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General Ripper
Jul 6, 2004
OUT OF KEITH'S?!?

Scudworth posted:

Oh don't you worry, Art Fundamentals will kick your rear end and show you exactly what you're made of by the end. You'll definitely have a better idea of which way you want to go when you're done. Fundies was the hardest school year of my life, harder than the multiple years combined in Illustration. Its workload alone is enough to make you question whether or not you could truly draw/create for the rest of your life. I recommend it.
Don't expect to get too far on all those side projects though, not during the school year. Don't expect to have any kind of life outside school & homework.
Ahhh, fundies flashbacks.


Perfect that sounds like what I was looking for

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Defenestration
Aug 10, 2006

"It wasn't my fault that my first unconscious thought turned out to be-"
"Jesus, kid, what?"
"That something smelled delicious!"



Grimey Drawer

Grimtooth posted:

I am about to graduate with a bachelor's degree in English with a focus in creative writing, and I'm trying to prepare myself for getting into graduate school for an MFA in Creative Writing.

I have no idea where to begin.

I would like to stay close to home (I basically live in Cincinnati), but even if I change my mind on this, I'm having a real problem even finding a list of schools that offer an MFA in Creative Writing. I'd love a map, but that's probably asking way too much.

Also, my grades suck. I spent the first four year of college grinding, and failing, my way through computer science before switching to my original dream of writing. So all my science and math grades are terrible and all my English classes are outstanding, situating my grade at a very blah 3.25. Obviously this GPA is none-too-impressive, so does anyone, especially anyone who has done it themselves, have any suggestions for getting into graduate school with so-so grades? To my credit, I am a member of the English honors society as well as a 2 year editor for my school paper, and will, by next year, have my work published in every literary publication my college has to offer but one.

I am also down for any book recommendations. I have bought one so far and it sucks so I'd really like to have suggestions before I blow any more money on this.
Do not worry too much about your grades. Great grades might have helped you get scholarships, but for creative writing programs, 95% of the decision is your writing sample.

[igg now, will add more later. sorry I didn't see your post until like two weeks later]

The Mechanical Hand
May 21, 2007

as this blessed evening falls don't forget the alcohol


Anyone have anything they can recommend for learning more about typography? I took a class on it but I want to really get into it and get all that good stuff down perfectly. I've been reading "Thinking with type" by Ellen Lupton but I want to know if there's any other books or sites or whatever I should check out to help me out.

Mansurus
Aug 7, 2007

by The Finn


I'm really interested in applying to the University of the Arts, in Philadelphia. Ideally, i'd like to attend in the Fall 2008 semester - but i've procrastinated. Is it too late?

I'm set to obtain my AA at the end of the summer, and i would like to leave her as soon as possible. I'd prefer not to wait until the Spring semester, but is that my best option?

Also, i'm somewhat worried about the portfolio requirements. I'd like to say i'm talented and well-rounded when it comes to photography - but i have absolutely no skill or experience with any other artform. I noticed Uarts requires at least two mediums in their portfolio, and recommends three. What should i do? How badly will this impact me?

Before my interest in Uarts i was looking into Pennsylvania College of Art and Design. Their program seemed good, and they were a little cheaper than most private art schools (14.4k). However, they required drawing in their portfolios, and are awaiting a second review from me. Also, they seemed really small - and the Lancaster area seems a bit dead as far as opportunities go.

Mainly, i would just like to be within two hours of Wilkes-barre. Those two schools are the ones i've been focusing on so far.

So - if anyone has any wise words concerned University of the Arts, Pennsylvania College of Art and Design, or portfolio requirements - i'd be eternally grateful.

Adversary
Jun 9, 2007
Not sick, but not well

The Mechanical Hand posted:

Anyone have anything they can recommend for learning more about typography? I took a class on it but I want to really get into it and get all that good stuff down perfectly. I've been reading "Thinking with type" by Ellen Lupton but I want to know if there's any other books or sites or whatever I should check out to help me out.

The Elements of Typographic Style by Robert Bringhurst is arguably the bible of typography. If you can only get one book, I'd seriously recommend picking it up. "Grid Systems" by Joseph Muller Brockman is another text that's certainly worth getting your hands on, although it doesn't deal solely with type. There's also tons of good typography resources on the net.

Zurich
Jan 4, 2008


The Mechanical Hand posted:

Anyone have anything they can recommend for learning more about typography? I took a class on it but I want to really get into it and get all that good stuff down perfectly. I've been reading "Thinking with type" by Ellen Lupton but I want to know if there's any other books or sites or whatever I should check out to help me out.
As Adversary mentioned, 'Grid Systems in Graphic Design' by Joseph Muller-Brockmann will kick your arse, make you rethink what you know about typo/graphic design and make you an amazing designer. Probably. As the title suggests it concerns grids and layout more than typography per se, but there's a shitload of Neue Grafik ranting about objectivity and transparency in typo design which is cool.

For a history and overview of type (and not necessarily how to apply it) I love 'From Gutenberg to Opentype' by Robin Dodd.

The only other type book I have to hand at the moment is 'Lettering' by Antonio and Ivana Tubaro - pretty concise but it gets every aspect of type design down to a T, nice quick reference for when you don't want to be looking through a massive book.

I have a txt somewhere of all the books I've read at the library and whatnot, I'll try and hunt that down for you.

Have you seen Helvetica?

The Mechanical Hand
May 21, 2007

as this blessed evening falls don't forget the alcohol


Adversary posted:

The Elements of Typographic Style by Robert Bringhurst is arguably the bible of typography. If you can only get one book, I'd seriously recommend picking it up. "Grid Systems" by Joseph Muller Brockman is another text that's certainly worth getting your hands on, although it doesn't deal solely with type. There's also tons of good typography resources on the net.

Thanks, I'll check these out.

Zurich posted:

I have a txt somewhere of all the books I've read at the library and whatnot, I'll try and hunt that down for you.

Have you seen Helvetica?

Thanks, I'd definitely appreciate that. You can PM me the list if you find it. And yeah, we watched it in the typography class I took. I loved the class and the professor was great and definitely helped me get a good understanding of typography but I want to learn a hell of a lot more about it so I'm trying to find more reading to do.

amirite
Oct 26, 2005
I am a chair. John Wayne.

Hey I'd love to get a copy of that TXT file as well if you don't mind. Funny, the past couple days I have been thinking of where I should start to dive deeper into Typography as well... all I've really done so far is explore some blogs, but I'm looking up where I can find a copy of Helvetica right now, and the books would be a huge help as well. Thanks in advance!

district 12
Oct 19, 2004

muscles griffon~~

What makes a good graphic design program in a school? Internships? Foundations courses? What should I look for? I have applied to two schools I want to attend, one costs more, the other seems to not offer internships as part of the curriculum. I realise that the portfolio is what matters most when one graduates and is looking for a job, and students in both schools churn out some really good looking stuff, but I don't know how to decide exactly.

Any advice, please?

Zurich
Jan 4, 2008


amirite posted:

Hey I'd love to get a copy of that TXT file as well if you don't mind. Funny, the past couple days I have been thinking of where I should start to dive deeper into Typography as well... all I've really done so far is explore some blogs, but I'm looking up where I can find a copy of Helvetica right now, and the books would be a huge help as well. Thanks in advance!
Soon as I can mate, sorry for keeping you waiting (final project deadline is Monday, can't go trawling through all my HDs at the moment)

district 12 posted:

What makes a good graphic design program in a school? Internships? Foundations courses? What should I look for? I have applied to two schools I want to attend, one costs more, the other seems to not offer internships as part of the curriculum. I realise that the portfolio is what matters most when one graduates and is looking for a job, and students in both schools churn out some really good looking stuff, but I don't know how to decide exactly.

Any advice, please?
Inspiring teachers that you can relate to as a friend rather than an authority figure or a talking book. You can't judge that from an open day, though.

Other than that, graduating students' work - you can have bad students with great teaching churn out bad work, and great students with hopeless teachers churning out great work, but by and large I'd hope that the better the work you see on a course would reflect an overall better quality of teaching.

(and tutors' links with agencies to get internships at and businesses to give you live briefs obviously help, but if you rely on a tutor to put contacts on your desk then stop now.)

district 12
Oct 19, 2004

muscles griffon~~

Zurich posted:

Inspiring teachers that you can relate to as a friend rather than an authority figure or a talking book. You can't judge that from an open day, though.

Other than that, graduating students' work - you can have bad students with great teaching churn out bad work, and great students with hopeless teachers churning out great work, but by and large I'd hope that the better the work you see on a course would reflect an overall better quality of teaching.

(and tutors' links with agencies to get internships at and businesses to give you live briefs obviously help, but if you rely on a tutor to put contacts on your desk then stop now.)

So if I prefer the overall aesthetic of what one school's students are producing, would it be safe to say that I'd probably like that school better?
I definitely would not rely on my school to get me contacts but I was thinking that it may be easier to get an internship if the school has good connections with design firms and businesses. Knowing the school has good students that do good work would give me an advantage, maybe? Or am I wrong in thinking that?
Both schools are relatively small (though one is an actual "art school" and the other is an art college within a larger university) and I don't imagine personal attention to be a problem. Right now I have been working very hard to get into the more costly art school while ignoring the less costly one, but now that I have seen what students at the latter have produced I am intrigued.

Zurich
Jan 4, 2008


Not necessarily, because the teachers could be dickheads

Honestly its a huge huge gamble, you just have to make your own decision on which you think will suit you better.

When I applied for uni my choices were-
#1 - Creme de la creme, pretty much top tier, can't think of anything in Europe that would be considered a better design course than it (I'd say places like Central St Martins would be on the same level; Miami Ad School doesn't count because its not really for undergraduates and its really expensive). 800+ applicants for 30 places, suburban London (so not fantastic nightlife, but I'm going there to work not drink). Amazing atmosphere, not top tier facilities but nothing to moan about. Great links.

#2 - Really good place in Central London. Top notch facilities & free evening enrichment fashion photography, printmaking, really nice letterpress place. Possibly easier odds - ~2000 applicants for 200 places. Central London so great links. Impression at the Open Day was that there were some people who didn't take it so seriously, but I could be wrong. Shady area.

#3 - Really really good advertising course, didn't go to the Open Day but my friend said it looked good. About 45 minutes on the train from London so still good links. No matter how fantastic the course is, the rest of the uni is regarded as utter poo poo as far as I know .

#4 - In another big city, but crucially not London. One of my tutors laughed in my face when I suggested moving out of London for the reason that all the design jobs are in London and the standard of teaching at this place would be lower. Emailed a few agencies in that city and they told me to stay in London. Seemed like a bit of a party place, which I might miss, but whatever. Not convinced on the quality of work.


Yeah, I went for #1, got in, great. Terribly difficult decision though, lost sleep over it. Just go with your gut feeling.

district 12
Oct 19, 2004

muscles griffon~~

Zurich posted:

Not necessarily, because the teachers could be dickheads

Honestly its a huge huge gamble, you just have to make your own decision on which you think will suit you better.

When I applied for uni my choices were-
#1 - Creme de la creme, pretty much top tier, can't think of anything in Europe that would be considered a better design course than it (I'd say places like Central St Martins would be on the same level; Miami Ad School doesn't count because its not really for undergraduates and its really expensive). 800+ applicants for 30 places, suburban London (so not fantastic nightlife, but I'm going there to work not drink). Amazing atmosphere, not top tier facilities but nothing to moan about. Great links.

#2 - Really good place in Central London. Top notch facilities & free evening enrichment fashion photography, printmaking, really nice letterpress place. Possibly easier odds - ~2000 applicants for 200 places. Central London so great links. Impression at the Open Day was that there were some people who didn't take it so seriously, but I could be wrong. Shady area.

#3 - Really really good advertising course, didn't go to the Open Day but my friend said it looked good. About 45 minutes on the train from London so still good links. No matter how fantastic the course is, the rest of the uni is regarded as utter poo poo as far as I know .

#4 - In another big city, but crucially not London. One of my tutors laughed in my face when I suggested moving out of London for the reason that all the design jobs are in London and the standard of teaching at this place would be lower. Emailed a few agencies in that city and they told me to stay in London. Seemed like a bit of a party place, which I might miss, but whatever. Not convinced on the quality of work.


Yeah, I went for #1, got in, great. Terribly difficult decision though, lost sleep over it. Just go with your gut feeling.

Well! Congratulations on all that. I spoke with advisors from both schools; one advisor cc'd the head of the graphic design department to my email and she ended up contacting me directly. She answered all my questions and more, so it cemented my decision to attend the cheaper school. Apparently cheaper does not mean lesser! She mentioned that their typography program is excellent which is what really interested me; I love typography and all it entails.
Are you still in school currently? I'm getting ahead of myself here but... How difficult would it be for an international student to get an internship in London? Ultimately that's one of my academic goals while in school. Study abroad while [possibly] making money? Awesome! London's my dream city as well; I visited a while ago and have been "homesick" ever since. So it really is an important objective for me. Is there a lot of exchange for that, or does it seem like agencies tend to go for the more local folk?

Zurich
Jan 4, 2008


district 12 posted:

Well! Congratulations on all that. I spoke with advisors from both schools; one advisor cc'd the head of the graphic design department to my email and she ended up contacting me directly. She answered all my questions and more, so it cemented my decision to attend the cheaper school. Apparently cheaper does not mean lesser! She mentioned that their typography program is excellent which is what really interested me; I love typography and all it entails.
Awesome. Do you have a chance to visit any of the schools? I guess its different in America with it being so massive, but here we tend to visit a load of places before applying.

Out of interest, how much do you mean by 'cheaper'? Our unis are 3145/year (for 3 years, not 4) so I have no idea what ballpark you're talking.

district 12 posted:

Are you still in school currently? I'm getting ahead of myself here but... How difficult would it be for an international student to get an internship in London? Ultimately that's one of my academic goals while in school. Study abroad while [possibly] making money? Awesome! London's my dream city as well; I visited a while ago and have been "homesick" ever since. So it really is an important objective for me. Is there a lot of exchange for that, or does it seem like agencies tend to go for the more local folk?
Oh yeah I'm still in school, I'm not some high flying art director (yet) - I'm just sharing what I've picked up.

Getting an internship wouldn't be any harder than anywhere else in the world - as long as you are good enough.

Studying here I'm not sure about - if you wanted it to go towards your degree credits or something I assume it would have to be formally done between the universities - there's this ERASMUS thing, that's all I've heard about though. Most unis seem to advertise study abroad opportunities in their prospectuses.

district 12
Oct 19, 2004

muscles griffon~~

Zurich posted:

Awesome. Do you have a chance to visit any of the schools? I guess its different in America with it being so massive, but here we tend to visit a load of places before applying.

Out of interest, how much do you mean by 'cheaper'? Our unis are 3145/year (for 3 years, not 4) so I have no idea what ballpark you're talking.

Oh yeah I'm still in school, I'm not some high flying art director (yet) - I'm just sharing what I've picked up.

Getting an internship wouldn't be any harder than anywhere else in the world - as long as you are good enough.

Studying here I'm not sure about - if you wanted it to go towards your degree credits or something I assume it would have to be formally done between the universities - there's this ERASMUS thing, that's all I've heard about though. Most unis seem to advertise study abroad opportunities in their prospectuses.

They're both in the city I'm currently living in and grew up in so I'm very familiar with both campuses. It's cheaper as in 3.5 years at $6000/yr vs. 4 years at $20000/yr. Very significant difference, but if the program for the more expensive school was better, then I'd swallow that debt. I'll look into the ERASMUS thing. I did look into study abroad programs through the school but they only one they really advertise is a semester in Peru which really isn't all that interesting to me. I much prefer Europe and I'd much prefer [south] England. The advisor told me that there is a $2500 travel grant that I can compete for (and many GD students have already won) so I guess we'll see about that. I don't necessarily need to study abroad, I'd much rather get work in.

Thanks so much for your responses! You've been very helpful, I really appreciate it.

j4on
Jul 6, 2003
I fix computers to pick up chicks.

HorseDickSandwich posted:

I dont want to have a professional portfolio of bad work, but do most places understand that it was a first job and know that you arent doing the greatest work?


One thing that you need to understand is that most companies don't care about "effort" or "potential". Unlike schools, which try to compensate for bad circumstances, companies just hire the guy who they think will make them the most money.

That said, it's certainly better to work than not work, and there's no reason that a bad shop should limit your own potential--worst case, you can easily do your own stuff on the side, pro bono for good causes if you have to.

Hatter106
Nov 25, 2006

bolshi fight za homosex

I'm finishing up a year of Art Fundamentals at my provincial community college (NBCC Miramichi) and it's been pretty drat educational for the money. I was planning to continue on for their two-year classical animation course, but lately I've been thinking that the 3D industry is where I'd rather be. I'd love to do special effects, CG environments, etc. for Hollywood movies. Thing is, I have no experience with 3D programs. I have solid art skills, and I'm not too bad with Photoshop and Illustrator, but I've never designed or animated a 3D object.

Now, I'm willing to learn, of course. But what I'm debating is whether to take both the two-year classical animation program and then the two-year CG graphics course. I'm 23, so I'm not in a huge rush to graduate. I'm thinking that being able to do both environmental and character CG animation would make me more appealing to prospective employers, rather than just the CG graphics course itself (which focuses mostly on Maya & 3ds Max, but doesn't have courses devoted to the principles of animation - timing, character design, layout, etc.)

Our classical animation course here is quite intensive, though - it's designed to produce animators who can move directly into the industry. Since I'm not too enthusiastic about said industry, I'm not sure I could muster the enthusiasm to make it through two years of 14-hour-days hunched over an animation table. And cartooning has never been my strong suit, anyways.

So my questions would be: Is it fairly easy to get a handle on working with CG? How hard is it to break into the industry? Do any Hollywood FX houses hire new graduates? Would someone with a classical animation background have a huge leg up over those with only straight technical animation training? And is it enough to only be taught Maya and 3ds Max?
Thanks!

(This is kind of bewildering for me - I've gone the whole past year confident that I was going to move onto the animation program... but now I'm looking at maybe another two years on top of that. Five years total here was more than I was expecting. But on the other hand, I don't want to enter the working world half-baked.)

Hatter106 fucked around with this message at Jun 10, 2008 around 04:33

PunkRockTuba
Apr 29, 2007

Is that you, John Wayne? Is this me?


j4on posted:

One thing that you need to understand is that most companies don't care about "effort" or "potential". Unlike schools, which try to compensate for bad circumstances, companies just hire the guy who they think will make them the most money.

That said, it's certainly better to work than not work, and there's no reason that a bad shop should limit your own potential--worst case, you can easily do your own stuff on the side, pro bono for good causes if you have to.


Thanks for the advice, I'm about to start freelancing so that should (hopefully) give me some decent work. I'm hoping to start getting some interviews with companies as well, I'm trying to be a little picky but not too picky about the first job. I need some experience on my resume before I can land a good one.

momtartin
Jul 22, 2007
Not to be confused with poptartin

So here's my dilemma/issue:
I graduated last year from a school in Ohio with a degree in Visual Communications, where they "taught" us a variety of different avenues to creating an ad, ie Print, Web, Video, etc., but couldn't find a job at all (doesn't help that Ohio has a bad job market), and so I ended up in retail. Fast forward 8 months and I moved down to Raleigh, NC with my retail job, since the job market is better down here, and I'm starting to search for a marketing/advertising job that has something to do with design (Print layout, video editing, photography, etc.)
Now I had to go through 3 co-ops to get my degree, and only 2 of them I felt were worth anything, but one of them was on campus. Other than that, and my classwork, I don't have much portfolio work that was worth showing/not from a class project, which is frustrating. I've got a portfolio site that I created from scratch in Flash that I'm working on updating as we speak. I'm teaching myself more and more about Flash and HTML/CSS as I go, but I don't have a lot of portfolio work that isn't from school.
Is that going to hurt me in this job search and what can I do to improve my options/chances of getting a job that I actually want? Keeping in mind I know absolutely nobody down in Raleigh yet, so networking is proving a little difficult.

Any suggestions/tips would be great.

Villon
Oct 7, 2004



Hatter106 posted:

I'm finishing up a year of Art Fundamentals at my provincial community college
So my questions would be: Is it fairly easy to get a handle on working with CG? How hard is it to break into the industry? Do any Hollywood FX houses hire new graduates? Would someone with a classical animation background have a huge leg up over those with only straight technical animation training? And is it enough to only be taught Maya and 3ds Max?

Do you want to be a character animator or an effects artist? A traditional (2D) animation program will be really useful if you want to be a character animator, and a lot of places are willing to teach 3D software to someone who already has the core skills.
If you want to be an effects artist, you will (of course) need to learn the software, but also drop all the character stuff. Your best chance of getting a job out of school is to kick rear end at one thing- diversity doesn't help you at this stage.

Hatter106
Nov 25, 2006

bolshi fight za homosex

Villon posted:

Do you want to be a character animator or an effects artist? A traditional (2D) animation program will be really useful if you want to be a character animator, and a lot of places are willing to teach 3D software to someone who already has the core skills.
If you want to be an effects artist, you will (of course) need to learn the software, but also drop all the character stuff. Your best chance of getting a job out of school is to kick rear end at one thing- diversity doesn't help you at this stage.

Well honestly I'd prefer effects, environments, matte painting, etc. to character work. But knowing how to animate characters might help me get a job.
I dunno... I've talked to industry pros, and I keep hearing "specialize in one thing!" but also "learn everything!"...
I can see how knowing classical animation would serve you as a CG animator, but I don't think I have it in me to animate on paper for two years. I've seen how much work they have to put in, it's nuts. I'm just not a cartoonist. I'd much prefer creating photo-realistic scenes.

Which brings me to my other question:
When it comes to getting a professional job in the CG industry, does it come down to talent or training? Do you need to take those $25,000 courses at places like SCAD to get the high-profile jobs? Or can you figure out enough on your own by messing with those programs? I've seen the results of a community college two-year Maya & Max course, and they weren't very impressive... either the students just weren't talented, or you need to shill out the big bucks for top-notch education.

I know I'm not making much sense, sorry... ultimately, my goal is to do CG work for a major studio like ILM, Weta, Rhythm & Hues, etc.
I'm just trying to figure out how to achieve that goal.

ceebee
Feb 12, 2004


Hatter106 posted:

When it comes to getting a professional job in the CG industry, does it come down to talent or training? Do you need to take those $25,000 courses at places like SCAD to get the high-profile jobs? Or can you figure out enough on your own by messing with those programs? I've seen the results of a community college two-year Maya & Max course, and they weren't very impressive... either the students just weren't talented, or you need to shill out the big bucks for top-notch education.

I know I'm not making much sense, sorry... ultimately, my goal is to do CG work for a major studio like ILM, Weta, Rhythm & Hues, etc.
I'm just trying to figure out how to achieve that goal.

If you're looking to work for ILM, Weta, Rhythm & Hues, etc you're going to have to work your rear end off if you plan on doing it cheaply or free. This means picking up as many books, buying as many instructional DVDs, and spending hundreds upon hundreds of hours fiddling with the software.

College may be expensive, but not only will it give you one of the best methods in learning 3D, but it will let you network and mingle with other people going/in the same field. Whether it's professors, students, alumni, whatever. Networking is the best way to get a job in the industry, sans that you're going to have to work your rear end off.

The reason why people at SCAD pay $25,000/year (more actually, I'm going there this fall) is because there are quite a few professors there who actually know what they're doing, and can educate students quicker and more efficiently. Also, SCAD spends their ridiculous tuition on a ton of high quality equipment for you to utilize.

You should check if the school you're attending has job fairs, or if they try to get the big name CG companies out to look at the student work and possibly get internships/entry level jobs. Go out right now and get Maya or 3DS, there are educational learning versions you can use I believe for both. The best way to get started is to just mess around, do online tutorials, watch video tutorials, etc.

Good luck.

Villon
Oct 7, 2004



Hatter106 posted:

Which brings me to my other question:
When it comes to getting a professional job in the CG industry, does it come down to talent or training? Do you need to take those $25,000 courses at places like SCAD to get the high-profile jobs? Or can you figure out enough on your own by messing with those programs? I've seen the results of a community college two-year Maya & Max course, and they weren't very impressive... either the students just weren't talented, or you need to shill out the big bucks for top-notch education.

I totally agree with Akaikami, and just want to chime in one more thing- I would probably bring you in for an interview if you were self-taught and had a really great reel, but would hesitate to hire you. In school, you not only learn to do the work, you also learn professional practices, lingo, workflows, you meet people...

People pay a fortune for an industry education because the job market is so competitive- they are making an investment. In short, go to school- the best one you can, and work your rear end off.

Dr Rotcod
May 20, 2004
I see the consistently reoccurring disappointment and failure you will continue to cause yourselves.

I have a some questions about cover letter etiquette. It seems that today's cover letters are now the body of the e-mail you send along with your resume attachment. This to me seems to make cover letters a little less formal. I'm worried that my cover letters sound jilted and robotic when what I really want to convey is excitement about the opportunity at hand. I'm wondering what kind of wordage is appropriate for these types of e-mails especially since the jobs that we're going for are creative jobs and some personality needs to shine through.

Is it ever ok to start an e-mail out with "Hey!" or "Hi!"? I usually seem to start out my e-mails with "Hi, my name is Dr Rotcod and I'm currently living in so and so..". That just seems so bland to me. I'd love to know some tips on this so I can stand out amongst the flood of e-mails an employer gets from craigslist users.

Villon
Oct 7, 2004



To be honest, I don't think about the greeting that much. I expect informality from creatives, and being really formal makes you sound either too young or too old. Say "Hey" if it suits you, but it doesn't make much difference.

Shaztastic
Mar 29, 2008

Your cash is good at the bar.


So, I finally have some published writing samples to send to prospective employers. Since I have never done this before, I have a couple of questions.

1. When sending samples of my published articles, do I send the version of published articles that I originally sent my editor- or do I send a copy with his edits?
2. Do I just send these samples in Word? Do I point the prospective employer to a website or newspaper they have appeared in?
3. What does a writer's resume' look like? I can google this I'm sure, but any tips you have would be great.

Zurich
Jan 4, 2008


Villon posted:

To be honest, I don't think about the greeting that much. I expect informality from creatives, and being really formal makes you sound either too young or too old. Say "Hey" if it suits you, but it doesn't make much difference.
drat, I tend to start emails with 'Dear' and end with 'Kind regards' on at least the first correspondence - changing to Hey Person or just Person- and ending with Cheers, Thanks or just -Zurich as soon as I can stomach it.

I can't bring myself to address a complete stranger as 'Hey First Name!' on first contact. Its enough to stop myself from ending with 'Yours faithfully' lol.

pikacheney
Mar 14, 2002

I shall remember this moment: the silence, the twilight, the bowl of strawberries, the bowl of Xoo, and that chubby, chubby choona.

I just left my web design job to pursue consultancy. Anyone have any experience doing this? I'm wondering what the most effective way is to find new clients. I've got the next few months set up on referrals but I'm thinking I probably shouldn't rely on that forever. I scanned craigslist (I'm in San Francisco so it's basically used by everyone for everything) and the people posting in the creative services sections are people who charge $300 for a website and their portfolio is World of Warcraft guild sites.

Second, I'm a front end designer. I'm learning jQuery and Rails but I'm wondering if Flash and ActionScript would be a better focus. Any opinions?

[chavez]
Dec 20, 2003

by Y Kant Ozma Boo


pikacheney posted:

Second, I'm a front end designer. I'm learning jQuery and Rails but I'm wondering if Flash and ActionScript would be a better focus. Any opinions?

Have you considered freelancing for agencies? Especially in the bay area, there are a lot of agencies you can probably get on with as a freelancer. Personally I've found it pretty disappointing trying to work with non-agency clients, I've had a few good clients but working with agencies is better, you'll get a lot of variety, it's probably better for your portfolio, and they know how much things cost, and are less likely to balk at your prices. At least that's been my experience.

pikacheney
Mar 14, 2002

I shall remember this moment: the silence, the twilight, the bowl of strawberries, the bowl of Xoo, and that chubby, chubby choona.

[chavez] posted:

Have you considered freelancing for agencies? Especially in the bay area, there are a lot of agencies you can probably get on with as a freelancer. Personally I've found it pretty disappointing trying to work with non-agency clients, I've had a few good clients but working with agencies is better, you'll get a lot of variety, it's probably better for your portfolio, and they know how much things cost, and are less likely to balk at your prices. At least that's been my experience.

I've considered it, definitely. But the few people I know who've worked through agencies are split in opposite directions about how good they are. Some say great, some say miserable. I have no idea what to think really. Your points in favor are good ones though.

treeboy
Nov 13, 2004

James T. Kirk was a great man, but that was another life.


I just graduated from SCAD this spring with a BFA in Animation (3d focus but i do some 2d as well).

If anyone has any questions regarding the school, especially animation or to a lesser extent Vis. FX/Game design/other majors, feel free to contact me via. pm or aim and i'll do my best to answer your queries.

FuzzLobster
Feb 22, 2004



So, quick background:
I went to college originally for electronics but dropped out after a year and a half because I really, really didn't like it. I spent the next couple years fixing computers and recently got a job at a large animation studio that does both CG and Stop-Mo. I work in Education and have been helping with documentation and have learned quite a bit about CG which is awesome.

Recently my boss has been encouraging me to look into some sort of school program for something I'm interested in. The problem is everything from 3D modeling, to web/graphic design, to compositing all spark my interest. Also, the studio would like to pay for m schooling which is beyond awesome, I just need to find a program that will work with my work schedule which may prove to be interesting.

My question is two-fold. One, what are your opinions of online programs. Personally I'd much rather to school and meet people, but it might be hard with a 40 hour work week. And two, does anyone have any suggestions for a degree or program that might fit someone who is design minded and wants to move up in the animation world. I'm in Portland, OR if that helps.

Also, are any of you going to SIGGRAPH this year?

soggybagel
Aug 6, 2006

I'm A Lonely Boy


Just wanted to drop in and say that I've been trying to get a couple jobs here as I just graduated college (History degree) but I saw your resume layout and love it. I'm going to adjust my current Resume and just want to say that I really think this new one rocks!!

akanekun
Apr 5, 2008


Been busy as hell, but here're some jobs that I nabbed from my school's job boards:

Date Posted 7/1/2008 4:44:28 PM
Company Name sellulloyd
Street Address 3191 Casitas Ave. ste-162
City Los Angeles
State CA
Zip Code 90039
Country usa
Website https://www.sellulloyd.com
Contact Email richard@sellulloyd.com
Contact Person Richard Lassalle
Job Type Freelance (Project)
Job Category Animation
Location California - Los Angeles Area
Nature of Company multi media production company
Duties/Responsibilities we are looking for an enthuastic 2&3d animator to design and build a series of animations. we are looking for a stylish rendition of a variety of human internal organs
Skills/Experience 2 & 3d animation
Experience Level Entry-level (0-2 years experience)
Information required from applicants Resume, cover letter, samples
Preferred Form of Response email


Date Posted 7/1/2008 4:50:07 PM
Company Name Connected Sound
Street Address 11684 Ventura Blvd, P.O. Box 383
City Studio City
State CA
Zip Code 91604
Country US
Website https://www.connectedsound.com
Contact Email cassie@connectedsound.com
Contact Person Cassie Bueno
Job Type Full-Time
Job Category Web Design
Location California - Los Angeles Area
Nature of Company Connected Sound is a web hosting and design company serving a global community of barbershop harmony groups.
Duties/Responsibilities A unique kind of start-up company is looking for a few great web designers who are versatile and can create a wide variety of layouts for a template-based business. The candidate must be able to create a Photoshop mockup and render the psd into a webpage with best-practices, cross-platform html and css. Must be Mac based. Must supply a portfolio specifically with web designs.
Required Skills / Qualifications: - Gifted artistic sense - Proficient with Photoshop - Efficient and reliable - Comfortable working from home and communicating with coworkers via phone and email. - Uses a Mac (necessary for compatibility with development environment), and is able to use own computer and software for work. - Strong understanding of HTML and CSS
Experience Level No Preference
Information required from applicants Resume, link to online portfolio
Preferred Form of Response e-mail


Date Posted 6/30/2008 3:58:45 PM
Company Name Dan Clark Company
Street Address 557 Terrill Ave.
City Los Angeles
State CA
Zip Code 90042
Country United States
Website http://www.myspace.com/danclarkcompany
Contact Email danclarkcompany@mac.com
Contact Person Don Asher
Job Type Freelance (Project)
Job Category Television
Location California - Los Angeles Area
Nature of Company Create & produce cool children's television shows.
Duties/Responsibilities Looking for ambitious & talented After Effects & Maya artists/animators for a four to five month project featuring puppets and digital effects for a puppet/CG action comedy.
Skills/Experience Tracking, compositing, Graghic Design. Must be proficient in Maya and/or After Effects.
Experience Level No Preference
Information required from applicants Resume and a work reel in Quicktime or a link to a work reel.
Preferred Form of Response Email only.
Other This project will begin in mid-July and run through mid-November. It's going to be a lot of fun.


Sometimes there's crossover with craigslist, other times not. I know for a fact there're more 3D/website guys here than in my school, so it's better here than wasted there anyway.

re: my portfolio, (forgot who asked) I'll spare you the pain since all my poo poo's anime and I had my head up my rear end for most of my education. The better students that come out of there do stuff that look like the pro conceptart.org style, basically.

marshmallard
Apr 15, 2005

This post is about me.

Zurich posted:

#3 - Really really good advertising course, didn't go to the Open Day but my friend said it looked good. About 45 minutes on the train from London so still good links. No matter how fantastic the course is, the rest of the uni is regarded as utter poo poo as far as I know .


Was this Bucks (BCUC)?

I'm a Copywriter in a London ad agency if anyone wants help with careers in that field.

JoeWindetc
Jan 14, 2007
JoeWindetc

Can anyone recommend a good online Master's program in Graphic Design? Thanks all.

mcsuede
Dec 30, 2003

Anyone who has a continuous smile on his face conceals a toughness that is almost frightening.
-Greta Garbo

JoeWindetc posted:

Can anyone recommend a good online Master's program in Graphic Design? Thanks all.

What are your intentions with it?

JoeWindetc
Jan 14, 2007
JoeWindetc

mcsuede posted:

What are your intentions with it?

Oh hey Mom and Dad, I didn't know you guys joined the forums. Honestly, no offense, but I'm really tired of hearing this question. I have yet to hear my sociology/history/philosophy friends get this question.

What is any intention with getting a Master's? To enhance and further one's education. That is my intention. Don't get me wrong, I've asked myself this question, but my decision is my decision.

I'll give you some background so I don't seem like such a jerk. I went to an undergraduate school that didn't have a degree in GD, rather a Visual Arts degree with a focus. At the time it was painting/sculpture/traditional arts. Basically I created my concentration. That all being said, I didn't get the education that would have come from a GD-focused program. My hopes in getting a Master's, rather than a Bachelor's all over again, is to basically learn the things I was not able to teach myself. A mentor is a powerful and useful tool as well. I can only teach myself so much, which is basically what I did in undergrad.

I hope that cleared things up, sorry for the mini-rant, I just get that question 100% of the time.

mcsuede
Dec 30, 2003

Anyone who has a continuous smile on his face conceals a toughness that is almost frightening.
-Greta Garbo

I had a big ranting response written out but instead I'll just say, make sure you crunch the investment/return numbers. Your sociology/history/philosophy friends don't get the question because they're in fields which traditionally have large gains from a masters program (and all three are near useless for someone with just an undergrad--unlike the GD field).

I've heard good things about : http://online.academyart.edu/degree...hic_design.html

I took a few classes from their online BFA in GD before I decided the expense wasn't worth it, but the instruction level was good for an online class and the technology side of things was better then most other online learning systems I've tried (which have been numerous). I also know a few people with BFAs who attended there in reality and they're all very solid designers. I don't know anyone who has gotten an MFA in GD so that's about all the help I can give. I asked your intentions to know if you wanted to be an educator, work in fine arts, or work in the GD field. The type of masters program would differ greatly for those three options.

p.s.-I'll also say that I'm someone working in GD without a degree in GD--mine is a B.S. in Art History and Criticism. The six years experience on my resume and my portfolio are looked into a lot more deeply than which words are on my diploma.

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ceebee
Feb 12, 2004


There's such thing as a good online Master's program? I'm surprised any online program is even good. If you're serious about becoming a Graphic Designer don't you think you should dedicate more than just some lovely online courses to progressing your skills?

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