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Mister Roboto
Jun 15, 2009

I SWING BY AUNT MAY's
FOR A SHOWER AND A
BITE, MOST NATURAL
THING IN THE WORLD,
ASSUMING SHE'S
NOT HOME...

...AND I
FIND HER IN BED
WITH MY
FATHER, AND THE
TWO OF THEM
ARE...ARE...

...AAAAAAAAUUUUGH!

I just reread Feet of Clay. It's a fun book, though the pacing is a bit off in the middle. It's very well tied together in the end, though, so it really shows Pratchett's genius as a writer.

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Entropic
Feb 21, 2007

patriarchy sucks


I'm Halfway through Good Omens now. You can definitely spot some of the Pratchett bits. And for some reason a lot of it seems very Douglas Adamsy. Like the bit about how any tape left in a car longer than a fortnight transmogrifies into a Best Of Queen album.

Grumio
Sep 20, 2001

in culina est

Entropic posted:

I'm Halfway through Good Omens now. You can definitely spot some of the Pratchett bits. And for some reason a lot of it seems very Douglas Adamsy. Like the bit about how any tape left in a car longer than a fortnight transmogrifies into a Best Of Queen album.

Reminds me of this bit from The Last Continent:

quote:

[...] The Lecturer in Recent Runes had gone to sleep with his book carefully shading his eyes. It had originally been entitled Principles of Thaumic Propagation but, because of the action of the sunlight and some specialized high-frequency vibrations from the sand granules on the beach, the words on the cover now read The Omega Conspiracy*

*This isn't magic. It is a simple universal law. People always expect to use a holiday in the sun as an opportunity to read those books they've always meant to read, but an alchemical combination of sun, quartz crystals and coconut oil will somehow metamorphose any improving book into a rather thicker one with a name containing at least one Greek word or letter (The Gamma Imperative, the Delta Season, The Alpha Project and, in more extreme cases, even The Mu Kau Pi Caper). Sometimes a hammer and sickle turn up on the cover. This is probably caused by sunspot activity, since they are invariably the wrong way round. It's just as well the Librarian sneezed when he did, or he might have ended up a thousand pages thick and crammed with weapons specifications

Mister Roboto
Jun 15, 2009

I SWING BY AUNT MAY's
FOR A SHOWER AND A
BITE, MOST NATURAL
THING IN THE WORLD,
ASSUMING SHE'S
NOT HOME...

...AND I
FIND HER IN BED
WITH MY
FATHER, AND THE
TWO OF THEM
ARE...ARE...

...AAAAAAAAUUUUGH!

appropriatemetaphor posted:

So is the consensus that I can show Going Postal to non-Discworld fans and *not* feel embarrassed?

It's average.

It's not TERRIBLE, but it shows that the director, once again, did not quite GET Pratchett's humor and subtle characterizations.

In fact there were almost no jokes at all, come to think of it. It was a straightforward fantasy movie.


The point of the book was that both Gilt and Moist are con men, masters of fooling people. Moist just happens to have a conscience (and has a thing for an honest woman). This wasn't made clear in the film, and they reduced Gilt to little better than a comic book scene snarler. Adora just comes across as needlessly mean at times, although the actor playing Moist tries his best to make his attraction seem real.

There's also unnecessarily added scenes, like Adora VERY OBVIOUSLY starting smoking from the loss of the clacks. Which in itself is a neat idea, but done so heavy-handed it's embarrassing from a writing standpoint.

It's probably one of the best Discworld adaptations, but it still shows really poor directing choices at times.

Entropic
Feb 21, 2007

patriarchy sucks


Yeah, I've yet to really be satisfied with any of the TV adaptations. It's like the HHGTTG movie: made by people who don't really "get" the sense of humour of the original. It's all overly dramatic, a little dumbed down, and the general aesthetic of it is close, but not quite there. I wished they'd used some of the money that went to epic CG scenes of 10-mile-long corridors filled with mail and used it to put a few dwarves and trolls in and generally make the city look a bit more, well, Discworldy.

Mister Roboto
Jun 15, 2009

I SWING BY AUNT MAY's
FOR A SHOWER AND A
BITE, MOST NATURAL
THING IN THE WORLD,
ASSUMING SHE'S
NOT HOME...

...AND I
FIND HER IN BED
WITH MY
FATHER, AND THE
TWO OF THEM
ARE...ARE...

...AAAAAAAAUUUUGH!

Entropic posted:

Yeah, I've yet to really be satisfied with any of the TV adaptations. It's like the HHGTTG movie: made by people who don't really "get" the sense of humour of the original. It's all overly dramatic, a little dumbed down, and the general aesthetic of it is close, but not quite there. I wished they'd used some of the money that went to epic CG scenes of 10-mile-long corridors filled with mail and used it to put a few dwarves and trolls in and generally make the city look a bit more, well, Discworldy.

What I don't get about these adapations is how unfunny they are.

British Humor is legendary. They KNOW how to do subtle jokes and snappy dialogue with perfect timing.

Yet there's none of it in the Pratchett adaptations. Why do the directors not "get" this? They have tons and tons and tons of sources and great comedic actors and writers.

Are they just hiring cheap rectors? Bad scriptwriters?

I wish someone on the inside would tell us.

u brexit ukip it
Oct 30, 2004


Fun Shoe

All cisterns go!

Just started reading Hogfather and it delivers already

Mokinokaro
Sep 11, 2001



NERF THIS!!!!!


Grimey Drawer

I think it's simply that Pratchett's (and Adams') work really relies on the written medium. Word puns and such are a lot harder to time correctly when done in film.

Unkempt
May 24, 2003

Sexual Air Supply



Mokinokaro posted:

I think it's simply that Pratchett's (and Adams') work really relies on the written medium. Word puns and such are a lot harder to time correctly when done in film.

It's the same with Wodehouse. You can have some perfectly nice, pleasant adaptations, but it's nothing compared to the joy of actually reading his sentences. You just can't get the writing across in any other medium.

Grumio
Sep 20, 2001

in culina est

plus some of the funniest bits in pratchett are the footnotes, which are really awkward to do outside of a book. I saw a theatre performance of Guards! Guards! and they'd ring a little bell, freeze everything and a narrator would be lit up with a spotlight to read the footnote. It worked, but it really broke the flow of the dialogue and a lot of the humour was lost.

Entropic
Feb 21, 2007

patriarchy sucks


So how much of Good Omens did Gaiman actually write? It really reads like a Pratchett book. Granted, I haven't really read anything of Gaiman's...

All the best bits are definitely with Crowley and Aziraphale, or the four Bikers of the Apocalypse.

appropriatemetaphor
Jan 26, 2006



Entropic posted:

So how much of Good Omens did Gaiman actually write? It really reads like a Pratchett book. Granted, I haven't really read anything of Gaiman's...

All the best bits are definitely with Crowley and Aziraphale, or the four Bikers of the Apocalypse.

It felt like Gaiman like, sketched the plot, and then Pratchett just wrote everything.

Entropic
Feb 21, 2007

patriarchy sucks


appropriatemetaphor posted:

It felt like Gaiman like, sketched the plot, and then Pratchett just wrote everything.
Yeah, I can see that.

Interesting that they totally went for Pratchett's version of Death over Gaiman's version of Death.

seaborgium
Aug 1, 2002

"Nothing a shitload of bleach won't fix"


Mister Roboto posted:

What I don't get about these adapations is how unfunny they are.

British Humor is legendary. They KNOW how to do subtle jokes and snappy dialogue with perfect timing.

Yet there's none of it in the Pratchett adaptations. Why do the directors not "get" this? They have tons and tons and tons of sources and great comedic actors and writers.

Are they just hiring cheap rectors? Bad scriptwriters?

I wish someone on the inside would tell us.

Honestly, I think Hogfather worked just fine. Death is supposed to be a little out of place and it worked. Teatime was supposed to be creepy as poo poo and he was, the only bad part was Nobbs but I can live with that.

Jekub
Jul 21, 2006

April, May, June, July and August fool


quote:

Between the 8th of October 1965 and the 17th of July 1970, acclaimed fantasy author Terry Pratchett wrote stories for the Bucks Free Press newspaper which were published weekly, sometimes in episodic format. They were printed in the Children's Circle section, written under the pseudonym of Uncle Jim. His style of writing and humour are easily recognisable in places. In total, Terry wrote about 250 episodes for the Children's Circle section of the Bucks Free Press.

These stories have never before been accessible outside of the original issues of the newspapers they were printed in, and now, due to a collaboration between the Bucks Free Press and the Friends of High Wycombe Libraries, this website will make all of these stories available. This is sure to be an exciting opportunity for enthusiasts to see some of Terry Pratchett's early works.

Children's Corner with Uncle Jim

Uncle Jim being Terry at age about 17 till 22 give or take.

There are a few stories up on the site already, most interesting is the first four parts of a very early carpet people. I've never had the chance to read the original version of that.

It is fantastic that they have put this up as a donation / charity site, they could have published these and done very well out of it.

Yodzilla
Apr 29, 2005

Now who looks even dumber?

Beef Witch


Grumio posted:

plus some of the funniest bits in pratchett are the footnotes, which are really awkward to do outside of a book. I saw a theatre performance of Guards! Guards! and they'd ring a little bell, freeze everything and a narrator would be lit up with a spotlight to read the footnote. It worked, but it really broke the flow of the dialogue and a lot of the humour was lost.

This sounds really annoying actually. Was the play a literally line by line adaptation of the book?

youtube commenter
May 27, 2003

I'm a real man with real views.

Grumio posted:

plus some of the funniest bits in pratchett are the footnotes, which are really awkward to do outside of a book. I saw a theatre performance of Guards! Guards! and they'd ring a little bell, freeze everything and a narrator would be lit up with a spotlight to read the footnote. It worked, but it really broke the flow of the dialogue and a lot of the humour was lost.
A bit like the way they did it in the video game, with the Attenboroughesque bloke and his chalkboard. I quite liked that, reminded me a bit of the guide interludes in the H2G2 TV series.

Mokinokaro
Sep 11, 2001



NERF THIS!!!!!


Grimey Drawer

Also similar to the H2G2 movie. Those bits were some of the best done parts of the film.

cheese
Jan 7, 2004

Shop around for doctors! Always fucking shop for doctors. Doctors are stupid assholes. And they get by because people are cowed by their mystical bullshit quality of being able to maintain a 3.0 GPA at some Guatemalan medical college for 3 semesters. Find one that makes sense.


I'm going to begin reading all of the Discworld books in published order. Good idea or bad idea?

Flipswitch
Mar 30, 2010

HA! HA! HA!


Well, you can definitely discover the improvement as the books go on and then watch them falter slightly on the last few. The first few don't read anything like the last ones mind you.

Entropic
Feb 21, 2007

patriarchy sucks


cheese posted:

I'm going to begin reading all of the Discworld books in published order. Good idea or bad idea?

Go through them in any order you like as long as you don't skip any book in a particular series. E.g. if you want to just read all the guards or Rincewind books in order go ahead.

cheese
Jan 7, 2004

Shop around for doctors! Always fucking shop for doctors. Doctors are stupid assholes. And they get by because people are cowed by their mystical bullshit quality of being able to maintain a 3.0 GPA at some Guatemalan medical college for 3 semesters. Find one that makes sense.


Entropic posted:

Go through them in any order you like as long as you don't skip any book in a particular series. E.g. if you want to just read all the guards or Rincewind books in order go ahead.

I see. I've had several people who have read all of them advise me to go with published order, regardless of 'story arc' because they said you miss out on tons of inside jokes, cameos, etc since you know things as the author wrote them.

withak
Jan 15, 2003


Grimey Drawer

Yeah read stuff in the order it was written.

Mister Roboto
Jun 15, 2009

I SWING BY AUNT MAY's
FOR A SHOWER AND A
BITE, MOST NATURAL
THING IN THE WORLD,
ASSUMING SHE'S
NOT HOME...

...AND I
FIND HER IN BED
WITH MY
FATHER, AND THE
TWO OF THEM
ARE...ARE...

...AAAAAAAAUUUUGH!

cheese posted:

I see. I've had several people who have read all of them advise me to go with published order, regardless of 'story arc' because they said you miss out on tons of inside jokes, cameos, etc since you know things as the author wrote them.

If you have access to the entire chronology, yes. You can see the plot threads for the future stories showing up slowly. If you're missing books, though, ask the fans, which I guess means us, for any spoiler-related advice.

John Charity Spring
Nov 3, 2009

ACTIVATE THE QUEEN


appropriatemetaphor posted:

It felt like Gaiman like, sketched the plot, and then Pratchett just wrote everything.

Pratchett wrote most of Good Omens but Gaiman still wrote some of it himself. Here's what Pratchett himself said on the subject:

quote:

"Neil and I had known each other since early 1985. Doing it was our idea, not a publisher's deal."

"I think this is an honest account of the process of writing Good Omens. It was fairly easy to keep track of because of the way we sent discs to one another, and because I was Keeper of the Official Master Copy I can say that I wrote a bit over two thirds of Good Omens. However, we were on the phone to each other every day, at least once. If you have an idea during a brainstorming session with another guy, whose idea is it? One guy goes and writes 2,000 words after thirty minutes on the phone, what exactly is the process that's happening?

I did most of the physical writing because:

1) I had to. Neil had to keep Sandman going -- I could take time off from the DW;

2) One person has to be overall editor, and do all the stitching and filling and slicing and, as I've said before, it was me by agreement -- if it had been a graphic novel, it would have been Neil taking the chair for exactly the same reasons it was me for a novel;

3) I'm a selfish bastard and tried to write ahead to get to the good bits before Neil.

Initially, I did most of Adam and the Them and Neil did most of the Four Horsemen, and everything else kind of got done by whoever -- by the end, large sections were being done by a composite creature called Terryandneil, whoever was actually hitting the keys. By agreement, I am allowed to say that Agnes Nutter, her life and death, was completely and utterly mine. And Neil proudly claims responsibility for the maggots. Neil's had a major influence on the opening scenes, me on the ending. In the end, it was this book done by two guys, who shared the money equally and did it for fun and wouldn't do it again for a big clock."

"Yes, the maggot reversal was by me, with a gun to Neil's head (although he understood the reasons, it's just that he likes maggots). There couldn't be blood on Adam's hands, even blood spilled by third parties. No-one should die because he was alive."

Nilbop
Jun 5, 2004

Looks like someone forgot his hardhat...


Allright what was the maggot-reversal then? I can't remember that at all.

farraday
Jan 10, 2007

Lower those eyebrows, young man. And the other one.

Nilbop posted:

Allright what was the maggot-reversal then? I can't remember that at all.

The call center selling double glazing that Hastur wiped out when he escaped the ansaphone. On Saturday(after the apocalypse) Newt receives a call from the named character there.

youtube commenter
May 27, 2003

I'm a real man with real views.

cheese posted:

I'm going to begin reading all of the Discworld books in published order. Good idea or bad idea?
I'm currently doing this, I'm nearing the end of Wyrd Sisters. It's costing me a small fortune to buy up all the ones I was missing though.

YggiDee
Sep 12, 2007



It's worth it, though. When you look into your bookshelf and see 30+ novels of Discworld you feel like a king or a duke or something.

After that you basically become a literary drug dealer. I keep re-buying Pratchetts because I'll lend one out and never see it again, or I read it so much the first 20 pages fell out

cheese
Jan 7, 2004

Shop around for doctors! Always fucking shop for doctors. Doctors are stupid assholes. And they get by because people are cowed by their mystical bullshit quality of being able to maintain a 3.0 GPA at some Guatemalan medical college for 3 semesters. Find one that makes sense.


BELL END posted:

I'm currently doing this, I'm nearing the end of Wyrd Sisters. It's costing me a small fortune to buy up all the ones I was missing though.

I'm trying to find some online seller that will offer decent shipping. The books can be had for less than 2 bucks easily enough (and mere cents for 'good' quality used ones) but they all seem to be 3 or 4 dollars shipping a pop.

AXE COP
Apr 16, 2010

i always feel like

somebody's watching me


If you can find a jumble sale near you they're really cheap. Every saturday there's a jumble sale in my town hall and I can get second-hand Pratchett books for like 50p. (note, I live in rural England so less civilized countries may not be able to get these awesome deals)

LooseChanj
Feb 17, 2006

Logicaaaaaaaaal!


AXE COP posted:

(note, I live in rural England so less civilized countries...)

You mean like say, North Sentinel Island?

AXE COP
Apr 16, 2010

i always feel like

somebody's watching me


LooseChanj posted:

You mean like say, North Sentinel Island?

Haha. Terry lives in the next county to me though

Yodzilla
Apr 29, 2005

Now who looks even dumber?

Beef Witch


AXE COP posted:

(note, I live in rural England so less civilized countries may not be able to get these awesome deals)

The fact that you used the term "jumble sale" kind of gave this away.

Nilbop
Jun 5, 2004

Looks like someone forgot his hardhat...


Yodzilla posted:

The fact that you used the term "jumble sale" kind of gave this away.

In Ireland we call them "debilitated manuscript disposal enclaves."

AXE COP
Apr 16, 2010

i always feel like

somebody's watching me


Yodzilla posted:

The fact that you used the term "jumble sale" kind of gave this away.

Well what do the yanks call it?

...They do have jumble sales, right? I mean, I know it's a barren wasteland over there but jumble sales are a basic human right

LooseChanj
Feb 17, 2006

Logicaaaaaaaaal!


AXE COP posted:

...They do have jumble sales, right?

They're called rummage sales over here.

Yodzilla
Apr 29, 2005

Now who looks even dumber?

Beef Witch


Or flea market. Or if it's at someone's residence garage or yard sale.

withak
Jan 15, 2003


Grimey Drawer

Garage sale or yard sale if it is one household, rummage sale if it is several, or flea market if it is lots of people selling stolen poo poo in one place.

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BlueGrot
Jun 25, 2010



I'm 4/5ths through Unseen Academicals and I'm sad to say it's one of his lesser books, some nice bits though. Nutt is a good character who should be used in other books.

Vetinari fraternizing with football fans and drinking beer was not needed, prolly the alzheimers.

Can't wait for the next book with Moist Von Lipwig though.

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