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Not an Anthem
Apr 27, 2003

I'm a fucking pain machine and if you even touch my fucking car I WILL FUCKING DESTROY YOU.


Can people post their CV/resumes or portfolio sites? I need to start working on my serious one and I'd like to see how people lay them out.

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Jabe
Nov 18, 2006

APPLE IS A SHIT COMPANY GOD I WISH THEY WOULD JUST GO DIE OR SOMETHING JEEZ



How much does the pay differ between a bachelors & masters in the graphic design world?

seadonkey
Jul 2, 2007
The Hambeast

how are you finding the job market for design in Portland gce? I would ask in a PM but you do not have it.

Bathing Poodle
Nov 28, 2003

by Fistgrrl


Does anyone here have any experience producing feature films/television, selling screenplays, acquiring production partners/funding, etc? I have a project but I have never produced before and I could use some guidance/advice or maybe even a partner. I can take PM or e-mail.

Kraven Moorhed
Jan 5, 2006

So wrong, yet so right.

Soiled Meat

Defenestration posted:

...lots of good advice...

So it doesn't matter where you get your BA, as long as you get one and can produce good writing, correct? If so, there might be some hope for me after all. I'd hate for them to look down at me for getting my BA at VCU.

Defenestration
Aug 10, 2006

"It wasn't my fault that my first unconscious thought turned out to be-"
"Jesus, kid, what?"
"That something smelled delicious!"



Grimey Drawer

Kraven Moorhed posted:

So it doesn't matter where you get your BA, as long as you get one and can produce good writing, correct? If so, there might be some hope for me after all. I'd hate for them to look down at me for getting my BA at VCU.
Exactly. You might have a slight advantage if your undergrad is in something exotic (ie. not English) but certainly WHERE you went is of no consequence.

Overture
Jun 9, 2003

It takes an idiot to do cool things, that's why it's cool.

Web / Graphic Designer - Austin, TX or Washington, DC
I'm the project/general manager/co-founder for a small web development company that is based both in Austin and DC. We currently outsource all design work and do the implementation (into CMS software), sales, support, and project life cycle work in house. While this works out most of the time we've decided having a talented designer in house would be very beneficial as well.

Our clients range from non-profits to small to medium sized businesses who will dish out anywhere from $5,000 - $100,000 for a website, the average being somewhere in the middle depending on the time of year.

What we are looking for:

- Diverse portfolio. You should be comfortable designing professional websites as well as more creative or down to earth projects. It's all about capturing what a client is looking for, not spinning off site designs that are the same with color scheme differences.

- Experience. As much as I love to hire recent or soon to be grads we've had some problems in the past with consistency and dependability. Both of these seem to be a theme with designers who are new to working in general, their talent as a designer has nothing to do with it. We are looking for someone who has experience working with clients, can be professional, and well spoken. Communication and meeting deadlines (or at least telling us in advance it can't be met) are key. I could honestly care less if you are still in college, as long as you have worked in the industry before and have something to back that up (and you have the time to work a full time job of course).

- Willing to take a strategic role in the company. We're looking for someone who wants to be more then just our designer who pumps out projects no questions asked. Personal investment is a must as we're looking to grow this company and someone in this "lead designer" position should want to see it grow as well.

Why should you work for us?

- Salary: We're willing to pay $50,000 - $60,000 a year depending on your experience from the get go. This will increase as the company grows and you prove you are worth more money. We have an open door policy; if you think you deserve more you just need to tell us why and if we agree that's really all there is to it.

- Benefits: Great benefits plan, all the normal stuff in terms of health, dental, vision. We also have cool perks like we've all got an iPhone and the plan is paid for.

- Flexible work hours: We're currently in the middle of deciding on office space/locations in both cities. DC will probably have a new location very soon, but Austin is just me at the moment as I am relocating for family reasons and I'll simply be working remotely unless we decide to hire others in Austin. This means much of the work can be done remotely, although we prefer to stick to working hours as much as possible so we can talk/coordinate when needed.

- Growth: We want to help you grow in your career while growing our company at the same time. We want you to make decisions with us to decide the future of the company. Your input will not only be valued but used.

If interested please reply here with any questions and email me at cullenw@gmail.com with your resume and a cover letter.

Overture fucked around with this message at Nov 1, 2007 around 15:34

Hemlock
Jan 17, 2006
Waffle.

This question is probably a little off topic but hopefully someone will be able to help me.

I知 currently an Art Foundation student (UK) looking to do a degree in graphics starting next year. This summer I bought Adobe Creative Suite Design Premium hoping to have a bit of a play with the programmes but, due to a hard-drive death on my PC, I have not yet had a chance to install it. The PC is still operating with one hard drive but having suffered several years of a very temperamental machine I am now looking to upgrade and have decided to get a laptop. I understand that the industry choice for graphics are Macs but aside from my comfort with a PC, I致e already forked out the money for the programmes as a PC format so I値l be getting a PC laptop- at least for the next few years.

My problem is I知 not really up on the technical side of computers. Obviously I want a machine that will be able to handle me working with big files etc. and wont be slow, but I知 not sure how that translates into specific specs. Given that there seem to be a fair few designer goons I was wondering if anyone could make some recommendations, at least for type of graphics card I should be getting. I don't mind spending a fair bit of dosh as long as I'm getting something that will operate efficiently. Any help would be much appreciated.

Positive Housemouse
Jun 5, 2006

by Y Kant Ozma Post


What can one do with a major in photography, that can make about six figures? Is this even plausible?

Authentic You
Mar 4, 2007

Listen now this is your
captain calling:
Your captain is dead.


Hemlock posted:

This question is probably a little off topic but hopefully someone will be able to help me.

I知 currently an Art Foundation student (UK) looking to do a degree in graphics starting next year. This summer I bought Adobe Creative Suite Design Premium hoping to have a bit of a play with the programmes but, due to a hard-drive death on my PC, I have not yet had a chance to install it. The PC is still operating with one hard drive but having suffered several years of a very temperamental machine I am now looking to upgrade and have decided to get a laptop. I understand that the industry choice for graphics are Macs but aside from my comfort with a PC, I致e already forked out the money for the programmes as a PC format so I値l be getting a PC laptop- at least for the next few years.

My problem is I知 not really up on the technical side of computers. Obviously I want a machine that will be able to handle me working with big files etc. and wont be slow, but I知 not sure how that translates into specific specs. Given that there seem to be a fair few designer goons I was wondering if anyone could make some recommendations, at least for type of graphics card I should be getting. I don't mind spending a fair bit of dosh as long as I'm getting something that will operate efficiently. Any help would be much appreciated.

I'm a junior in industrial design, and I have a PC, even though most of the school runs on Macs. And to be more abnormal, I have an IBM (T-43). I've had it for almost two and half years now, and I love it. However, my edition has much better specs than factory standard, and that's really important for running stuff like Adobe. I have an ATI graphics card (forgot specs, I just know it's better than standard) and 2 GB of RAM, which is very, very nice. I can run Photoshop, InDesign, Solidworks, AIM, and Media Player all at once without any issues. As for processing power, I have a Pentium Centrino, but they've since moved on to Duo Core, which I hear is awesome, and definitely make sure to get Pentium over Celeron. None of this stuff is IBM exclusive, that's just what I have, and there just aren't too many other PCs in my class, a couple Dells and a Toshiba. Just make sure with whatever kind of PC you get, make sure it has good components, don't opt for a cheaper machince just because it's cheaper, and don't get a Gateway (a couple of my friends had them, and they just started wearing out and being weird after a year and a half). And back to the IBMs, one thing I like about them is that they are extremely durable.

Well, just offering some advice based on my experience. I'm no expert, but reserarching your options and taking quality over cost effectiveness is important when you're always running tons of heavy duty crap and working on 200+ MB files. Also, going into graphics, I'm assuming you'd probably dabble in things like Flash and After Effects too, which again would be very taxing on a computer not up to par. Yeah, definitely make an investement in a high powered machine.

twovansnotone
Jun 25, 2004


I'm not sure if this is exactly the place for this, but how does a person go about selling their art? I'm a part time math tutor, and make good money at it and enjoy it a lot - in other words I'm not looking for a JOB in which I take photographs - but I also love photography and would like to start selling some prints eventually. What are my options? I pretty much do digital only now, although I do have the complete resources (free of charge besides paper/chemicals) to print b/w up to about 18x24ish. Where do I go to start selling it? Do I just send my portfolio to lots and lots of galleries? Do I walk around to cafes and restaurants that hang local art and show them samples of my work? Do I post stuff on eBay? I have no idea how to go about getting started selling my art. I'm not interested in making huge money, but would like to get anywhere between $50 and $100 per print, depending on the exact size (8x10 up to 18x24, or maybe even larger). Can anyone help??

If it helps: I am located in Boston, MA, so any Boston goons with experience please chime in!!

gce
Oct 11, 2004


seadonkey posted:

how are you finding the job market for design in Portland gce? I would ask in a PM but you do not have it.

sorry about the late response, haven't checked the thread in awhile.

to be honest, it's a little frustrating right now. i'm dead set on working for Laika but haven't heard back a response from them. i'm definitely qualified for the position i applied for so it's hard to see what they're thinking. i made the decision to move to portland because i fell in love with the area and don't plan on moving anytime soon. that being sad, if Laika doesn't contact me soon, i'll be outside their offices wearing a sandwich board, handing out resumes.

Haggins
Jul 1, 2004



Over the last few months I've been getting serious about my photography and want to do everything I can to become a better photographer. Second to that I always wanted to learn how to draw and possibly paint. Right now my photography needs a lot of work on the artistic end (I can learn the technical side fine on my own) and as far as drawing skill and art appreciation goes, I'm about on par with a 3rd grader.

Aside from a small (recently increased) interest in photography, I feel I have been devoid of artistic expression for most of my life. I would like to change that and I think the best way of accomplishing my goal is to be put into a structured environment since I have motivational issues as a self learner. I have been considering taking classes at the local state university (UCF) that would apply towards to a BA/BFA in Art with a photography track (kind of like a photography minor I guess). I currently have a BS and a well paying job in the space program that I love, so I would be completing this degree out of pure personal satisfaction.

The advantage to having a degree and being gainfully employed is that I would not have to take any general education classes and I could take the classes at my leisure. The classes I would have to take consist of drawing, design, computer art, art appreciation/history, photography, and non photography studio classes of my choice.

Now I suppose I should get to the point of this post; is this a good idea? My expectation is that going through the degree will turn me into an artist if I put in the required dedication to complete the degree. Am I expecting too much? Is there another/better path to take? Am I doomed to becoming an old man who has never expressed himself artistically?

Finally, I'd love to hear from other goons who took up art for the first time as an adult. I am curious to know what you did to learn your artistic trade.

Georg LeBoui
Feb 10, 2006
Wearing a Monocle Since 1987

I was wondering if I could get some career advice.

Tomorrow I've got an interview for a freelance designer position and I'm kind of on the fence whether I should take it or not. Since it's would be my first freelance-based job I've got questions.

1. They mention it's a "full-time" position, which to me sounds weird considering I always thought "freelancer" is kind of a part time, sub contractor kind of thing. What does the "full-time" bit mean?

2. What is the general attitude towards this sort of work? Would I be going about business as usual, or would they put extreme (and perhaps unnecessary) pressure on me? Would I be sitting for days waiting for them to send me work? How likely is it that a freelancer would ever be offered a permanent position?

3. Are there any specific questions I should ask them during the interview?

Right now I'm on the fence about this. On one hand it sounds awfully temporary and I do have bills to pay, but on the other hand I think it would really help make my CV and portfolio look nicer and I've really been bored with my current job.

It would be great if you guys posted your experiences as well.

ceebee
Feb 12, 2004


Georg LeBoui posted:

I was wondering if I could get some career advice.

Definition of freelancer:
Also, freelancer. a person who works as a writer, designer, performer, or the like, selling work or services by the hour, day, job, etc., rather than working on a regular salary basis for one employer.

So basically you'll be working full time hours, you'll just be paid by the hour, day, job, etc.

I'm sure they'll choose how many hours you get paid/work and other variables depending on the workload.

I'd say go for it, it's always a great idea to get as many design referrals on your portfolio/resume as possible. After all it's a pretty difficult field to get into nowadays.

If they like you enough ask if they could hire you full on, I'm sure they can make up a salary for you...or just keep you being paid hourly.

._.
Jul 28, 2007

by Fistgrrl


I'd like to get a diploma or degree in Web Design/Web development while working full time. What are recognized online degree courses to achieve that? I've had a look at Open University UK but their degrees are more computing/IT oriented.

Deep Hurting
Jan 19, 2006


(Cross-posting this from Ask/Tell)

I've been applying to jobs for years and I've only been invited in for two interviews in that time. And the one that didn't reject me was an unpaid internship that they closed until next spring. I graduated with my New Media degree in June '06. I finished the tail end of another major in Creative Writing in March '07.

I don't think my resume needs work.

Here is my New Media design portfolio:
http://www.tnowicki.com/

Here is some of my work as a cartoonist, with which some of you may already be familiar:
http://www.mctcampus.com/cartoons/nowicki.htm

I am looking for work either in design, new media, or illustration (HAH!). The furthest I feel I can travel is to the Seattle area, not because I'm not willing to travel further, but because I have practically no money left and most employers aren't likely to pay move costs for an entry-level employee.

I honestly have no idea what the problem is. Anybody else think they can crack this riddle?

Cerebellum
May 15, 2007


Removed for privacy.

Cerebellum fucked around with this message at Feb 6, 2010 around 04:58

bunky
Aug 29, 2004



Alright, so I'm pretty new to the world of design, but this thread has inspired me to start up my portfolio and try to get my foot in the door. I'm pretty skilled in Photoshop considering I've never been formally trained. I need a few more solid pieces to round out my portfolio before I'd be comfortable presenting it to a possible employer, though. I have a few questions if anyone would be willing to answer.

Is the way I've constructed my portfolio professional enough? I figured a web page with simple navigation would be sufficient.

Are the pieces I've selected the type of thing most employers are looking for in a graphic artist? Like I said, I'll be adding at least 3-4 more pieces to it, preferably a photo restoration and some more print work.

Lastly, would it be a good idea to add a link to sources to get an idea of the work put into them?

lostatsea
Oct 23, 2005

Set Yourself On Fire

FULL-TIME JOB POSTING:

XHTML/CSS Rockstar

This is an on-site full-time position in San Diego. We're looking for a talented web developer to join our progressive team. We are open to applicants from anywhere, but please realize that this is an on-site position. We're not looking for freelancers at this time.

Send me a PM to get the application process started. Thanks!

/////////////////////////////////////

Here's all the info:

Qualifications:
- Proficiency writing semantic XHTML and tableless CSS without using WYSIWYG editors
- Thorough understanding of the parse tree and how CSS interacts with it (XHTML 1.0 Transitional standards)
- Applied knowledge about the DOM and JavaScript. Candidates must be able to build templates that accommodate JavaScript site functionality
- Working knowledge of a server-side language, preferably PHP, and/or programming theory is a plus
- 1+ years creating and modifying HTML/CSS templates from layered graphic files for commercial web sites in a professional, team-oriented environment
- Knowledge of cross-browser limitations
- Understanding of content management systems (CMS) capabilities, and experience working with them preferred
- Strong attention to detail
- Strong quality assurance (QA) skills
- Ability to meet deadlines and multitask
- Strong design aesthetic is a plus


Primary responsibilities:
As an HTML/CSS Template Specialist, your primary responsibility will be to:
- Create semantic, standards-oriented XHTML/CSS templates (cut-ups) based off of layered graphic files
- Collaborate with multiple departments to ensure that templates encompass design and functional requirements.
- Create templates that accommodate advanced programming and applications later in the project cycle.
- Ensure that templates are cross-browser and cross-platform compatible.
- Guide and assist interns and junior team members
- Work on multiple, concurrent tasks requiring stringent attention to detail and excellent time-management skills
- Perform quality assurance tests throughout the project life-cycle
- Perform maintenance tasks and content population when necessary
- Develop JavaScript when necessary
- When necessary, implement web sites that use our proprietary content management system (CMS)


Opportunities:
- Learn from and collaborate with a diverse, experienced team of web developers, designers and project managers
- Master and help implement next-generation Web technologies (Web 2.0 and beyond).
- Advancement opportunities available for self-starters who show good aptitude and initiative.

lostatsea fucked around with this message at Nov 25, 2007 around 04:51

Magman
Jul 23, 2004
Toppling the mighty and denting the hard.

Mistress Mouse posted:

Also, do copy places like Kinkos hire designated designers for business cards, etc. or do the retail employees also do the design? I'm hoping to avoid retail work as much as possible, as I've already done it and I really really hate it. If anyone has advice to offer about what sorts of places I should look up in my area and visit, please reply

I can answer this as I used to be a "Computer Services" guy for them. I did all their document creation and such. THEN they outsourced all their poo poo to India to a company named OfficeTiger, and then I was stuck making copies most of the time and occasionally doing design stuff. BEsides, most of the stuff I did at Kinko's was pretty mundane/crap work. You're not really allowed to spend much time on things and people rarely want anything well designed, they just want what they want (ie, their name and some crappy clipart on a business card).

My advice would be to try and do stuff for friends/family right now. Design some flyers or business cards or whatnot. You'll need some samples of your work or a portfolio to get just about any job that is design-related.

Magman
Jul 23, 2004
Toppling the mighty and denting the hard.

Not a double-post, but later on in the day I have some questions, so I figured I might post my thoughts.

First off, kudos to same for such a comprehensive OP. This is an incredibly valuable resource for CC, and it's really great to know there is more on the way.

As for my current situation/questions, I was recently cut loose from an Art & Promotions Director position at a local Apple Specialist due to the middle manager trying to work my rear end off as a stockboy and add additional mandatory hours that I was supposed to be at work regardless of my workload (IE, nothing to do? stay anyway just so we feel better). So if I get an interview for a position, what do I tell them when they ask me why I left (was fired after a single incident)?

So now I'm looking for work. I've tried to get some feed on openings via my social network to no avail. I've tried monster, careerbuilder and their ilk (but personally I don't think a lot of good jobs for designers make it to being posted there). Should I just coldcall creative agencies around town as my next step? Is there any way to make coldcalling more effective to try and get my foot in the door?

Secondly, I've recently acquired a domain name and have put my portfolio up. I'm working on designing the logo (which I'll use as my creative/freelance identity), but my first step was making sure I could have the name because making a logo for an unavailable domain name does me no good. I feel my portfolio could greatly be improved but my pieces show potential. I want to do some nice, newer work but I've run dry on clients (I usually have no problem charging $45/hr for freelance). So if I want more work, should I reduce prices for a short time (which I think comes off as a cheesy tactic, designers don't really run sales on their freelance prices)? I wouldn't mind doing some freebie stuff for certain people but now I'm unemployed and feel I should have SOMETHING coming in to help pay the bills (though I'm not in dire straights just yet).

On a related note, I would LOVE to add some more contemporary, businesslike design pieces to my portfolio, but as my town is very music business oriented, I usually end up getting a lot of work related to that. Any tips for how to capture some work from businesses as opposed to musicians/promoters/etc?

Here's the url:
https://www.clinkmedia.com/portfolio

Magman fucked around with this message at Nov 27, 2007 around 08:11

Glitch
May 6, 2002

zip zip zoom

Just wanted to throw some major gratitude your way for that resume template, same. You're pretty dead on in saying technical people will benefit from it. I couldn't design a good looking resume to save my life. Now I'm excited to show it off.

I only wish I could use a PDF like your sample so that I could be more picky about my fonts. I love the one you used, but most places I submit this to are wanting a Word document, so I have to limit my font choices to Windows staple fonts. Arial was the only one that seemed to behave enough for even the minimal typeface formatting I did. The layout more than makes up for it though.

Thanks again!

kibble
Dec 30, 2003
all kibble - none of the bits

Satellite posted:


With that, I've been looking into SCAD's online courses for a BA for Digital Media with concentration in Interactive Design. Tuition looks spendy, but I am beside myself with excitement when I look at their class catalogs. Does anyone have any experience with SCAD's distance learning program? I'm also looking into the Academy of Art - San Francisco's online course for a BA in New Media. Any input on the quality of either school's online courses?

I'm essentially wondering the same thing about the SCAD online program. I have an acquaintance that is a professor there, but he doesn't have much information about their e-learning program.

Also, I'm currently working on my Associates in Multimedia Technology (web design) from a local community college and am looking into options for a BFA in Visual Communications or Graphic Design in the Dallas area. UNT has a great program, and Texas Women's does as well, but is there anything besides the Art Institute in Dallas proper? I work full time and my husband is in law school here so moving just isn't an option for us now.

Can anyone tell me about the programs in the area?

kibble fucked around with this message at Nov 30, 2007 around 00:49

Graq
Feb 20, 2007

Dear people on the Internet who don't give a fuck: Mood: Frustrated

Defenestration, maybe you or another writer could help me on this one. I want to switch majors to something that will qualify for some admittedly nerdy goals; I want to write for tabletop RPGs, comic books, or video game scenarios. Does that fit under a MFA in Fiction or is something else more appropriate for any/all of these?

Defenestration
Aug 10, 2006

"It wasn't my fault that my first unconscious thought turned out to be-"
"Jesus, kid, what?"
"That something smelled delicious!"



Grimey Drawer

Graq posted:

Defenestration, maybe you or another writer could help me on this one. I want to switch majors to something that will qualify for some admittedly nerdy goals; I want to write for tabletop RPGs, comic books, or video game scenarios. Does that fit under a MFA in Fiction or is something else more appropriate for any/all of these?
An MFA in fiction will not help you do this. The vast majority of MFA programs are focused on producing literary fiction (think Updike), and even genre writers (like sci-fi) are just starting to become more accepted. I'm not sure how one goes about writing for game companies!

Are you an undergrad now? I strongly discourage undergrads from switching to creative writing majors. It's not marketable.

Gray Ghost
Jan 1, 2003


Edit: See new post.

Gray Ghost fucked around with this message at Mar 14, 2008 around 21:36

CherryBomb
Feb 20, 2006



I'm in school for animation, and have an idea for a DVD-based reel/resume combo. The menu would have sections for a demo reel, short films, artwork, and on-screen resume.

I haven't felt ready enough to send things to studios until recently, so I don't have much experience with the application process. I know it's more common to send reels through DVD anyway now, but is combining everything too much? Should I include a paper resume just in case? Have people been doing this sort of thing already?

I don't know what sending a reel/portfolio/resume hybrid would come off as, but I would hope it'd be something like "organized and simple", not "dumb and pretentious".

qirex
Feb 15, 2001



One piece of resume advice I'd give people is to have decent-looking Word and ASCII versions of your resume handy. A lot of bigger companies require one or the other for their HR systems.

If anyone has questions specific to UI design I can probably answer them.

pikacheney
Mar 14, 2002

I shall remember this moment: the silence, the twilight, the bowl of strawberries, the bowl of Xoo, and that chubby, chubby choona.

qirex posted:

One piece of resume advice I'd give people is to have decent-looking Word and ASCII versions of your resume handy. A lot of bigger companies require one or the other for their HR systems.

If anyone has questions specific to UI design I can probably answer them.

My design career recently took a turn towards UI design, which is something completely new to me. I realize this is a broad question, but what are some good resources for learning the basics? I've read "Don't Make Me Think" and enjoyed it but felt a lot of it was already obvious to me from my regular web design experience.

Secondly, what skill set should I be looking to develop? I'm fluent in XHTML/CSS but not JS. Should that be my next target?

Lastly, I also work in San Francisco as a designer. Are there any SF specific design resources you're familiar with? Conferences, groups, libraries, etc.? This question may not make much sense but I feel kind of isolated in my design career so far.

Thanks in advance!

Shnitzel
Jan 16, 2006
Mr. Pibb + Redvines = Crazy Delicious

I'm currently a Sophmore Graphic Design Major at the University of San Francisco.
Thus far, I'm pretty unhappy about how its been going.

For one, the school is off-the-loving-charts expensive.
Two, the staff and founders of the graphic design program were just fired and new douchebags are turning poo poo upside down.
Three, I can only take 2 graphic design related classes a year (1 per semester), and they are always jokes.

So, My question is, what should I do? I'm in such a whack situation, I feel like I'm dumping 40k a year (Yes, a YEAR) and being cheated of any type of real graphic design education (my Intro to GD teacher came to class late and drunk, haven't learned anything about typograpy).
The issue is, I also want a good general education. I want to learn poo poo like basic econ, buisness methods, psychology... in addition to things like illustration, web design, print design etc.

I'm not too opposed to art school, but like I said, I still want a general education. My home is in Seattle but I am currently living in San Francisco,

So what should I do? Should I stick it out or does anyone know of a good state university with a legit Design program?

CoffeeIsForClosers
Nov 26, 2004


Here痴 my situation: I知 about to turn 24 and graduate from UC Davis with a non-art degree. I致e recently realized that art, specifically cartooning/illustration is what I really want to be concentrating on at this point in my life. Is art graduate school at all realistic considering, other than a few drawing and painting classes, I have no background in art and no resume to speak of? To be honest, I知 far more interested in simply learning and growing as an artist, and am in a unique position where I can support myself through online poker, so actually getting credentials and/or a well-paying job aren稚 a priority. Are any art academy programs that are open to anyone worth my time? Or will the best option be putting together a portfolio and trying to get into a more selective school?
I would like to live somewhere in SoCal, can anyone tell me anything about the general art scene there?

deathbychimney
May 19, 2006


Shnitzel posted:

I'm currently a Sophmore Graphic Design Major at the University of San Francisco.
Thus far, I'm pretty unhappy about how its been going.

For one, the school is off-the-loving-charts expensive.
Two, the staff and founders of the graphic design program were just fired and new douchebags are turning poo poo upside down.
Three, I can only take 2 graphic design related classes a year (1 per semester), and they are always jokes.

So, My question is, what should I do? I'm in such a whack situation, I feel like I'm dumping 40k a year (Yes, a YEAR) and being cheated of any type of real graphic design education (my Intro to GD teacher came to class late and drunk, haven't learned anything about typograpy).
The issue is, I also want a good general education. I want to learn poo poo like basic econ, buisness methods, psychology... in addition to things like illustration, web design, print design etc.

I'm not too opposed to art school, but like I said, I still want a general education. My home is in Seattle but I am currently living in San Francisco,

So what should I do? Should I stick it out or does anyone know of a good state university with a legit Design program?

why don't you go to UW and get into the design program in the school of art . pay in state tuition.

Liselle
Oct 27, 2007

A purpose of human life, no matter who is controlling it, is to love whoever is around to be loved.

deathbychimney posted:

why don't you go to UW and get into the design program in the school of art . pay in state tuition.

Did you go to UW? I've been looking into UW and I am terrified of large class sizes coming from very small schools (live in Oregon, come from small magnet schools). Do they have a good program? I am not too depressed if I am missing out on some general education.. but I am a lit-nut and I wonder if I can find my place in the middle at UW.

Edit: I was specifically referring to their Design Program (VCD and such). What is it like? (this is to anyone with experience with UW)

Liselle fucked around with this message at Dec 27, 2007 around 01:16

magnificent7
Sep 22, 2005

THUNDERDOME LOSER


pikacheney posted:

My design career recently took a turn towards UI design, which is something completely new to me. I realize this is a broad question, but what are some good resources for learning the basics? I've read "Don't Make Me Think" and enjoyed it but felt a lot of it was already obvious to me from my regular web design experience.

Secondly, what skill set should I be looking to develop? I'm fluent in XHTML/CSS but not JS. Should that be my next target?

Lastly, I also work in San Francisco as a designer. Are there any SF specific design resources you're familiar with? Conferences, groups, libraries, etc.? This question may not make much sense but I feel kind of isolated in my design career so far.

Thanks in advance!
I was in your shoes 10 years ago. I was a print designer and got hired to be a UI Prototype designer. My job turned into a TON of javascript - but that's because we were developing multi-page interfaces and had to used javascript to simulate form entries and results based on those entries. I would say that yes, javascript is definitely important.

I loved Don't Make Me Think and still use the principles today. I think you should also work on the processes of the user (if you're developing multi-page interfaces, or interfaces that will change based on user input).

For brainstorming and working through the user's steps, go get some software called FREEMIND. It's free and it's the bomb. Really all it is is creative/brainstorming software, but once you've developed your mindmap, it can be exported as css/html which will help you develop your FRD (Functional Requirements Document).

In fact - let's talk about that for a sec. The FRD is the part I hated the most. You spend 3 months developing a user interface, and then you had to document every single piece of the interface for the java developers so they'd understand what each field does etc. It's necessary as much as it's a pain in the rear end.

Another thing about UI Design is that it's very similar to Information Design - so go check that out in your research... it's sort of the same thing - designing things to be used the way people expect them to be used.

Congratulations. When I got my job, at first I thought I would hate it since I was a graphic designer and the new job entailed so much programming, but in the end, it's made me a much more valuable member of the team because I can design AND program. (worth lots more bling bling).

magnificent7
Sep 22, 2005

THUNDERDOME LOSER


Tales Of Interviewing for a Designer

I recently went from designer to manager of my department, having to hire my own replacement as well as hiring another graphic artist. After reading a lot of questions in here about upcoming interviews and what is expected to get better money, I figured I'd share what I recently learned.

Money
I'm starting with this one first because that's the BIG question. After the company has decided to hire you, they take the salary range ($50,000 - $70,000 for instance) and consider how quickly you will be into your position working smoothly and productively. So how do we determine that? Experience in that field. This one is a biggie since graphic designers can work in drat-near any field. If you've spent the past 5 years designing print ads, even if they're the bomb, it will still take awhile to get you up to speed designing web sites.

Education vs. Experience
Which one gets you the job? Me personally, I'd take a good portfolio and 4 years experience over a great portfolio fresh out of 4 years in art school. Unless the graduate had a mind-blowing portfolio. Why? Because art students lack real-world knowledge. They've spent 4 years working in a vacuum, developing fantastic designs without a real budget, without the constraints of a real office. I've seen it time and time again - a great art student comes up with un-workable designs. They don't have the social graces of an office environment. It sucks, but that's the truth. I would say start freelancing right now while you're in school. Go work in an office somewhere somehow.

When I see a portfolio that contains only school assignments, the possibility of hiring that person drops a LOT. If they had just one or two real-world pieces from a paying client, it would improve their hire-ability because I can see that they can design great things, but they can also design within real client constraints. When I was in design school, they never touched on creative guidelines of a company. Monster.com has a 24-page book on how to design online ads for their company. 4 pages alone on logo placement. Same with AT&T, Lincoln-Mercury - ANY national company with a poo poo-ton of money invested in branding will insist that you never run their logo over certain colors, it has to be X picas/pixels from any other element, etc. Art students never seem to grasp that kind of thing too well.

So how can you get experience designing stuff for large corporations like that? I have no clue. Fake it. But that kind of stuff is necessary... go ahead, make the amazing full-color 2-page spread ads for pretend chocolate bars, but also design some quarter-page black and white ads for Wendy's or Target, and make it look as much like any other Target ad as possible. The hiring person (me) wants to see how creative you can be, but we also want to see how well you can stay inside the lines when it's necessary.

Suit? Jeans? Take out my nose ring? Shave my goatee?
These are up to you. But know your prospective employer and dress accordingly. If you're going for a corporation design department, wear a suit, lose the face metal and shave the facial hair. You can always bring all of those things back once you get the job. I did. I put my earrings in 2 weeks after I started at weather.com. Sure, that's a minor thing these days but it STILL might have affected their decision to hire me if I was up against Johnny Teamplayer.

Because in the end, that's what we're all looking for. A team player who can fall into step as quickly and painlessly as possible. I don't care if you can paint ciaroscuro and watercolors and do murals or carve statues out of rice kernels. Those are interesting things, but in the end, if it's between you and one other person who is just as qualified, just as creative, just as interesting - in the end, the final decision comes down to "will this person be a good fit?"

And in the design world, that has very little to do with education. If you have degree, it just doesn't matter like it would in accounting or architecture. I want somebody who is creative and has experience in my field already.

I hope this doesn't come off as a rant or a snobbish post. I remember every design interview I've been on, and I ALWAYS wondered what the gently caress were they looking for, what's the secret handshake to get the drat job. I don't know if I really answered that question in this post, but I hope I helped a little bit.

magnificent7
Sep 22, 2005

THUNDERDOME LOSER


IntoTheNihil posted:

Quite simply, i'm 17 and am interested in making a career out of graphic design. I'm decent at photoshop and fairly well off with art. What do I need to do schooling/job-wise to get my feet wet?
Go find people to work for. Go design flyers for churches, for anybody. Photoshop is okay, but to do print or web design you'll need to be good in Illustrator or Flash as well.

The best advice I got when I started out was to open up the nearest magazine to any page and recreate the ads on that page. Maybe not the exact same photos or fonts, but start out learning design by copying the basic layouts of ads that are right in front of you. That will teach you about curves lines shapes, font sizes, weight, leading the eye through an ad, how to draw attention to the most important thing in an ad, etc.

And as a bonus, the more of these you design, the more you'll be able to put into your portfolio - just be sure to tell them that you were copying somebody else's ad to learn how to use the application, etc. I got my first design job (a nightclub) by copying their ad out of the local paper. That's all I had for a portfolio was their ad. Which of course was their biggest question - "can you design our ad for us every week along with all the other stuff". As soon as I showed them the ad, I was in.

Nihiliste
Oct 23, 2005
The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.

The more I consider it, the more I think I need to build a new website for my photo business from the ground up. Anyone have recommendations on a starting place?

root a toot
Aug 7, 2006

mondo burger was manufactured and distributed to intentionally destroy the black community

Okay, I've done the whole art school bit and I'm graduating in May 08 with a degree in sculpture.

Does anyone know of any list of reasons to/no to go to grad school? Right now I'm all GOGOGOGOGO and the school of my choice is pretty psyched that I'm interested... but really, the only reason I see for going to is teach afterwards.. and I don't really know if I want to do that.

root a toot fucked around with this message at Dec 31, 2007 around 02:24

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CataraX
Feb 21, 2004

C8H10N4O2

I've just graduated with a degree in illustration and a focus on concept art (yea no one does that right? ) am based in San Francisco and really hoping to land a job at least partly related to what I've learned in school.

Anyone in the area or know someone in the area that could point a guy in the right direction? I've got a portfolio up at stimshock.com but I need to get it finished.

Is there anything I need to seriously revamp to up my chances? I know that I need to get my resume posted and finish my contact page, and i could probably benefit from culling a few images from my gallery to clean it up a bit.

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