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ToxicFrog
Apr 26, 2008



Buttcoin purse posted:

Oh also it has "SIXEL graphics display support" since apparently that's a thing someone upthread cares about

That was probably me, but since I don't use windows except for gaming I don't care about SIXEL support there.

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feedmegin
Jul 30, 2008




bitprophet posted:


Running terminal-only apps, WSL seems fine as long as you don't require certain things that really want an actual Linux kernel, such as netfilter-based tools, memory-mapped files

I'm pretty sure mmap() must at least mostly work or a hell of a lot of stuff would break...looks more like there are compatibility issues in edge cases (the sort that might also cause trouble if you were trying to port Linux software to a non-Linux UNIX, not that anyone does that any more).

bitprophet
Jul 22, 2004



Taco Defender

feedmegin posted:

I'm pretty sure mmap() must at least mostly work or a hell of a lot of stuff would break...looks more like there are compatibility issues in edge cases (the sort that might also cause trouble if you were trying to port Linux software to a non-Linux UNIX, not that anyone does that any more).
I don't recall the exact details, just that something about the way BerkeleyDB functions had one of those edge case problems, which in turn prevents rpm --rebuilddb from working, or something. Folks I work with had a long running ticket open with RedHat support about it so I assume it wasn't just some stupid mistake.

peepsalot
Apr 24, 2007

††††††††PEEP THIS...
†††††††††††BITCH!



I want to run a CPU intensive command on multiple cores, where each call processes a different range of numbers.

I can generate a list of numbers with `seq FIRST STEP LAST > in.txt`

Then I tried to use GNU parallel based on this example *verbatim*: https://www.gnu.org/software/parall...to-b-and-b-to-c
And the result is

quote:

parallel: Warning: Input is read from the terminal. You either know what you
parallel: Warning: are doing (in which case: YOU ARE AWESOME!) or you forgot
parallel: Warning: ::: or :::: or to pipe data into parallel. If so
parallel: Warning: consider going through the tutorial: man parallel_tutorial
parallel: Warning: Press CTRL-D to exit.

So it seems parallel is extremely dumb and broken. Is there another alternative that works?

kujeger
Feb 19, 2004

OH YES HA HA

Fun Shoe

peepsalot posted:

I want to run a CPU intensive command on multiple cores, where each call processes a different range of numbers.

I can generate a list of numbers with `seq FIRST STEP LAST > in.txt`

Then I tried to use GNU parallel based on this example *verbatim*: https://www.gnu.org/software/parall...to-b-and-b-to-c
And the result is


So it seems parallel is extremely dumb and broken. Is there another alternative that works?

That example works fine for me?
code:
$ seq 1 1 10 > in.txt
$ parallel echo {1} - {2} ::::+ <(head -n -1 in.txt) <(tail -n +2 in.txt)
[..]
1 - 2
2 - 3
3 - 4
4 - 5
5 - 6
6 - 7
7 - 8
8 - 9
9 - 10
Which version of parallel are you using?

ToxicFrog
Apr 26, 2008



Also, what is the exact command you entered, and what shell are you using?

peepsalot
Apr 24, 2007

††††††††PEEP THIS...
†††††††††††BITCH!



ToxicFrog posted:

Also, what is the exact command you entered, and what shell are you using?
Bash shell on Linux mint 19. The terminal is in a byobu (tmux) session if that matters.

Also like I said I copied the example verbatim in order to test before running the actual command. I tried copy-pasting as well as typing it out manually in case the HTML had a weird character.

edit: version info
GNU parallel 20161222
bash 4.4.19(1)-release

peepsalot fucked around with this message at Mar 25, 2019 around 21:59

ToxicFrog
Apr 26, 2008



peepsalot posted:

edit: version info
GNU parallel 20161222
bash 4.4.19(1)-release

The latest version is 20190322. There have been 27 releases since the version you're using.

If for whatever reason you can't update, try `man parallel` and see if the examples in the documentation that shipped with the version you have are different.

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

What is wrong with having a disaster recovery system such as this for home VM's:

Regularly backup everything in / except for /proc and /sys
Keep a text file containing the partition layout.
When poo poo hits fan, just create another VM with the same partition layout, install base system that's the same distro as the dead one.
Copy files over to new system.

So a CentOS 7 VM would have a new CentOS 7 VM created and everything copied over to it, possibly with a rescue CD.
Ubuntu 18.04 to Ubuntu 18.04.

etc.

jaegerx
Sep 10, 2012

Maybe this post will get me on your ignore list!

Grimey Drawer

There are better ways to backup vms. But itís a sound plan. Iíd personally just backup /home and automate everything else via packages and stuff with ansible.

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

jaegerx posted:

There are better ways to backup vms. But itís a sound plan. Iíd personally just backup /home and automate everything else via packages and stuff with ansible.

Cool. I thought I'd missed something. The reason I asked is that I've been tinkering around with Bacula (which can be a PITA to set up) and I've already got it pulling all of the files off my VM's into a backup volume.

I can restore a whole VM into a directory tree:
code:
total 4
drwxr-xr-x 19 root root 4096 Mar 30 17:20 restore
root@debian-ws:~# ll /bacula/restore/
total 68
drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Mar 26 20:15 bin
drwxr-xr-x   3 root root 4096 Mar 26 19:49 boot
drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Mar 26 20:23 dev
drwxr-xr-x 115 root root 4096 Mar 26 20:29 etc
drwxr-xr-x   3 root root 4096 Mar 26 19:49 home
lrwxrwxrwx   1 root root   29 Mar 30 17:20 initrd.img -> boot/initrd.img-4.9.0-8-amd64
lrwxrwxrwx   1 root root   29 Mar 30 17:20 initrd.img.old -> boot/initrd.img-4.9.0-8-amd64
drwxr-xr-x  17 root root 4096 Mar 26 19:54 lib
drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Mar 26 19:45 lib64
drwx------   2 root root 4096 Mar 26 19:44 lost+found
drwxr-xr-x   3 root root 4096 Mar 26 19:44 media
drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Mar 26 19:44 mnt
drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Mar 26 19:44 opt
drwx------   4 root root 4096 Mar 30 17:20 root
drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Mar 26 20:58 run
drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Mar 26 20:15 sbin
drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Mar 26 19:44 srv
drwxr-xr-x  10 root root 4096 Mar 26 19:44 usr
drwxr-xr-x  11 root root 4096 Mar 26 19:44 var
lrwxrwxrwx   1 root root   26 Mar 30 17:20 vmlinuz -> boot/vmlinuz-4.9.0-8-amd64
lrwxrwxrwx   1 root root   26 Mar 30 17:20 vmlinuz.old -> boot/vmlinuz-4.9.0-8-amd64
root@debian-ws:~# 

But the Bacula restore process is even more complicated. I figured that, since I can back up the whole file structure of multiple VM's into a central repo then I can just extract whichever VM dies into temporary space and restore it to a brand-new VM.

I just thought that there would be something I had missed but if that's a decent idea I will use it for my backup plan. The Bacula storage repo (and catalog export) will get regularly backed up, too. So if the Bacula VM dies I still have the backups.

e: I will probably need to exclude /boot from my backups if I am doing a 'lazy restore' since there's no need to restore boot or grub if I am rebuilding the system manually.

apropos man fucked around with this message at Mar 31, 2019 around 07:28

other people
Jun 27, 2004
Associate Christ

Kind of a quaint way to be doing things in TYOOL 2019 but sure, it can work.

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

other people posted:

Kind of a quaint way to be doing things in TYOOL 2019 but sure, it can work.

Heh. I'm open to recommendations.

Horse Clocks
Dec 14, 2004


Itís a VM? Canít you just back up/make a copy of the entire VM image?

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

Yeah. It's a bit wasteful to copy the whole 20G or whatever the qcow2 is.

Also, I'd have to shut the VM down, copy the image and start it up.

Also, Bacula will do a weekly full backup and nightly incrementals (or whatever schedule you give it) and the VM can run while that is happening.

Mr. Crow
May 22, 2008

Snap City mayor for life


jaegerx posted:

There are better ways to backup vms. But it’s a sound plan. I’d personally just backup /home and automate everything else via packages and stuff with ansible.

Shofixti
Nov 23, 2005

Kyaieee!

Biscuit Hider

Every time I open a text file through the file manager I get the following message. It's really annoying. What's going on? It's not happening with any other file types.

I'm running Mint and still getting comfortable with Linux.

Double Punctuation
Dec 30, 2009

Ships were made for sinking;
Whiskey made for drinking;
If we were made of cellophane
We'd all get stinking drunk much faster!


Shofixti posted:

Every time I open a text file through the file manager I get the following message. It's really annoying. What's going on? It's not happening with any other file types.

I'm running Mint and still getting comfortable with Linux.



Did the files come from an external drive or another system? If so, they will have the execute permission set by default. Other files wonít do that because they are clearly not executable, but Mint has no way to tell that a text file isnít actually a shell script, so it relies on the execute permission to determine that.

peepsalot
Apr 24, 2007

††††††††PEEP THIS...
†††††††††††BITCH!



Shofixti posted:

Every time I open a text file through the file manager I get the following message. It's really annoying. What's going on? It's not happening with any other file types.

I'm running Mint and still getting comfortable with Linux.


If its just that particular file, it must have gotten executable permissions set on it somehow.
Right click the file, properties -> permissions -> uncheck "Execute:"
or from terminal "chmod -x yourfilename"

Shofixti
Nov 23, 2005

Kyaieee!

Biscuit Hider

Double Punctuation posted:

Did the files come from an external drive or another system? If so, they will have the execute permission set by default. Other files wonít do that because they are clearly not executable, but Mint has no way to tell that a text file isnít actually a shell script, so it relies on the execute permission to determine that.

Yes you're right. My setup is SSD 1 (Linux), SSD 2 (Windows), HDD (shared bulk storage). I poked around and this issue is only happening when I open a text file from the shared HDD or Windows SSD.

peepsalot posted:

If its just that particular file, it must have gotten executable permissions set on it somehow.
Right click the file, properties -> permissions -> uncheck "Execute:"
or from terminal "chmod -x yourfilename"

Is there some way to apply this to every .txt file on my shared HDD? I have many and this method seems a bit too labour intensive.


[Edit - sorry I now see that I can easily apply this to every .txt by searching for all .txt and mass selecting and then going to properties. However, I don't have ownership of the files. I looked up the chown command and figured I could do something like this to take ownership of the entire drive but it's not working. By not working I mean it executes without throwing an error but I still don't have ownership of anything on the drive.]

code:
 darmok@darmok-mint:~$ sudo chown -R darmok:darmok /media/darmok/Spinner 

Shofixti fucked around with this message at Apr 2, 2019 around 03:28

peepsalot
Apr 24, 2007

††††††††PEEP THIS...
†††††††††††BITCH!



I think the issue with shared drives which Double Punctuation was getting at is that windows ntfs doesn't really do permission flags like execute, so linux assume they are all executable, or something like that.

Something that might work is mounting the shared drive with noexec option in fstab or however its mounted.

Tad Naff
Jul 8, 2004

I told you you'd be sorry buying an emoticon, but no, you were hung over. Well look at you now. It's not catching on at all!



Eee 1018p, xubuntu 18.10 fresh install, wireless no workie. Atheros 9x. I was going to make it a print server or pihole or something. Tips or pointers?

Buttcoin purse
Apr 24, 2014

THIS DUDE HERE IS A REAL CLOWN


apropos man posted:

Keep a text file containing the partition layout.

I should do this in my backup system too. https://unix.stackexchange.com/ques...-standard-tools has some information about getting partitioning tools to generate a machine-readable dump of the partition tables.

G-Prime
Apr 30, 2003

Baby, when it's love,
if it's not rough it isn't fun.


Tad Naff posted:

Eee 1018p, xubuntu 18.10 fresh install, wireless no workie. Atheros 9x. I was going to make it a print server or pihole or something. Tips or pointers?

Short answer: Maybe not supported, if it is supported it probably isn't very well, just gauging on the lack of information that I can find on a quick Googling. Or, the lack of information may indicate it normally Just Works. Personally, I wouldn't waste hours futzing with it and just find a well known USB-based wireless adapter that's supported and pop it in and move on with life. They're like <$20 at this point. The official RPi adapter is definitely mainline supported and easy to source.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



I've recently made the jump to Linux Mint on my primary home laptop in an attempt to learn and become more comfortable with Linux, and because I have a win10 work laptop and the OS bugs me.

I really foobared my first install by going sudo apt-get crazy and not knowing what I am doing so I'm going to format and try again. I have a few questions for my second attempt:

1. What is the best file system format for normal day to day use? The install lets me select from BTRFS or EXT4 and this ties in with the journaling/backup system from what I can tell. Is there a big difference either way? This is a newer laptop with newer hardware so performance shouldnt be an issue.

2. Any sites with good beginners information? So far I have been working through this site and it has been helpful:
https://linuxjourney.com

3. Finally has anyone used Cloudberry before? Pros/Cons? I use to use Backblaze on my windows laptop and thought I could pretty easily setup Cloudberry to use B2 storage and have it be even cheaper yearly.

ToxicFrog
Apr 26, 2008



BaseballPCHiker posted:

1. What is the best file system format for normal day to day use? The install lets me select from BTRFS or EXT4 and this ties in with the journaling/backup system from what I can tell. Is there a big difference either way? This is a newer laptop with newer hardware so performance shouldnt be an issue.

Ext4 is an older, battle-tested filesystem that does't support things like snapshotting but is generally reliable. BTRFS is a relatively new filesystem that, IMO, should still be marked as highly experimental; it supports a bunch of cool ZFS-like features (snapshots, builtin RAID, builtin compression, online scrubs...) but is also prone to serious performance issues and weird hauntings like running out of space while still having lots of space free.

Unless debugging your filesystem sounds like fun, I recommend choosing ext4.

No help on the other questions, sorry.

ItBreathes
Jan 6, 2013

A golden helix streaked skyward from the Helvault. A thunderous explosion shattered the silver monolith and Avacyn emerged, free from her prison at last.


I've only ever managed to bork my install when trying to install things outside of my package manager, and after the 3rd format I don't bother anymore. Linux as a daily system just works, provided you don't want to do the things it can't (AAA gaming) or get too deep into the poweruser space, though it's there if you want to gently caress around.

Also, Gnome 2 is the perfect desktop environment and the main reason I can't see moving away from Linux.

mystes
May 31, 2006



When I last tried BTRFS on a laptop 2 years ago, it got serious filesystem corruption every time the laptop lost power without being shut down cleanly.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



ToxicFrog posted:

Ext4 is an older, battle-tested filesystem that does't support things like snapshotting but is generally reliable. BTRFS is a relatively new filesystem that, IMO, should still be marked as highly experimental; it supports a bunch of cool ZFS-like features (snapshots, builtin RAID, builtin compression, online scrubs...) but is also prone to serious performance issues and weird hauntings like running out of space while still having lots of space free.

Thanks for the response. I'll keep that in mind when I format and start over today, I think the first time I actually went with BTRFS because it seemed fancier not knowing it wasnt stable yet.


ItBreathes posted:

I've only ever managed to bork my install when trying to install things outside of my package manager, and after the 3rd format I don't bother anymore.

Yeah thats basically what I did to a T. Had %90 of everything running fine, then thought to myself. Hmmm why dont I try installing this Steam/Proton business and see what thats all about. Lesson learned. It was working flawlessly before then and I was really liking it.

Crotch Fruit
Jul 1, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT
CRUSTING MY
JORTS OVER THE
INTERNATIONAL
FEMINIST LEGO
AGENDA


Shofixti posted:

Yes you're right. My setup is SSD 1 (Linux), SSD 2 (Windows), HDD (shared bulk storage). I poked around and this issue is only happening when I open a text file from the shared HDD or Windows SSD.


Is there some way to apply this to every .txt file on my shared HDD? I have many and this method seems a bit too labour intensive.


[Edit - sorry I now see that I can easily apply this to every .txt by searching for all .txt and mass selecting and then going to properties. However, I don't have ownership of the files. I looked up the chown command and figured I could do something like this to take ownership of the entire drive but it's not working. By not working I mean it executes without throwing an error but I still don't have ownership of anything on the drive.]

code:
 darmok@darmok-mint:~$ sudo chown -R darmok:darmok /media/darmok/Spinner 
What file system are you using for the shared drive, and what version of windows? The easy answer is permissions are not compatible between Windows and Linux/Unix, hell even just the carriage return and line feed are not compatible (although I think the latest version of notepad finally addressed that). I can't say much more other then I would expect changing the permissions on a non-Linux drive to fail, especially if it is NTFS formatted or contains files made by Windows.

Tad Naff posted:

Eee 1018p, xubuntu 18.10 fresh install, wireless no workie. Atheros 9x. I was going to make it a print server or pihole or something. Tips or pointers?
Do you know the model or chip on the wifi adapter, or can you run LSPCI and post what it spits out for a WiFi adapter? I for one would be kinda surprised if Linux can not support your wifi adapter. I assume you have already tried checking for updates with the laptop connected via ethernet? A USB dongle is probably the easiest option, but it also doesn't appear to be too tremendously complex to replace the internal wifi card, assuming you can find one that is Linux supported. Remove all the rear screws, use a pocket knife credit card (I use spent gift cards) to pry the keyboard cover off, then swap the wifi card and replace the crusty old spinner with an SSD. Really, if it still has it's original HDD it's probably on it's last legs or just begging to die as soon as you shake the laptop/drive, an SSD might (barely) increase battery life and performance (don't kid yourself, an Atom is still slooooow) and you can get a 240GB SSD for about $40 or less these days.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J84v4k8pnyQ

ItBreathes posted:

Also, Gnome 2 is the perfect desktop environment and the main reason I can't see moving away from Linux.
KDE and/or XFCE would like to have a word with you. Really my biggest complaint about Gnome 2 is simply that Gnome 3 went crazy and I thought that means that Gnome 2 development was officially halted. Sure there are forks, but do the forks have the monetary support of backers like Red Hat IBM?

ItBreathes
Jan 6, 2013

A golden helix streaked skyward from the Helvault. A thunderous explosion shattered the silver monolith and Avacyn emerged, free from her prison at last.


BaseballPCHiker posted:

Thanks for the response. I'll keep that in mind when I format and start over today, I think the first time I actually went with BTRFS because it seemed fancier not knowing it wasnt stable yet.


Yeah thats basically what I did to a T. Had %90 of everything running fine, then thought to myself. Hmmm why dont I try installing this Steam/Proton business and see what thats all about. Lesson learned. It was working flawlessly before then and I was really liking it.

The native Linux steam works fine in my experience, though you should be able to grab that through apt as well. Haven't mucked about with proton.

E:

Crotchfruit posted:

KDE and/or XFCE would like to have a word with you. Really my biggest complaint about Gnome 2 is simply that Gnome 3 went crazy and I thought that means that Gnome 2 development was officially halted. Sure there are forks, but do the forks have the monetary support of backers like Red Hat IBM?

Gnome flashback is built off of Gnome 3 but keeps all the Gnome 2 goodness. Any shortcomings of it I'm not aware of, but I'm not running a mission critical system here either.

ItBreathes fucked around with this message at Apr 2, 2019 around 14:59

Kassad
Nov 11, 2005

It's about time.


^^ Proton is just Wine implemented through Steam, it doesn't require you to mess with anything if you got Steam (and graphics card drivers) running.

BaseballPCHiker posted:

Thanks for the response. I'll keep that in mind when I format and start over today, I think the first time I actually went with BTRFS because it seemed fancier not knowing it wasnt stable yet.

Yeah, just go with EXT4 and never look back. Literally, the only time you'll need to think about which file system to use is if you want a flash drive that also works on Windows.

Kassad fucked around with this message at Apr 2, 2019 around 14:55

Crotch Fruit
Jul 1, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT
CRUSTING MY
JORTS OVER THE
INTERNATIONAL
FEMINIST LEGO
AGENDA


Kassad posted:

^^ Proton is just Wine implemented through Steam, it doesn't require you to mess with anything if you got Steam (and graphics card drivers) running.


Yeah, just go with EXT4 and never look back. Literally, the only time you'll need to think about which file system to use is if you want a flash drive that also works on Windows.
I think all of the flash drives I have bought recently are still formatted with Fat32, which is nice since it's highly compatible. The only downside is the 4GB file size limitation, which hasn't been a problem but some of my blu-ray rips have ended up close to 4GB even after re-encoding. To get around this, I could format the drives as either exfat or NTFS. I think exfat would likely have better Linux support and NTFS of course would have better windows support, is this correct? Is there a different file system I should consider for flash drives?

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

Buttcoin purse posted:

I should do this in my backup system too. https://unix.stackexchange.com/ques...-standard-tools has some information about getting partitioning tools to generate a machine-readable dump of the partition tables.

That is an awesome Stack Exchange page. I'm bookmarking it. Cheers!

So far I've managed to recreate my VM's using the files stored in Bacula. It's not the most automated solution for restoring but the advantages are:

1. It will run a weekly full backup and nightly incrementals as standard. So I can restore a VM to the state it was in at 11pm previous to a disk fail.
2. Once it's setup I can forget about it. I can set up a periodic email to remind me it's still running, if I want.
3. The whole filesystem is saved: all configs and binaries, minus any manual exclusions I make.
4. The volume containing the backup data and SQL catalog file can be dumped onto my ZFS array for redundancy and further backup.
5. The volume containing backed up files is much smaller than making a copy of a 20G or 40G qcow for each VM.

The only obvious downside is that if I have a catastrophic failure then I have to manually install a VM of roughly the same partition layout, boot from a system revcovery CD and rsync all the files back onto it. Then dick around with the virtual MAC and IP DHCP setting to restore my static IP.

I run my VM's from a Samsung 970 NVMe drive, so when and if it actually fails could be years away. So the fact that it's an antiquated system with a clunky restore method doesn't bother me. I hardly ever expect to actually do the restore, but it's there if I need it.

gourdcaptain
Nov 16, 2012



Crotch Fruit posted:

I think all of the flash drives I have bought recently are still formatted with Fat32, which is nice since it's highly compatible. The only downside is the 4GB file size limitation, which hasn't been a problem but some of my blu-ray rips have ended up close to 4GB even after re-encoding. To get around this, I could format the drives as either exfat or NTFS. I think exfat would likely have better Linux support and NTFS of course would have better windows support, is this correct? Is there a different file system I should consider for flash drives?

Inverse with Linux. NTFS has pretty widely distributed Linux drivers that are more mature (ntfs-3g, most distros included them by default),, exFat has some but they're not as common and a legal mess. They're both a bit slower than more native drivers (barring the one out of tree exFat kernel driver) due to being FUSE drivers that run outside of the kernel and use a bit more CPU. Both work fine with Windows, though.

ToxicFrog
Apr 26, 2008



BaseballPCHiker posted:

Yeah thats basically what I did to a T. Had %90 of everything running fine, then thought to myself. Hmmm why dont I try installing this Steam/Proton business and see what thats all about. Lesson learned. It was working flawlessly before then and I was really liking it.

That should just be sudo apt install steam and away you go; Proton is bundled as part of Steam (and shouldn't interfere with mainline Wine installs). Mint is even based on Ubuntu which is the only distro Steam officially supports.

waffle iron
Jan 16, 2004


BaseballPCHiker posted:

Thanks for the response. I'll keep that in mind when I format and start over today, I think the first time I actually went with BTRFS because it seemed fancier not knowing it wasnt stable yet.

From everything I've read about BTRFS in the last couple years, it's unlikely that it will ever become stable due to some early design errors. The kinds of design problems that would require wholesale rewrites and changing the on disk format. Two things that shouldn't happen once a file system has been mainlined into the Linux kernel. And also there aren't many people who are capable of fixing it besides the guy who created the fs.

It's a mess and unlikely to get better. Redhat no longer ships it in RHEL. You hear about Facebook using it in production, but that's because they have the orchestration to test the integrity of any server and reprovision it from zero if it fails.

Shofixti
Nov 23, 2005

Kyaieee!

Biscuit Hider

peepsalot posted:

I think the issue with shared drives which Double Punctuation was getting at is that windows ntfs doesn't really do permission flags like execute, so linux assume they are all executable, or something like that.

Something that might work is mounting the shared drive with noexec option in fstab or however its mounted.

Mounting with noexec option in fstab worked. Thanks!

mystes
May 31, 2006



Its really unfortunate that btrfs is such a mess and zfs has licensing issues.

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CommieGIR
Aug 22, 2006

If Godzilla can do it, you know I can deliver!

Pillbug

An oracle product? A mess? Never. Never.

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