Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«361 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Lawlita
Oct 10, 2006

deadpan and deadly.

Dr. Futurity by Philip K. Dick, found it in a bookstore and it's one of the last on my list of his work that I haven't read yet. Morbid and intriguing, but that's PKD for you. Also finished The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula Le Guin, was curious after reading her Dispossessed; this one takes an interesting approach to sexuality.

MetricLeft posted:

I just finished Neuromancer by William Gibson. Great cyberpunk read.
Amen. I discovered Gibson through my utopian literature class, of all places, and promptly got some recommendation lists from that professor, heh.

For the two of you who just finished the Count of Monte Cristo, did either of you see the movie? I didn't actually read Dumas til after having seen the movie, and I found that I enjoyed them for very different reasons...

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Krinkle
Feb 9, 2003

Ah do believe Ah've got the vapors...
Ah mean the farts



Lawlita posted:

For the two of you who just finished the Count of Monte Cristo, did either of you see the movie? I didn't actually read Dumas til after having seen the movie, and I found that I enjoyed them for very different reasons...

I was suprised that out of all the adaptations of the count of monte cristo I've seen, the anime where he's a space elf with space cancer and all the duels are fought in giant robots was the most faithful to the book.

And if you're talking about the 2002 movie it was fine while I watched it but in retrospect, and after reading the book, I really hate it. The old man teaches him fighting instead of science and history and languages? Instead of smugglers he finds pirates who make him fight jacopo to the death, who he spares, and makes his slave? His actual slave doesn't appear. Haidee was completely absent, benedetto (and betruccio) was completely absent... oh and they had to make albert his illegitimate son and he gets back together with mercedes to try to dig out a happy ending without any redemption. The movie, with hindsight, was ham fisted as gently caress all and I am glad I read the book.

SgtScruffy
Dec 27, 2003

Babies.



God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut. I didn't like it as much as I did Slaughterhouse V or Cat's Cradle, but it was definitely a fun read

kaworu
Jul 23, 2004



Lastnight I read Flow my Tears, the Policeman Said by PK Dick, and before that I read The Power Broker by Robert Caro, which was terribly fascinating for me to read. I highly reccomend anyone who has the time and interest to check out his three-part biography of Lyndon Johnson, which is inarguably the greatest work of biography I've ever encountered. I've also been going through the collected works of Allen Ginsberg. Was quite amused to hear a poem he wrote concerning loving boys who go to Naropa, where I take classes.

Lawlita posted:

Also finished The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula Le Guin, was curious after reading her Dispossessed; this one takes an interesting approach to sexuality.

Left Hand is one of my favourite sci-fi book of all time, at least in terms of basic likability. I'd say it takes an entirely unique approach to sexuality, and one of the things I find so stunning is that Le Guin wrote that book in '69, when concepts such as 'transgendered' barely existed in any form at all. It's ultimately flawed, due to plotting and pronoun issues, but from the point when Estraven and Ai escape together to the end of the book, it's just incredible.

Somebody fucked around with this message at 18:44 on Nov 26, 2006

mallratcal
Sep 10, 2003

Goodnight Canada!


I just finished Pure Dynamite. Itís the best wrestling book Iíve read, just edging out the Foley books.

nnamaste
Jun 15, 2005

by elpintogrande


I just finnished On The Road by Kerouac like half an hour ago, and it was really amazing, i felt Dean Mortiarty's beat, of that generation, and I can definetly see how it's called The Bible of the Beat Generation. I'm really enjoying Kerouac, next my best friends gunna let me borrow his copy of Naked Lunch.

Hoover Dam
Jun 17, 2003

red white and blue forever


Jon Krakauer's Under the Banner of Heaven. First of his books I've read, and I'll be picking up the rest. It's the story of the fundamentalist (i.e. still practicing polygamy) Mormon sects and how they're keeping up the tradition of holding tight to church practices that Joseph Smith and Brigham Young and other church founders all just kinda made up.

Dick Toucha
Dec 12, 2005

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~


I just finished Vladimir Nabokov's The Defense. I've never read Nabokov before this and I really enjoyed it - I look forward to reading more of his stuff.

Sloth Socks
May 13, 2005

dangling is the finest of all the arts in all the worlds



Lipstick Apathy

gurntsville posted:

I just finished Vladimir Nabokov's The Defense. I've never read Nabokov before this and I really enjoyed it - I look forward to reading more of his stuff.

Pick up Lolita, Pale Fire, and if you're feeling like shorter stuff, try his big fat collection of short stories.

Dick Toucha
Dec 12, 2005

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~


Sloth Socks posted:

Pick up Lolita, Pale Fire, and if you're feeling like shorter stuff, try his big fat collection of short stories.

Someone told me that his true talent was in short stories - I look forward to them a lot because I really liked The Defense.

thehandtruck
Mar 5, 2006

An alien race's sociological experiment.



Just finished The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Tomorrow I'll be starting Acid Dreams: The Complete Social History of LSD. You might be able to tell that my interests lie in history...and acid.

As for Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. It felt like Hunter S. Thompson's early works with a lot less tequila and a lot more acid. The book has a lot of pages that are really just Tom Wolfe blathering about bullshit that people tell him. In it's entirety it's really a perfect counter-point to Leary, his philosophies, and his books.

MentosMan
Dec 4, 2005


Just finished The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway. I personally didn't understand why everyone gushes over this novel, it is rather mundane. I understand it's all about the feels of a man with no penis, but that still didn't make the story interesting.

DramaLlama
Nov 9, 2004



Residence on Earth by Neruda.

Awesome.

parademaker!
Aug 5, 2006


I also just finished God Bless You Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut. I loved it. Hilarious and even more true to-day than when he wrote it.

Bullet Ant
May 28, 2005


Finished Chuck Klosterman VI a few weeks ago. It was pretty good, although the fiction piece at the end was a little weak.

Bullet Ant fucked around with this message at 04:07 on Nov 18, 2006

combover commando
Jun 23, 2005



Just finished Ray Bradbury's The Cat's Pajamas. I liked it about as much as his other collection of short stories, One More for the Road. There were one or two phenomenal stories, and slightly more pieces that revolved around batshit insane time travel schemes where everyone spoke rapidly (if you've read a collection of Bradbury's short stories, you'll know what I'm talking about). Overall, it was a solid read, and I'd recommend it just for "A Careful Man Dies", which is the only story that I have re-read the moment I finished it.

Leospeare
Jun 27, 2003
I lack the ability to think of a creative title.

Make Love! The Bruce Campbell Way by, you guessed it, Bruce Campbell. I thought it was hilarious, and a great followup to If Chins Could Kill, even though that was a straight autobiography and Make Love! is fiction. If you're a huge Bruce fan like I am, well, you've probably read it already. If not, then it might not be the book for you.

What kind of bugged me about it was the font. I never realized how rare sans serif fonts are in novels until I read this one.

Krinkle
Feb 9, 2003

Ah do believe Ah've got the vapors...
Ah mean the farts



For such a well referenced book I finished the metamorphosis in a couple hours. Maybe doug stanhope poisoned the well for me but I didn't see why you would attach so much literary interpretation to it. I tried to find somewhere to explain why it's so famous for being famous but all I found was a write-your-termpapers website with a sample page, and a wiki blurb mentioning that there are entire books that discuss the metamorphisis in length.

Modern Life Is War
Aug 17, 2006

I'm not just eye candy

Mystery Opponent posted:

I've also read Johnny Got His Gun and The House of God over the summer.

I remember loving JGHG in college. Big recommendation right there.

uh zip zoom
May 28, 2003

Sensitive Thugs Need Hugs


uh zip zoom posted:

really? That's too bad. That's my favorite work by Vonnegut. Mostly because of the ending, though.

edit:

parademaker! posted:

I also just finished God Bless You Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut. I loved it. Hilarious and even more true to-day than when he wrote it.

that's better.

uh zip zoom
May 28, 2003

Sensitive Thugs Need Hugs


double post, sorry

Seksiness
Aug 24, 2006
I screwed your grandma and all I got was this lousy custom title... and herpes

Inversions by Iain Banks

LorneReams
Jun 27, 2003
I'm bizarre

College Slice

Traitor's Knot by Janny Wurts.

Slothpolo
Oct 1, 2005
STUPID
DICK


Monsoon, by Wilbur Smith (second book of a series beginning with Birds of Prey).

Birds of prey was hands down the most fun book to read I have ever come across. If you like action and adventure, this series is proving to be the ultimate tale of 1600's life and war in the seas surrounding South Africa.

Krinkle
Feb 9, 2003

Ah do believe Ah've got the vapors...
Ah mean the farts



Just finished Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. It was a fun to read as the movie. I've never done drugs, and never will, but his descriptions are just fantastic.

V-Men
Aug 15, 2001

Don't it make your dick bust concrete to be in the same room with two noble, selfless public servants.

I was halfway through a book of Peter S. Beagle's stories, Lila the Werewolf and The Last Unicorn, when my friend lent me State of Denial by Bob Woodward.

Pontius Pilate
Jul 25, 2006

Crucify, Whale, Crucify

I just finished Through the Looking Glass which is of course the sequel to Alice in Wonderland. I enjoyed Alice more but this was certainly entertaining.

Also, shouldn't this thread be stickied or something, so we don't have people saying, "I just finsihed this! What do you think of it?" Or maybe I just have an alterior motive.

Bat Chain Puller
Nov 16, 2006


Fiasco-The American Military Adventure in Iraq by Thomas Ricks

Pantaloon
Apr 19, 2004



Licensed to Kill: Hired Guns in the War on Terror by Robert Young Pelton. Already established as the man with the most 'sack in North America, he interviews the new PMC lords (notably Erik Prince and Tim Spicer) and rides shotgun with Blackwater contractors along the deadly Route Irish. An excellent blend of travelogue and journalism, it was informative and more than a little entertaining.
The contractors he interviews don't fit the the blood-and-thunder image of mercenaries, but are mostly former cops and military men who wanted a job where their skill set could be useful.

Zero Karizma
Jul 8, 2004

It's ok now, just tell me what happened...

Slappy Seal posted:

next my best friends gunna let me borrow his copy of Naked Lunch.

You know that this book was written using the "cut-up" technique, right? If you don't, then check out what I'm talking about on wikipedia.

I'm not waving an intellectual dick around, I promise. When I first started trying to read Naked Lunch I had no idea about this, or even what the "cut up" technique was. I absolutely loving hated the book and dismissed it as this wandering, pointless, and crazy story. I thought the slang was really dated and I didn't understand enough about drugs to get it. When my friend recently explained the cutting thing to me, I was able to look at it with new eyes.

So... heads up!

Peeps
Aug 10, 2004
.

Just finished The Pinhoe Egg by Diana Wynne Jones, a complete joy as always. About to read the cartoon history of Karl Marx.

jayd42
Jul 19, 2004
custom title

I just finished Snow Crash by Stephenson. It's a great book, but I have the same complaints about it that I do about Cryptonomicon. This guy kinda just phones in the ending after he's spend all his talent on writing an awesome story up until that point, and that either I have to look up the historical stuff he uses, or just let it be part of the story and not care about whether it is accurate or not. Oddly enough, Crypto was the reason I was ignoring The Da-Vinci Code, due to some historical stuff being thrown into a fiction story. After Snow Crash I just said "gently caress it" and bought DVC, but haven't started it.

I'm also expecting to have the same complaints about The Diamond Age, which is sitting next to my bed waiting for me to start it.

Leospeare
Jun 27, 2003
I lack the ability to think of a creative title.

Just finished "The Basic Eight" by Daniel Handler (who is also Lemony Snicket, and has a good reason for using a pseudonym for children's books because his adult books are hosed right the hell up). It was quite a ride. It's about a pretentious high school clique who call themselves the Basic Eight, who are the kind of kids that I loved to hate in high school, and how they deal with things like first loves, alcohol, and Satanic murder. Normally I'm not a big fan of high school lit, but I love Handler's style so much that if he wrote the phone book I'd read it and love it.

I also recommend "Watch Your Mouth", Handler's second novel, which is written in the style of an opera and deals with such time-honored themes as incest and golems.

MrL_JaKiri
Sep 23, 2003

Ask me about my calm and reasonable opinions on cycling!

I am in no way a zealot about cycling!

Cycling helmets are ABSOLUTE HARAM!


Two books read for the first time, two not.

Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny. It's that rarest of beasts: a science fiction novel that spends a significant amount of time referencing religion whilst not being about Christianity. The Hindu pantheon appear, in a novel in which revealing the plot would undermine the deliberated way in which it would unfurl. One of the earliest of the "Science Fiction Masterworks" series, and well deserved.

Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh. As Waugh says in his introduction, this is very much a book of when it was written, the Second World War, rather than when it was set. English collegiate life is both accurately and inaccurately potrayed in equal measure, with the book after they go down being much more forlorn and melancholic in its nostalgia than anything else that Waugh wrote.

Beyond Good and Evil by Freddy Nietzsche. One of the best ways to describe my relationship with this book, and indeed all of Nietzsche's works, is to refer to the first section of BG&E itself - "i Philosophy about the search for truth, and why should truth be valued - because whilst I disagree with the conclusions and arguments that Nietzsche puts forward, it is certainly interesting to read.

Something Happened by Joseph Heller. This book is incredibly dense. From the start, you are bombarded with a vast wall of text upon an average american man; his musings on his chidren, his job prospects and his reminiscing about a girl he could have slept with when he was seventeen. As has been noted at length, this is not another Catch 22: the novel is both worse written and has a target less universal than Heller's piece apparantly upon war. Like American Psycho, the time of this book has, to some extent, past. Like American Psycho, I still found it interesting despite that.

DMCrimson
Jan 2, 2005



Nap Ghost

Sloth Socks posted:

Pick up Lolita, Pale Fire, and if you're feeling like shorter stuff, try his big fat collection of short stories.

I just finished up with reading Pale Fire. Fantastic idea for a book, and I could read that beautiful prose for days.

SHARIA LAW SCHOOL
Aug 25, 2005

By Crom! These instruments are AMAZING!



Bleak Gremlin

The Descent - Jeff Long. Nothing to do with the movie. A vast underground cave system is discovered and exploited by humanity as the next fronteir. It is discovered to already be inhabited. Its inhabitants are the creatures mankind already knows as demons and its society as hell. I found it in the horror section but it could also just as easily have been placed in science fiction. I thought it was very good and pretty suspenseful. Anyone who enjoys religious thrillers like Da Vinci Code might want to look at it.

parabolic
Jul 21, 2005

good night, speedfriend



I finally got around to A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. I actually enjoyed, despite my misgivings based on what people have said in the past. I obviously didn't fully appreciate every level of it, but I devoted a fair amount of thought to it. Enjoyed Dubliners more, actually.

FreelanceSocialist
Nov 19, 2002


I've been keeping a list of stuff I read out of curiosity. Work and classes have been slow on and off so I've wrapped up a bunch of books this month. Here's the latest few:

27 OCT Coupland, Douglas. Microserfs. (Excellent. Neat insight into a small software start-up. Journal format.)
02 NOV Coupland, Douglas. jPod: A Novel. (Bleh. Don't bother. Read Microserfs again, instead.)
04 NOV Gibson, William. Pattern Recognition. (Fun. Some interesting characters.)
11 NOV Pynchon, Thomas. Gravity's Rainbow. (Too much hype. Not that amazing.)
14 NOV Gibson, William. Virtual Light. (Good book. I love Gibson, though, so I am biased.)
18 NOV Gibson, William. Burning Chrome. (Excellent.)
20 NOV Gaiman, Neil. American Gods. (Weird. Interesting writing style. Somewhat cliche comic-book-ish characters, but that's to be expected of Gaiman...)

I just started A Fire Upon the Deep by Vernor Vinge on the recommendation of my roommate. Not too bad so far - but I've only just hit a hundred pages in or so.

FreelanceSocialist fucked around with this message at 02:57 on Nov 22, 2006

Sinclair
Jan 11, 2006

Plague Doctor Cosplay

"Wintersmith" by Terry Pratchett.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

OMFG FURRY
Jul 10, 2006

[snarky comment]

World War Z It's good if you want a feel good book about faith in the human race.

With zombies.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«361 »