljubljana posted:

The Final Girl Support Group is a solid thriller, a love letter to slasher movies. Ripping prose. Loved it. Picked up Utopia Avenue by the guy who wrote Cloud Atlas and it's a 70s rock band version of Faust, at least from what I've read so far. Very very British with the slang and all, so reader beware

ya cloud atlas is 100 one of my favourite books and i liked the bone clocks too but i would be wary of mitchell tackling a theme like that. i could tell from segments of bc that he kind of wants to be up on a podium just dropping takes on art


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Dr. Yinz Ljubljana

baka fwocka fwame posted:

yall read this guyotat guy pretty wild

ya cloud atlas is 100 one of my favourite books and i liked the bone clocks too but i would be wary of mitchell tackling a theme like that. i could tell from segments of bc that he kind of wants to be up on a podium just dropping takes on art

It's still interesting, Mitchell nails a lot of the foibles of musicians and hits the vibe of 60s London. Jasper de Zoet is a character with ties to other Mitchell books (The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet)

Uria aalge

Chi-la-la-la-lax
I don’t really have any time to read books anymore apart from work-related books, but every now and again I pick up Anthony Doerr’s “Four Seasons in Rome: On Twins, Insomnia and the Biggest Funeral in the History of the World”.

I got it as a present when I had my twins in 2020, but I’m only 1/4 of the way through it. It’s good, though, I like his writing style!


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Thanks for the summer sig, ChubbyChecker!

"Nobody owns life, but everyone who can pick up a frying pan owns death" - Kurt Cobain

baka of lathspell

Dr. Yinz Ljubljana posted:

It's still interesting, Mitchell nails a lot of the foibles of musicians and hits the vibe of 60s London. Jasper de Zoet is a character with ties to other Mitchell books (The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet)

ya i made a recursive comment and dropped my take on the takes that someone might have

im sure its good ya theres deffo stuff hes good at


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nut

after so many failed attempts throughout life, I finally properly read A Void by Georges Perec last week and very much enjoyed how dumb but also fun it is.

beer pal

im reading lincoln in the bardo by george saunders and enjoying it quite a bit

before that i read death's end by cixin liu and it was fine. sometimes felt like he just had a bunch of cool sci fi ideas and needed to come up with a story to link em all together

before that i read my year of rest and relaxation by ottessa moshfegh i thought it was very good

before that i read blackshirts and reds by michael parenti. i didnt think it was very good. like its all good and correct what he's saying but its all so cursory and offers little concrete info (hardly any citations). the bits about post soviet russia were pretty good though

before taht i read the brothers karamazov. i found the first third or so pretty dry (a lot of theological debate etc) but once past all that i enjoyed it a lot

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i read bps book report & enjoyed it

chap into tomb of 500 thousand soldiers by guyotat and yea id cw it for a lot of stuff but the language is crazy good in the translation i have sometimes. burroughsian obvsly idk. opening of 2nd chap is crazy good i think im gonna actually finish this 1


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Ass-penny

Hi book thread! Been a long time!

beer pal posted:

before that i read death's end by cixin liu and it was fine. sometimes felt like he just had a bunch of cool sci fi ideas and needed to come up with a story to link em all together

Dang, you know it's been a minute since I read the Three Body trilogy but that's kind of making sense to me. That series turns so fast it could give you whiplash. I wonder if the ideas could be separated into individual stories and still make sense. Have you read Cixin's other books?

I just finished The Worm and His Kings by Hailey Piper. This novella is short, fast paced cosmic horror kind of on the vein of how Lovecraft wrote, except Piper is actually capable of describing things occasionally.

I don't know a lot of the authors y'all talk about, which makes me feel like I don't really know books, which is funny because I know so many non-readers who are just astounded I'm a dude who likes to read fiction when I'm on break at work, or occasionally on sleepy weekend mornings.


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