Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
devicenull
May 30, 2007



Grimey Drawer

Elviscat posted:

Itchy pillow!



All the stud bays are 24" I don't have to mea.....



That was lucky.

Did a bunch of fiddly carpentry behind there too, since that end of the wall was kind of flying in space.

I'm going to try to finish all subfloor installation limiting items tomorrow, which I'm sure will go well since I just got round 2 of the COVID vaccine and the body aches are already setting in.

More mastic on the joints! If you can see the seam, you didn't use enough mastic.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





devicenull posted:

More mastic on the joints! If you can see the seam, you didn't use enough mastic.

Is it okay if that's a "blind" seam? The visible portion is just where I bent the side over itself to make screwing it together easier.

Any other advice on ductery in general? I seriously have no idea what I'm doing here.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I'm no pro but my suggestion is use hard pipe everywhere if possible, it flows better. Dampers for every supply register because they're dirt cheap, take 5 minutes to install and make seasonal balancing easy. MARK WHERE THEY ARE.

insulate all supply ducting, ideally returns too where they go through unconditioned space.

I'm partial to nashua 324a foil tape over the duct butter because I enjoy bloodletting rituals I guess but either works. I actually bought a bucket of duct butter for mine and never even opened it.

I can't believe it looks like you're gonna pull this poo poo off in like a year or two aside from the stuff you'd already done when you started the thread. Wish I had that kind of motivation.

E: what do you have for sheetmetal tools? How much more do you have to go? I can spend 5 minutes putting together a shopping list if you want.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





kastein posted:

I'm no pro but my suggestion is use hard pipe everywhere if possible, it flows better. Dampers for every supply register because they're dirt cheap, take 5 minutes to install and make seasonal balancing easy. MARK WHERE THEY ARE.

insulate all supply ducting, ideally returns too where they go through unconditioned space.

I'm partial to nashua 324a foil tape over the duct butter because I enjoy bloodletting rituals I guess but either works. I actually bought a bucket of duct butter for mine and never even opened it.

I can't believe it looks like you're gonna pull this poo poo off in like a year or two aside from the stuff you'd already done when you started the thread. Wish I had that kind of motivation.

E: what do you have for sheetmetal tools? How much more do you have to go? I can spend 5 minutes putting together a shopping list if you want.

So my current plan is to hard pipe everything supply related, I'm using 2x12" flex ducts for the returns just because it's so much easier, the duct calculator says that's 1400cfm, which compared to 1200cfm supply should be good.

Supply will have a close to 1400cfm "wide open" capacity that I plan on dampering down to the target flow rate, everything but the kitchen will be supplied from this air handler, I'll leave it on resistance heat for now, probably throw a mini-split in later.

A big "box" in the master walk-in closet is earmarked for the air handler, so that'll have most of the dampers in it.

Sheet metal tools are:

Sheers (L/R/S cut)
Straight-edge
30" cheap pos metal brake
Hand seamer
Salf-tapping screws


Trust me, I wouldn't be this motivated if my balls weren't absolutely in the frier to get this done by mid-May. If it's not done by then it's not the end of the world, but it's also not preferable.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


A flex section right at the end of your duct runs, like 5 feet, will provide a quieter system. I don't know how, but I know it does.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





StormDrain posted:

A flex section right at the end of your duct runs, like 5 feet, will provide a quieter system. I don't know how, but I know it does.

Flexy stuff is good for minimizing vibrations. Is that the air handler end or outlet end?

Is there a good place to get rag joints for flexible sections? Alternately is there a way to make them?

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





Got about this far with the ductwork before I got dizzy from a little aftershock of the vaccine and fell into a joist bay.

#1 (living room) has juuuuuuust enough clearance to get over the beam, the 1/2" less on the other side kills that chance though, I wanted to put #2 (bedroom) up against the exterior wall, but there's not enough room in the joist bay, I'm envisioning putting a desk there anyways so it shouldn't be a big deal.



kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I bought the stock for my flex joints on mcmaster, it was pricy but worth it. 1781K47 is what I got. You need neoprene cement to join the rubber portion at the splice, B002DZRFIK on Amazon.

I'd consider a hand sheetmetal punch if you are using any pop rivets or getting frustrated with sheetmetal screws not biting on the second layer. Mine came from Amazon too, B0002T87CW

If you're going to have to make any significant number of bends for drive cleats on rectangular ducts, you should probably get a hand folding tool. Mine is a malco 12F off Amazon. Skip this if you're only doing a few, your HF brake will do most of the same job.

If you're going to have to cut round duct to length and recrimp ends on it to slide into other pieces, you'll definitely want a malco C5R duct crimper or equivalent.

If you're gonna be using a buttload of hex head sheetmetal screws (I love the brad point ones from HD, they're in a white yogurt bucket in the HVAC aisle - way easier than split point and way better than phillips drive) you should get a magnetic hex driver bit for them for your cordless drill. I got mine at my local supply house but here's a decent reversible two size one on Amazon, B07BFQCJLF

Depending on how much custom fab you need to do on your filter rack and supply and return boxes at the indoor unit, you might want to consider an hf 220v spotwelder but it's not critical unless you're making a bunch of like, wacky square to round transitions, custom boxes, etc etc.

Yoga straps are awesome for holding ducts up in place and fine tuning position before you put them up permanently with plumbers strapping. This was not my idea, I was gonna use ratchet straps, but they work great.

A magnetic wristband is awesome for holding a bunch of self tappers on your dominant wrist while you're up a ladder setting ducts because it means one less container of fasteners to knock off the top of the ladder and the screws stay closer to your work, so you can easily have a duct on your shoulder and load screws onto the drill socket blind without losing your position. Something like B07FJ6BWPQ but there are a bunch of styles.

I think that's about all the stuff I actually use. I bought a pile of clecos and a cleco tool but only used them on two or three things and only because I made my own life difficult for no good reason on my system design. You shouldn't need those.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Elviscat posted:

Flexy stuff is good for minimizing vibrations. Is that the air handler end or outlet end?

Is there a good place to get rag joints for flexible sections? Alternately is there a way to make them?

Outlet end. Last 5 feet or so of the run. I mean just straight up flex duct too.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





Thanks for the great advice.

Supply for the downstairs is going to come straight off the supply stack, I was thinking of doing a couple loops of flex to keep noise between the rooms down, now I'm definitely going to do so.

I'll probably do rag joints on each side of the air handler, its central location makes anything that can cut down on NVH a real bonus.

Kastein, I already ordered the sheetmetal punch, I was thinking of pop rivets already, but drilling all the holes would be a second step, so that solves that.

Lowe's near me has a decent stock of Maco tools, I paid the extra :10bux: over the Lennox, because the blades actually mate correctly with each other, they have the transitioning tool too.

E:
I especially appreciate the PNs, I know that takes effort.

In other news, this guy disappeared in threw snow storm, and I was super worried, but he's back! Gotta get this house done so he can be an indoor kitty.

Elviscat fucked around with this message at 06:03 on Feb 19, 2021

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





Trying to tie up any loose ends I'll hate myself for once I cover the crawlspace.

Ducting in place and strapped.



From the crawlspace, they'll end up running to a trunk dropping down right near that wall.



Plumbing somewhat deshitified, that 1/2" white line is for a future outdoor spigot.



Transition back to temp plumbing, when I frame this wall this'll get redone, shutoff valve etc, bonus shot of a new boot. (Boots seem good so far, need to correct the severe lack of arch support with some insoles)



Water ground for new panel.



All the little framing blocking and bullshit is wrapped up.

Lowe's selection of nailers is looking dire, I might have to go all metal.




Nice primer on your frame Lowe's door.



Lots of wood correcting the Ranger's ride height.



I might have a floor tomorrow!

E:
View from the deck in the snow.

Elviscat fucked around with this message at 05:50 on Feb 21, 2021

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





:siren::frogsiren::siren:floooooooorrrrrr:siren::frogsiren::siren:





It is solid and level!
I'm excited, but I'm not cutting the strips to finish it tonight because I'm exhausted!

E: I can't stop walking around on my flat level floor in circles grinning like an idiot.

Also it's windy tonight, and my house doesn't have a loving breeze through it! It's even noticeably warmer than ambient on the first floor, and the kitchen heater isn't running continuously. My knees are fina be so happy not clambering around open joists for awhile.

Elviscat fucked around with this message at 02:50 on Feb 22, 2021

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Oh hell yeah. That's good quality subfloor, I'm a little jealous. My recent dumbass realization is that carpentry is a lot of just picking things up off the floor and putting them back down, so I'm quite impressed again with the progress and very sympathetic to the unfinished strip.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Elviscat posted:

E: I can't stop walking around on my flat level floor in circles grinning like an idiot.

I know this feeling.

Hrvstmn31
Aug 2, 2014

You did what in your cup?


Elviscat posted:

They've done me good for the only boots in my size, and being cheap lovely boots, I've had them around ~4 years, but the first two I was out to sea 75% of the time, and at work (in different boots) the rest.

I ordered a pair of USA made Danners, I always want to go Red Wings, and choke on the price tag (all the styles I like are like $400).

If these don't work out I'll swallow it and go Red Wings, boots are so hard because every decent brand's reviews are a mix of "best boots in the world!" And "used to be the best boots ever, now they SUCK!"

Oh yeah, that hole in the arch is from me kicking a pick-axe to ram it under some boards, and I kicked it through the sole and into my foot, oops.

Do we not have boot thread? Boots have seriously become a pita, like you said reviews are hella mixed and take forever compared to really any other tool to get a good feel for. I've used swats for the past 6 1/2 years since my redwings were no longer required for work and the tongue kept slipping meant I had t re-tie my boot every thirty minutes. So let me know how the Danner's go I need new boots soon and I've had my eye on them.

On other notes house is lookin' totes fab, congrats on the floor. Were hoping to get our first house and soon since the kitchen here is sinking into the crawl space. Fingers crossed I don't have to start my own thread for that adventure.

FAKE EDIT: Tell yer cat I said hi.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


That's why I tend to stick to a brand I know, like Sievi, which is made locally to me.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





Hrvstmn31 posted:

Do we not have boot thread? Boots have seriously become a pita, like you said reviews are hella mixed and take forever compared to really any other tool to get a good feel for. I've used swats for the past 6 1/2 years since my redwings were no longer required for work and the tongue kept slipping meant I had t re-tie my boot every thirty minutes. So let me know how the Danner's go I need new boots soon and I've had my eye on them.

On other notes house is lookin' totes fab, congrats on the floor. Were hoping to get our first house and soon since the kitchen here is sinking into the crawl space. Fingers crossed I don't have to start my own thread for that adventure.

FAKE EDIT: Tell yer cat I said hi.

Thanks, yeah I'll keep updating on the Danners, I'm a little suspect of the leather quality already, they're picking up little knicks really fast, and I'm not abusing them.

The arch support problem is solved at least, side benefit to having size 14 shoes is I never have to trim the insoles.


FOR MEN OVER 200 LBS.
Men of heft.

So far I'm on day 2 of a 9 day vacation to work on the house, and so far I've:

-Gone dirt bike riding
-Smoked 7 lbs of pork for my coworker/friend's going away potluck, which involved me driving in to work today.

Help how do I manage time?


THAT'S NOT WHAT'S SUPPOSED TO BE IN THE TRUCK!

(J/K, part of the goal of the time off is to blow off a little steam)

At least I got my ladder situation somewhat improved.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Ba

By

Sharkytm doot doo do doot do doo




Fallen Rib

Buy better insoles.

I've been running the heat-moldable ones from redwing for over a decade. Deep heel cups, high arch, and they actually last. Those Dr Scholl's are junk.

https://jimmysworknwear.com/red-wing-moldable-orthotic-96329/
I never mold them, they're perfect for me right out of the box. I get about 5 years out of a pair before my toes wear through the top layer. They've got a hard base plate, so it'll take a week or so to get used to them if you've been using floppy insoles, butt IMHO, there's no better QoL improvement than quality boots+insoles other than a good mattress. poo poo that comes between you and the ground and all...

angryrobots
Mar 31, 2005



I was gonna say, the Dr Scholl's insoles I had were comfortable but the toe end of them would sometimes follow my foot out, and they basically fell apart at about 8 months. They have great marketing I guess.

I have the Walk Hero high arch insoles from Amazon now and they've held up to about a year of daily use with no complaints.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





Now that I think about it I've had bad luck with cheapo insoles before, didn't give it much thought since most shoes have enough arch support built in, even my work boots that are made by lowest bidder government contractors. I'll get nice ones when these go bad, those thermo-form ones sound nice, my snowboarding boots have thermal molding insoles in them.

Finished the floor today, ran into some problems with the wonky walls you can probably see, also made some sub-optimal choices so I wouldn't have to run to Lowes and buy another $50 sheet of subfloor ro rip a 13" step off of.

I also really should have cut those floor registers with a jigsaw before installing the floor, would've looked way better, and probably saved me time in the looking run. Oh well.

Half way through another Big Clean to get reoriented and ready to finish framing.



Check out this cool hole in my ceiling that goes from the first floor to the attic.




Old chimney?

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Chimney or laundry chute.

Looks great, must be weird having a mostly level floor.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





Oh man, I love laundry chutes, too bad this house doesn't have a layout where one makes sense.

Yeah the level floor is weird, it makes it even more brain breaking when you look at the original framing compared to the new.



I'm pleased as punch with my performance on cutting and laying the new floor in general too, all my splits on joists were good, all the seams are nice and tight, it's actually a little better than the first half, which my former roomate cut. Precision has not been my best skill in carpentry so far.

I also made this floorknocker 5000, which came in real handy for closing up the tongue and groove joints.



The floorknocker 1000 was just an off cut of subfloor and exploded on contact with my mini sledge.

tetrapyloctomy
Feb 18, 2003

Okay -- you talk WAY too fast.

Nap Ghost

Elviscat posted:

Yeah the level floor is weird, it makes it even more brain breaking when you look at the original framing compared to the new.


Are the off-plumb walls going to drive you a little crazy now that it's so obvious compared to your perfect floor and windows?

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





tetrapyloctomy posted:

Are the off-plumb walls going to drive you a little crazy now that it's so obvious compared to your perfect floor and windows?

Probably, lol, they're not that badly out of plumb inside- outside thankfully maybe 1" over the 9' height, the window walls are actually framed slightly out of plumb to match, you can tell when you operate the windows since there's about 1/4" of gap the locking mechanism has to take up.

It was just too much work to try and make everything perfectly plumb, I'm hoping the drywall hides a lot of it, lol.

tetrapyloctomy
Feb 18, 2003

Okay -- you talk WAY too fast.

Nap Ghost

I sometimes dream of building new so that everything is straight and level... but my wife knows someone whose house was declared unfit for occupation because the foundation was made incorrectly, and the contractor used a sub who wasn't properly insured, and the contractor declared bankruptcy and disappeared, and they were left paying back the bank on a house that they couldn't live in ... yeah, as out of level as my house is, it's made it almost a hundred years so far.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


Out here, everything hurts.




Yeah, unless you're both willing to spend money to hire someone to do the foundation right instead of fast, and get lucky on settling, everything's eventually going to be a little out of level. As long as it's not major, most stick builds are flexible enough that you won't notice.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





I'm hoping to build a house from the bottom up in a few years. Apparently settling can be pretty bad, my boss's brand new house is still getting nail pops in the drywall 18 months on.

I mentioned building a house to my girlfriend, and she got really upset, something or other about "this house is consuming your life" and "making you unhappy"

Dunno what that's about :toot:

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


I mean ALLEGEDLY it's a lot more fun to build one from bare ground instead of trying to build one like some kind of residential structure ophiocordyceps unilateralis spore

:shepspends:

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





Yeah, there's certain things you can't, or effectively can't do yourself too, well, septic, slab if you want it nice and flat, and those need to be sub contracted.

That being said I don't trust anyone to build my house for me, the number of issues I've seen with my mom and brother's houses... rotting posts set in earth, roof underlayment run under valley flashing, suspiciously bouncy floors, main water shutoff in a carpeted closet, seismic codes not met.

You just never know what you'll get.

E, nothing newsworthy on the house, lots of measuring, figuring, and ordering like $1,000,000 in wood because wood costs 3x as much as normal now. Started laying out walls.

Elviscat fucked around with this message at 04:51 on Mar 1, 2021

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





Last OG window is out, one last look at the awesome retro framing they did.



So, for the bedroom and top-of-the-stairs doors I wanted to put in 36" doors, but there's two stain-grade solid core hemlock doors sitting on the clearance rack outside Lowe's for 1/2 off, they'd match my French doors, and they have the correct swing. (They don't match each other, but whatever)

Any thoughts on 32" vs 36"? Would the latter make moving furniture way easier? Should I just get them?


I'm covered in mouse sebum covered blow-in rn, and it's so incredibly itchy.



I also need to stain my deck.

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


I think 32 is just fine. Perhaps you already have furniture you need to verify can go in and out, otherwise it doesn't feel small. Doors are practical in nature but should be proportional to the space. If your rooms are small then 32 will look good.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Moderator at http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/and soon to be mod of AI. MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN. Motronic for VP.


Most of my rooms are 32in door. Basement and bathroom are 30 by necessity. I haven't had an issue, I think 32 will be fine. 36 would be better but it certainly isn't a dealbreaker.

Alarbus
Mar 31, 2010


Elviscat posted:

Last OG window is out, one last look at the awesome retro framing they did.



So, for the bedroom and top-of-the-stairs doors I wanted to put in 36" doors, but there's two stain-grade solid core hemlock doors sitting on the clearance rack outside Lowe's for 1/2 off, they'd match my French doors, and they have the correct swing. (They don't match each other, but whatever)

Any thoughts on 32" vs 36"? Would the latter make moving furniture way easier? Should I just get them?


I'm covered in mouse sebum covered blow-in rn, and it's so incredibly itchy.



I also need to stain my deck.



If you stain the deck, the cat won't blend in as well. Tradeoffs, I suppose.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





Alarbus posted:

If you stain the deck, the cat won't blend in as well. Tradeoffs, I suppose.

I think the auto color balance on my phone is matching the deck to his coat, because it doesn't look nearly as bad in person as it does in that picture.

I'm going with the 32" doors, thanks for the advice, as always with this house, it'll still be better and easier to move things around then it was before.

Framed out the old window opening. I split the sheathing on one of those cripples, so I just have to, like, leave them there, looking all stupid.



Framed in another window in the bedroom, I wasn't planning on putting one here, but I ordered a matching fixed casement window for the stairwell, and after redoing the measurements realized it'd be at Grover height, so in it goes, it's the southern wall anyway so it'll be nice in the winter.

E3: I initially nailed one of the king cripples straight to the existing king stud, then measured the other off of it, because I'm a loving idiot who somehow forgot that nothing existing is level or plumb.



Interior walls are all laid out, it's probably hard to tell what it is, but yeah.

Bedroom wall, 2x6 to accommodate utilities easier, new panel's going in this wall too, the stairs will be on the living room side.

E: you can also see the wall where the stairs will end.



Closet framing, you can see the opening for the door, that'll swing into a nice little pocket, also the 60" opening for the barn doors that are going on the closet. The air handler will have its own little enclosure at the exterior wall end. It'll be kinda a pseudo walk-in.



E2: lol, looking at those pictures I can see I totally forgot to lay down the plate for the closet end wall, oops.

I used the last of my 2,000 count box of general purpose construction screws too.

Elviscat fucked around with this message at 04:59 on Mar 2, 2021

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





Statistics question, you're framing a wall with 16" O.C. studs, there is a 3.500" plumbing stack at position x in that wall, what are the odds that the plumbing stack will be in the way of a stud?

That's right, 90%



(Pencil line is left side of stud)

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




No wait I've seen this one before

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





:argh:

StormDrain
May 22, 2003

Thirteen Letter


Elviscat posted:

Statistics question, you're framing a wall with 16" O.C. studs, there is a 3.500" plumbing stack at position x in that wall, what are the odds that the plumbing stack will be in the way of a stud?

That's right, 90%



(Pencil line is left side of stud)

I insist you put a boca plate on the sill, before you drive a nail into that pipe when you install trim. I think the stats on that are 99% of you hitting it, and it was influenced by my warning you.

It goes up to a full 100% if you reply with nah it'll be fine.

Oh and also you may want to check your drywall layout so you don't put a butt edge against that stud. That'll also be a high percent chance of driving a screw into the pipe.

Edit or gently caress it, line an edge up there at least you'll see the stud.

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





Oh yeah, everything's getting a full round of nail plates for protection once the framing and electrical's done, don't worry.

Especially since I'm not doing the drywall.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

MESS WITH THE OWL GET DISEMBOWEL





Wall (mostly) done, lost a lot of productivity because I had to go feed/spend time with my GF's cats since she's out of town.



The stud twister on my hammer got a lot of use today, I'm going to have to go back to picking out all my own lumber.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply