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qri11
Dec 30, 2004

Arrest Me, I'm Banksy

JoeWindetc posted:

Oh hey Mom and Dad, I didn't know you guys joined the forums. Honestly, no offense, but I'm really tired of hearing this question. I have yet to hear my sociology/history/philosophy friends get this question.


I'm sure you have heard this, but grad school is only really worth it for graphic designers if you want to teach.

How old are you? A lot of places look down on kids right out of undergrad going straight to masters. You need life experience. Especially for design. If you think that you are not quite there as a designer, you wont make it is to a masters program to start with, and I think it might help you most to do some freelance work, find some entry level job and work for a few years. Then see if you still want to go to grad school. And if you do, go to Cranbrook or something.

Just my opinion, but you sound like you have your mind set.

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Octagon N
Aug 21, 2007


Well hey there goons.
So, if possible, I'd like some advice from people who may have been in my predicament, or haven't and think they can help anyways. I graduated a year ago with a general BA in Visual Arts, with a personal focus on animation and digital art. I know my way around Maya, Photoshop, Painter, and Illustrator fairly well, and have aspirations of going into 3D animation or design (character, environment, what have you) for animation.

After I graduated I moved back to my hometown (DC) to figure out exactly what I wanted to do, and to theoretically build my portfolio up (which hasn't really happened due to general retardation/laziness on my part), got a job only tangentially related to my ideal field at best (print/design), but am now feeling the pull to get going and REALIZE MY DREAMS.

My plan at this point is to move out of DC to somewhere I can get some kind of job related to what I want to do in order to get a little more experience/contacts before going to grad school for animation/design. I'd ideally go to Chicago for personal reasons, but am otherwise open to almost anywhere.

So I guess my main questions are: What are some good cities to start (somewhat) fresh in animation work/study? Is Chicago a decent city for opportunities, or am I fooling myself? I know it's got a few animation/game studios, and some good general art schools, but I'm still in the middle of my research and don't know a whole lot. Any advice is much appreciated.

Skelezoid
Mar 30, 2003

"I looked in her eyes and realised how rare it is to find someone willing to have sex with me."

Octagon N posted:

Well hey there goons.
So, if possible, I'd like some advice from people who may have been in my predicament...

I was in a similar situation to yourself back in 2005 after I graduated with a BS in Virtual Technology & Design. I concentrated in 3D design with the ultimate goal of getting into film or game work. At the end of the program, I had a pretty mediocre portfolio that really needed some polish. After graduation, I moved back home and picked up my old job doing web design and development for about 6 months. In the mean time I worked on polishing up my portfolio every so often. I had one really good project now that I focused my portfolio around, but most importantly I had an array of other work that demonstrated I wasn't just a modeler or designer.

With this, I moved a couple hours away to Boise, Idaho mostly to move out of my parent's house. I got a job right away doing 3D animation, modeling, design and DVD/Flash presentation. The other guys I worked with were mostly CAD modelers with 3D animation experience so I was basically the art and creative input for the team. This allowed me to focus most of my work on presentation and the design process itself.

After spending 2 years in Boise, I moved up the Vancouver, BC in January this year. If you know someone in Vancouver, I'd highly recommend sending out a resume and portfolio to the major companies up here. I got a job after only a month of looking (spent most of that month finishing up my updated portfolio) with a big game studio doing interface art and design. Two things got me this job: previous work experience in design and demonstrated knowledge of Flash and Photoshop. Even though I had never worked in the games industry and the position I applied for wasn't exactly entry-level, I was able to talk to my interviewers in the same language they use every day. The more you can connect in an interview the better. There is no 3D work for the position I was applying for but my portfolio was 3D heavy. However, it did show an attention to detail and creativity; enough to land me an interview.

Throughout this whole process, laziness was my constant struggle. I'd put everything off when it was my free time. gently caress I'm still doing it. I need to put together a mockup tonight for a new game idea being pitched and I don't even have Photoshop open yet. I'm not sure if any of this has helped much; I'd recommend getting a polished portfolio together if you're getting ready to move and apply to some major studios. If your portfolio isn't ready, then don't fool yourself into thinking you'll be getting a job at a major studio, you won't. I'd see if you can get a job at a smaller place and getting work experience. Grad school is going to be a waste of money unless you want to teach. Work experience is king in this industry and you get paid to acquire it. Start small and work your way up.

Skelezoid fucked around with this message at Jul 10, 2008 around 06:32

Zmej
Nov 6, 2005

?




Mansurus posted:

I'm really interested in applying to the University of the Arts, in Philadelphia. Ideally, i'd like to attend in the Fall 2008 semester - but i've procrastinated. Is it too late?

I'm set to obtain my AA at the end of the summer, and i would like to leave her as soon as possible. I'd prefer not to wait until the Spring semester, but is that my best option?

Also, i'm somewhat worried about the portfolio requirements. I'd like to say i'm talented and well-rounded when it comes to photography - but i have absolutely no skill or experience with any other artform. I noticed Uarts requires at least two mediums in their portfolio, and recommends three. What should i do? How badly will this impact me?

Before my interest in Uarts i was looking into Pennsylvania College of Art and Design. Their program seemed good, and they were a little cheaper than most private art schools (14.4k). However, they required drawing in their portfolios, and are awaiting a second review from me. Also, they seemed really small - and the Lancaster area seems a bit dead as far as opportunities go.

Mainly, i would just like to be within two hours of Wilkes-barre. Those two schools are the ones i've been focusing on so far.

So - if anyone has any wise words concerned University of the Arts, Pennsylvania College of Art and Design, or portfolio requirements - i'd be eternally grateful.

I finished two semesters at UArts studying Theater Design and Tech, but I'm transferring elsewhere to pursue a non-art career because I just couldn't see myself making a living after four years of UArts (particularly), or anywhere else.

If you're procrastinating now, and you feel your portfolio is weak, then goddamn do something. Half the kids I met at UArts are terribly unmotivated and the school isn't cheap (they just raised tuition by $2,000, so now it's $30,000 a year but they hand out $10,000 yearly scholarships like candy). You should find out if it's too late. Do research!

Having other mediums in your portfolio is important. At UArts or anyone else. It'll make you stand out compared to the person who focuses on one medium. Having multiple mediums makes you more marketable. But that's a no-brainer for any portfolio.

You don't sound like you've really prepared. You seem like the majority of kids who enter there who want to pursue an art/design career, but aren't willing to put in the work or don't have that natural artistic ability. It's pretty much another for-profit, rejects nobody art school. Don't waste your money, take other people's advice in this thread and go to a place for a fraction of a cost if your determined. Or apply to much more competitive programs at other schools to test yourself. A normal college/university is great, since art schools really narrows your options, which is my biggest regret. I've been fortunate that a good amount of my credits will transfer from freshmen year.

I'm sorry, but UArts left me bitter and I've realized my mistakes. I don't want someone else making the same mistakes. I can't speak for all of UArts, but the theater design program was undercooked, and that's the impression I got from rest of the departments. I was never impressed by their facilities or faculty. In summary: avoid UArts.

Zmej fucked around with this message at Jul 10, 2008 around 08:48

MonkeyDonkey
Jul 9, 2001


I've got an issue I'm not sure how to proceed. I work for a sign company and designed a sign for a cooking team to use at competitions. A representative for a rodeo association eslewhere in the state saw the sign and wanted the same artist to design a logo for them and the team referred them specifically to me but at my e-mail address for work.

The rodeo association wants to commission me to design their new logo, but I'm not sure if it's ethical to do it outside of work. I could do it at work through my company but I get paid by the hour and don't get extra for design work which doesn't seem right to me either.

I've never sold a design before so even if I do decide to do it on my own I'm not sure how to go about it or what legal precautions I need to take. Some help would be appreciated.

KittenofDoom
Apr 15, 2003

Me posting IRL


I really want to be an illustrator, or at least a graphic designer that draws a lot. I finally got my BA squared away, so now it comes down to finding a job. My question is whether I should take the first available related job from monster.com for the sake of experience, or should I hold out for something I'd be really happy with? The job I have right now is enough to pay my bills, but only just.

I can't rely on my school for jobs, since I moved way far away right after I finished, so how would I even find the kind of job I'm looking for? I'd like to think there's better resources than the job websites.

Villon
Oct 7, 2004



KittenofDoom posted:

I really want to be an illustrator, or at least a graphic designer that draws a lot. I finally got my BA squared away, so now it comes down to finding a job. My question is whether I should take the first available related job from monster.com for the sake of experience, or should I hold out for something I'd be really happy with? The job I have right now is enough to pay my bills, but only just.

I can't rely on my school for jobs, since I moved way far away right after I finished, so how would I even find the kind of job I'm looking for? I'd like to think there's better resources than the job websites.

I've said this before on SA, but I would recommend concentrating on the company you want to work for, rather than a) taking any job or b) holding out for your dream job. Most of the people I know who got their dream job got it by starting somewhere to get their foot in the door and then working into the position that they wanted to be in.

Look for companies that are doing the work you're passionate about and apply for anything they have- if they don't have any openings, scrounge up a contact at the company and request an informational interview. When you get there, demonstrate how much you like and respect their work. Find out the company history and the history of the founders. Use the verbiage in their mission statement in your cover letter (not a direct quote, but if you already know that they value innovation, use that knowledge to your advantage. Somewhere in your resume, mention that you "introduced an innovative filing system" or something.)

If you do establish a contact, keep in touch with that person. If the company posts a job you might apply for, ask them about it "I see you just posted such and so, and I'm considering applying for it. Do you think I'd be a good fit for that position?" (don't ask them for any insider knowledge- it's inappropriate, and if they like you they'll tell you anyway.) Don't be obnoxious, but let them know if you accept a position somewhere else and keep them updated on your career every year or so.

Finally, if you do accept an entry-level position that isn't really where you want to be, let everyone know it. Make sure that your boss and everyone else knows that you're really happy to be working for the company, but you wish you were doing _________. If they like you and you're a good worker, you have a really good chance of moving over to that position.

Oh, one more finally- put a time limit on that. If a year goes by and they haven't promoted you and you don't think they will, start looking for a new job. It's perfectly legitimate to say that you feel underutilized or that you need the opportunity for advancement- a new potential employer will understand that, and your old job will understand it too, since you've made it clear the whole time.

Sorry this is so long- hope it's helpful.

Xansabar
Jan 12, 2006

Old sun and stars,
And oceans below me


I just graduated with my BFA in graphic design.

Right now, I'm living with my girlfriend and working at a gas station/convenience store/restaurant making less than minimum wage, and boy do I want to get out of this rut and start my design career.

I've been applying to jobs I find on craigslist and the online job search site of the city near me (Syracuse, NY), and as of yet I havent heard back from one of them (to no surprise).

The thing is, I am very confident in my work and my website, and I feel good about my resume, but holy hell am I shaky about my cover letters. I have no idea what format to follow, how casual to make it, what to say (etc. etc. etc.). Any tips, absolute rules, or ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Zonko_T.M.
Jul 1, 2007
Nah. Offhand, I'd say I haven't learned a damned thing.

Heyo, goons. I've got a question of a different tack-
I recently came up with an idea for a children's book. Let's pretend for now that the idea is marketable and awesome and stuff. My issue is that the chief characters are pirate dinosaurs, and when I did a little searching I discovered there's already a book about 'em. The actual plots and art-styles are different, they just both revolve around pirate dinosaurs.
So the question is, what kind of ground does that put me as far as copyrights go? Would/could I be sued for infringement, or is this a general/vague enough idea that I'd be fairly safe?
Much obliged, CC.

ceebee
Feb 12, 2004


Xansabar posted:

The thing is, I am very confident in my work and my website, and I feel good about my resume, but holy hell am I shaky about my cover letters. I have no idea what format to follow, how casual to make it, what to say (etc. etc. etc.). Any tips, absolute rules, or ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Let us see your work/website. If your work is good enough they'd probably overlook a misshapen cover letter.

Zonko_T.M. posted:

Heyo, goons. I've got a question of a different tack-
I recently came up with an idea for a children's book. Let's pretend for now that the idea is marketable and awesome and stuff. My issue is that the chief characters are pirate dinosaurs, and when I did a little searching I discovered there's already a book about 'em. The actual plots and art-styles are different, they just both revolve around pirate dinosaurs.
So the question is, what kind of ground does that put me as far as copyrights go? Would/could I be sued for infringement, or is this a general/vague enough idea that I'd be fairly safe?
Much obliged, CC.

Looks like the story is based around "Captain Flinn" or the boy with side characters of the dinosaur pirates. If you base it totally around pirate dinosaurs I do not see why this would be similar. It would only be infringement if you copied the story word for word. For example, how many books do you see based around the headless horseman? There's a ton. You don't hear people suing each other over them.

ceebee fucked around with this message at Jul 17, 2008 around 03:19

Xansabar
Jan 12, 2006

Old sun and stars,
And oceans below me


Akaikami posted:

Let us see your work/website. If your work is good enough they'd probably overlook a misshapen cover letter.

my work can be seen at https://www.evanwaring.com

comments/suggestions about the site are welcome as well!

brad industry
May 22, 2004


Any of you guys have a recommendation for e-mail mailing list software/web service? I need to be able to send out a newsletter every once in a while to clients and I want something with a one-click unsubscribe and some kind of contact management I guess.

akanekun
Apr 5, 2008


MonkeyDonkey posted:

I've got an issue I'm not sure how to proceed. I work for a sign company and designed a sign for a cooking team to use at competitions. A representative for a rodeo association eslewhere in the state saw the sign and wanted the same artist to design a logo for them and the team referred them specifically to me but at my e-mail address for work.

The rodeo association wants to commission me to design their new logo, but I'm not sure if it's ethical to do it outside of work. I could do it at work through my company but I get paid by the hour and don't get extra for design work which doesn't seem right to me either.

I've never sold a design before so even if I do decide to do it on my own I'm not sure how to go about it or what legal precautions I need to take. Some help would be appreciated.

It'd probably be safest to do it through your company since it's the same thing you do for work - normally for freelance I make sure clients contact me through an email completely unrelated to work.

I personally don't give a poo poo whether or not it's ethical for me to do work on the side - I need to make ends meet, and if that means I have to take outside work then I will.

Typically, you offer them either an hourly rate and an estimate of how long it'll take, or you give them a flat rate plus the amount of revisions you're willing to do under that rate. Additional revisions should cost extra, and anything that requires a faster turnaround should also be charged extra. This is written up in a contract either by them or by you - this contract will also cover the rights of the logo, who owns what (most likely a work for hire), etc.


brad industry posted:

Any of you guys have a recommendation for e-mail mailing list software/web service? I need to be able to send out a newsletter every once in a while to clients and I want something with a one-click unsubscribe and some kind of contact management I guess.

phplist is supposed to be a decent service. Not something I've used personally, but it's probably one of the first ones I'd try just because it's free.

dr. madlove
Jul 21, 2008


anyone here with experience in the field of architecture? i may do an arch graduate program after i finish my undergrad degree.

Zurich
Jan 4, 2008


marshmallard posted:

Was this Bucks (BCUC)?

I'm a Copywriter in a London ad agency if anyone wants help with careers in that field.
Nice one

#1 - Ravensbourne, 2 - LCC, 4 - Salford, if that makes you see my post in any different light.

TheKingPuuChuu
Oct 13, 2005

Reality leaves a lot to the imagination.

WOOO Lost my job today, in part due to the Economy, and that the production manager didn't like me too much.

So, while I'm applying for new jobs, I started wondering about maybe Canada. Does anyone know how I can find jobs there?

I'm also thinking South Korea, because I have two friends ( ones a goon) who just got accepted to go there.

Lastly, anyone in Phoenix know of anyone who needs a Print Designer??

Munkie
Feb 3, 2007
Mmm..chickens

I recently finished the NYU Summer Publishing Institute, and I am pursuing positions like editorial assistant, literary agency assistant or sub rights assistant. But until I find some full-time work, I need a temp job so I can pay the bills. Does anyone have a suggestion for a good temp agency in NYC? Or, how to get noticed at the ones that I have applied for already? Thanks.

Skelezoid
Mar 30, 2003

"I looked in her eyes and realised how rare it is to find someone willing to have sex with me."

TheKingPuuChuu posted:

WOOO Lost my job today, in part due to the Economy, and that the production manager didn't like me too much.

So, while I'm applying for new jobs, I started wondering about maybe Canada. Does anyone know how I can find jobs there?

I'm also thinking South Korea, because I have two friends ( ones a goon) who just got accepted to go there.

Lastly, anyone in Phoenix know of anyone who needs a Print Designer??

I'm an American working in Canada. Short answer: you find jobs here just like you do in the states, look for them. The web is probably your best bet. Put a portfolio together, polish it up as much as you can, and fire it off to as many places as you find and hope someone bites. Companies will only hire outside of Canada (by law) if they cannot find any qualified Canadian applicants. You either have to be really good at what you do or the company has to be in a pinch. There's quite a bit of paperwork involved on the company's end so most smaller places aren't too inclined to make the extra effort unless it's worth it. If you do get a job offer, then you're in the clear for 6 months, the duration of the work visa. If the company doesn't extend your contract for another 6 months and you don't find another place willing to hire you, then you've got to leave the country the day your work visa expires. I believe if the company likes you enough, they can "sponsor" you for landed immigrant status (or something like that) which allows you to apply for residency and eventually citizenship. It's probably harder to get a job here than it is in the states, but you'll never know unless you try.

Mein Eyes!
Apr 15, 2002


I've still got another year (blargh) left in my BFA, so this is a pressing issue at the moment, but I'm curious if anyone here has had experience working with galleries. I mean this in two senses - working for galleries, either helping to hang or sell or manage or just sit and work shifts; and getting work into galleries, either being part of non-school-related exhibitions or getting represented. I've had a few shows in galleries related to my university, but I'm not sure how to enter the extra-curricular, commercial sphere.

My mid-term plans at the moment are to try and volunteer/intern at a local gallery this fall to get some experience working in a commercial space, then either continue interning in Chicago or see if I can't get a paid position somewhere, while at the same time showing my work around to everyone who can see it.

As a painter, I'm pretty much settled on making my income off of a job either marginally related to art, or a completely art-unrelated day job, and in both cases supplementing that income with portraits and such until I start building a good sales record.

mcsuede
Dec 30, 2003

Anyone who has a continuous smile on his face conceals a toughness that is almost frightening.
-Greta Garbo

Are you referring to commercial galleries, art museums, or commercial art galleries operated by art museums?

Mein Eyes!
Apr 15, 2002


mcsuede posted:

Are you referring to commercial galleries, art museums, or commercial art galleries operated by art museums?

Specifically commercial galleries, though I'm equally in the dark about how museums select and purchase work. For some reason I imagine museums to be selective rather than receptive of new work.

Zurich
Jan 4, 2008


OK this might be a longshot, but I'm sure it was posted in CC somewhere and someone must remember what I'm talking about.

This guy's blog.

He was in the games industry, I can't remember what, something senior.

Blog had a red background. It was a good blog. He had some reviews of his favourite self help/motivational books and I distinctly remember a link to his Myspace.


Anyway, he had a link to an article about following up on job-advert replies. It was a good article, lots of examples and stuff.

Anyone remember what I'm talking about? I remember emailing him but I can't find anything in my sent items which leads me to believe there was a contact form rather than an email link.

I think his name might have begun with a J but that's just a guess.


e: found it, that was quick, sorry for the frivolous post. Good blog though, if you've got some reading time.

http://www.thejonjones.com/2005/08/24/smart-people-are-dumb-failure-is-awesome/

ee: thanks anyway stuckeys

Zurich fucked around with this message at Aug 1, 2008 around 20:20

oldyogurt
Aug 14, 2004

Son of a--


Muldoon

Well, this might be it: http://www.thejonjones.com/ - Jon Jones, smArtist

poopinmymouth
Mar 2, 2005

PROUD 2 B AMERICAN (these colors don't run)

I'm interested in returning to school to study photography. However for personal reasons, the US and UK are out, but I only speak English (and a tiny bit of Icelandic).

Can anyone recommend a good photography school (I want to focus on location portraits) in Canada or Australia or Ireland?

Nihiliste
Oct 23, 2005
The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.

poopinmymouth posted:

I'm interested in returning to school to study photography. However for personal reasons, the US and UK are out, but I only speak English (and a tiny bit of Icelandic).

Can anyone recommend a good photography school (I want to focus on location portraits) in Canada or Australia or Ireland?

Can't speak much for other Canadian cities, but here in Ottawa the only two options are really Algonquin College or the School for the Photographic Arts (SPAO). The University of Ottawa has a photography program, but only enough of one to complement a larger Arts degree.

sirbeefalot
Aug 24, 2004
Fast Learner.

Fun Shoe

I'm 25, fresh out of a BFA in Industrial Design. All I've got in my portfolio are school projects, and my previous work experience is pretty much totally unrelated to my degree. Poor earlier planning at its finest. My question is, I've seen suggestions for graphic designers and illustrators to do work for friends and family to build up their portfolios relatively easily before they land their first "real" jobs, but what can an industrial designer do? Make up fake projects for myself? Just sketch and render a lot?

I've just moved to Los Angeles, and have been applying for positions in everything from basic assembly in an aftermarket motorcycle design shop to clerical positions in larger companies related to art/design. Ideally I'd like a position that keeps me working with my hands. I feel that my portfolio could be a big help starting out, but there just isn't enough to it. I don't even have a website for it. What can I do to fill it in a little more?

ceebee
Feb 12, 2004


sirbeefalot posted:

I feel that my portfolio could be a big help starting out, but there just isn't enough to it. I don't even have a website for it. What can I do to fill it in a little more?

You hit the spot if you're looking for any kind of ID jobs. With any type of creative job what matters more is your portfolio rather than your resume. Come up with unique/creative designs and maybe do 3D model prototypes of them or something. You probably should've moved to LA after you landed a job. Also, get working on a website.

ceebee fucked around with this message at Aug 4, 2008 around 17:05

Zurich
Jan 4, 2008


Zurich posted:

http://www.thejonjones.com/2005/08/24/smart-people-are-dumb-failure-is-awesome/
Just to report that yes, it works.

If anyone is too lazy to read the article -

Follow up emails (for job adverts)

I'm 1 for 1 in replies now

Just literally

"Hey, I emailed you a week ago about the job vacancy you advertised on xyz and just wanted to check that you received my email. Thanks!"

and quote your email below.

marshmallard
Apr 15, 2005

This post is about me.

Mein Eyes! posted:

Specifically commercial galleries, though I'm equally in the dark about how museums select and purchase work. For some reason I imagine museums to be selective rather than receptive of new work.

I can't help with your question but for anyone hesitating in replying to Mein Eyes! because it's such a hard field to crack - he is an awesome artist. And no, I don't know him personally, I commissioned a painting and it rules.

dikdik
May 18, 2005

Picture a shrew.... only majestic.

Mein Eyes! posted:

I've still got another year (blargh) left in my BFA, so this is a pressing issue at the moment, but I'm curious if anyone here has had experience working with galleries. I mean this in two senses - working for galleries, either helping to hang or sell or manage or just sit and work shifts; and getting work into galleries, either being part of non-school-related exhibitions or getting represented. I've had a few shows in galleries related to my university, but I'm not sure how to enter the extra-curricular, commercial sphere.

My mid-term plans at the moment are to try and volunteer/intern at a local gallery this fall to get some experience working in a commercial space, then either continue interning in Chicago or see if I can't get a paid position somewhere, while at the same time showing my work around to everyone who can see it.

As a painter, I'm pretty much settled on making my income off of a job either marginally related to art, or a completely art-unrelated day job, and in both cases supplementing that income with portraits and such until I start building a good sales record.

Get to work now and stay where you are. My biggest set back in getting into galleries was losing all the contacts I had made in NYC.

Stay friends with your classmates because they will recommend you. Focus on galleries that carry work similar to yours. Go to their openings and kiss rear end. I know that is terrible and sickening. I hate doing it, but it's they way to get them to remember you. Stop in the gallery constantly.

Send out your porfolio regularly. It will not come back, so prepare to invest lots of money. Write cover letters for every porfolio you send out and include your artist resume.

Until you can show in galleries show in coffee shops so that you have something that isn't school on your resume. When you have your openings kiss rear end. Meet your buyers and be nice so they want to buy more.
Be prepared to be rejected a lot. Like, more than you think you can handle.

Noomsby
Nov 20, 2002

by Fragmaster


Can I get some feedback on my CV?

It's for academic, post-secondary jobs, so it's more thorough than a resume is. I redesigned it using Same's template and like the look. I'm still reworking it and deleted the contact info, but this is the basic picture.

http://www.sadarnoomsby.com/CV.pdf

Rashomon
Jun 21, 2006

This machine kills fascists

Hey, you were at CCM. If you ever taught any of the musical theater kids, you probably know some of my friends.

I'm not necessarily the most qualified to make judgments, so for what it's worth: Why are the unattributed "student evaluations" on the front page? I feel like MAYBE if they had names attached, but as they are now, it feels like, well why should I care? Maybe I am wrong and this is something usual and important. Personally, if you wanted to have these at all, it seems like that coveted front page space should go to the masterclasses you taught or your primary teachers or something. Something that someone who was evaluating your resume might see and say "Oh! He studied with _____________, that means he is a really talented and hardworking guy."

edit: also, your font is lovely.

KittenofDoom
Apr 15, 2003

Me posting IRL


Looking through my portfolio, I noticed that most of my work is dedicated to the illustrative side of design. Aside from being employed strictly as an illustrator, which seems to be a mostly freelance thing, are there design positions that specialize in image creation?

Do these positions have specific job titles aside from the generic Graphic Design label?

Liselle
Oct 27, 2007

A purpose of human life, no matter who is controlling it, is to love whoever is around to be loved.

So, I kind of got talked into doing a calendar print project to raise money for an alumni who has a daughter with cancer. I am at a loss how exactly to put something like that into some sort of portfolio for college acceptance.

Also I am kind of at a loss where to start with a college portfolio in general. Tips? Advice? Horror stories?

Thanks in advance.

Furthermore, I'm interested in a few colleges and would be interested in talking to some students in the art programs offered there.

Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design (Vancouver, BC), University of Washington (Seattle, WA), Pacific Northwest College of Art (Portland, OR), Cornish College of the Arts (Seattle, WA), and Western Washington University (Bellingham, WA).

Liselle fucked around with this message at Aug 25, 2008 around 02:37

plaguedoctor
Jun 26, 2008

I CAN DUMP MY GIRLFRIEND CAUSE SHE'S LIKE A WHORE, RIGHT GUYS? RIGHT???

I have a question about legal issues in photography.
I know all the stuff about photographing in public, but this one's kind of different.

Who owns the RAW data in digital photography? I've tried to find info on this, but any kind of google search just comes up with other issues.

For example, if I do a photo shoot for a company, then process the photos and send the data to them, what do I do with the RAW files? Are they mine to keep and do with as I please? Do I need to send them to the company?

I always figured it was something akin to research/notes for a book, but that the final printing and distribution rights will be held by someone else (as in, the case of a university holding the copyright for the product of one of its professors).

Am I wrong in this?
In my own case, there is nothing in the actual contract stating who owns the original data.

qirex
Feb 15, 2001



If you do photos on contract that is probably work for hire. My limited photo-specific understanding is that the company that pays use has exclusive rights to use of the images regardless of format. I don't think there's anything preventing you from keeping copies for personal use as long as it's strictly that. You should ask specifically about using them in your portfolio but most places are OK with that in my experience barring NDAs [I have to scrub a lot of the work I do].

qirex fucked around with this message at Aug 28, 2008 around 17:24

Chernabog
Apr 16, 2007



Liselle posted:

So, I kind of got talked into doing a calendar print project to raise money for an alumni who has a daughter with cancer. I am at a loss how exactly to put something like that into some sort of portfolio for college acceptance.

Also I am kind of at a loss where to start with a college portfolio in general. Tips? Advice? Horror stories?

Thanks in advance.

Furthermore, I'm interested in a few colleges and would be interested in talking to some students in the art programs offered there.

Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design (Vancouver, BC), University of Washington (Seattle, WA), Pacific Northwest College of Art (Portland, OR), Cornish College of the Arts (Seattle, WA), and Western Washington University (Bellingham, WA).

Are you drawing/painting pictures for the calendar? or are you making the calendar itself?

For my portfolio I needed 10 pictures drawn from life and up to 10 pictures that showed my artistic range. For the first part I got into drawing lessons and made 10 drawings. For the second part I put stuff that I had done when I was eleven to show that I had been doing this for a long time and things that I had done recently with different techniques to show that I could do many things.
I think that the most important thing that you can demonstrate is that you are serious about this, rather than how good you are, because in theory, the reason you go to college is to get good in the first palce.

Also, DON'T PUT ANY MANGA.

Toasterhunter
Dec 3, 2002

You know what you got? What? F+
Click.

FT Web Designer for CreateSpace (Amazon.com subsidiary in Scotts Valley, CA)
(Goons welcome, relocation is possible, let's talk...)

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If you're amazingly stellar, I might answer a PM - but seriously, apply through the site if you're interested.

raggedphoto
May 10, 2008

I'd like to shoot you


plaguedoctor posted:

I have a question about legal issues in photography.
I know all the stuff about photographing in public, but this one's kind of different.

Who owns the RAW data in digital photography? I've tried to find info on this, but any kind of google search just comes up with other issues.

For example, if I do a photo shoot for a company, then process the photos and send the data to them, what do I do with the RAW files? Are they mine to keep and do with as I please? Do I need to send them to the company?

I always figured it was something akin to research/notes for a book, but that the final printing and distribution rights will be held by someone else (as in, the case of a university holding the copyright for the product of one of its professors).

Am I wrong in this?
In my own case, there is nothing in the actual contract stating who owns the original data.

The format of the digital image doesn't matter, whether its a PSD, TIFF, JPEG its still the same image. It sounds like the company you shoot for owns the photos, something that should be in a contract. A lot of companies will let you keep a copy for personal use (portfolio) but its best to ask permission first. First thing I would do is look over the contract, mine was 10 pages long and filled with gray area unfortunately. This is assuming you are a employee of the company and not a contractor, that's another mess.

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plaguedoctor
Jun 26, 2008

I CAN DUMP MY GIRLFRIEND CAUSE SHE'S LIKE A WHORE, RIGHT GUYS? RIGHT???

raggedphoto posted:

The format of the digital image doesn't matter, whether its a PSD, TIFF, JPEG its still the same image. It sounds like the company you shoot for owns the photos, something that should be in a contract. A lot of companies will let you keep a copy for personal use (portfolio) but its best to ask permission first. First thing I would do is look over the contract, mine was 10 pages long and filled with gray area unfortunately. This is assuming you are a employee of the company and not a contractor, that's another mess.

Ah, that's what I thought.

Unfortunately, I wasn't hired on as a photographer or anything like that, so there's nothing in my contract about it. I basically got put into the position of company photographer, simply because I know more about photography than my coworkers.
My contract is basically one page that is ONLY gray areas -- it basically just says "He'll do work for us."

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