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General_Failure
Apr 17, 2005


Question. I'm fine with the answer being "No." or equivalent by the way.
A portable ARM based linux device would be extremely useful to me right now. The most useful thing I can find is the Pinebook, but they have a system which involves giving them an email address and waiting. Perhaps forever for my turn in the build to order queue.
The only really usable things I dug up in the house were my ASUS TF700T and Ainol Elf II. The trouble with both is that they would seem to have a Linux version circa 2012. The Elf II is a bit easier to work with. Ubuntu Quantal vs. Gentoo with some real tinkering on the TF700T.

I shoved the boot stuff and fs on an SD card last night for the Elf II. Worked first go. Set up Wifi. That worked too. Touch screen, no. It needs a package. Quantal is EOL. I know it's on the ubuntu archive server, old-releases or something like that, but the current entries in sources.list are something like ports.ubuntu.com. Sorry I don't have it in front of me. I'm unfamiliar with it. Is it something magical or just deprecated? Ie if I point sources.list towards the normal archive, will it still fetch functional armhf packages?

Really I couldn't give a drat about the integrity of the package based nature of Ubuntu. I just want to drag as much as I can up to more modern versions while keeping the kernel.
I'm using a crappy 7" USB tablet case keyboard with it, but I need touchscreen for the mouse. Most of what I need it for I'll be building from source anyway, but some dependencies do need to be filled.

Why ARM based? Well, it's either that or QEMU. The only portable thing I have besides my phone is my lovely old netbook, which an RPi B would probably outperform. Not suitable clearly.

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mystes
May 31, 2006



General_Failure posted:

Question. I'm fine with the answer being "No." or equivalent by the way.
A portable ARM based linux device would be extremely useful to me right now. The most useful thing I can find is the Pinebook, but they have a system which involves giving them an email address and waiting. Perhaps forever for my turn in the build to order queue.
The only really usable things I dug up in the house were my ASUS TF700T and Ainol Elf II. The trouble with both is that they would seem to have a Linux version circa 2012. The Elf II is a bit easier to work with. Ubuntu Quantal vs. Gentoo with some real tinkering on the TF700T.
Maybe you should look into whether you can install linux on an ARM based chromebook? I think people prefer using intel based chromebooks for this purpose so I don't know what the state of support for arm chromebooks is, but it might be worth looking into.

General_Failure
Apr 17, 2005


mystes posted:

Maybe you should look into whether you can install linux on an ARM based chromebook? I think people prefer using intel based chromebooks for this purpose so I don't know what the state of support for arm chromebooks is, but it might be worth looking into.

I'm just doing this as a short term solution.
Just had a quick look on eBay to see if the Australian Chromebook situation has improved. Short answer is "no". Looking at AUD$150+ for working ones, and they are x86 based anyway. That's a shame.

Quick update on what I'm doing. I tried changing from ports.ubuntu.com to old-releases.ubuntu.com and changing from ubuntu-ports (I think it was anyway) to ubuntu and it seemed to work. Didn't get the touchscreen to work yet, but I got vim installed instead of vi thankfully and it worked, and right now I'm letting it attempt to update all the packages to the latest ones in the archive. If it shits itself, no big deal. Just dump the files back over to the SD card and try again.

At the risk of causing some aneurysms, I'll explain what all this is about.

I'm working on porting RISC OS 5 (currently 5.25) to the Allwinner H3. There are some hurdles with this. One being I can't always use where my RPi etc. is set up. I need to use something running RISC OS to build it. Now, some clever people did a Linux port of it. It uses virgin sacrifices and demonic summoning to function. Their build system is even clever enough to use QEMU on non native architectures. This needs to be done because a large part of the OS is written in ARM assembly. On aarch32 and aarch64 (I've tested both) it runs comparably to native speeds. Graphics is slower and the port is incomplete but it's enough to run the build system.

My netbook just isn't up to the job of running it. I've tried a few times. I've also tried RISC OS in RPCEmu. Some things aren't worth it.
There are some performance hits for using older Linux kernels unfortunately, but they are still bearable.

My reason for considering the Pinebook at all is because it uses an aarch64 SoC from the same family as the one I'm working on. Later I'd like to get it running on them too in aarch32 mode.

So, yeah using linux for not linux.

e: I have to say it's kind of nice to have a use for the old tablet again. Shame the old projects like Opie(?) and that other one... err... aren't really around anymore.

Varkk
Apr 17, 2004
[img]https://forumimages.somethingawful.com/images/newbie.gif[/img]



Maybe a Pi Top it is a laptop shell with keyboard and screen. Which you can then put your own Raspberry into to power it.

General_Failure
Apr 17, 2005


Varkk posted:

Maybe a Pi Top it is a laptop shell with keyboard and screen. Which you can then put your own Raspberry into to power it.

Yeah. That was my other idea. Sadly I saw one in an affordable range on eBay shortly before I thought of taking this line of attack. I think it was about $AUD120. The others I've seen have been $400+. Yeah no. This is just a hobby. Certainly not investing that on something with no returns.

The tablet just finished updating all the packages with the ones in the ubuntu archive and still boots somehow! This is interesting.

freeasinbeer
Mar 26, 2015

urf. urg. mmph. i'm a stupid blind guy with no legs. urrrg. hurble. i'm homeless. gblgblbgblgblgble

Re: Pinebook two things are going on, the $99 version is two expensive to produce at the moment and they are trying to build a black 1080p IPS version at some point(but no news on that in awhile).



Also re pinebook/sopine, a lot of things are super broken while stuff gets into mainline, and the community is more focused on the rock hip stuff at the moment. It sucks, I have a clusterboard that is barely functional.

General_Failure
Apr 17, 2005


freeasinbeer posted:

Re: Pinebook two things are going on, the $99 version is two expensive to produce at the moment and they are trying to build a black 1080p IPS version at some point(but no news on that in awhile).
Also re pinebook/sopine, a lot of things are super broken while stuff gets into mainline, and the community is more focused on the rock hip stuff at the moment. It sucks, I have a clusterboard that is barely functional.

Ah man. That suuuucks. Kind of related there's someone who just got a port of RISC OS up to a decent status on a Rockchip board. Can't remember what though.

I got my Linux experiment up to Saucy. I'm making an image of the SD card right now. Going to strip out the stuff I don't want and try for the next upgrade.

e: Trying for trusty now. The difference in layout of the apt repository directories caught me off, but it's looking good so far. Hopefully a supported release will actually work.

General_Failure fucked around with this message at May 20, 2018 around 07:55

evol262
Nov 30, 2010
#!/usr/bin/perl

I'm honestly curious why you don't just use a hosted build server, or bring a 18650->5V USB battery pack plus a pineboard with you. It'd be significantly more efficient than an EOL Chromebook...

General_Failure
Apr 17, 2005


evol262 posted:

I'm honestly curious why you don't just use a hosted build server, or bring a 18650->5V USB battery pack plus a pineboard with you. It'd be significantly more efficient than an EOL Chromebook...

Excellent question. I'm using an Orange Pi PC, but it's neither here nor there. The SoC is the important part.

Alright... It's a multi tiered issue.

RISC OS unfortunately needs to be built with the DDE toolchain which only runs on RISC OS. With some minor caveats this also includes the Linux port of RISC OS. A year or two ago my ill fated first attempt was using a terrifying combination of things. It almost worked too, but for some (many potential) reason/s the landing points were missing their mark after linking. So I caved and tried again the normal way.

My netbook just can't seem to do the Linux port for some reason. It's also too slow to effectively run RPCEmu. It's a half decayed piece of poo poo. Thanks for nothing, Acer.

I have power banks. Even an unwieldy 20000mAh one. With a solid power connection and a decent capacitor on the board it seems to work okay. But that still leaves me with no way to build. I mean, my port is almost far enough along to self build, but it's not practical. No UI, lovely supervisor prompt and no text editor.

There are a few other options that are kind of unwieldy too, but potentially okay.

Build server... not so easy because of what the toolchain runs on.

In other news, I got the tablet updated to Ubuntu Trusty and got the touch screen working. It's working in relative mode, but it's better than nothing. Especially for an ancient Android BSP kernel from a Chinese manufacturer.

e: All that pretty much means the Linux port is about the only thing I can get away with.
Changing the sources to old-releases.ubuntu.com then going through the motions until the next distribution is supported. From then the only way seems to be to edit sources.list to ports.ubuntu.com and changing the dist name before running do-release-upgrade. Otherwise it either tries to fetch the new package list from old-releases.ubuntu.com even though it knows about the newer releases, or it falls over because just the server has changed.

So that's that question answered, I guess.

General_Failure fucked around with this message at May 20, 2018 around 23:05

ewe2
Jul 1, 2009

TRUMP TRUMP TRUMP

put clinton in prison imo


Lipstick Apathy

General_Failure posted:

Excellent question. I'm using an Orange Pi PC, but it's neither here nor there. The SoC is the important part.

Alright... It's a multi tiered issue.

RISC OS unfortunately needs to be built with the DDE toolchain which only runs on RISC OS. With some minor caveats this also includes the Linux port of RISC OS. A year or two ago my ill fated first attempt was using a terrifying combination of things. It almost worked too, but for some (many potential) reason/s the landing points were missing their mark after linking. So I caved and tried again the normal way.

My netbook just can't seem to do the Linux port for some reason. It's also too slow to effectively run RPCEmu. It's a half decayed piece of poo poo. Thanks for nothing, Acer.

I have power banks. Even an unwieldy 20000mAh one. With a solid power connection and a decent capacitor on the board it seems to work okay. But that still leaves me with no way to build. I mean, my port is almost far enough along to self build, but it's not practical. No UI, lovely supervisor prompt and no text editor.

There are a few other options that are kind of unwieldy too, but potentially okay.

Build server... not so easy because of what the toolchain runs on.

In other news, I got the tablet updated to Ubuntu Trusty and got the touch screen working. It's working in relative mode, but it's better than nothing. Especially for an ancient Android BSP kernel from a Chinese manufacturer.

e: All that pretty much means the Linux port is about the only thing I can get away with.
Changing the sources to old-releases.ubuntu.com then going through the motions until the next distribution is supported. From then the only way seems to be to edit sources.list to ports.ubuntu.com and changing the dist name before running do-release-upgrade. Otherwise it either tries to fetch the new package list from old-releases.ubuntu.com even though it knows about the newer releases, or it falls over because just the server has changed.

So that's that question answered, I guess.

Uh, you tried apt pinning in preferences?

General_Failure
Apr 17, 2005


ewe2 posted:

Uh, you tried apt pinning in preferences?

...no. Remember I'm dragging someone's ancient, Android kernel based, unsupported for 6 years linux port up to a supported release. The repos that came with it were dead, so I had to shift it over to the old versions server. Due to some failing somewhere, the updater fails to hop to a different server even though it is able to deduce the existence of a newer release so I had t get a little heavy handed. It was just a total gamble what would break and what wouldn't. Due to a known bug which I can fix with an entry in a script that I think was clobbered, xorg's is a touch wonky. To do with the colour depth being wrong initially or something. I just get around it mostly for now by switching to a terminal and back.

Right now I have an ssh session open to it, because I'm using the PC. It's currently building the Linux port of RISC OS. Should be interesting to see if the UI works.

On that whole options with building / setting up a build server thing, there is another option. It's a little complex but could be made to work. RO Linux self builds essentially. However the important thing here is it's running a standard-ish build tree in the CLI. Possibly I could change the target and find where the good stuff starts to utilise the CLI based build environment which honestly I've never touched. Some how it's calling these things from a linux CLI. It's so fascinating and bizarre.

Boris Galerkin
Dec 17, 2011


That last part is really common. Lots of things are built from a terminal.

code:
./configure
make install
Or

code:
mkdir build
cd build && cmake ..
make install

Boris Galerkin fucked around with this message at May 21, 2018 around 04:18

General_Failure
Apr 17, 2005


Boris Galerkin posted:

That last part is really common. Lots of things are built from a terminal.

code:
./configure
make install
Or

code:
mkdir build
cd build && cmake ..
make install

True that.
Here's a link to the RO Linux port. Remember, I didn't do this. I just use it.

https://github.com/TimothyEBaldwin/...Dev/tree/Linux2

The main makefile definitely holds secrets about how it achieves things, but beyond that it's a little hazy to me.

These lines from the makefile are the key to it though, definitely. It's from the self build though.
TARGET could either be the target OS, or the name of the build environment.
METHOD Would be possibly native, or RPCEmu.
PHASES are the truly useful ones. They correspond to the build phases of the OS.
Being able to tease this out and run them in scripts or even I guess maybe even a makefile and I'd be sorted.
code:

TARGET=Linux
METHOD=Linux
PHASES=export_hdrs export_libs resources rom install_rom join

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Boris Galerkin
Dec 17, 2011


SoftNum posted:

well click some boxes in the GUI it's that simple always

Yeah I already tried that. There's nothing I can find in the GUI options, and I literally didn't change any configurations; I just upgraded from Fedora 27 to Fedora 28. I found this post that seems like he's having the same problem but I've tried one of the things it suggested and it didn't work.

Uncommented in /etc/systemd/logind.conf:

code:
HandleLidSwitch=hibernate
IdleAction=hibernate
The other thing that he mentioned was

quote:

Ok after a fresh installation of Fedora 28 the other day (after UPDATE 4), resume is now added by default to the appropriate line in /etc/default/grub

Except he suggests that a resume parameter should be added to /etc/default/grub by default but mine doesn't have it, even though I haven't touched it.

quote:

sodapop:~ $ cat /etc/default/grub
GRUB_TIMEOUT=5
GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR="$(sed 's, release .*$,,g' /etc/system-release)"
GRUB_DEFAULT=saved
GRUB_DISABLE_SUBMENU=true
GRUB_TERMINAL_OUTPUT="console"
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="rd.lvm.lv=fedora_sodapop/root rd.luks.uuid=luks-[UUID] rd.lvm.lv=fedora_sodapop/swap rhgb quiet"
GRUB_DISABLE_RECOVERY="true"

The instructions for this are unclear so I'm hesitant to try cause I don't wanna be in a situation where I can't boot up. It's unclear because 1) this reply:

quote:

> Then add it to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX in /etc/default/grub, e.g. add the
> following (replace /dev/dm-0 with your path):
>
> GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="resume=/dev/dm-0"

Suggests that I replace my line completely with what he wrote, but other posts say to prepend/append it to the line. All of the examples are also not dealing with FDE/LUKS and I don't know if that will be an issue.

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