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Windy
Feb 8, 2004





DrivesLikeAGirl posted:

Girlscout, PM me if you need some bonding help. I had a "rabbit whisperer" from out of state help me with my first pair bonding years ago, and some of her techniques were really good.

I'll gladly take any hints you have too I've tried every trick on the net to get my two to love each other outside of their cages, but Debbie still insists on trying to rip Murphy to shreds.

Girlscout, you have a cute pair. I love lops so much. Lucy reminds me of one I took in from my stupid cousin when I was about 13. She was a huge lop who loved chewing phone cables.

MDR, rabbits are fairly awesome if I do say so myself. I'm actually without mine for two more days - they're in boarding and I got home from vacation early. My day is pretty dull without having to play "chase the bunny around the apartment" for a few hours every night. They are very curious, incredibly playful, and have more personality than either one of my cats. Virtually odorless, quiet as church mice and super cute to boot. There is almost no downside to having a bunny, as long as you take the time to train and bond with it. I even take mine outside on leashes when weather permits(and neighbor kids are away). They enjoy lounging in the grass with my cats.

I've posted them on about a hundred different occasions, but you can ever have too much of the 4lb. fluffball that is Captain Murphy I say!


White Debbie is cute too.

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Windy
Feb 8, 2004





tunafishicecream posted:

So what technically is a "house" rabbit? Is it a purely indoor, or an indoor/outdoor rabbit? Are indoor only rabbits more socialized with people?

I look at "house rabbit" as meaning a pet bunny vs a wild or wild caught one. A rabbit that will be more than just roaming furniture, and actually be a part of your family as any cat or dog would be.

99% of house rabbits are going to be found living in the home, but I've come in contact with a few online who have happy bunnies that dwell in hutches outside and are allowed to come and play indoors when the owners are home. I'd just prefer to keep the animals indoors where I know what dangers are lurking instead of outside where they can be exposed to fleas or a myriad of different bugs and inclement weather conditions.

The main thing to keep in mind is that your typical "house" rabbit will be well socialized and playful. Rabbits become bored easily, and boredom breeds destruction. They need to be challenged as they are smart animals and require interaction and playtime as they are quite social. That's why you'll see that the majority of owners have two rabbits instead of just one. One rabbit will do just fine in a home as long as you pay it plenty of attention.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





Was your old bunny fixed? I'm also thinking that it may have been a territorial thing.

Both my buns are litterbox trained, but they have occasional accidents. They will use either of the three cat boxes, much to my dismay(clumping clay litter ya know), but I provide a bunny box outside their cages on both levels of my apartment. Murphy not so much, but Debbie, coincidentally a mini Rex, will miss if she's too busy chasing the cats to realize she needs a crap. At least it's easy to clean.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





angelicism posted:

How long did it take to litter train a bunny? I've been trying for a few weeks now but it's sometimes hard to tell when he's peeing. He'll sometimes back into a corner and just sit there and when I peek under his butt, no pee. And the one time I think he's just sitting in a corner, he moves away and look, puddle.

Cute little bunny

Debbie used the litterbox within five minutes after coming home with me, Captain Murphy took about 2 months iirc. Lot of patience, and trial and error. What worked with him was removing all bedding from the cage floor, and any time he pooped I would pick it up off the cage bottom and place in his litterpan. Then wiped the floor clean with some white vinegar and a damp cloth. Every bunny is different though :/

I just built Debbie a new cage. She adjusted to it immediately. Just keep something familiar smelling in or near the cage after a move, kind of like with cats. He shuold settle in within a day at the most I'd imagine

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





I just made a new cube cage for Debbie(left)


My problem is that she now proceeds to kick out half the pellets in her litterbox for no discernable reason. She still uses the box just fine for bathroom duties. I'm going to try a larger box as soon as I can get to the store and pick something up, but for those of you bunny fans who have built the cubular cages, do you think that she may be freaking out about the new lower ceiling, and kicking out the pellets as she jumps in/out? I have yet to catch her doing so, but I'm sick of having to vacuum up usable litter every night.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





Hanpan posted:

I don't suppose any can tell me what is wrong with her ear from those pictures... one of Pickles ears will stand upright almost constantly and looks as though it is broken because it doesn't rest naturally like the other.

Murphy had ears like that as a baby, but after a couple weeks it remained flopped over like the other. I think it had more to do with his ears being relatively short as a baby, so when he perked them to listen to surrounding noises, one would stand up like Pickels'.

First day home


Week or two later

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





SpaceMonkey posted:

Do rabbits really need water bowls vs water bottles?
because I know that if I put a bowl in there my rabbit with flip it over no matter what.

and the website needs work design/code wise, it was like a blast from the past but fun!

Murphy never learned to use a water bottle, and will not drink from one at all. I have a bowl that clamps onto the side of the cage so he can't tip it over or dip his ears in it on accident. It also stays clean since it is off the floor of the cage.



As for the website, The picture of the gray rabbit blocks part of the text on some pages for me. Also, alfalfa hay is ok for young rabbits to eat. My vets have actually scolded me for not providing more alfalfa to Debbie when she was a "kid".

Windy fucked around with this message at 04:30 on Jul 25, 2007

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





ritjet posted:

This is Belle. We got her yesterday. We're definitely new to the house bunny world. From what we've been told, she's a 5.5-week-old Holland Lop. She doesn't look as puffy as the pictures I've seen of Holland Lops. Right now, she's a unicorn. She has her initial shots. Should I take her in sometime soon just for a check-up?



That is a CUTE bunny! From the looks of it, you'll need a larger cage soon. As far as the vet is concerned, it's always a good thing to find a vet and schedule an appointment to at least meet the doc and introduce him/her to your new bunny. Better to familiarize yourself now(to decide if you like the vet) than to wait until an emergency pops up.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





ritjet posted:

I don't know if you can see it in the picture, but she has a pen (made out of unassembled wire cubes) that surrounds that cage. We took the door off so she can go in and out.

Ohhh, I do see it now that you mention it. Dunno how I missed that.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





Just echoing to avoid corner boxes. Most bunnies prefer to lounge or sit in their litter boxes, and a corner one just doesn't do the trick. There isn't a lot of room at all. Also, your bunny will not stay little forever. I admit that when my two were tiny, they used corner boxes to learn in until they were big enough to hop in and out of a larger litter box. Murphy actually uses a large ferret litter box with a low opening for easier entry/exit, and Debbie has a small cat box in her cage.

You will find it easier and cheaper to avoid bedding on the floor of the cage all together. It's more difficult(in my opinion) to litter train a bunny with bedding on the cage floor - infinitely more difficult if you place the same or similar bedding in the litter pan as litter. I preferred Feline Pine over Yesterdays News because of the smell, but currently use untreated wood stove pellets for litter. I picked up 4 bags for under $3 each in late February, and with regular changes, I am just now on my second bag of the stuff. Before I was buying about 3 bags of Feline Pine every two months at $12 per bag.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





Well, the term dwarf can be misleading. They will stay on the smaller side of 6lbs or less, but they don't stay baby sized. Debbie is easily three times larger now than at two months of age, and Murphy is about twice as large as he was at 3 months old. Debbie is a dwarf mini-rex and Murphy is a dwarf mini-lop.

Newspaper is fine, though your bun will likely tear it to shreds in no time. This is perfectly fine unless the cage is in your room. If the cage is in your room, don't expect to get any sleep tonight :p

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





Bigger bunny means more bunny to love! But whatever size she becomes, she is still guaranteed to be a bundle of cute.

Shredded newspaper is cool, it's actually a free "toy" of sorts. Like boxes,old phone directories and used magazines. Bunnies like to rip things apart and better to have useless paper items shredded than your carpet or clothing.

I used to have ferrets which is why I had leftover cage supplies that came in handy for my rabbits. The litter boxes can be found at most pet stores, I've even seen them at PetCo. It's basically a high-backed box with sloping sides, which comes in quite handy if you have a bunny that loves to launch itself from the litter box like a rocket. Here is a pic of the box I use for Murphy. It's a bit cut off, but you can see the majority of it and what I mean with the low opening.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





angelicism posted:

So I got a small corner litter for now and... uh, my bunny is just chilling in her toilet. I guess she doesn't dislike it, at least. We'll see if she manages to actually use it as a bathroom.

On another note: sometimes she just sits there and, for lack of a better word, trembles for like 5 minutes at a time. I don't think I'm doing anything threatening - usually just watching her - and it's not too cold or anything. Could she be sick? I thought I heard a sneeze once too but I might have just been hallucinating. Or maybe she just hates me and wants me to go away.

It's normal for a rabbit to just chill in the litter box. I've never had one that didn't spend some quality time sitting in the crapper.

For trembling, it may be a fear issue, or just being overall uncomfortable with the surroundings still. Don't get discouraged, but continue to spend time observing her from a short distance. I don't think it signifies that your rabbit is ill, however, if you do schedule a visit a vet for a routine checkup anyway(as posted earlier) you can bring it up as a concern. I've heard my rabbits make a sneeze noise before, but it was just fur or dust in their noses while grooming.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





angelicism posted:

I'm not sure I'm at the point where I want to sacrifice a shirt to toss into her cage

Have you thought of using a hand towel or a washcloth? These would be smaller items with a familiar smell that are cheaper to replace

Levitate posted:

Out of curiosity, do other people here have completely free range rabbits? Mine hated cages from the beginning, so at this point, he gets run of the place.

I would love to, but can't. The way my apartment is set up, there is no way to completely bunny-proof everything to the point of trusting Debbie to be out of her cage for that many hours without supervision. I could probably do it with Murphy, but I'd fear the cats would eventually hurt him(he just wants to snuggle with the kitties, the kitties hate it). But even with his free time now, Murphy will spend 80% of it just chillin in his cage. He feels safe and content in there.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





I came back from veg shopping this afternoon and realized that bunnies can enjoy fresh Basil leaves and I happen to have a full pot of Thai Basil on the patio. I've looked up different information for the plant online but I'm still left unsure as to whether the Thai Basil is really any different from Sweet Basil other than taste and appearance. Is it safe to assume then that the bunnies can eat the Thai Basil without getting ill?

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





Just rinse it really well. You can never be too certain of who in the neighborhood is using pesticides and when. I generally buy "pet grass" at the market because the goddamn kids in my apartment building like to pull out all the signs from the lawn maintenance crew and poke each other in the eyes, or whatever children do with sticks.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





HildyJohnson posted:

"caged"

Actually, a lot of no-pet apartments will allow caged pets(in my experience anyway), you just have to call and ask about the guidelines. I've had ferrets in an apartment and never paid a pet deposit because they were caged. Not my fault the landlord never asked about what percent of the time the ferrets stayed in the cage

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





Deceptor101 posted:

that's what I've been hoping, she's theoretically caged, and whenever the landlord comes over she will be

I had my landlords over a month or two ago because of my bitchy neighbor. Story aside, he saw my rabbits(which someone forgot to even add to my lease info) had their own room and were both in their cages and just sort of laughed when I said they were litter box trained too. He'd never seen a rabbit that used a box to poo in and I think he was impressed with their chill behavior.


Vonbrigšum, is that a mini Rex bunny you've gotten yourself? I like his pattern.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





alucinor posted:

DON'T put him outside. His lifespan will go from 12 years to 5 or less. It's far crueler to subject him to heat, flystrike, cold, predators, and lonliness outside, than it would be to simply confine him inside with you.

I'm not fond of the zoo idea either because you have no idea and no say in what they may decide to do with him. They could decide to cull their rabbit herd by euthanizing them for tiger food...

Why not build the multi-story cage that you have in mind, and then just get a couple of big sheets of coroplast, and build a pen that he can run around on? I've known several people with pens in excess of 10'x10' and their rabbits seem perfectly happy despite not being truly "free range". This worked well to protect my hardwood from my guys frantic digging habits.

Or, if you can't find coroplast, you can get some scrap carpeting or wool rugs or something that can protect the current flooring. My rabbits are not 100% free roaming, and even when I let Murphy out, he likes to just chill in his cage. As long as the enclosure is large enough to move around in, and he can have a few hours of run time, Momo should be just as happy. It may take some time to adjust, but you should both be fine.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





Chiken n' Waffles posted:

My girlfriend and I recently bought a mini lop. Tomorrow we are taking him into the vet to get him fixed. So far he's been great on not chewing on cords or anything you generally wouldn't want him to chew on. Except carpet. Can anyone give me advice on how to get him to stop eating the carpet?
Also, we really want him to be able to free to roam whenever he wants. Should rabbits be free to roam at night when not supervised, or only when we're around the house?

Reminds me of my Murph as a baby, adorable!

For carpet munching, it's a difficult habit to break. Neither of mine do it to a destructive degree anymore, but sometimes Debbie will get into her bitchy moods and want to destroy something - anything. And If I'm not watching, she'll go for carpet or furniture. I broke the habit with Murphy simply with thumping. If I noticed him doing something he shouldn't, I would give the floor a good solid thump with my hand or foot. He'd quickly stop and move onto something else. Debbie just doesn't really care. I do provide plenty of toys however, and scratching posts borrowed from the cats. Various cardboard objects and willow toys can help redirect the need to chew. Extra litter pans with hay in them helps to distract a bunny as well.

If you want a 100% free roaming bunny, you will need to do extensive bunny-proofing of your home. Think of it like having a very active and curious baby. Anything they can fit in their mouth will probably end up in it. Make sure you don't have any plants in reach or exposed cables and outlets. Close up all small gaps and spaces behind heavy furniture where a bunny could crawl in and get stuck. You may want to just get some baby gates and block off certain areas too. I personally let my rabbits out for a few hours at a time each day. Supervised if running through the whole apartment, and if just in their room, they can run around unsupervised.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





impelled posted:

Here is my bunny, Lily!




That's a disgustingly cute baby you have there! I like the smudges on her ears.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





girlscoutdropout posted:


Each month I spend about $35. It's different for everyone, I buy hay a bale at a time for $5 so that's alot cheaper. If you can't buy hay in a big bale and have to buy it from the pet store, you're going to spend $20-30 a month in hay alone. If you buy Purina Rabbit chow, you can get a 25 lb bag for $7 at most co-ops. I have to buy Kaytee Timothy Complete because one of my bunny has digestive problems and needs a higher-end pellet. This food is $10 for a 5 lb bag. I spend about $20 a month in fruits and veggies.

I'm sure it's probably just my preference, but I found Oxbow pellets to be far better than Kaytee, and cheaper as well. The 5# bag of Oxbow Timothy pellets I purchase is under $7. Over winter, when I purchase 10lbs at a time for roughly $13, it lasts roughly 3 weeks between 2 rabbits.

KingColliwog posted:

Are bunny noisy? I suppose they just can't be but hey it's always better to ask.

Are they smelly? That's one of the reason I never considered bunnies. For some reason I think they must be smelly (they probably aren't though if you clean their cages well)

Are they bad for people with allergies (I guess they must be since I've never heard about hypo-allergic bunnies)

How much money do you think you spend on your house bunny each month on average?

I spend about $20/month on bags of hay and orchard grass. Veggies range between $6/week in the summer, usually $3/week more in winter(hence increased pellet usage in winter). This is a major cost with the rabbits, but very important for the diet. Older rabbits will need more veggies than pellets, and you could even disregard pellets completely if you can commit yourself to purchasing and preparing salads and offering fresh hay daily. Feeding strictly pellets can lead to fat bunnies :/ Litter used to cost $12/month, and due to a deal on wood stove pellets in spring, my cost is reduced to under $2/month. Treats and toys vary, adding maybe at most $40 per year. Routine yearly checkup is $60 per rabbit.

So, estimated cost for a year for 2 bunnies including misc. expenses:
40 - toys
24 - litter
115 - pellets
240 - hay
372 - veggies/yr
120 - vet, routine
80 - misc.
___
$991/yr, give or take

One rabbit should cost under $500 per year in normal expenses, plus you'll want to keep an extra $300 or so in "float" just in case someone eats something that they shouldn't. Granted this is just my estimated run down of cost, it doesn't include initial supplies or cage upgrades which happened over time. Also, scoring deals on toys and food and summer veg bring the costs way down.

Noise, smell and allergies...pretty much the same as above. Most of them shed a lot too and the fur gets everywhere. Murphy is on his third shedding of the year and it's a doozy. I swear, looking at him makes him explode into a poof of white fluffy shrapnel. His fur is so fine and so light that it just gets in the air and hangs out for hours. It gets all over my clothing, in my eyes, mouth and nose. Brushing him is almost a waste of time because his body has an endless supply of loose fluff! But it subsides after a few weeks, and doesn't happen again for at least 3 months. Debbie on the other hand, I don't think she's ever shed a single hair. Bless that little rex.

I highly suspect that I am allergic to my rabbits, if not my cats as well, but it's generally only noticeable during a major shed, when I've been cleaning out the cages or burying my face in their fur. Everyone will be affected differently, but the best thing to do is find a shelter or someone who has a rabbit and spend time handling it for a week or more.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





An hour? Holy cats that sucks. I have to drive about 20 minutes, but I only do it once or twice a month when I need cat or bunny food. I know you can order it off the website, but even for me a 5# bag cost only 9.50, but 11.61 to ship. However, it's still cheaper than the other store I'd purchase from in bulk(non-prepackaged).

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





Don't do it on my account How is your rabbit website coming along btw?

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





SpaceMonkey posted:

any difference between sun dried timothy hay and normal green stuff besides lack of water?

And we got another bunny 3month old female broken lop/dwarf from but she's rib counting skinny yet eats alot (loves banana's of course), taking her to the vet this week but any ideas?

fake edit; our local rabbit breeder for the stores sucks rear end so i wouldn't put it passed the rabbit being ill.

In a rabbit that young, you can and should introduce some alfalfa into her diet. It will help fatten her up a little. If you can find pellets that are a mix of alfalfa and timothy, get her those as well. Until she is about 6-7 months old, or you start noticing her getting too fat, she should be able to free-feed on pellets or at least eat a healthy handful(half to one cup) daily. I'll assume you already know the feeding routine for bunnies older than 7mos

For the hay, I've never seen it advertised any differently on the packages at my local pet shops. I usually buy greener hay because of the aroma and the fact that my rabbits like it better than the drier stuff. This is more due to preference, but also greener hay usually means it was cut "younger" and will be more nutrient rich. If it is sun dried - all hay is sun dried really - it probably has just been left on the field and raked more than twice before baling/ shoving it into the bags.

CalamityKate, I've started to use the furminator on Murphy. I know it's pricy, and was originally bought(and still used) for my cats, but it does wonders on him. I just lightly spritz with water to keep the flyaways down, and start brushing. He hates to be brushed, but the furminator grabs so much loose fur. I get more out in one sitting than the slicker brush or zoom groomer.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





CalamityKate posted:

Well there's the excuse I needed. I've got a cocker spaniel also, so it will get plenty of use if I go ahead and get one Thanks!

No problem! Once I figured out how well it worked on the rabbit I finally felt justified in spending $30 on one brush. Once I thought about it though, I have 8 different shedding blades, matt removers, slickers and brushes, some over $12/ea. You save money buying the Furminator(and it really works)

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





Debbie loved the foster kittens I had 2 years ago. They would swat at her and chase her around, then Deb would chase them right back. They never harmed either of my rabbits, and seemed more curious about the rabbits than the hamster. In fact, I have a video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmK7M-m10xI They pretty much ignored Murphy and were content to play with the sparkle ball and run through his box forts.

Playing with Debbie:



I did a lot of short introductions with them in a cage while the rabbits were loose, then a few times where I held the kittens and let the rabbits come up to sniff them and stuff. And gradually allowed supervised playtime. Since the rabbits were already used to fat lazy cats, rambunctious kittens were a treat.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





girlscoutdropout posted:

I would imagine if the playtime was 100% supervised it would be alright (at least while he/she is still in the kitten stage). It might still be a good idea to have a bunny proof room the kitten couldn't go in. You don't want to stress out your bun.

Oh yeah, I forgot about that. Some rabbits can be territorial and we all know about cats and curiosity. If you have a possessive bun, introduce a new playmate in neutral territory. I'm lucky enough to have a bedroom upstairs that belongs only to my rabbits, so at any time I can close the door to their sanctuary. Another thing that helped was to have other animals to take the focus away from kitten vs rabbit. They all played in the living room along with the hamster(safe in her ball) and resident fat cats. If the rabbits felt threatened or annoyed, they ran upstairs to their room. Naughty kittens were awarded with a time-out in their crate until they settled down.

If you do get a kitten, and said kitten decides that claws are fun for battles and destroying everything, you can always look into SoftPaws.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





girlscoutdropout posted:

When I read this last sentence I thought you were going to say "you can always look into declawing" and I was about to have a conniption fit haha. Declawing is so so painful (for all their life) for cats, it has many negative aspects, the only positive one is that your furniture is safe. If you care about your furniture so much, then don't get a cat! Simple.

(Not saying you didn't know this Windy, I just saw a chance to get on my soap box for a second, and had to take the chance)

Actually, I didn't know that years ago when my vet recommended front declawing when I took my cats(now old and fat) in for spay/neuter. I thought "hey, the vet said it's cool, I trust my vet". The first day after I had them back I was in tears because they looked so horrified and in pain. I never went back to that vet again. The worst part is that the only convincing thought in my mind - other than the vet's reassurance - was that I wouldn't have to buy yet another waterbed mattress, as I'd been through 5 at that point. Well, after the declawing I still ended up having to buy 3 more mattresses :/

Make room on that soapbox, for I fully support NOT declawing now! Me and the fatties learned the hard way.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





angelicism posted:

So I was ripped off if I paid like $500 for checkup, bloodwork, and spaying?

I'm a little annoyed by that, but I really like the vet that I took my bunny to -- she seemed very friendly and knowledgeable. Also I'm in NYC so everything rips me off. Or was I just a sucker?

Not necessarily. I called seven HRS recommended vets in my vicinity when I took Murphy in to get neutered. The cheapest ended up being $170. Debbie is going to run me about $350(when I can fit it in the schedule!), but it covers meds, blood work and overnight stay. My vet did tell me that blood work has to be sent out, so keep in mind that - sometimes - when you take the animal in for an overnight procedure, you may end up paying through the nose for expedited work. I've found that prices vary regionally, but I'm not going to drive 3 hours away for a cheaper spay. Plus, I like my vet so I'll pay a slightly higher price out of convenience and positive staff care.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





I have those bungee style harness/leash sets for my rabbits. Debbie doesn't mind it as much as Murphy, he just never looks happy in his harness. I don't take them out anymore because the neighboring building uses pesticides on the lawn, but when I used to have them on my patch of grass by the patio, they seemed to enjoy hopping around and smelling new smells. I never walked them so much as just let them go as far as the leash would let them.

Modeling the stylish harnesses:

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





angelicism posted:

Litter training is so frustrating.

Tell me about it. Murphy took a few months to train! Debbie appeared trained when I got her - she just knew to use the litterbox for all of her elimination needs. However, there were a few occasions when I had her on my lap or up on the bed where she piddled on me and the bed as well. Depending on the amount of space in your room, you may want to limit her running area with an Xpen or make a pen from those grid cube shelves. Just give her enough room outside the cage to play in with a few toys and an additional litterbox. Increase the area a little each week and watch how she is acting with her potty habits. May or may not work, but it's worth a shot and will keep your bed dry for a while at least.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





Well, it wouldn't be permanent mind you. When bringing the animal into a new surrounding, you really should start with a small area of exploration and increase the space as it becomes familiar with smells and surroundings. If you throw a rabbit into a house and just let it run about freely, you're never going to have any luck establishing boundaries. This will give you ample time to bunny-proof the entire room so that you *can* turn your back without worrying that she may piss on your clothes or eat your wall or something.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





You Are posted:

I would consult a vet as to what chemicals act abrasively towards rodents. Because this is "pet wipes", you can assume that the formula is different from Cottonelle or other people brands. It doesn't specify what kind of animal to use it on, though? I've never heard of animals bigger than a rabbit needing a specially made buttwipe, so I wouldn't doubt it being for delicate animals.

I use wipes from Target. They have a dye free, aloe free, alcohol free, perfume free box for about 2 bucks. But once everything is removed, how much different are they from wet paper towels :p Nevertheless, I buy the small packs for a dollar and keep them on hand for accidents, since any paper toweling in the room ends up shredded into bits(no matter how hard I try to keep it out of reach).

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





girlscoutdropout posted:

Have you ever used them to try to get urine (etc.) off a little bunny behind? Jack's butt fur is white that's why it's so noticeable. Maybe Lucy's butt is the same way and I just can't tell because she's solid black. I really doubt it because she has her nice bunny-ish figure and Jack does not.


Edit: I've got to stop jumping the gun and replying to posts separately. Sorry guys!

I purchased baby wipes specifically for that reason. The staining doesn't wipe off immediately no matter what you use - pet specific or not. It takes several days in a row of patient fur blotting and smooshing to get the stains to a more tolerable tinge of yellow.

The reason I still keep them on hand is mainly for the cats, but also Debbie, who occasionally bathes in her litterbox like a chinchilla. She is such an odd one.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





One of my cats tolerates the rabbits, the other doesn't. You would be better off, like dropout said, to get another bunny. Rabbits will almost always bond easier with another rabbit than another animal. Mine are not normal, and Murphy has it in his little head that Link(cat) is his bestest friend ever. But in his defense, Debbie(rabbit) tries to eat Murphy -in a bad way- when they are out together and the bonding just never seems to go well with those two.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





Moraine Sedai posted:

Instead of soap, would something like Bitter Apple spray or even using distilled white vinegar work? I know that works for most puppies and kittens when they get into the "test everything with your mouth" phase.

Bitter apple doesn't phase some animals. I had one ferret who hated it, one that didn't mind. Two hamsters liked the flavor, one didn't. My cats and my mothers cats could care less about it, but my sisters kittens can't stand it. It's worth a shot though, but may or may not work.

Angelecism, bunny may just want to get out and play or be commanding attention :/ Have you plenty of toys to keep her occupied, not just food and sticks? Paper tubes(from tp and kitchen towels), boxes, old magazines and cheap plastic bird toys are awesome.

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





TheDeadKnow posted:

What kind of pellets does everyone feed their buns? And other than grass and pellets and veges, are there any other staples that need to be met? I ask because Momo has no interest in most vegetables and he doesn't seem to eat any grass at all.

I buy Oxbow Timothy pellets. Lately my buns have not gotten more than a tablespoon of pellets per day unless I couldn't make it to the store for fresh greens. Sometimes I treat them to that pet grass stuff - I think it's wheat grass, but only when it's on sale. Otherwise they just get a lot of greens for dinner and fresh Oxbow Timothy Hay and Orchard Grass(it's dried like the hay) daily.

My rabbits aren't too picky about veggies, but sometimes you have to go through 4 or 5 to find one they like. Examples of favorites are: Parsley(Italian and Curly), cilantro, green peppers, apples, mango and carrot greens. I'll lose a finger if my hands get in the way of those and my bunnies. Other items they like: carrots, cucumber, broccoli(stems especially), spinach, basil, pear, parsley, mustard and collard greens and more. Every week I just buy 5 or 6 items from what I listed, and switch it up for the next week based on availability.

If your rabbit isn't eating veg or hay much, it may be due to the pellets. Pellets are to bunnies like Friskies/Meow Mix is to kitties. Junk food. How much of the pellets do you feed Momo and how often? My rabbits had always been given 1/4C pellets once per day, and an ample supply of hay and grasses. I notice that Murphy doesn't enjoy hay unless it smells very fresh. However, I don't give in to the "puppy" eyes, no matter how starving he may act. At dinnertime these days, he'll knock over the veg bowl to get to the pellet dish and scarf them down first, then pout before eating his veggies.

impelled posted:

For those with adult bunnies, how much did you spend to get them neutered?

For spaying, Debbie is going to cost me roughly $270(iirc). Murphy was half that to get neutered. Girls cost more because it's a more invasive procedure, but don't be afraid to call around. I got prices ranging from $180 up to $350, and while I'd like to go the cheaper route, I'm going to just stick with their regular vet because I already like and trust them with my rabbits.

Windy fucked around with this message at 17:19 on Oct 8, 2007

Windy
Feb 8, 2004





Deceptor101 posted:

You guys have any tips for taking a vacation from your bunnies?

I go on a couple long vacations each year(a week or two at a time) and have had great success with leaving them both with their vet. It costs a bit, $13 per rabbit each day, but that is for two cages due to their drat non-bonding. I can bring in all the toys, hides, food and hay and leave explicit instructions, and they are followed. Last time I left my sister in charge, I got a call at 12am in Florida about bites and bleeding and horrors. I tell my sis every time "never let both rabbits out at once. Ever. Even if there is a fire, separate carriers." It's like that kid in Gremlins.

Also, hay on the floor never bothered me. I vacuum the bunny room and cages every other day(some weeks daily) because it just gets everywhere. I've gotten used to the barn look.

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Windy
Feb 8, 2004





Chiken n' Waffles posted:


Severus says hello!

He almost resembles my Captain Murphy, a super cutie you have there Also, if Severus is a digger, or an easily bored bunny, that rug will not last long. I put one like that as the floor to Debbie's cage and she's been shredding it into a cottony mess. I really need to track down some coroplast or scrap linoleum asap

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