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Erotic Crab
Oct 16, 2004

*BBRRRR* It's cold in here!

My current dilemma:

I've had a job as a graphic designer at one of the top theatrical design companies in Los Angeles for a few months now (very competitive), but I just got a letter of acceptance for the Art Center graduate program. I can't stay at the company while at school since the job demands 60+ hours a week. What do I do?

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ceebee
Feb 12, 2004


Erotic Crab posted:

My current dilemma:

I've had a job as a graphic designer at one of the top theatrical design companies in Los Angeles for a few months now (very competitive), but I just got a letter of acceptance for the Art Center graduate program. I can't stay at the company while at school since the job demands 60+ hours a week. What do I do?

See if they will take you back upon graduation and then decide. If you already have a great job, why do you need to go back to grad school?

Erotic Crab
Oct 16, 2004

*BBRRRR* It's cold in here!

Akaikami posted:

See if they will take you back upon graduation and then decide. If you already have a great job, why do you need to go back to grad school?

I want to teach university students at some point, but you need a graduate degree to do that. Other then that, I don't know why I want to go back to school; I just like school :\ Somebody tell me if this is a stupid idea or not...

oneplusone
Sep 1, 2007
For Sale

Erotic Crab posted:

I want to teach university students at some point, but you need a graduate degree to do that. Other then that, I don't know why I want to go back to school; I just like school :\ Somebody tell me if this is a stupid idea or not...

It is stupid. The opportunity cost is too great. Stay where you are.

Ecojiro Desu
Feb 19, 2005


I graduated from a University in subjects unrelated to design (Composition, Environmental Studies), and am entirely self-taught. None-the-less, I'm applying for Graphic Design jobs. Should I mention a year at an Art Institute, where I didn't earn a degree, in my resume? I dropped out because I wanted to pursue other things, though it sparked me creatively.

ceebee
Feb 12, 2004


Ecojiro Desu posted:

I graduated from a University in subjects unrelated to design (Composition, Environmental Studies), and am entirely self-taught. None-the-less, I'm applying for Graphic Design jobs. Should I mention a year at an Art Institute, where I didn't earn a degree, in my resume? I dropped out because I wanted to pursue other things, though it sparked me creatively.

I'd probably be more impressed that you were self-taught and had a good portfolio then "creatively inspired" by some crappy chain art school that you dropped out of after only a year.

Ecojiro Desu
Feb 19, 2005


The more I think about it I realize it would be incredibly unprofessional and flaky to include it.

Skelezoid
Mar 30, 2003

"I looked in her eyes and realised how rare it is to find someone willing to have sex with me."

mka posted:

What kind of a job market is there in creative CG industry for very technical people with some artistic talent? I'm graduating with Masters in computer science at some point and I'm considering specializing in some rendering/shading algorithm stuff etc. (this kind of thing) because I find it quite fascinating compared to the usual code monkey database maintenance web2.0 stuff. I've been doing 3D and other graphics stuff for ages but mostly as a hobby (e.g. here's something I put together last week). I haven't really considered it as a career option for a while because obviously I'm not in art school, but lately I've been thinking that combining my CG hobby with my technical background might be very interesting and (perhaps?) appealing to employers too.

So anyway, I don't really know much about the field. What kind of jobs are there for this kind of people and what kind of companies should I be looking at? Is there reasonable demand for this kind of work and how competitive is it? What kind of things would they be looking for in a candidate? Any useful links or other resources?

There are a TON of options out there for you. I would encourage you to apply to some film and video game companies, look under something like "technical artist" and you shouldn't have much problem at all getting a great position with that kind of talent and experience in programming.

oldyogurt
Aug 14, 2004

Son of a--


Muldoon

Ecojiro Desu posted:

The more I think about it I realize it would be incredibly unprofessional and flaky to include it.

Anyone else have a say on this? I'm in a very similar situation and am applying for jobs. I graduated from a top tier university for computer science, then went to art school for a year before dropping out, for a number of reasons (particularly time, money. But I could easily have stayed if I chose to). I thought having a diploma from a big name school on the record would counteract the notion of being flaky. Also, if you take your art school out of the resume, wouldn't they ask you what you were doing during that time?

b0nes
Sep 11, 2001


OK I have settled with going to school for art/design, and I live in California.
I have had problems deciding what is better, to go through a traditional 4 year arts degree, and then after I graduate take specilized CG/compositing classes, or go to school where I can take CG classes at the same time as traditional classes.

I know th eindustry is talent driven, I think I can hang, maybe I don't even need a degree, but I feel I should get one anyways.

kedo
Nov 27, 2007



Octorok posted:

From a recruiter's perspective, are there any significant advantages for a potential hiree to have both a BFA from a technical art school like AI and a BFA from a 4-year public university in a similar field?

Also, is it fairly common?

I've been dealing a lot with recruitment lately (although recruitment is such a military-sounding word), and I have to say that someone with a BFA from an art school and a BFA from a university will probably get looked at a little more closely than someone who just did one or the other.

A big problem in any art related field (or at least graphic design), is that you get a lot of job candidates who have spectacular portfolios, but are as dumb as bricks when it comes to anything besides their niche area. For example, we hired a front end web developer a few months ago whose portfolio was mind bogglingly awesome. However, it soon became apparent that he had virtually no communication skills. We had to proof read every single email he sent to clients as they were nigh unintelligible.

In short, the situation you're talking about makes you seem more well rounded to a recruiter. If I'm looking at two people with identical portfolios and one person has a university degree, the other just an art degree, I'd probably lean more towards the university person.






Of course maybe that's just me.

PunkRockTuba
Apr 29, 2007

Is that you, John Wayne? Is this me?


BabyArm posted:

We, the fun folks at Fossil (yes, the watch co.) are looking for interns to join our happy family.


----------------
Position Summary
Fossil Graphic Design & Web Design Internships - at Fossil's award-winning design studio! Fossil, a leader in the design, marketing and distribution of fashion watches, apparel, leather goods and eyewear has opportunities for full-time and/or part-time graphic design & web design internships for the fall semester in our headquarters in NE Richardson, Texas USA. You must be currently working on, or have a Bachelor's degree in Graphic Design, Visual Arts or related field. Our paid internship program will offer you hands-on experience in a fast paced, in-house environment. Our design studio of over 100+ creative people will provide you an enriched internship experience.

Fossil is an Affirmative Action and Equal Employment Opportunity Employer.

Requirements

SKILLS & EXPERIENCE: Internship candidates are encouraged to apply if able to meet the following requirements:

* Working knowledge of graphic design principles and possess both artistic and technical skills
* Knowledge in Adobe programs on a Mac platform.
* Web experience a plus, but not required
* The ability to effectively balance multiple projects and meet tight deadlines
* Strong communication skills
* The ability to work well with others and as part of a team
* The ability to follow direction well
* Currently working on or have a Bachelor's degree in Graphic Design, Visual Arts or related field.

Portfolio required at time of interview. We prefer interns who would be available for full days at least 2-3 days per week up to full time, 5 days a week. We are willing to work with school schedules. Please e-mail resume including samples of your work to Lori Massey at Lorim(at)fossil.com, and apply online at https://www.fossil.com. Please indicate your availability in your correspondence. No phone calls please. We will be accepting resumes through mid-November. VERY IMPORTANT-Please put your name in the subject area of your e-mail. Thank you!
----------------

I'll be happy to answer any questions not covered in the listing.


Does Fossil have any full-time openings available that are not internships? I am looking to go to Dallas after I graduate (I'm from Oklahoma City) so any info you can give me would be awesome.


Same, I was looking at your website, could you point me in the direction to where you got that floating menu or a place that has directions on how to make one? Thanks.

Zurich
Jan 4, 2008


Atheist Sunglasses posted:

Does anyone have any advice on how to make a PHYSICAL graphic design portfolio? I have an online one but recently decided that it would make sense to put together a physical version. Unfortunately, I don't know what size is appropriate or normal. Is there any special way it should be printed or presented? What about bindings or covers? Furthermore, is there supposed to be an introduction page or something or just straight up pages of work? Finally, how many pieces or pages should you have? Can you put more than one piece on one page?

Sorry about all the questions but I feel like this is going to cost me a shitload of money and I only get one chance. Here is my online version if you have any tips: https://www.razmiggetzoyan.com

thanks.
As far as I've ever read/been taught (take it with a pinch of salt, this is just what I've learnt)
- Mounted in A2 sleeves.

- I prefer black card for graphic design; had one person say they prefer grey or white card, but I like black.

- Don't worry about artwork being printed out smaller to fit into sleeves - if you have a portrait A3 poster and you are showing your portfolio landscape \/\/\/, just scale it appropriately. Multiple images on a sleeve are fine as long as the spacing is cool and its not too crowded. By that I mean multiple images from one project, not lots of random images thrown together on one page. Also consider how the layout works as a spread - having both pages of a spread with one project is more consistent than two projects on two pages making one spread.

- Keep the orientation constant - decide either landscape

- After 2 years of assuming ringbound portfolios are the best, I noticed it said in How To Be A Graphic Designer Without Losing Your Soul that people might prefer if the sleeves were loose, because interviewers can pick up the sleeves to look closer and stuff. I had an interview a few days later and got the place, I don't know if that says anything, but I like to think that not having my portfolio ringbound worked in my favour

- Have some sort of marking on one side of your portfolio so you know which side is the start. Again from How To Be A Graphic Designer..., you don't want to get into an interview, lay your big portfolio on the table, open it, realise its the wrong way, faff around turning it the right way around etc. I guess you could mark 'this way up' with chalk or tippex, but I just wrapped a tiny bit of clear tape around one handle of my portfolio so I can feel the correct orientation of it, yet its next-to invisible.

How much is a shitload?
Say an A2 portfolio is 30-60, depending on quality, leather vs. pleather vs. plastic, ringbound or not, etc; sleeves cost me about 2.50 for the really nice quality ones, then spraymount/doublesided tape and however much it costs for you to print A2/A3.

The Third Man
Nov 5, 2005

I know how much you like ponies so I got you a ponies avatar bro


Cross-posting this question from the CA forums because I'd love to get some input from you guys as well.

I've got a bit of an interesting situation, but I'll try and make it quick, since nobody cares about the gritty details. I'll be graduating next spring with a BFA from the University of Michigan, and I'd like to work in animation. Problem is Michigan does very little with animation, and what little experience I have has been from exploring myself and reading books/just watching animated films. I probably should have transferred to CalArts or something a year ago when I started thinking I'd like to focus in animation, but I ended up chickening out and sticking with the program here, even though I don't really like it. I figured I'd take out a bunch of loans and study hard for a couple years at a dedicated animation program.

Now I'm starting to do a bit of research this summer in preparation, but I really don't know a whole lot about schools. Ideally I'd like to be working for Pixar or Disney or Blue Sky, but then again, what aspiring animator doesn't? I know UCLA has an Animation Workshop, but that's 3 years long, and that's a lot of money to be in debt. I've read that a lot people go to big studios from the Academy of Art in SF, too, but again, I've read mixed things about the place, and since I will be going into debt for this, I want to get the most I can out of this. My situation is a little different than most people around here, since I've been at college for 4 years now, so I've been through a lot of the foundational courses.

In a nutshell, I'm looking for a program specifically geared towards animation that takes into a account the BFA I will already have, and preferably it's one that graduates a lot of students into the film industry. I'm interested in animation, not just 3d, so I want to avoid those places that just teach the technology and not the art. Thanks a lot for any advice you folks might have.

qirex
Feb 15, 2001



I use 2 cheapo Itoya portfolios, one tabloid and one letter size. For web stuff I feel it's as or more important to show in-process pieces, design documentation and the like for each project than it is to show the final "money shots". If you're doing mailers or anything that folds it's nice to have loose ones you can hand people.

I've heard a lot of discussion around physical portfolios and the general consensus is to not get too fancy. Nobody's going to complain if you have individually mounted and centered pieces but nobody's going to give you a job because you have one of those $400 ones made out of old road signs. Not that those aren't totally bitchin'.

General Ripper
Jul 6, 2004
OUT OF KEITH'S?!?

I'd like some general art school/career direction advice.

For some background, I've been writing and drawing my whole life. I never had any formal art instruction beyond grade 9 art, and I've been writing all through high school and through the few years of undergrad as a history major. Now, I want to pursue a creative career of some kind. I'm not set on any particular medium for sure, my main thing is that I've got stories I want to tell and want to get them out in whatever medium suits them best.

With that in mind, I want to go to art school, ideally animation, and eventually work toward film, or something. For financial reasons, full-time schooling is unfortunately not an option for the foreseeable future. For those reasons a good animation program is out of the question, also since I have no decent finished work to use as a portfolio and don't meet the requirements having no senior art credits in high school.

My big thing is that I'm 6 years out of high school, have nothing to show for it and hate everything I've done since then. I'm sick of being a loser and want to get better at the only thing I enjoy doing.

I've been drawing non-stop for the past year trying to get serious about art and have some pretty well-developed stories and concepts for comics and other things I eventually want to do. Now all I need to do is get/hone some skills. I'm scrounging and pulling my life together and managed to get into Art Fundamentals, a one-year program at Sheridan College in Oakville, ON. The reason I chose that program is because if I can't afford a more advanced 4-year program, I can at least afford one year. This way, I'll at least get some training where I had none before, build a portfolio, and can then reassess from there.

I'm also a big believer in taking responsibility for my own education and am trying to self-teach as much possible (drawing, digital art, reading up to try some DIY animation). I'm also of course constantly reading and learning here in CC.

So what I'd like to know is if you guys think this is the best course of action given my limited means, and what else I can try and do to get myself ready for animation, comics, film in the absence of formal instruction. If further schooling does become financially feasible, bet your rear end I'll be all over it. I want nothing more than to be back in school learning, but I just can't for now beyond this one-year program.

VVVV Yo! Anything I should know?

General Ripper fucked around with this message at May 17, 2008 around 01:42

SENSUAL DAD KISS
Oct 28, 2006

You are willing to die, you coward, but not to live.


Tortured By Flan

^^^ What up Sheridan Buddy

Anyway, I have a really stupid question. I have a few portfolio pieces that are digital, and I want them printed at a decent res (higher than 8x11, and glossy) my printer can't handle this, but I can't figure out how the hell to do this. I've looked up a few print shops but they only seem to print business cards and stuff. Am I just not looking hard enough?

Night Gaunt
Jan 9, 2007



Moist von Lipwig posted:

^^^ What up Sheridan Buddy

Anyway, I have a really stupid question. I have a few portfolio pieces that are digital, and I want them printed at a decent res (higher than 8x11, and glossy) my printer can't handle this, but I can't figure out how the hell to do this. I've looked up a few print shops but they only seem to print business cards and stuff. Am I just not looking hard enough?

I'm surprised you're having trouble with that actually. Most print shops should be able to do that easily. I've personally used Kinkos and Sir Speedy (US based, not sure if it's in other countries) and both have been fine. You should be able to ask to see paper samples. Just keep in mind if you do an odd size, you'll probably have to pay extra for them to trim it down unless you're a cheap bastard and want to trim it out yourself.

oneplusone
Sep 1, 2007
For Sale

Moist von Lipwig posted:

^^^ What up Sheridan Buddy

Anyway, I have a really stupid question. I have a few portfolio pieces that are digital, and I want them printed at a decent res (higher than 8x11, and glossy) my printer can't handle this, but I can't figure out how the hell to do this. I've looked up a few print shops but they only seem to print business cards and stuff. Am I just not looking hard enough?

Sup, I am a Sheridan graduate. If you want a good printer any of the ones I marked here http://maps.live.com/?v=2&encType=1...AC15AFB1372!118 should do. I can probably print them for you as well as I can print 13"x44" with archival color at home (Georgetown, 30 minutes from Oakville) and it looks stunning. It is expensive though.

ceebee
Feb 12, 2004


Moist von Lipwig posted:

^^^ What up Sheridan Buddy

Anyway, I have a really stupid question. I have a few portfolio pieces that are digital, and I want them printed at a decent res (higher than 8x11, and glossy) my printer can't handle this, but I can't figure out how the hell to do this. I've looked up a few print shops but they only seem to print business cards and stuff. Am I just not looking hard enough?

If you have a Staples anywhere near you they usually have a print center. I've printed posters up to 16x20"

oldyogurt
Aug 14, 2004

Son of a--


Muldoon

Yeah you can do it at staples, but on the Wide Format printer even if you are printing smaller images. The print quality is quite good and it's $8 per sq. ft. I printed some stuff there for an art show.

TheKingPuuChuu
Oct 13, 2005

Reality leaves a lot to the imagination.

Ok, I have an issue, and I would the advice of my fellow peers.

I graduated in December, and I got a job 2 months later, working for a Print shop in my town.

Yesterday, my boss told me that everything I learned in school was crap, and to just design whatever he says, basically breaking every rule that I had ever learned.

We get no business, but I am constantly riled on for not working fast enough or hard enough, which is odd to me, because we barely have any work.

What the hell do I do? I know that he is wrong, or else places like Pentagram, AIGA, or people like Sagmeister, David Carson, etc, would be poor. Its just confusing, I guess. Anyone else have these kinds of issues?

Skelezoid
Mar 30, 2003

"I looked in her eyes and realised how rare it is to find someone willing to have sex with me."

Sounds like you have a dick of a boss like a lot of people. I'd be looking for another job if you aren't already.

I've had one or two managers who didn't know much about design yet insisted that their word was final. I don't know if I'd recommend butting heads with this guy over any design issue, it sounds like he's looking for an excuse to fire you probably because business is slow and the store (i.e. him) isn't making much money. Make sure you get another job lined up as soon as you can.

Grimtooth
Dec 3, 2004

Fred Meijer has a posse....

I am about to graduate with a bachelor's degree in English with a focus in creative writing, and I'm trying to prepare myself for getting into graduate school for an MFA in Creative Writing.

I have no idea where to begin.

I would like to stay close to home (I basically live in Cincinnati), but even if I change my mind on this, I'm having a real problem even finding a list of schools that offer an MFA in Creative Writing. I'd love a map, but that's probably asking way too much.

Also, my grades suck. I spent the first four year of college grinding, and failing, my way through computer science before switching to my original dream of writing. So all my science and math grades are terrible and all my English classes are outstanding, situating my grade at a very blah 3.25. Obviously this GPA is none-too-impressive, so does anyone, especially anyone who has done it themselves, have any suggestions for getting into graduate school with so-so grades? To my credit, I am a member of the English honors society as well as a 2 year editor for my school paper, and will, by next year, have my work published in every literary publication my college has to offer but one.

I am also down for any book recommendations. I have bought one so far and it sucks so I'd really like to have suggestions before I blow any more money on this.

qirex
Feb 15, 2001



TheKingPuuChuu posted:

Ok, I have an issue, and I would the advice of my fellow peers.

I graduated in December, and I got a job 2 months later, working for a Print shop in my town.

Yesterday, my boss told me that everything I learned in school was crap, and to just design whatever he says, basically breaking every rule that I had ever learned.

We get no business, but I am constantly riled on for not working fast enough or hard enough, which is odd to me, because we barely have any work.

What the hell do I do? I know that he is wrong, or else places like Pentagram, AIGA, or people like Sagmeister, David Carson, etc, would be poor. Its just confusing, I guess. Anyone else have these kinds of issues?
Your first several jobs will suck. Just do the best work you can and get used to cranking stuff out as fast as possible. If anything look at it as training for dealing with irrational clients.

There is definitely a gap between academic design and what happens in the real world but crap is crap. Focus on improving so you can get a better job in the future.

General Ripper
Jul 6, 2004
OUT OF KEITH'S?!?

I posted some career direction questions a few posts up (here: http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...6#post343450394 ) and would really appreciate some input, so I'm bumping.

Villon
Oct 7, 2004



General Ripper posted:

I posted some career direction questions a few posts up (here: http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...6#post343450394 ) and would really appreciate some input, so I'm bumping.

Be more specific about what direction you'd like to go. I'd say something different for film vs. animation vs. comics. Comics you could just self-publish, at least to get started- do a zine. Film you could become a PA to start with and get to know people. Animation you could draw like crazy and then teach yourself Flash.

Zurich
Jan 4, 2008


How do you deal with wanting to be good at everything (or at least being able to bluff your way around most things) vs. spreading yourself too thin?

I'm on a graphic design course at the moment, completely print based, I got accepted onto a really good graphic design degree starting October (again as far as I know 99% print), but I find myself wanting to have some degree of skill in most areas.

I've known HTML and CSS for years, and I think basic web skill is essential for any discipline, and I dabble with Ajax and such.

The past few weeks I've become interested in motion graphics - Conrad Ostwald's showreel blew my mind. I've been getting up to speed on Cinema 4D - had it for ages but never did anything more than dabbling, and I've been playing around with Motion and After Effects at college. I can't see myself having a future in motion graphics; besides, the uni I'm going to has a great motion graphics program so my course would have nothing to do with it, but its fun.

This week I decided that enough was enough and I do, in fact, need to know ActionScript (2.0), so that's been occupying me for the past few days.

Its not even that I dislike or am bored with print - I love it, but I find more and more of my time is spent in Flash, Cinema 4D or Motion when I should be in InDesign or Illustrator...

What are your skillsets like? Very specialised or broad?

Skelezoid
Mar 30, 2003

"I looked in her eyes and realised how rare it is to find someone willing to have sex with me."

Zurich posted:

How do you deal with wanting to be good at everything (or at least being able to bluff your way around most things) vs. spreading yourself too thin?
You sound a lot like me. I started out in college pursuing a studio art BFA with emphasis and Graphic Design and Interface Design (Web). I was self-taught HTML/CSS/Flash at this point, but didn't get too into actionscript. After 2 years into the degree, I switch into an interdisciplinary degree that focused a lot more on 3D technologies; I was aiming to get into the film or games industry when I graduated. I never neglected my Graphic Design skills since that's the foundation for nearly every design field I explored.

It was a mixed blessing for me, mostly. I always wanted to learn something new, but my scatter-shot approach never allowed me to measured up to the amazing portfolios of people who dedicated their time to one specific area.

I studied lighting, texturing, polygon modelling and a multitude of other things not directly related to graphic design. I also learned PHP, SQL, actionscript and flash to keep up my development skills. However, the one common thread in my studies and exploration was "what does this do for communication and design?" I think it's important to use the technology as a tool and apply it where best appropriate. Companies will want to hire artists and designers who are more than just modelers or button-pushers. The more you can demonstrate your ability to use the technology effectively the better off you're going to be.

Right now, I'm up in Vancouver working on the sequel to a best-selling next-gen console game as an interface artist. I work mostly in Flash and rely heavily on my graphic design and art background. Before that, I was working as a 3D generalist for a small company doing scientific visualization. Both jobs are challenging and both had perks and drawbacks. The video game work is definitely a focused area. One hard lesson for me was to resist the urge to write actionscript for my own screens. Whenever I worked on Flash before this job, I was 100% responsible for all aspects of its design and execution, spending at least two-thirds of my time writing and debugging code. Because I can't dedicate 40 hours a week to code here, I'm not going to be as efficient as the guy next to me who can dedicate the time. So far I'm happy with that workflow but I still have side projects: my ongoing 3D car model and flash game I'm developing.

If I had to get another job in the next few months, I'd probably be best suited for flash and interface design. Because I can't devote 40 hrs a week to my 3D stuff, I'd probably be looking at an entry-level 3D artist position if I went into that area, even if I was able to spend the next few months really polishing my 3D portfolio.

TheKingPuuChuu
Oct 13, 2005

Reality leaves a lot to the imagination.

Giggity! I got the job offer from the other place, and it will completely benefit me more, I'll actually be doing work, instead of not having anything to do, and having my bosses see that as " not doing anything".


So what I'm wondering now is what's the best way to quit? I can only give a week, and my current work is very family friendly (Bosses are mom and son, and have a way too close Norman Bates thing going on).

General Ripper
Jul 6, 2004
OUT OF KEITH'S?!?

Villon posted:

Be more specific about what direction you'd like to go. I'd say something different for film vs. animation vs. comics. Comics you could just self-publish, at least to get started- do a zine. Film you could become a PA to start with and get to know people. Animation you could draw like crazy and then teach yourself Flash.

Well, specifically I'm wonderig if my taking art fundamentals at college is a good first step, having no prior training in anything.

Beyond that, for film, Ive gotten myself into a project with someone where we'll both be learning from the ground up, with comics, I've similarly gotten involved with an old high school friend and his (weird anarchist wacko) zine, and animation, well... that's why I'm trying to hone my drawing/general art skills then once I'm competent I'd like to experiment with flash like you say, also stop-motion once I get a new computer. If I end up doing well on any one path I'll maybe stick with that, but at this point nothing is for sure, other than school in september.

In my mind I'm taking the right steps, but I don't know anyone in real life who's into this stuff so I have no guidance beyond you guys. I just want to get on the right track early.

ferdinand
May 14, 2003
lo stupire me

TheKingPuuChuu posted:

Giggity! I got the job offer from the other place, and it will completely benefit me more, I'll actually be doing work, instead of not having anything to do, and having my bosses see that as " not doing anything".


So what I'm wondering now is what's the best way to quit? I can only give a week, and my current work is very family friendly (Bosses are mom and son, and have a way too close Norman Bates thing going on).

Tell your boss you quit, it's pretty easy. Tell him you can give a week if he wants it.

Chernabog
Apr 16, 2007



General Ripper posted:

Well, specifically I'm wonderig if my taking art fundamentals at college is a good first step, having no prior training in anything.

Beyond that, for film, Ive gotten myself into a project with someone where we'll both be learning from the ground up, with comics, I've similarly gotten involved with an old high school friend and his (weird anarchist wacko) zine, and animation, well... that's why I'm trying to hone my drawing/general art skills then once I'm competent I'd like to experiment with flash like you say, also stop-motion once I get a new computer. If I end up doing well on any one path I'll maybe stick with that, but at this point nothing is for sure, other than school in september.


In my mind I'm taking the right steps, but I don't know anyone in real life who's into this stuff so I have no guidance beyond you guys. I just want to get on the right track early.

As an animation student, the only advice I can give you if you are not going to enroll in a program is the following:

-Draw as much as you can, and If possible go to life drawing sessions.

-It might be expensive, but getting a light table (or building your own) would help a lot. The problem would be getting the software and hardware to shoot the pictures and see them continuously. I guess you could pull this off with a scanner.

-Get the animator's survival kit. It is an excellent book.

-Another book I like is Disney's the illusion of life because it explains the principles of animation really well and it has a bunch of other stuff like the history of animation and character design among other things.

-Learn anatomy.

-There will be a lot of things that you won't realize are wrong until someone else points them out. Since you won't have a teacher I guess that posting what you do online in an animation forum or something like that is your best bet so you can get feedback.

-Always research before you start. For example, if you are going to animate a horse go watch a lot of horse videos and look at how they move. If it is a human character maybe the research would be acting whatever the action is before committing to paper.

-Making thumbnails before you start can save you a lot of time, as it can give you a rough idea of what it will look like and you can make changes.

TheKingPuuChuu
Oct 13, 2005

Reality leaves a lot to the imagination.

Well, to update, I told my bosses I was leaving at the end of the week, and they got upset. My boss looked like he was going to cry, is that normal?

Anyways, thanks for the advice, all I know is that this week is going to be awkward.

PunkRockTuba
Apr 29, 2007

Is that you, John Wayne? Is this me?


I graduated in May and I am currently on the job hunt, i had 5 really good interviews with a big company in a city near me (still waiting to hear back) and ive emailed a few other big ad agencies in the same city. The place that I had 5 interviews with i dont think is going to hire me, i havent heard anything in 3 weeks and yes ive called to check up on the process. Is that a normal amount of time to wait, what should I do now?

I have also emailed 5 local companies friday and im waiting to hear back, a couple of them do really good work and the others are so so. Earlier somebody said your first few jobs are going to suck, I understand that because I am the new guy and I have to learn everything. If I end up working at a place that does so so work, how much will that effect me when I try to get a better job in a few years?

I dont want to have a professional portfolio of bad work, but do most places understand that it was a first job and know that you arent doing the greatest work?

I want to get a job, but I am not going to rush it because I would like to get the best job I can and not just take whatever gets offered first.

Ive shown my portfolio to a lot of people at a big design conference, and had 5 interviews with that big company, so I am comfortable showing my work. I think I have a good variety of stuff in my portfolio, show a lot of styles, and I know my typography is good. Is there any other advice anybody can give about searching for the first job?

Thanks for any help

(hopefully all of that makes sense, its 2 am and im tired. if it needs clarification please let me know)

PunkRockTuba fucked around with this message at May 27, 2008 around 07:19

General Ripper
Jul 6, 2004
OUT OF KEITH'S?!?

TheKingPuuChuu posted:

Well, to update, I told my bosses I was leaving at the end of the week, and they got upset. My boss looked like he was going to cry, is that normal?

Anyways, thanks for the advice, all I know is that this week is going to be awkward.

Don't worry about that boss. You're moving on to bigger and better things and you were nice enough to give some notice. If they don't like it, that's their problem, not yours. Save your sense of loyalty for better employers.

ButteryNoodles
Jul 18, 2006
Deliciously satisfactory.

So I got a job interview at a marketing firm, and they've asked me to bring hard copy samples of my web work. Now I can understand bringing in hard copies of print, illustration, and photo work, but this is kind of a first. So far my attempts at getting decent looking reflections of what I see on my screen, versus what gets printed out has been pretty fruitless. If the lines and text aren't crisp, then the colors look off, and vice-versa.

Is there some kind of guide out there for this sort of thing, or should I just go to Kinkos?

Edit: I'm sure they'll understand the reasons for differences in the printed versions versus the online versions, but you know "best foot forward" and all that crap.

ButteryNoodles fucked around with this message at May 27, 2008 around 20:21

Scudworth
Jan 1, 2005

When life gives you lemons, you clone those lemons, and make super lemons.


Dinosaur Gum

General Ripper posted:

Well, specifically I'm wonderig if my taking art fundamentals at college is a good first step, having no prior training in anything.


Oh don't you worry, Art Fundamentals will kick your rear end and show you exactly what you're made of by the end. You'll definitely have a better idea of which way you want to go when you're done. Fundies was the hardest school year of my life, harder than the multiple years combined in Illustration. Its workload alone is enough to make you question whether or not you could truly draw/create for the rest of your life. I recommend it.
Don't expect to get too far on all those side projects though, not during the school year. Don't expect to have any kind of life outside school & homework.
Ahhh, fundies flashbacks.

manchego
Feb 16, 2007

MEANWHILE,

manchego posted:

I'm applying to several positions with User Experience Designer/Interaction Designer/Glorified Name for a Web Project Manager. I would appreciate any feedback on the documents that I'm applying to these jobs with.

The industry is the creative/design/web industry, so the cover letter isn't going to be cookie cutter. I'd like to ensure that my peripheral skills are marketed well as well as coming off as a "he knows his poo poo" person for the core competencies.

Oh, and portfolio that is in the process of a redesign and overhaul: https://www.webgoblin.net

http://www.box.net/shared/86x3otg08w

http://www.box.net/shared/7p38z3gws8
If it's ok, I'd like to crosspost this to get some industry-specific feedback on my resume and cover letter.

I appreciate it.

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Zygar
Aug 6, 2005
I LEIK TRAINZ!!!1

I'm 17.

Been using Photoshop for about 5 years, XHTML/CSS for about 2. Never had any formal tuition in design theory itself, most of my high-school classes just focused on the "how" with less emphasis on the "why." So far I have been trying to teach myself as much as I can in regards to usability, colour, typography and everything else involved in web and graphic design, as I think this is where I want to go with my life. I registered a company and have been busy setting everything up and doing some low end work for friends of the family, as well as teaching myself content management systems like Drupal.

I think I'm getting a better feel for design now, as the difference between my work 18 months ago and my work now is massive, I churned out some real rubbish back then. I still feel like I know more "how" than "why", but I can feel a definite improvement and I'm less intimidated by the idea of showing my work to anybody else.

To get some practice in, I've been working on a personal site, (still hammering away on this particular concept,) as well as a site for a non-profit, a plumber (god I hope he sends me a new picture for the heading soon) and my Dad. (the Circumcisions page is slightly NWS.)

My plan is to freelance while I'm going through university and hopefully have a nice portfolio by the end of things. Right now I'm finishing off my final year of high school and I was hoping that I could get some feedback on my work so far, particularly the design aspect of it, and based on the level I'm at, book recommendations, good sites/articles to read, etc. By the time I start university next year (I'm not sure exactly what I'm going to pursue here either, what is "good" for web design?) I want to have a solid, self-taught grounding in design-theory to go with my technical experience.

Thanks in advance!

EDIT: If it helps, one area I feel particularly weak in is traditional media, especially and most importantly drawing - it's a vicious cycle, I suck at it, so I don't do it, so I never get better. My sense of perspective is terrible. I can put together a site structure and toss together a logo but fall flat when it comes to sketching something or doing vector art. Since I want to branch out and learn to draw/illustrate, where's the best place to start?

Zygar fucked around with this message at May 29, 2008 around 08:48

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