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anthonypants
May 6, 2007

by Nyc_Tattoo


Dinosaur Gum

DrankSinatra posted:

I'm trying to figure out what distro to use for my daily work. I realize, to a certain extent that's a dumb question, but whatever. I'm a grad student/programmer, and I spend a solid 75% of my computer time at the command line or in Emacs. I like farting around in Slackware, because it's a Unix-rear end Linux system, and coming at it from the perspective of a dude who does a ton of command line stuff, I like how every component can basically be configured in their respective text file; it feels simple and predictable to me.

On the other hand, dealing with slackbuilds gets old really fast. I have a life to live, and I'd rather not piss it away staring at compiler output.

Is there anything out there with a robust binary package management system that's still that level of dead-simple vanilla text configuration? I thought about just doing a server install of CentOS, and installing the packages I want, but the packages in the default repos are old as hell, and I really don't want to putz with adding a bunch of extra repos. Also it seems like, even at the default setup level, CentOS has a bunch of extra enterprise cruft that I'm not interested in.

Realistically, all I need is the bleeding edge version of my compilers and text editor, a web browser, virtualbox, and Xmonad.
So, like...Gentoo?

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mike12345
Jul 14, 2008

"Whether the Earth was created in 7 days, or 7 actual eras, I'm not sure we'll ever be able to answer that. It's one of the great mysteries."





It's just a sneaky ad for Arch.

Horse Clocks
Dec 14, 2004


Ubuntu + ppa's for your bloody edge.

kujeger
Feb 19, 2004

OH YES HA HA

Fun Shoe

Fedora or Ubuntu probably.


Or Debian Sid if you want as bleeding edge as possible without too much risk of cutting yourself.

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

Fedora? Debian unstable? Arch?

Mao Zedong Thot
Oct 16, 2008




Taco Defender

Ubuntu. It's the best desktop distro, and I don't mean for the default WM.

ExcessBLarg!
Aug 31, 2001


DrankSinatra posted:

Is there anything out there with a robust binary package management system that's still that level of dead-simple vanilla text configuration?
This is pretty much what Debian unstable is. Sometimes bleeding-edge stuff sits in experimental if it's going to really break the rest of the system, but you can individually install packages from experimental if you need it.

HPL
Aug 28, 2002

Worst case scenario.

OpenSUSE Tumbleweed?

peepsalot
Apr 24, 2007

        PEEP THIS...
           BITCH!



VOTE YES ON 69 posted:

Ubuntu. It's the best desktop distro, and I don't mean for the default WM.

which WM do you mean for?

LochNessMonster
Feb 3, 2005

I need about three fitty



peepsalot posted:

which WM do you mean for?

Unity

peepsalot
Apr 24, 2007

        PEEP THIS...
           BITCH!



Uh, but thats the default you butthead!

Odette
Mar 19, 2011



DrankSinatra posted:

I'm trying to figure out what distro to use for my daily work. I realize, to a certain extent that's a dumb question, but whatever. I'm a grad student/programmer, and I spend a solid 75% of my computer time at the command line or in Emacs. I like farting around in Slackware, because it's a Unix-rear end Linux system, and coming at it from the perspective of a dude who does a ton of command line stuff, I like how every component can basically be configured in their respective text file; it feels simple and predictable to me.

On the other hand, dealing with slackbuilds gets old really fast. I have a life to live, and I'd rather not piss it away staring at compiler output.

Is there anything out there with a robust binary package management system that's still that level of dead-simple vanilla text configuration? I thought about just doing a server install of CentOS, and installing the packages I want, but the packages in the default repos are old as hell, and I really don't want to putz with adding a bunch of extra repos. Also it seems like, even at the default setup level, CentOS has a bunch of extra enterprise cruft that I'm not interested in.

Realistically, all I need is the bleeding edge version of my compilers and text editor, a web browser, virtualbox, and Xmonad.

There's also openSUSE Tumbleweed. Rolling release without the "Arch" stigma.

feedmegin
Jul 30, 2008




DrankSinatra posted:

I'm trying to figure out what distro to use for my daily work. I realize, to a certain extent that's a dumb question, but whatever. I'm a grad student/programmer, and I spend a solid 75% of my computer time at the command line or in Emacs. I like farting around in Slackware, because it's a Unix-rear end Linux system, and coming at it from the perspective of a dude who does a ton of command line stuff, I like how every component can basically be configured in their respective text file; it feels simple and predictable to me.

On the other hand, dealing with slackbuilds gets old really fast. I have a life to live, and I'd rather not piss it away staring at compiler output.

Is there anything out there with a robust binary package management system that's still that level of dead-simple vanilla text configuration? I thought about just doing a server install of CentOS, and installing the packages I want, but the packages in the default repos are old as hell, and I really don't want to putz with adding a bunch of extra repos. Also it seems like, even at the default setup level, CentOS has a bunch of extra enterprise cruft that I'm not interested in.

Realistically, all I need is the bleeding edge version of my compilers and text editor, a web browser, virtualbox, and Xmonad.

AIX

Edit: more seriously, an Ubuntu flavour isn't a bad way to go if only because everyone else is running it. I run Kubuntu myself.

Mao Zedong Thot
Oct 16, 2008




Taco Defender

peepsalot posted:

which WM do you mean for?

Whichever WM you like. I use i3, you can use whatever.

I mean that Ubuntu is a solid, well supported, reasonably up to date distro that is well suited to desktop use. Desktop programs all work well, graphics drivers too. Weird proprietary desktop programs that want you to download a .deb like Google Earth generally work well. Steam and games work well. I may spend my most my day in tiles of terminals, but I can still wreck people (well, get wrecked ) in some FPS with zero loving-around-with-Linux effort too.

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

Is anyone familiar with using postfix to forward mail?

I've got it running on my Ubuntu home sever, set up with my gmail credentials via the /etc/postfix/sasl_passwd and sasl_passwd.db files.

What I'm wondering is this: if postfix is using my Google creds to interact with the Google smtp server on a regular basis then am I sending my password out over clearnet?

I don't mind the body of the emails going out in the clear because it's just boring server stuff like S.M.A.R.T tests and login times, and I don't really understand setting up my own TLS to do it encrypted. Should I learn how to set up basic TLS?

anthonypants
May 6, 2007

by Nyc_Tattoo


Dinosaur Gum

apropos man posted:

Is anyone familiar with using postfix to forward mail?

I've got it running on my Ubuntu home sever, set up with my gmail credentials via the /etc/postfix/sasl_passwd and sasl_passwd.db files.

What I'm wondering is this: if postfix is using my Google creds to interact with the Google smtp server on a regular basis then am I sending my password out over clearnet?

I don't mind the body of the emails going out in the clear because it's just boring server stuff like S.M.A.R.T tests and login times, and I don't really understand setting up my own TLS to do it encrypted. Should I learn how to set up basic TLS?
If you're using smtp.gmail.com then I don't think you can connect without SSL/TLS.

peepsalot
Apr 24, 2007

        PEEP THIS...
           BITCH!



VOTE YES ON 69 posted:

Whichever WM you like. I use i3, you can use whatever.

I mean that Ubuntu is a solid, well supported, reasonably up to date distro that is well suited to desktop use. Desktop programs all work well, graphics drivers too. Weird proprietary desktop programs that want you to download a .deb like Google Earth generally work well. Steam and games work well. I may spend my most my day in tiles of terminals, but I can still wreck people (well, get wrecked ) in some FPS with zero loving-around-with-Linux effort too.
Yeah I was just curious about which WM you prefer. I've been using Ubuntu since dapper drake. I really didn't like when they switched to unity, and ended up using gnome 2 fallback or whatever it was called, and then moved to cinnamon shortly after, then eventually just switched to linux mint since i found cinnamon a bit buggy on Ubuntu.

Mao Zedong Thot
Oct 16, 2008




Taco Defender

i3 is definitely a bit but SO good if you're looking for a tiling window manager. I'm just sad I used xmonad for years, because it is vastly worse and so much more of a pain to configure.

(Okay so I do miss the default layout of xmonad where creating (i.e.) 4 windows results in the following automatically

code:
+------+------+
|      |      |
|      |------|
|      |      |
|      |------|
|      |      |
+------+------+
Don't think I can do that without movement in i3 :/ )

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

anthonypants posted:

If you're using smtp.gmail.com then I don't think you can connect without SSL/TLS.

Oh poo poo, yeah. I think you're right because I seem to remember using one of the default CA certs that comes with Ubuntu during setup. I was following a guide to set up postfix using monkey see monkey do method. I should really learn the basics of how CA's and certs work and how they interact with each other, though. I can rationalise in my head how public key encryption works, so understanding how TLS does what it does shouldn't be much of a stretch.

gourdcaptain
Nov 16, 2012



ExcessBLarg! posted:

I'd probably post a report against Dolphin in hopes of catching the attention of people likely to run into the same issue and hope that there's enough collective traction to figure out where the problem really is.

Otherwise you would generally post a report closest to the most-likely buggy component, but in this case it could be any of Mesa, Radeon, or Dolphin, and the first two are probably full of "it doesn't work" reports with not much information to debug further. Also the Dolphin people are, if they care and are able to reproduce it, in the best position to obtain enough debugging information to make a useful report against Mesa or Radeon.

Now that Mesa 13.0.0 is out on Arch, I filed the bug following this advice here: https://bugs.dolphin-emu.org/issues/9868
I did find one Vulkan program I could install that worked on the drivers - Vkquake. Which proves Arch didn't mess up the package somehow... and that I am still completely hopeless at FPSes.

Combat Pretzel
Jun 23, 2004

No, seriously... what kurds?!

Oh shiiiiiiit, Fedora is writing EGLStreams support for GNOME. I guess I'll be reconsidering Linux again soon.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



apropos man posted:

Oh poo poo, yeah. I think you're right because I seem to remember using one of the default CA certs that comes with Ubuntu during setup. I was following a guide to set up postfix using monkey see monkey do method. I should really learn the basics of how CA's and certs work and how they interact with each other, though. I can rationalise in my head how public key encryption works, so understanding how TLS does what it does shouldn't be much of a stretch.

Understanding the basics of how TLS works and how certs are issued and trusted would put you ahead of a shocking number of IT professionals So yes, I recommend learning about it.

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

Haha. I find things less daunting once I've actually managed to get them working in practice. I'll definitely have an educational hour looking at TLS/certs.

Last night I stuck this in my root crontab in Ubuntu:

smartctl -a /dev/sda | mail -s "smartctl" <my.receiving.address@mail.com>

I got the email on my phone when I was at work today, but the smartctl part failed, so the email body was blank. If I put sudo in front of the smartctl command, like this...

sudo smartctl -a /dev/sda | mail -s "smartctl" <my.receiving.address@mail.com>

...then it works and I get an email from root with the details included. What am I doing wrong? I shouldn't need to use sudo in root crontab and the command works without sudo if I'm logged into the box as root using sudo -i.

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

cron wants the full path to the command

RFC2324
Jun 7, 2012

Http 418


evol262 posted:

cron wants the full path to the command

If you don't know that, 'which' is your friend.

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

evol262 posted:

cron wants the full path to the command

RFC2324 posted:

If you don't know that, 'which' is your friend.

Wohoo! Thanks. I feel slightly stupid now. I was going to ask if it was because the environment variables aren't sufficiently set up for root, but smartctl is covered by $PATH :scratches head:

xzzy
Mar 5, 2009

wakey wakey to
this bowl of tasty


Yams Fan

If for some reason you don't like giving the full path in all your crontab entries, you can set a PATH variable at the top of the crontab.

I tend to prefer full paths, but if the command gets too long there's it's reasonable to shorten things up.

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

Has this always been the rule?

I have this in the example text:

code:
# For example, you can run a backup of all your user accounts
# at 5 a.m every week with:
# 0 5 * * 1 tar -zcf /var/backups/home.tgz /home/
# 
which doesn't use a path for 'tar'. I've also got rsync and cp entries in my user crontab without full paths (or a path header anywhere).

xzzy
Mar 5, 2009

wakey wakey to
this bowl of tasty


Yams Fan

Maybe it has a limited path, like it'll search /bin and nothing else.

If you want to know get to the google because I ain't trying to figure out the keywords to determine the history or specification of cron.

Shaocaholica
Oct 29, 2002

Fig. 5E


What's the easiest way to find out if some USB 3.0/3.1 chipset is going to be supported? I need a PCI-E 1x USB 3.0/3.1 card on an IO workbench machine running Parted Magic.

anthonypants
May 6, 2007

by Nyc_Tattoo


Dinosaur Gum

Shaocaholica posted:

What's the easiest way to find out if some USB 3.0/3.1 chipset is going to be supported? I need a PCI-E 1x USB 3.0/3.1 card on an IO workbench machine running Parted Magic.
Look it up on the Linux Kernel Driver DataBase

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

xzzy posted:

Maybe it has a limited path, like it'll search /bin and nothing else.

If you want to know get to the google because I ain't trying to figure out the keywords to determine the history or specification of cron.

Hehe. I sought and found out why, here http://unix.stackexchange.com/quest...-executes-a-job

The third answer down, by Bram, explains it quite succinctly:

Bram posted:

....you need to consider that the jobs will run in a non-interactive shell meaning that the $PATH might be different from the one you have when running the script from the command line.

It is best to always use full paths in scripts, especially if you plan to schedule them via at/cron etc.

SamDabbers
May 26, 2003

QUITE.


Fallen Rib

Shaocaholica posted:

What's the easiest way to find out if some USB 3.0/3.1 chipset is going to be supported? I need a PCI-E 1x USB 3.0/3.1 card on an IO workbench machine running Parted Magic.

The Renesas uPD720201 chipset is well supported in Linux. I use this inexpensive Rosewill adapter based on that chipset and have had zero problems with it, though any brand should work just as well.

peepsalot
Apr 24, 2007

        PEEP THIS...
           BITCH!



I have a bundle of mystery desktops purchased at auction, and their hard drives are rightfully wiped. Whats a good live distro that i could load up quick and get the specs on each machine.

Martytoof
Feb 25, 2003

It's called a hassle, sweetheart..



peepsalot posted:

I have a bundle of mystery desktops purchased at auction, and their hard drives are rightfully wiped. Whats a good live distro that i could load up quick and get the specs on each machine.

Eh they're all going to be pretty much the same if all you want to do is get specs. So let's say CentOS because why not.

peepsalot
Apr 24, 2007

        PEEP THIS...
           BITCH!



Ok but is there also any one particular app that will report every relevant thing and fit it on a single screen and does it come installed on the live distro.

Mao Zedong Thot
Oct 16, 2008




Taco Defender

peepsalot posted:

Ok but is there also any one particular app that will report every relevant thing and fit it on a single screen and does it come installed on the live distro.

code:
lsblk; free -m; cat /proc/cpuinfo

Martytoof
Feb 25, 2003

It's called a hassle, sweetheart..



the utility is 'cat' and the relevant stuff lives in /proc

But joking aside I know what you're saying and I honestly can't think of any utilities that do that. I typically just go through /proc when I need info, and then stuff like lsusb and lspci are useful and should come preinstalled on most liveCDs. Someone smarter than me will have to pipe in here, sorry.

Shaocaholica
Oct 29, 2002

Fig. 5E


peepsalot posted:

I have a bundle of mystery desktops purchased at auction, and their hard drives are rightfully wiped. Whats a good live distro that i could load up quick and get the specs on each machine.

You could try UBCD. It's not linux but it might get you what you want faster.

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Shaocaholica
Oct 29, 2002

Fig. 5E


SamDabbers posted:

The Renesas uPD720201 chipset is well supported in Linux. I use this inexpensive Rosewill adapter based on that chipset and have had zero problems with it, though any brand should work just as well.

Thanks! Bought.

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