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VikingofRock
Aug 24, 2008


Slippery Tilde

Toalpaz posted:

Yeah their whole website is written by elitist pricks it seems, that's why I came here first. Things I learned: mostly how to mount and unmount hard drives from the live USB in order to install files/look at stuff. I wish I had gotten to know how to use the fdisk and parted but I couldn't write a new tree because I would lose my copy of windows, and I tried really hard looking about how to write new commands with them but ended up just hoping onto windows and partitioning the drive from there where there's a graphical interface. Other then that it's a lot of the same with lots of pacman instead of apt-get. And you have to edit some files but honestly if they had a better guide I'm sure it would be more painless. Instead they like giving vague descriptions like people should know everything already.

They used to have a shorter and more specific beginner's guide, but IIRC they merged it somewhat poorly with the installation guide and the result was kind of hard to follow. This is the old beginner's guide if you are interested. It gave me a pretty good place to start when I was setting up arch, and then when I got stuck the installation guide or the specific page for the stuff I was stuck on helped me through it.

After you finish installing, you should also check out the general recommendations page if you haven't already.

edit:

ToxicFrog posted:

on ZFS / BTRFS

Thanks for the write-up. I'm surprised that BTRFS was so bad, because as you said they seem to claim it is "production ready" when it sounds like it is clearly not.

VikingofRock fucked around with this message at Sep 22, 2016 around 01:09

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YouTuber
Jul 31, 2004


VikingofRock posted:

They used to have a shorter and more specific beginner's guide, but IIRC they merged it somewhat poorly with the installation guide and the result was kind of hard to follow. This is the old beginner's guide if you are interested. It gave me a pretty good place to start when I was setting up arch, and then when I got stuck the installation guide or the specific page for the stuff I was stuck on helped me through it.

After you finish installing, you should also check out the general recommendations page if you haven't already.


There was quite the furor over that wiki change on the subreddit for Arch. Fortunately, they left the old one intact because it's far better for a newbie to reference.

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



VikingofRock posted:

What happened with ZFS? I've been thinking about experimenting with either ZFS or BTRFS and I'd be interested to hear your experiences.

The HUGE thing to watch out for with ZFS is that it will ruin your life if a partition gets too full while still under IO load. At least on ZFS-for-Linux, which is my only exposure to it. If it behaves better elsewhere where it's a first-class citizen, great.

"Too full" means about 90% full. At this point, performance drops off a loving cliff and hopefully your deletes even make it through the 99% iowait shitshow. I've personally seen it death spiral into total data loss of many TB's once you get too full (literally my first day at a new job was "hey our entire ZFS file share suddenly dropped offline, what gives? Joe Previous Sysadmin said everything was cool and good?")

ZFS on Linux is cool, but the safety is definitely off.

fwiw my last job was at a website serving millions of visitors per day, and they ran /var/log on BTRFS for the inline compression. But not for data that mattered. That was petabytes of good old ext4

Docjowles fucked around with this message at Sep 22, 2016 around 03:39

Twerk from Home
Jan 17, 2009

This avatar brought to you by the 'save our dead gay forums' foundation.


That's a pretty drat big downside, especially because I've seen a server with 300MB free in a 27 Terabyte hardware RAID recently, and ext4 managed to recover well from that.

Edit: It looks like you can use quotas to protect users from themselves, but that's yet another thing to worry about.

Thermopyle
Jul 1, 2003

...the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt. —Bertrand Russell


I've got 30TB of data in pools that are 98+% full and have been that way for months.

Haven't really seen a problem other than RW performance dropping maybe 10%.

I'm not saying there can't be a problem, I just wonder under what circumstances there would be.

peepsalot
Apr 24, 2007

        PEEP THIS...
           BITCH!



Is it possible to get keydown and keyup events(as in press and release events for individual keys, not the up/down arrow keys) from a terminal program, maybe with ncurses or some other text lib? And if so, is there any possible way to get that info through a ssh connection?

ToxicFrog
Apr 26, 2008



peepsalot posted:

Is it possible to get keydown and keyup events(as in press and release events for individual keys, not the up/down arrow keys) from a terminal program, maybe with ncurses or some other text lib? And if so, is there any possible way to get that info through a ssh connection?

No. The terminal emulator sees keydown/keyup events corresponding to individual keys on the keyboard, but the program running inside the terminal only sees the characters those keystrokes emit. Among other things, this means:
- You can't detect keyup events
- You can't distinguish between a key being held down (with key repeat on) and just being pressed a bunch of times
- You can't detect modifier keys being pressed on their own
- You can't tell the difference between the number pad and the non-number-pad equivalents (e.g. KP1 shows up as either '1' with numlock on or 'end' with numlock off; there's no way to tell if it's the numpad key or the "normal" key)

This applies whether the program is running locally (getting input from the terminal), or running over ssh (getting input from sshd, which gets it from your ssh client, which gets it from the terminal).

There are programs that appear to do impossible things in the terminal, like Dwarf Fortress, but they do it by actually being graphical programs that use bitmapped fonts to make it look like they're running in the terminal.

ToxicFrog fucked around with this message at Sep 24, 2016 around 21:30

peepsalot
Apr 24, 2007

        PEEP THIS...
           BITCH!



ToxicFrog posted:

No. The terminal emulator sees keydown/keyup events corresponding to individual keys on the keyboard, but the program running inside the terminal only sees the characters those keystrokes emit. Among other things, this means:
- You can't detect keyup events
- You can't distinguish between a key being held down (with key repeat on) and just being pressed a bunch of times
- You can't detect modifier keys being pressed on their own
- You can't tell the difference between the number pad and the non-number-pad equivalents (e.g. KP1 shows up as either '1' with numlock on or 'end' with numlock off; there's no way to tell if it's the numpad key or the "normal" key)

This applies whether the program is running locally (getting input from the terminal), or running over ssh (getting input from sshd, which gets it from your ssh client, which gets it from the terminal).

There are programs that appear to do impossible things in the terminal, like Dwarf Fortress, but they do it by actually being graphical programs that use bitmapped fonts to make it look like they're running in the terminal.
But why can ncurses receive mouse down and up data and not for keyboard, can't they just use a similar mechanism for however the hell mouse works.

ToxicFrog
Apr 26, 2008



peepsalot posted:

But why can ncurses receive mouse down and up data and not for keyboard, can't they just use a similar mechanism for however the hell mouse works.

Because there's a terminal protocol for transmitting mouse information from the terminal over a text link and no similar protocol exists for keydown/keyup events.

If I had to guess why, I'd guess that people cared a lot more about mouse support, and earlier, than keyup support; by the time people needed keyup support for stuff they were programming for vector terminals or X11.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004
Probation
Can't post for 3 days!


Fun Shoe

I think the world would be receptive to development of a similar protocol for low-level keyboard handling.

jaxercracks
Oct 12, 2012


I seem to have a couple of orphaned initrd.img files in my /boot partition:

code:
noone@nowhere:/boot$ uname -r
4.4.0-39-generic
noone@nowhere:/boot$ ls -alh                                  
total 118M
drwxr-xr-x  4 root root 3.0K Sep 26 13:01 .
drwxr-xr-x 27 root root 4.0K Sep 25 13:12 ..
-rw-r--r--  1 root root 1.2M Sep  6 14:52 abi-4.4.0-38-generic
-rw-r--r--  1 root root 1.2M Sep 20 17:03 abi-4.4.0-39-generic
-rw-r--r--  1 root root 186K Sep  6 14:52 config-4.4.0-38-generic
-rw-r--r--  1 root root 186K Sep 20 17:03 config-4.4.0-39-generic
drwxr-xr-x  5 root root 1.0K Sep 26 13:01 grub
-rw-r--r--  1 root root 9.4M Jan 21  2016 initrd.img-4.2.0-22-generic
-rw-r--r--  1 root root 9.8M Jul  1 20:46 initrd.img-4.4.0-25-generic
-rw-r--r--  1 root root  37M Sep  9 16:26 initrd.img-4.4.0-38-generic
-rw-r--r--  1 root root  38M Sep 25 13:13 initrd.img-4.4.0-39-generic
drwx------  2 root root  12K Apr 17  2014 lost+found
-rw-r--r--  1 root root 179K Jan 28  2016 memtest86+.bin
-rw-r--r--  1 root root 181K Jan 28  2016 memtest86+.elf
-rw-r--r--  1 root root 181K Jan 28  2016 memtest86+_multiboot.bin
-rw-------  1 root root 3.7M Sep  6 14:52 System.map-4.4.0-38-generic
-rw-------  1 root root 3.7M Sep 20 17:03 System.map-4.4.0-39-generic
-rw-------  1 root root 6.8M Sep  6 14:52 vmlinuz-4.4.0-38-generic
-rw-------  1 root root 6.8M Sep 20 17:03 vmlinuz-4.4.0-39-generic
Specifically I am talking about :
code:
-rw-r--r--  1 root root 9.4M Jan 21  2016 initrd.img-4.2.0-22-generic
-rw-r--r--  1 root root 9.8M Jul  1 20:46 initrd.img-4.4.0-25-generic
Normally I use the purge-old-kernels command periodically to get rid of older stuff in /boot

Can I just rm these two files or is there a better/more correct way to do it to keep apt happy?
Thanks.

telcoM
Mar 21, 2009


Fallen Rib

jaxercracks posted:

I seem to have a couple of orphaned initrd.img files in my /boot partition:

Specifically I am talking about :
code:
-rw-r--r--  1 root root 9.4M Jan 21  2016 initrd.img-4.2.0-22-generic
-rw-r--r--  1 root root 9.8M Jul  1 20:46 initrd.img-4.4.0-25-generic
Normally I use the purge-old-kernels command periodically to get rid of older stuff in /boot

Can I just rm these two files or is there a better/more correct way to do it to keep apt happy?
Thanks.

Those initrd images look suspiciously small compared to the others.

So.... you're using *Ubuntu, I guess?

See whether your distro's package management still thinks those specific kernel versions are installed or not:
code:
$ sudo dpkg -l 'linux-image*'
(This command might also display some kernel metapackages with only a partial version number or no visible version number at all; ignore them)

If the package manager thinks those kernel packages don't exist on your system, the files are truly orphaned: feel free to blow them away.
But you might want to try this first:
code:
$ sudo update-initramfs -d -k 4.2.0-22-generic
You may also check if /lib/modules/4.2.0-22-generic and/or /lib/modules/4.4.0-25-generic directories exist: they normally contain the modules for the respective kernel versions.

If the package manager thinks those kernels are still installed, let it try to remove the package first:
code:
$ sudo dpkg --purge linux-image-4.2.0-22-generic
If you were running low on disk space when updating, you may sometimes get orphans like that if a package install/update/initrd regeneration process gets interrupted because of lack of disk space. In that case, with kernel packages, the package manager follows "better safe than sorry" principles and might leave an old initrd file around.

telcoM fucked around with this message at Sep 26, 2016 around 21:50

xzzy
Mar 5, 2009

wakey wakey to
this bowl of tasty


Yams Fan

I'm trying to come up with a scheme to automate an audit of logins on serial ports. Short version, we got a room with couple thousand linux servers, using a mix of IPMI and old school db-9's attached to a serial aggregator.. gives us the ability to troubleshoot machines from POST without having to stand next to the machine itself.

So I'm trying to come up with a way to test if that serial connection is actually working. The traditional response is "use an expect script" or these days the pexpect python module, but that's not what I'm hung up on. What I can't figure out is the "rm -rf /" situation.. if I have a process connecting to these consoles and someone left an active shell, there is a chance of a script logging in and pounding enter a couple times could run commands. Or even worse, if someone is actively typing on the command line and this script shows up and smack enter, what if they were in the middle of typing a destructive command and this script executes it prematurely?

As serial connections don't give any sort of indication of a successful connection, it's mandatory that I send some kind of output over the wire to trigger a prompt.

I can think of a few ways of dealing with this, with varying levels of insanity:

a) Auto-logout any sessions on the console after some period of inactivity. Solves some issues, but not all.
b) Instead of mashing enter, send ctrl-c or ctrl-d or some other "safe" key sequence that generates a login or shell prompt
c) some kind of script on the server itself that checks for an active login, and if not, pings a server to initiate a check
d) Send newlines anyway and hope for the best
e) Configure all serial access so that only one connection can be open at a time, would also need auto-logout.

Anyone ever tried something like this and got some other sensible option that I'm not seeing?

ToxicFrog
Apr 26, 2008



xzzy posted:

e) Configure all serial access so that only one connection can be open at a time, would also need auto-logout.

Anyone ever tried something like this and got some other sensible option that I'm not seeing?

Last place I worked at had a similar setup, and did (e). There was no auto-logout when idle, but the serial aggregator had a web UI that would tell you who was using it, how long since they last transmitted, and had a button to forcibly disconnect them.

jaxercracks
Oct 12, 2012


telcoM posted:

Those initrd images look suspiciously small compared to the others.

So.... you're using *Ubuntu, I guess?

See whether your distro's package management still thinks those specific kernel versions are installed or not:
code:
$ sudo dpkg -l 'linux-image*'
(This command might also display some kernel metapackages with only a partial version number or no visible version number at all; ignore them)

If the package manager thinks those kernel packages don't exist on your system, the files are truly orphaned: feel free to blow them away.
But you might want to try this first:
code:
$ sudo update-initramfs -d -k 4.2.0-22-generic
You may also check if /lib/modules/4.2.0-22-generic and/or /lib/modules/4.4.0-25-generic directories exist: they normally contain the modules for the respective kernel versions.

If the package manager thinks those kernels are still installed, let it try to remove the package first:
code:
$ sudo dpkg --purge linux-image-4.2.0-22-generic
If you were running low on disk space when updating, you may sometimes get orphans like that if a package install/update/initrd regeneration process gets interrupted because of lack of disk space. In that case, with kernel packages, the package manager follows "better safe than sorry" principles and might leave an old initrd file around.

Thanks very much for this. Yes it is Ubunutu. I had already checked with dpkg to make sure the kernels really were gone.

Now that you have me looking in /lib/modules I see I have a lot of extra stuff there as well:

code:

ls /lib/modules
3.13.0-27-generic  3.13.0-33-generic  3.13.0-37-generic  4.2.0-22-generic
3.13.0-29-generic  3.13.0-34-generic  3.13.0-39-generic  4.4.0-38-generic
3.13.0-30-generic  3.13.0-35-generic  3.16.0-24-generic  4.4.0-39-generic
3.13.0-32-generic  3.13.0-36-generic  3.16.0-25-generic
I assume I can rm the unneeded directories here as well just so everything is neat?

Winkle-Daddy
Mar 10, 2007


I was referred to this thread by the 'POS for some RedHat help! Crossposting:

Winkle-Daddy posted:

We have a build automation process where we use Boxcutter + Packer + VMWare vSphere + VMWare VirtualBox to create Windows and Linux box files. The Windows box files are built to automatically be pointed at our internal MS KMS server. We also maintain boxes for each patch level of each OS as well as a rolling "latest" that is built weekly and re-imported into our cloud. This works great for all of our supported platforms (CentOS, Fedora, Ubuntu, Debian, Suse, Win* since XP) except for one: Red Hat. The way that we use the containers with Vagrant is that we just invoke Chef to cook up our node with recipes hosted on our internal Supermarket, some acceptance tests are run and the environment is destroyed to be run again the next day with a new build of our software.

How in the actual gently caress do we license these RH servers in such a way we can use package management with them and then destroy them when we're done? We can't reliably "un-register" them because we have some jobs that do automated cleanup in the vagrant cloud if something happens and a Jenkins job failed to properly vagrant destroy something. AFAIK, the old satellite server methodology still required you to manually remove registration of the machine, same with executing rhn_register.

What should I be looking at to help solve this problem??

e: Some suggestions from the 'POS:
  • Since we're using chef, just add a centOS repo and install packages from there -- Doable but if we're bothering to make the templates in the first place, might as well make them for reals.
  • Make a RH mirror to mirror an official repo, just make sure your licenses cover it (I assume this is still an option?).
  • Write a script that deletes the license registration after they're offline (check by hostname?)
All of these are likely doable, I'm thinking #2 on this list if it's still available as it seems the easiest for long term support.

Winkle-Daddy fucked around with this message at Sep 27, 2016 around 16:30

MrMoo
Sep 14, 2000



This is what I have done previously: setup one RHEL registered host to download packages, setup as a HTTP/NFS server and then point every machine you build to that as it's repo.

The RHEL licensesubscription to at least version 6 has been to download binaries, there is no license for using the binaries or distributing internally. Something may have changed with version 7 as our organization moved to Oracle which has a free open repo server on the Internets.

Red Hat do or had a proxy system for Satellite registered hosts, but not everyone has open connectivity to support Satellite in any form.

This is still on Red Hat's site,

quote:

What happens at the end of my subscription?

...
If all of your subscriptions expire and you have no other active subscriptions in your organization, you retain the right to use the software, but your entire environment will no longer receive any of the subscription benefits, including:

* The latest certified software versions.
* Security errata and bug fixes.
* Red Hat technical support.
* Access to the award-winning Customer Portal.
* Red Hat's Open Source Assurance.

MrMoo fucked around with this message at Sep 27, 2016 around 16:44

Winkle-Daddy
Mar 10, 2007


That's some good info, thanks!

Sounds slightly more threatening, imo:

a little further down the page... posted:

Some resources may require more of these benefits, some less, so Red Hat measures the full value of your subscriptions by counting the number of instances or installations of Red Hat software you use. While you have subscriptions for a Red Hat product, you must maintain a subscription for every instance or installation of Red Hat software being used in your environment.

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

Winkle-Daddy posted:

I was referred to this thread by the 'POS for some RedHat help! Crossposting:

e: Some suggestions from the 'POS:
  • Since we're using chef, just add a centOS repo and install packages from there -- Doable but if we're bothering to make the templates in the first place, might as well make them for reals.
  • Make a RH mirror to mirror an official repo, just make sure your licenses cover it (I assume this is still an option?).
  • Write a script that deletes the license registration after they're offline (check by hostname?)
All of these are likely doable, I'm thinking #2 on this list if it's still available as it seems the easiest for long term support.

rhn_register (and rhnreg_ks) are dead. subscription-manager/RHSM is the future.

CentOS repos are bad if you ever need a support case for any reason. You probably won't (and using OEL/CentOS/SL repos is fine in that sense), but if you ever do need to file a customer case for any reason, you will be asked to reproduce without using CentOS, which is annoying.

RHN/RHSM channels are just plain yum repos, and you can work with them as normal. Take some registered host (your buildhost), and:
code:
reposync --gpgcheck -l --repoid=rhel-7-server-rpms --download_path=/foo/bar
Create a repo from that and go.

In general, there's no such thing as "licensing". Only subscriptions, which entitle you to updates/support. You have to try really hard to get any kind of subscription audit.

  • sync a repo
  • use that to build
  • get enough subscriptions to cover your pool of hosts (or somewhere around that number -- it's unlikely to be super anal

If you actually want to update those systems while they're running, they'd need to be registered (or pointed at your repos), but it doesn't sound like it.

e:

That clause is basically CYA. Nothing "phones home" or anything. We don't know. But if you're a dick (and file support cases because you're using CentOS for your environment and reproducing bugs on RHEL in order to get official support with your 2 entitlements) or obviously trying to game the systems (tons of support cases/systems registered without many entitlements), the "threatening" part might apply. I wouldn't worry about it.

evol262 fucked around with this message at Sep 27, 2016 around 17:22

Winkle-Daddy
Mar 10, 2007


That is some good poo poo, evel262, thank you!

We are planning on building from RHEL 5.2 through to the current release, I assume reposync would be best in this case as well?

e:

quote:

If you actually want to update those systems while they're running, they'd need to be registered (or pointed at your repos), but it doesn't sound like it.

What do you mean by this? The templates will execute chef runs, so they are going to try to install various package resources. If we go with the reposync option it sounds like we would want to create a chef recipe that points a machine to our newly synced internal repo before installing other packages?

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

Winkle-Daddy posted:

That is some good poo poo, evel262, thank you!

We are planning on building from RHEL 5.2 through to the current release, I assume reposync would be best in this case as well?

e:


What do you mean by this? The templates will execute chef runs, so they are going to try to install various package resources. If we go with the reposync option it sounds like we would want to create a chef recipe that points a machine to our newly synced internal repo before installing other packages?

You can reposync any channel you use, yeah.

You'd want to create a chef recipe that poitns to some repo (internal or otherwise), yes. You can also use it to install with a kickstart/packer/whatever, but you probably already have a mechanism to do that.

I meant that, basically:

If you want to have those images running persistently with something like yum-cron fetching updates from RHN, they'd need to be registered. Otherwise, you can use a local repo/whatever.

Winkle-Daddy
Mar 10, 2007


Awesome! Thanks!

This has been on someone else's "to do" list for like 6 months and I got sick of them humming and hawing over it, so like I really appreciate this a lot!

ToxicFrog
Apr 26, 2008



taqueso posted:

I think the world would be receptive to development of a similar protocol for low-level keyboard handling.

I'm not convinced they would be, since raw keyboard input is, AFAIK, mostly useful for gaming, and these days the main reason to write a game for the tty is for the aesthetics (which you can emulate with X11) rather than because you have no other options. And it is certainly more easy to do so than it is to hammer out a sensible protocol for this that no-one has strong objections to, then get support for it added to all the backends (ncurses, terminfo, termcap...) and frontends (xterm, (u)rxvt, gnome-terminal, konsole, iterm...).

anthonypants
May 6, 2007

by Nyc_Tattoo


Dinosaur Gum

I need to tell proftpd to require glusterfsd when it starts, so it doesn't fail at boot. I can edit the initscript to add glusterd and glusterfsd to the Required-Start line, but what's the method I should be using to do this? CentOS 6.7 btw

politicorific
Sep 15, 2007


evol262 posted:

If it's writable, it's easy.

Their busybox config is in the source dump (along with the kernel config). busybox is modular, so you can just enable whatever you want, set a root password, and deploy a new filesystem.

Since it's writable, though, you could theoretically force it to boot from a very small initrd which never loads root, but instead uses anaconda or debootstrap or whatever to just lay down an entirely new image of whatever distro you want. Probably easiest to just start with their kernel config, but...

Is Linux From Scratch, http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/lfs/view/stable/, a good resource to learn how to do all this? Or is there a better guide? Looks like I'm going to be on my own on this.

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

Are you sure? There's a BusyBox config.

If it's LFS, bootstrap gcc and go from there.

politicorific
Sep 15, 2007


evol262 posted:

Are you sure? There's a BusyBox config.

If it's LFS, bootstrap gcc and go from there.

I mean... I'm looking for a tutorial on how to do the things you suggest. To understand from top to bottom.

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

politicorific posted:

I mean... I'm looking for a tutorial on how to do the things you suggest. To understand from top to bottom.

I'm not at all sure that this is LFS. It's probably busybox.

Initial system bringup/bootstrapping doesn't have a convenient tutorial. It's really hard, actually. The normal mechanism is usually something like "cross-compile necessary utilities for your target architecture, move them into the system, bootstrap from stage 1". For gcc, this is something like "make, awk, libmpfr, libgmp, libmpc" (plus tar/gzip for extraction). How do you get "make" or "awk", then, since both require a compiler? And all of these require a bourne-compatible shell?

Well...

The short version of this is that it's all historical. At some point in the past, someone had to build an initial compiler for a language which was higher level than assembler (you can always write assembler code to re-implement the entire base system to do that you want now, I guess, but it would take a couple of decades). This is done by "lexical analysis" of source code, in order to break it into tokens, then they're checked against regular expressions. Remaining pieces are checked for context free grammar. And... you should just read a book on compiler design.

However, once you have a working compiler for some language, you can start building real tooling (which isn't in assembler). Eventually, you also get a compiler which is "self-hosting" (that is -- once you have a first-generation compiler for FORTRAN which can build FORTRAN applications, you can start writing FORTRAN applications to replace your assembly compiler, and now FORTRAN applications build FORTRAN applications). These days, you'd probably write a compiler using a normal set of tooling (yacc, flex, probably a first phase compiler in C).

This sort of iteratively grew, and tools were built on top of other tools. Somebody got the idea for awk, sh, C, foo, and bar. These wound up everywhere. Including very basic C compilers (you had to pay $$$ for the "good" ones from HP/etc). So they're required for bootstrapping. If you try to build the whole toolchain on a system which doesn't have necessary pieces, you'll fail. You'd need to build elsewhere and copy it over (then use the tools to rebuild the tools for that system if you want).

Basically, there's no easy way to go from "all I have is ash and tar" (from your filesystem summary), to "build me a complete toolchain that I can use to build other stuff". If there is one, I don't know of it. For all of GUIX/Gentoo/LFS's claims to be, even they start from the assumption of a system which already has some basic utilities (Gentoo's stages, and LFS starts with you running in another distro, GUIX requires Guile and Make).

So, you can build applications on another system by creating a buildroot with versions of glibc and other utilities which match what's on the device already. It looks like glibc and not ulibc, so that's not as annoying. Just building GNU make, GNU awk, libgmp, libmpc, and libmpfr should be enough.

Really, though, trying to bootstrap gcc on a 1ghz geode is going to suck. I'd probably also build gcc in your buildroot and drop that on the system as well.

Once that's out of the way, you can grab GNU Guile and put it on the phone. Use that to install the guix package manager. Use the guix package manager to handle the rest of the system. I'd probably replace the kernel, too (it's likely that current upstream kernels support all the hardware on the phone).

Or you can drop a PXE/Rescue kernel and initrd (arch, gentoo, whatever) onto the system, and modify extlinux.conf to boot from them (presumably they're not requiring any kind of kernel signing), wipe the phone (you'll be running from memory), and install whatever goddamn distro you want. But that won't keep skype working/etc.

ewe2
Jul 1, 2009

TRUMP TRUMP TRUMP

put clinton in prison imo


Lipstick Apathy

Anyone got a recommendation for a web interface to a linux-based router that I want to run headless? It's a debian box, apache/nginx either one is fine. I'd like to manage the usual things, networking, dns, postfix etc.

Toalpaz
Mar 20, 2012

Peace through overwhelming determination


Uhg, so Arch-Linux. It's going pretty good until it doesn't. I've been trying to install Libre-Office because it's a pretty big deal and I was hoping it would be more stable as an office tool compared to Calligra Words, and Abiword. However I've been failing pretty horribly.Every time I open Libre Office it only has a fraction of the window, a square in the top left corner approximately 60% of the whole window, visible with a part of the page and some tool bar stuff. It clearly cuts off the rest of the Libre Office window, and parts with nothing in it are simply a grayed out window area. I have no clue what the issue is and I've been downloading gnome graphical extension stuff, and personally set the display option to fit the Gnome window environment. I just have no clue really what the issue is at this point, I'm stuck. Do any of you have any clue as to what would make only the top left chunk of the screen visible in this office software?

Like imagine this Libre office window:

- = Office suite
/ = gray window of frustration
________
|----|//|
|----|//|
|///////|



I tried to install "shutter" to take a picture of what it looked like, however this too failed me graphically. When I tried to take any kind of screen capture the file that was written was simply a wallpaper with a white background an a million "shutter" logos milling about on screen. So I may have bigger issues than just with that program.

Toalpaz fucked around with this message at Sep 30, 2016 around 05:16

Da Mott Man
Aug 3, 2012

Merry Christmas!

Ho! Ho! Oh, no!

Toalpaz posted:

Uhg, so Arch-Linux. It's going pretty good until it doesn't. I've been trying to install Libre-Office because it's a pretty big deal and I was hoping it would be more stable as an office tool compared to Calligra Words, and Abiword. However I've been failing pretty horribly.Every time I open Libre Office it only has a fraction of the window, a square in the top left corner approximately 60% of the whole window, visible with a part of the page and some tool bar stuff. It clearly cuts off the rest of the Libre Office window, and parts with nothing in it are simply a grayed out window area. I have no clue what the issue is and I've been downloading gnome graphical extension stuff, and personally set the display option to fit the Gnome window environment. I just have no clue really what the issue is at this point, I'm stuck. Do any of you have any clue as to what would make only the top left chunk of the screen visible in this office software?

Like imagine this Libre office window:

- = Office suite
/ = gray window of frustration
________
|----|//|
|----|//|
|///////|



I tried to install "shutter" to take a picture of what it looked like, however this too failed me graphically. When I tried to take any kind of screen capture the file that was written was simply a wallpaper with a white background an a million "shutter" logos milling about on screen. So I may have bigger issues than just with that program.

arch.txt

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

Toalpaz posted:

personally set the display option to fit the Gnome window environment

What does this mean?

Can you provide some basic info, like:
  • X.org or wayland?
  • What GPU? What drivers?
  • What login manager (gdm/kdm/etc), if any?
  • How do other applications look?
  • What "gnome graphical extension stuff"?

IAmKale
Jun 6, 2007

やらないか


Fun Shoe

What might be a good thread to ask OpenLDAP questions? It's kinda Linux-related so I figured I'd start here

Bourricot
Aug 7, 2016



Toalpaz posted:

Uhg, so Arch-Linux. It's going pretty good until it doesn't. I've been trying to install Libre-Office because it's a pretty big deal and I was hoping it would be more stable as an office tool compared to Calligra Words, and Abiword. However I've been failing pretty horribly.Every time I open Libre Office it only has a fraction of the window, a square in the top left corner approximately 60% of the whole window, visible with a part of the page and some tool bar stuff. It clearly cuts off the rest of the Libre Office window, and parts with nothing in it are simply a grayed out window area. I have no clue what the issue is and I've been downloading gnome graphical extension stuff, and personally set the display option to fit the Gnome window environment. I just have no clue really what the issue is at this point, I'm stuck. Do any of you have any clue as to what would make only the top left chunk of the screen visible in this office software?

Like imagine this Libre office window:

- = Office suite
/ = gray window of frustration
________
|----|//|
|----|//|
|///////|



I tried to install "shutter" to take a picture of what it looked like, however this too failed me graphically. When I tried to take any kind of screen capture the file that was written was simply a wallpaper with a white background an a million "shutter" logos milling about on screen. So I may have bigger issues than just with that program.
I know some GTK themes can create problems with LibreOffice, so maybe pick a new one? Adwaita should be a safe bet, or Arc if you'd prefer something flatter.

Edit: If you don't want to change theme, here's something I found on the Manjaro forum

quote:

LibreOffice might be broken on gtk-based Desktop Environments. Workaround would be to force a look to Libreoffice by editing /etc/profile.d/libreoffice*sh. We recommend to uncomment SAL_USE_VCLPLUGIN=gtk.

Bourricot fucked around with this message at Sep 30, 2016 around 17:31

Mao Zedong Thot
Oct 16, 2008



Taco Defender

Toalpaz posted:

Uhg, so Arch-Linux. It's going pretty good until it doesn't. I've been trying to install Libre-Office because it's a pretty big deal and I was hoping it would be more stable as an office tool compared to Calligra Words, and Abiword. However I've been failing pretty horribly.Every time I open Libre Office it only has a fraction of the window, a square in the top left corner approximately 60% of the whole window, visible with a part of the page and some tool bar stuff. It clearly cuts off the rest of the Libre Office window, and parts with nothing in it are simply a grayed out window area. I have no clue what the issue is and I've been downloading gnome graphical extension stuff, and personally set the display option to fit the Gnome window environment. I just have no clue really what the issue is at this point, I'm stuck. Do any of you have any clue as to what would make only the top left chunk of the screen visible in this office software?

Like imagine this Libre office window:

- = Office suite
/ = gray window of frustration
________
|----|//|
|----|//|
|///////|



I tried to install "shutter" to take a picture of what it looked like, however this too failed me graphically. When I tried to take any kind of screen capture the file that was written was simply a wallpaper with a white background an a million "shutter" logos milling about on screen. So I may have bigger issues than just with that program.

Didn't we tell you to not use Arch?

Try using `scrot` to take screenshots, it's a good program with a funny name.

Toalpaz
Mar 20, 2012

Peace through overwhelming determination


Hey there, sorry I didn't attach pictures or try other photo capturing techniques. I was really tired and passing out in my bed at that point!
So here's what my problem looks like using the gnome screenshot thing.



So this image up above shows the program's display not working. As you can see the visible box in the window's resolution is quite large too.


This is me showing uh, the fix I was directed to by the Arch wiki and I believe essentially what Bourricot asked me to do. So thanks a lot but I think I tried that, editing each comment away one by one until I've tried all the options once. (Leaving the rest commented of course.)


This is just an image of my Gnome on the preferences about thing to prove that I am running gnome 3, which I believe is the gtk3 option in the picture above. To speak to the people talking about my themes. I am using the default Adaita for everything! Except for the shell theme, I'm using no shell theme. As you can see I'm using Wayland. I use GDM I believe, when Arch starts up I'm taken to a graphical user selection screen and log onto the desktop from there. As for graphical driver, just uh, a basic one that does intel built in graphics, arch comes with the vesa drivers, and I just installed xf86-video-intel as a result of the question.

Hey thanks for all the comments, sorry I'm using Arch and making GBS threads up the thread with my problems. Calligra Word still technically works, and I have a desktop and windows. So I'm not totally out of options or desperate or anything. Calligra word just can't really open docx compatibility files however. I'd just like Linux to work and I think of it as a puzzle trying to figure out whats happening and investigating online and stuff. However I'm at a bit of a dead end this time. Thanks for taking the time to read this!

Keito
Jul 21, 2005

WHAT DO I CHOOSE ?


Everyone in these threads furiously masturbate to CentOS and openSUSE and will jump in to throw a jab towards Arch at any opportunity. LibreOffice just Works For Me™ to be honest, maybe start off with using a non-poo poo desktop environment like Xfce if you gotta have one.

Bourricot
Aug 7, 2016



I don't think LibreOffice is compatible with Wayland yet. Do you still have those issues if you use Gnome with an Xorg session ?

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

What do people use for benchmarking under Linux?

I'm eagerly awaiting a new motherboard (this Asrock Braswell) to use in my little Ubuntu server. It's arriving tomorrow (UK).

I want to do some tests on the current Gigabyte Bay-Trail that I'm using.

Everything else is remaining the same (RAM, drives and PSU), so I'm only interested in raw CPU performance and also how this affects r/w io.

Tomorrow I plan to benchmark the current installation of Lubuntu 16.04 with the new board, followed by wiping the WD Red system drive and installing the same OS with full disk encryption via luks and then benchmarking again. These are low power, modest performance boards, so I'm interested to see if on-the-fly encryption has any major effect on performance. The current CPU doesn't have AES-NI, so I've never ran it with disk encryption.

I also want to benchmark the Bay-Trail tonight and tomorrow morning before it arrives to get an idea of the gains.

I just tried phoronix-test-suite but it's late and I can''t deal with anything that thorough (complicated!).

EDIT: spelling and grammar.

apropos man fucked around with this message at Sep 30, 2016 around 19:34

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Thermopyle
Jul 1, 2003

...the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt. —Bertrand Russell


Keito posted:

Everyone in these threads furiously masturbate to CentOS and openSUSE and will jump in to throw a jab towards Arch at any opportunity.

Imagine a world where this was justified. How would the thread look different?

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