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same
Mar 31, 2004

Seriously

The Iron Giant posted:

Mr. Tofslie,

I followed your advice in the first post about resume layout. My CV initially looked like one of the word templates (without the boxes, but everything left-flush). My best friend (Mac tech support) and my aunt (Human Resources) help me adjust the contents of the resume so that it would best showcase my graphic art experience in my previous employment. I then used InDesign to recreate your layout and to plug in my data.

I sent this resume to my best friend at her office. She had told a coworker that a friend was looking for graphic arts work, so the coworker asked for a copy of my resume. She called me later to say that her coworker hand-carried my resume into her boss's office. The supervisor also mentioned that it looked very impressive.

If this lands me a job, and they like my portfolio pieces, then I thank you in advance. I will give you credit for the inspiration if anyone asks.

PS: Your website is very impressive.

That's awesome man, I hope you get the job, keep us updated.

NOS482 posted:

I would like to see Chapter 2 of Same's post. I have been working on putting a portfolio together for about 3 months picking though projects and jobs and would love to hear exactly what an art director would be looking for.

Sorry, been so busy lately, will try and get to it soon.

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MonkeyDonkey
Jul 9, 2001


I eagerly await the second installment of same's series. I myself have found myself needing to put together a resume and portfolio in quick order. I've followed the 2 column template for my resume but it looks very empty for me. Probaly due to my lack of working experience. Would it be possible for someone to look at my resume and give me a critique? Just let me know how I should get it to you.

Corky Kraptrucker
Oct 12, 2006
Being out of your box isn't a right. It's a privilege.

I find myself trying to figure my life out and am rapidly coming to the conclusion that I should have gotten into art like I told myself I would my whole life before I chickened out and decided to major in English (I'm 19 and a Sophomore). However, I really don't know a ton about any schools. I'm very interested in illustration and animation and I kind of want something on the Northwest coast. The Art Institute of Seattle sends me stuff like twice a month, but I don't know how to go about judging an art schools quality. Is that an okay school? Will I end up a talentless and destitude hack if I go there? Can anyone recommend me some killer schools in that part of the country?

same
Mar 31, 2004

Seriously

Corky Kraptrucker posted:

I find myself trying to figure my life out and am rapidly coming to the conclusion that I should have gotten into art like I told myself I would my whole life before I chickened out and decided to major in English (I'm 19 and a Sophomore). However, I really don't know a ton about any schools. I'm very interested in illustration and animation and I kind of want something on the Northwest coast. The Art Institute of Seattle sends me stuff like twice a month, but I don't know how to go about judging an art schools quality. Is that an okay school? Will I end up a talentless and destitude hack if I go there? Can anyone recommend me some killer schools in that part of the country?


personally, I recommend going to a state school like WSU or U of W and enroll in their art program. You will have a better well rounded experience in college and you will pay instate tuition which usually is cheaper. Most art schools in my opinion are rip offs. Too much money for what you learn. Also, going to a state school like WSU, gives you the option to do a minor in English or Business.
Also, look into the WUE Program. http://wue.wiche.edu/ It is a program that my wife and many other students use. It allows you to go to other colleges in other states, like the University of Idaho or something, for instate prices.

Watch Art School Confidential, there is one line in there that rings true...
"what is the secret to becoming a great artist?"

Answer

"to be a great artist, you simply have to be a great artist"

After going to art school and design school, this is very true.

Some people work their rear end of and get nowhere and suck, some people dont lift a finger and become geniuses.

Think of art school as a way to channel and get your artist out of yourself. If you go to any decent art school, this will happen. You will start out rough, but you will see after the first year who will be good and who sucks.. and it is not because of the teachers, it is just a method of projects and advice to help you along your way.

But going to the best art school in the world is not going to help you become talented, it may help you get better, but it is not going to make you good, if that makes sense. Aka, some people who suck.. get sorta better than they were before but never really get good enough to land them a job. You either have it or you dont.... Art school just weeds people out and guides them.

Lost of people get good at what they do, a few become really good. But if you want to be a true artist there is no guarantee for a job or that people will like your work. That is why many artists learn illustration and graphic design, these are much much much better skills to find a job that pays decent.

same fucked around with this message at Sep 2, 2007 around 05:41

Corky Kraptrucker
Oct 12, 2006
Being out of your box isn't a right. It's a privilege.

Thanks for such a thoughtful response. The art school=ripoff thing is kind of what I figured but I wanted to be sure. I think I'm capable of really great stuff, so I guess I just have to bite the bullet, give myself a chance, and take some classes. So anyway, thanks again!

Nihiliste
Oct 23, 2005
The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.

I'm looking for advice on two more things.

1) Putting together a good photo portfolio. As an addendum, should I stay online, or are prints a must?

2) If I want to get into fashion/commercial work, which people do I need to approach, and what do they want me to send?

Brother Michael
Jul 4, 2005
++Pirate Captain++

I am a senior in college this year. I will be earning a degree in Economics, but my original degree was in Visual Communications. I changed to econ because I thought that I was not good enough to be a graphic designer, nor did I think that working for a small company would be the decision for me.

After having worked for a large corporation for about 2 years as an intern, I have decided that the grass is indeed NOT greener on the other side. In fact, I hate it. I remember working at my print shop internship that I had a few years ago and I miss it. I hate the idea of working for large company and being just a cog in a machine and doing horribly boring work (adding users all day to a Novell Network is not nearly as fun as working on design work).

I want to get back into the design world. I am not going to change my major this close to graduation. I guess how can I get into the design world when I don't have a degree in design or marketing and I don't have a portfolio? i know how to use a lot of the tools (like Adobe products, cameras, printers/presses) but I lack training and experience.

same
Mar 31, 2004

Seriously

Brother Michael posted:

I am a senior in college this year. I will be earning a degree in Economics, but my original degree was in Visual Communications. I changed to econ because I thought that I was not good enough to be a graphic designer, nor did I think that working for a small company would be the decision for me.

After having worked for a large corporation for about 2 years as an intern, I have decided that the grass is indeed NOT greener on the other side. In fact, I hate it. I remember working at my print shop internship that I had a few years ago and I miss it. I hate the idea of working for large company and being just a cog in a machine and doing horribly boring work (adding users all day to a Novell Network is not nearly as fun as working on design work).

I want to get back into the design world. I am not going to change my major this close to graduation. I guess how can I get into the design world when I don't have a degree in design or marketing and I don't have a portfolio? i know how to use a lot of the tools (like Adobe products, cameras, printers/presses) but I lack training and experience.

To be a designer, you really don't need to have a degree, but the one thing you must have, with or without a degree, is a good portfolio. Most agencies never really look at if a designer has a degree, only if their work is great.

So you really need to get some projects under your belt. Lots of people get started in this industry by just doing design favors for friends... and build a portfolio that way. Websites, Posters, Business cards etc.

I would definitely continue on the path you are on now, as you will need a job, but try and do this in your spare time, and try and get a good 10 pieces under your belt, ask advice along the way,,, get better each time.... then do some more... and update your portfolio with your best pieces, then you will be more likely to get a job.

Peachstapler
Sep 5, 2003

don't stop believin

I have two job postings that I'd like filled by some qualified applicants. Depending on talent we may bring on more than one candidate for each posting.

3D Game Developer

++++++++++++++++++

Short Description: We're in search of a technical developer for an upcoming e-learning/MMORPG-style simulation. Candidate should be knowledgeable of VSL (Virtools Scripting Language), C++, or a similar programming language. Direct3D or OpenGL experience a plus. Familiarity with 3D Studio Max also a plus.

++++++++++++++++++

Principal Duties and Essential Job Functions: We're seeking a game programmer capable of a fast start on our new third-person training simulator. This position will require working with a talented team of professionals, including graphic artists and other programmers. This position also requires evaluating and working to create an in-house game engine using Virtools and to determine the best programming solutions. The applicant should have a strong background in programming using C++ or a similar language. Individuals with experience using Virtools will be strongly considered. Because this position requires working directly with 3D artists and may include working in 3D programs, a familiarity with 3D Studio Max is a big plus.

++++++++++++++++++

Basic Qualifications: A degree in computer science or related field. Excellent C/C++ proficiency, design, and debugging skills are required. Expertise with Virtools development software preferred but not required. Familiarity with 3D software preferred but not required.

This position is located in Hampton, VA. Relocation assistance is not provided. This is a great opportunity with benefits for U.S. based applicants.

++++++++++++++++++

How to Apply: Applicants should send résumé in Word format to jgriffith2 at CSC dot COM. Due to the volume of applications we receive for our job postings, we are unable to respond personally to telephone inquiries regarding the status of an application. As well, only candidates being considered for interview will be contacted.

Peachstapler fucked around with this message at Sep 5, 2007 around 13:37

Peachstapler
Sep 5, 2003

don't stop believin

And the second opening (which we may bring on more than one candidate for)

3D Artist

++++++++++++++++++

Short Description: Looking for an experienced 3D artist with a great portfolio. Candidate should be knowledgeable of both high and low poly modeling methods and the tools used to augment believable textures. Rigging and animating experience is a definite plus. Familiarity with 3D Studio Max preferred but not required.

++++++++++++++++++

Principal Duties and Essential Job Functions: We're seeking the full-package 3D artist who needs no introduction to the major facets of production (planning, modeling, texturing, rigging, and animating). This position will require working with a talented team of professionals, including programmers and other graphic artists. This position requires evaluating and working to create an in-house game engine using Virtools and to determine the best methods of approaching 3D challenges. The applicant should have a strong background in modeling lo-poly characters, props, and environments. Game industry experience is a huge plus in this respect. Individuals with experience using Virtools will be strongly considered. The ideal candidate should have several years experience with 3D Studio Max (or a comparable application), Adobe Photoshop mastery, and a solid grasp of how interactive software pipelines work. Bonus points for Z-Brush or Mudbox experience or C/C++ programming experience.

++++++++++++++++++

Basic Qualifications: A degree in computer science or related field. Excellent 3D software proficiency and design skills are required. Expertise with Virtools development software preferred but not required.

This position is located in Hampton, VA. Relocation assistance is not provided. This is a great opportunity with benefits for U.S. based applicants.

++++++++++++++++++

How to Apply: Applicants should send résumé in Word format to jgriffith2 at CSC dot COM. In addition to their CV, graphic artist applicants MUST submit an electronic portfolio through a URL. Due to the volume of applications we receive for our job postings, we are unable to respond personally to telephone inquiries regarding the status of an application. As well, only candidates being considered for interview will be contacted.

Mansurus
Aug 7, 2007

by The Finn


I would love to attend school for photography. Right now i'm in a community college, just coasting through for my two year degree.

Growing up in Savannah, Georgia, i've always had a fondness for Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD). I've grown up around it, i love the city, and i've heard many awesome things about the school and how it's one of the best in the nation. One thing that worries me is their "foundation studies" requirement. I have little desire or talent in regards to any art other than photography. How big of a deal is this, and should it make me dismiss the notion of seriously considering the school? Also, how good is the school objectively? How does it stand against others in the nation? Should i hold it up to some pedestal and ignore other options?

Also, a complication has recently come about. I'm interested in this girl, who lives in Pennsylvania. I'm considering moving there to pursue a relationship, but i would only do so if i found a school that would help me and teach me what i want to know. Are there many good schools for photography in Pennsylvania? Where? Are they as good as SCAD? Would it be wise to give up the dream of SCAD for a school there? Do schools really matter, and would i suffer any if i did not go for something near the best? I would consider giving her up for my education.

Any online resources about photography schools in the United States would also be a big help to me.

If it matters: I'm interested mainly in documentary photography and fine-art photography. Although, i may also consider photojournalism.

Thanks.

Mansurus fucked around with this message at Sep 6, 2007 around 05:53

Molten Llama
Sep 20, 2006


Mansurus posted:

Growing up in Savannah, Georgia, i've always had a fondness for Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD). I've grown up around it, i love the city, and i've heard many awesome things about the school and how it's one of the best in the nation. One thing that worries me is their "foundation studies" requirement. I have little desire or talent in regards to any art other than photography. How big of a deal is this, and should it make me dismiss the notion of seriously considering the school?

If you're going to a fine arts program, you're going to have to complete the fine arts core curriculum. There's no escaping it, and there's also no need to worry about it. Nobody's expecting you to become an amazing painter or crank out photorealistic drawings—it's just to get you grounded in the arts and supply a baseline of knowledge for every student. If you've done your time in a black and white darkroom, you've actually got a leg up on many of the students when it comes to art core... Shading is a huge stumbling block for many people because they can't divorce color from light and shadow.

You will survive drawing, and you will be amazed at yourself. If you don't go into things with angst and blinders on, you'll also learn something from all of your out-of-concentration courses. "How can I apply X to my Y" is the correct answer; "I don't need no X because I'm a Y-er" is the answer that makes people miserable and gets them lovely grades.

brad industry
May 22, 2004


Mansurus posted:

One thing that worries me is their "foundation studies" requirement. I have little desire or talent in regards to any art other than photography. How big of a deal is this, and should it make me dismiss the notion of seriously considering the school? Also, how good is the school objectively? How does it stand against others in the nation? Should i hold it up to some pedestal and ignore other options?

I am a photo major at SCAD about to graduate this fall... I was worried about foundations too but it's all pretty basic and the professors understand that everyone has to take Drawing and that a lot of people like you and me could care less and suck rear end. I actually did get pretty good at drawing while I was taking those classes and I had never drawn anything before, ever. Just don't go into class with the "I don't need this, I'm a photographer" attitude and you'll be fine. The point of foundations is to get you used to basic design concepts and participating in critiques and poo poo, not to turn photographers into illustrators.


And like I said I am a senior about to graduate and I consider going to SCAD invaluable to me personally. I don't think I ever would have gotten to the point I am now without school. SCAD has really, really loving good facilities and equipment for photography.. way better than pretty much any other school I looked at a few years ago, art or traditional.

Frankenfinger
May 1, 2007


Peachstapler posted:

And the second opening (which we may bring on more than one candidate for)

3D Artist
Cool job info here...

I'm curious, not so much specific to this post, but to any job posted anywhere a goon might visit. If you're familiar with this thread, and receive a resume/cv formatted exactly like the one at the beginning of this thread... is that a plus or a minus? As much as I'd love to apply to a great job found herein, I would think my recent adoption of the super-cool two column resume would make me look mighty hacky and unoriginal. No?

ZergCow
Nov 3, 2002


I just got back from the game developers conference in Austin Tx where they had a "job day". I handed out over 30 resumes and talked to a hundred or more HR reps and from the sound of it i dont stand much of a chance as far as a job in the gamming world goes. Basicaly long story short you have to either know someone in the industry or you have to have 5 years experiance. 5 years in a industry that is only like 15 years old. whatever I am over it.

I am not giving up though. i am still going to waste a few hundred more dollers to go to the one in LA in october. But i was wondering if anyone had any sugesstions of companies or industries to look into.

I am a digital art major so any companies dealing with art, 3d modeling, textureing, traditional ar, web design, flas, photoshop, video editing. anything like that i would love to know what companies are out there.

Here is a list of game design companies in case anyone wants to get practice at being turned down.

https://www.activisionvalue.com
https://www.beenox.com
https://www.infinityward.com
https://www.luxoflux.com
https://www.neversoft.com
https://www.ravensoft.com
https://www.redoctane.com
https://www.shaba.com
https://www.toysforbob.com
https://www.sony.com/SCA/jobs.shtml
https://www.blizzard.com/jobopp/
https://www.perpetual.com/jobs/
https://www.bioware.com/bioware_info/jobs/

I suppose i will add more later. Microsoft hase a game division as well as some other large companies but you can find those.

oldyogurt
Aug 14, 2004

Son of a--


Muldoon

Hey ZergCow I was considering relocating to Austin (in the distant future) and am interested in the "job day" you went to. Do you have a link?

I am in a similar position to you so you're not the only one dealing with heroic odds. I got out of college this spring and right now I'm working with different game mods/teams for unpaid experience in concept art. It's a start, I guess, but it seems so hard to break into the big time.

Kilometers Davis
Jul 9, 2007

They begin again


Quite simply, i'm 17 and am interested in making a career out of graphic design. I'm decent at photoshop and fairly well off with art. What do I need to do schooling/job-wise to get my feet wet?

----------------
This thread brought to you by a tremendous dickhead!

Hyper Whale
Oct 17, 2005


I just wanted to say that I really am enjoying/appreciate this thread. I'm in the same boat as Brother Michael where I messed up on my major and now realize what I really want to do. I'm a photography minor and work on the layout staff for my school paper and I love every second of it. It's good to hear that college is not everything and that there are opportunities for people you didn't attend a FA school (I'm really just jealous of you SCAD folks).

I know that learning from a professional is probably the best way to get better at Design work but do you have any recommendations for other resources (i.e. Books, Websites)?

ZergCow
Nov 3, 2002


stuckeys posted:

Hey ZergCow I was considering relocating to Austin (in the distant future) and am interested in the "job day" you went to. Do you have a link?

I am in a similar position to you so you're not the only one dealing with heroic odds. I got out of college this spring and right now I'm working with different game mods/teams for unpaid experience in concept art. It's a start, I guess, but it seems so hard to break into the big time.

Yea i forgot about that link. It was the Austin Game Developer conference. here is the link http://www.austingdc.net/

Also, the people that did the "career day" for it are here... http://www.gamecareerguide.com/?cid=GCG06_EDWPX3

the game career people have some more fairs coming up. i will be going to one in LA October 19th.

Also if anyone is interested I am starting to find that a good recruiter can go a long way. You can actually get people to find a job for you. basically they network for you and find what you need. i havent looked into the cost of this yet but i found an amazing team of people that can do it well. this was recomended to me by several people that are looking for jobs in the industry. http://www.gamerecruiter.com/ I hear nothing but good things about this company. Also check out the conferances they go to and their partners. http://www.gamerecruiter.com/partners/

oldyogurt
Aug 14, 2004

Son of a--


Muldoon

ZergCow posted:

Links

Thanks a lot ZC, that is some stellar information. Too bad I can't make em this year, but it'll give me full year to work my rear end off to draw better and learn how to use Maya. Good luck in LA, let's hear how you do!

Xeltos
May 19, 2004

The Freshmaker

It's really nice to see threads like this. I am currently a senior illustration major at Ringling. We actually have a portfolio class geared to stuff like career advice and resumes and all that junk, so I'll be sure to pass on any useful information I get to you guys.

I was wondering what the general consensus was on how many pieces to put in a portfolio website. I know a real physical portfolio should have around 15 pieces, but forgot to ask about Web Portfolios.

The Iron Giant
Dec 27, 2003


DOMO ORIGATO
MISTER ROBOTO


I've had three job interviews last week. Two for IT / Tech Support, and one for pre-press (retouch, color correct). Two out of those three have called me back for a second meeting. One step closer to a job offer!

The pre-press company invited me back this morning for a skills assessment in Photoshop. They gave me 2 high-res, press-quality images, and a time limit of three hours.

The first image was a photograph of an SUV driving swiftly through a dead grassy field at sunset. There was a big black steel camera crane visible in the shot, attached to the rear frame of the car. I was told to remove the crane and its shadow.

The second image was a scanned color slide: a celebrity headshot from about 20 years ago. I was asked to improve its appearance with brighter colors in the scene and objects while presenting good flesh tone on the actor's face. The clothing and lighting looked too "flat" and dull, so they wanted some more contrast and visible detail (without retouching the photograph).

At the end of the second project, the file was having trouble saving "because of a program error." Turns out that the original file had disappeared from the server. I had only the temporary copy open and tried to figure out another way to save it. Eventually I got it out using a flattened EPS (PSD and TIFF layered didn't work).

It was very challenging work, but I loved it and was pretty pleased with my results. The manager said that he'd examine my work with the V.P. and let me know within a day or two if they want to hire me.

Hoorj!

ZergCow
Nov 3, 2002


Xeltos posted:

It's really nice to see threads like this. I am currently a senior illustration major at Ringling. We actually have a portfolio class geared to stuff like career advice and resumes and all that junk, so I'll be sure to pass on any useful information I get to you guys.

I was wondering what the general consensus was on how many pieces to put in a portfolio website. I know a real physical portfolio should have around 15 pieces, but forgot to ask about Web Portfolios.

with websites information flows faster and people are less interested in looking at stuff. so the more the better. I would put at least 10 from each area. like 10 drawing then 10 of whatever feild you are going into and then 10 of a feild you like or do as a hobby.

I would say that some of the best i have seen have had about 20-30 from each area. you get lost in the art and it makes the "just ok" stuff less noticable. especially if a large majority of it is good strong bodies of art work.

The Iron Giant posted:

stuff...

so how did you find those companies. I am thinking of starting to look into digital touchup stuff since i have been using photoshop for over 8 years now. my longterm goal is game design or at least work on one major game in my life. But i need a job that i am good at ... i just dont know where to look to get a job as a touchup artist.

Puzzle Thing
Dec 12, 2006
Your life is as steak!

Do you guys know any good schools for illustration in New York City? At the moment I'm either looking to join Cooper Union for a fine arts Degree or FIT for an illustration degree. The thing is, I'm having trouble figuring out the good illustration schools in the area. I'm not really even sure if FIT is a good school for it.

oldyogurt
Aug 14, 2004

Son of a--


Muldoon

I went to SVA and NYU. I had a friend in Cooper so I visited sometimes. It is a Fine Art school, so the primary focus there and in NYU is not technical skill. Also very difficult to get in, but it's a very good school. NYU's art is pretty good too, right around the corner literally from CU. If you want to pursue illustration your options are FIT, SVA, Parsons, Pratt. I had friends in FIT too, and it seemed so-so for illustration. SVA was very good IMO, but I was there for only one year for illustration. A lot of famous illustrators teach there, and were (with few exceptions) were fantastic.

oldyogurt fucked around with this message at Sep 26, 2007 around 17:03

Delita
Jan 6, 2005


I'm a 4th year Illustration major at FIT. I can give you ANYTHING you want to know about FIT. I've been very much involved in the college, department and the social life.

As an art school, FIT is okay. They have a HUGE problem with the associates program (the first 2 years) because a good number of the professors are 80 year old has-beens that have no idea wtf they're doing anymore. They can't get fired because of their union and they keep forcing themselves to teach for the health benefits. It's pretty much hit or miss with the faculty for the first 2 years. The Bachelor's program is pretty much amazing. There are a number of famous illustrators teaching there. (Much like SVA and most of them know each other/some of the FIT teachers have taught at SVA and most of the models work for both schools as well as Pratt simultaneously)

They are however working intensely on changing the curriculum for Illustration because they've realized how they're starting to lose students to those terrible teachers in the associates program.

I've taken a summer class at SVA and have always wanted to go there. I just couldn't afford it, I was even ready to early decision to SVA. SVA's illustration chairpersons (MFA and BFA) are real hardasses and they really press their teachers to get the students to produce. "You're only as good as your previous class" My SVA professor explained to me when I asked him why the SVA shows held such a great amount of quality works compared to FIT.

Unfortunately most of FIT's students are very unmotivated and scattered. Most of my colleagues don't even draw outside of school. (Though FIT is pretty strict on attendance) Out of the 7 groups of 25 or so students that were in my year, only 2 and a half of those groups remain.

So to break it down; FIT's associates program blows, even if you opt for the Fashion Illustration path but they ARE changing and hiring new teachers. The bachelors program have some of the best teachers I could ever imagine. I know close to nothing about the masters program but I'll tell you that I hear the SVA's masters program is one of the best.

Fun fact: FIT is 70% girls, though their website says something like 90%. There's a lot of them.

Defenestration
Aug 10, 2006

"It wasn't my fault that my first unconscious thought turned out to be-"
"Jesus, kid, what?"
"That something smelled delicious!"



Grimey Drawer

I'm doing an MFA in fiction at Emerson. If anyone would like to hear about MFA life or my personal theory of how/where to apply, I'd be happy to post a little something.

Jabe
Nov 18, 2006

APPLE IS A SHIT COMPANY GOD I WISH THEY WOULD JUST GO DIE OR SOMETHING JEEZ



I'm loving your advice Same, please don't forget about me because I would like to read more!

Atheist Sunglasses
Jul 26, 2003

All the candy you want. Crotton crandy, crandy apple. I like to go on the best ride first. Name of roller croaster.



Can anyone show me some examples of good portfolios? I'm about to graduate college with a degree in GD and nobody every showed me how to make a portfolio. I have no idea what is expected, what its supposed to look like, web or print? Help me!

Beanpants
Oct 26, 2004



Well, here's my portfolio. I designed it for print, but this is the electronic version. I'm still messing with the content, and would switch out the pieces depending on who I'd be giving it to. I haven't sent it to any perspective jobs just yet, but all my other arts related contacts and friends have loved it so far. It's all just a matter of packaging your work to make it attractive. If you're a designer, think of your portfolio itself as another piece of design. Your portfolio is itself a part of your portfolio.

http://www.floodtown.com/img/portfolio.pdf

The Iron Giant
Dec 27, 2003


DOMO ORIGATO
MISTER ROBOTO


I got a job offer!!!

I'll be starting as a trainee retouching artist for PR1MARY COLOR:

http://www.primarycolor.com/

It's all but official at this point; I just met with the vice president and department manager this morning. The paperwork gets filled out tomorrow and I start Monday! The pay is $18/hr with full health benefits, lots of training, and LOTS of room for growth. And it's 5 minutes from the apartment where my future wife and I will be living together in about 3 weeks.

To same, I thank you for creating this thread.

The Iron Giant
Dec 27, 2003


DOMO ORIGATO
MISTER ROBOTO


ZergCow posted:



so how did you find those companies. I am thinking of starting to look into digital touchup stuff since i have been using photoshop for over 8 years now. my longterm goal is game design or at least work on one major game in my life. But i need a job that i am good at ... i just dont know where to look to get a job as a touchup artist.

I found this job through a friend of a friend of a friend. Yes, networking really does get jobs.

Beanpants posted:

Well, here's my portfolio. I designed it for print, but this is the electronic version. I'm still messing with the content, and would switch out the pieces depending on who I'd be giving it to. I haven't sent it to any perspective jobs just yet, but all my other arts related contacts and friends have loved it so far. It's all just a matter of packaging your work to make it attractive. If you're a designer, think of your portfolio itself as another piece of design. Your portfolio is itself a part of your portfolio.

http://www.floodtown.com/img/portfolio.pdf

Page 15: Commission is misspelled on the back of the card. Otherwise, great portfolio. I loved the section for Blazing Saddles.

If you get a chance, use Adobe Acrobat Professional to create chapters and finagle the page/section numbering so that "Page 05" really does correspond to the 5th page in your portfolio. Right now, page 5 is the 6th page in the document.

The Iron Giant fucked around with this message at Oct 4, 2007 around 19:30

Beanpants
Oct 26, 2004



The Iron Giant posted:

Page 15: Commission is misspelled on the back of the card.

That's what I get for copying and pasting what a client sends without proof reading it first. Thanks, I'll make the changes you've suggested.

meta²
Sep 11, 2001

What the flip was Grandma doing at the dunes?

LOOKING FOR FULL-TIME GRAPHIC DESIGNER FOR CLOTHING
===============================================
I work at a medium sized children's clothing company based in Berkeley, CA. We are looking for graphic designers to work in photoshop/illustrator on graphic designs for t-shirts, and to adjust patterns. Email me at sweetpotatoesjobs@gmail.com or PM me. Send some of your work/illustrations/etc. I am one of the freelance designers at the company and I have a lot of fun working here, so if you are in the area hit me up!

I cant rhyme
Aug 19, 2007


Defenestration posted:

I'm doing an MFA in fiction at Emerson. If anyone would like to hear about MFA life or my personal theory of how/where to apply, I'd be happy to post a little something.

What are you going to do when you get out? What's your BA?
How do you like it? How hard was it to get in?
What are the best schools?
I plan on doing that after I get my Ba, teach part time and write part time, hopefully.

Defenestration
Aug 10, 2006

"It wasn't my fault that my first unconscious thought turned out to be-"
"Jesus, kid, what?"
"That something smelled delicious!"



Grimey Drawer

I cant rhyme posted:

What are you going to do when you get out? What's your BA?
How do you like it? How hard was it to get in?
What are the best schools?
I plan on doing that after I get my Ba, teach part time and write part time, hopefully.
My BA was in English at a SUNY school. But it doesn't matter what you did; so long as you write well they'll take you.
When I get out, I am going to get a publishing job and start shopping my thesis novel around.

I don't really know how hard it was to get in. I like to think it was pretty drat selective. 95% of your application is the writing sample. You could have a recommendation from the Pope and they still wouldn't let you in if your pieces weren't good. I applied to 2 MFAs, Emerson and Columbia, which are both big classes (Emerson at 40 or so and Columbia takes 70). Compare that to a place like Johns Hopkins, which takes less than 5 fiction writers A YEAR. Emerson took me, Columbia didn't.

Now that I'm here, I love Emerson. I love that it's all about writing. That was my biggest problem with undergrad, that we didn't get to work on our own fiction. Ain't no problem with that anymore. It's also so amazing that now I have all these friends who care about writing the same way I do. Who want to sit around and talk about it, and share their work, and take and give honest critique.

The best school is The University of Iowa. This is undisputed. Extremely selective to get in, extremely good writers coming out. I don't know why (though I have a theory). After that the next group is Johns Hopkins, Columbia, NYU, UVA and UC-Irvine. I firmly believe that if you can't get in to a good school, you shouldn't get your MFA. It's not a practical degree, so reputation counts for so much. Emerson is top 20, though US News hasn't ranked MFAs in years, and outside of the top 6 or so it varies widely list to list.

KosherNostra
Dec 31, 2004

WHERE DA PIRATES AT?

I'm pretty puzzled as to where I want to go to school. I've always loved Film and would like to work in the industry, specifically interested in Directing/Screenwriting, but not interested in a screenwriting program. I went to the University of Arizona last year and was doing the Media Arts BFA before deciding the school wasn't for me. Right now i'm doing a photo/film internship while I research schools.

If I'm going to get a degree in Film however, i want to get one that counts. Part of me wants to go to an art school like Pratt and SVA, but I would also like a well rounded education as I have an interest in political science and have considered and still do consider going to law school. Any thoughts or advice? I know UT-Austin, UCLA, NYU seem like what i'm looking for, but they're either too expensive or i just couldn't get in. Help!

Recycle Bin
Feb 7, 2001

I'd rather be a pig than a fascist

Xeltos posted:

It's really nice to see threads like this. I am currently a senior illustration major at Ringling. We actually have a portfolio class geared to stuff like career advice and resumes and all that junk, so I'll be sure to pass on any useful information I get to you guys.

They're not still making you put together a portfolio box, are they? I busted my rear end putting one together and it never saw the light of day because, hey, no one uses them anymore! I think the most valuable thing I got out of that class was the GAG handbook I bought for it.

quote:

I was wondering what the general consensus was on how many pieces to put in a portfolio website. I know a real physical portfolio should have around 15 pieces, but forgot to ask about Web Portfolios.

I say less is more when it comes to online portfolios. A lot of people seem to think that, because bandwidth is cheap, they'll just throw up every piece they've ever done. A potential client is going to be much more likely to move on from a website than if they were meeting you in person, so you need to make sure they see the best of the best.

My own site has just eight pieces on the front page. I have a sketchbook link for older work, roughs, etc.

gce
Oct 11, 2004


I'm about to apply for a technician position with portland-based Laika (https://www.laika.com). I really really want the position and was looking for any cover letter advice. I'm definitely qualified and it's with a company that I think I would fit in well with. Any help would be appreciated.

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Satellite
Aug 31, 2001

your kiss goes everywhere

Alright, I've got a dilema and I hope this thread can provide some insight for me.

Long story short, I attended a private, for-profit college that I dropped out of after attending for 2 and a half years since I was dissatisfied with the breadth of courses and how lovely the instructors were. After hunting for a new school and getting my earned credits turned away because my college was nationally accredited (as opposed to regionally), I found myself with a shitload of useless credits, a lot of debt, and time wasted. The college I attended went out of business shortly thereafter so I couldn't even try to re-enroll to complete my degree. Lesson learned.

At this point, I'm looking to enhance what P-Shop/Illustrator/Flash skills I do have, but I also want to learn more After Effects, motion graphics, and any other digital design software considered to be industry standard. I already work in the administrative field in entertainment, so I kind of have an "in" for a job if needs be. But with my full-time job and LA traffic, I need to attend online classes and start all over as a Freshman.

With that, I've been looking into SCAD's online courses for a BA for Digital Media with concentration in Interactive Design. Tuition looks spendy, but I am beside myself with excitement when I look at their class catalogs. Does anyone have any experience with SCAD's distance learning program? I'm also looking into the Academy of Art - San Francisco's online course for a BA in New Media. Any input on the quality of either school's online courses?

I'm focusing on online art schools because I can't think of any local colleges that offer any online classes besides GE, and I really want to get into the core classes ASAP. Are there any other alternatives?

I've been dwelling on this for a couple of years now, whether or not I have what it takes to thrive in an online art school while maintaining a full-time job. Has anyone else been in this situation, or can advise me on whether or not this is worth persuing so late in my life? I'm about to hit my salary cap in my administrative job and I'm EXTREMELY dissatisfied with the clerical life. I'm looking for a creative change.

In short: oh my god am I doing the right thing?

Satellite fucked around with this message at Jan 12, 2011 around 01:07

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